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June 2, 1982     Journal Opinion
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ilnl ItA MIINllU tyme Orford Piermon! Hover hdt Woodsvdle ioth VlIMoNT Thet ford Foirlee West fo,rtee |odford Corinth Topshom Newbuty Wells Rver Ryegote Groton . USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June2,1982 hearing scheduled for Grafton County budget A Public Hearing on the Grafton Commissioners' recent FY 1983 budget will be held on Monday, June 7, at the Courthouse in N. Haverhill beginning the commissioners -- Richard Campion, Arthur Snell and treasurer III -- are expected to be on hand to from the public regarding the newly will effect all the towns in Grafton figures released by the tom- week show that the county may need to 46 percent more in taxes for the coming For additional information see the lead s Journal Opinion. say the higher taxes are due and federal program cuts. Senior citizens go free to 49xbow High events From now on, senior citizens will be attend any public function at Oxbow High : of charge. This is a result of a new policy on admissions adopted by the Oxbow May 6. to the new policy, persons 60 years of age ,,est an annual pass to Oxbow public regular office hours at the school. The the pass must be made in person and also allows free admission to school can prove they are 60 years old or Evidence of age, membership cards citizens groups, and senior citizens Cards will suffice as proof, say school of- was adopted, say school officials, in order such events as plays ; at the school. Prb atwiculatral land case decision pending. A District Environmental Commission involved in a dispute over the tl land 10 days to submit arguments before the commission makes a involves a proposal from George Hun- Bradford land developer, seeking to build a homes on 23 acres of land that Thetford's and a number of state officials have prime agricultural land that should be has been cited as a "test case" for a Vermont's Act-250 (9-b) that requires a to prove his development will not reduce the potential of agricultural soils or that he can get a fair return from his using the land for non-agricultural project, the commission must the proposal meets the ten criteria Under the state's Act-250 law. The ten such issues as a project's effect on its on regional plans, and on a This in addition to how a project will agricultural. state parks are open for 1982 Vermont's State Park System of- for the 1982 summer season on May 28, Edward J. Knenemann, Director of including 35 campgrounds, have the opening. The Park Rangers are reservations for camping and picnic I be open through Labor Day weekend. will remain open until Columbus Day contact your nearest State of Forests, Parks, and , Vt., 05602. State and .federal cuts Grafton County taxes may soar N. HAVERHILL-- Our local compared to this year's Recent county and town budget will rise by a much county tax increase on each ot A public hearing on the say that because of federal Grafton County in New figures of $2,401,865. figures in our local New smaller 14 percent. The Grafton County's towns has proposed budget has been set and state cuts, the county will Hampshire will be asking its constituent towns for $1,098,108 more in taxes this year-- representing an in- crease of roughly 46 percent. Proposed and present budget figures, released last week by the Grafton County Commissioners, call for $3,499,973 to be raised in taxes for the fiscal year 1983 as ii The county commissioners appear to be facing a similar dilemna to the one that the Haverhill selectmen and budget committee have been calling attention toward since last fall. The problem is that state and federal cut- backs are causing local governments to foot more of the bill. Hampshire region show that budgetz are increasing, but at not nearly the rate at which revenue from traditional 'sources, other than property taxes, has been depleting. For example: while under the Grafton County Com- missioner's new proposed budget, taxes will jump by 46 percent -- the county's total proposed FY 1983 county not yet been determined. budget is $6,482,651 as corn- However, according to town pared to a 1982 budget of officials, the breakdown for $5,683,951. how property taxes from the Tax rates for individual Town of Haverhill are divided towns in New Hampshire are uplookslikethis: 69 percent of set by the state's Department the Haverhill property taxes of Revenue Administration at goes to the Haverhill the end of the fiscal year. A Cooperative School District; department spokesman said 25 percent goes to the town, six the effect of th proposed percent goes to the county. for Monday, June 7, at the Grafton County Courthouse in N. Haverhill. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 7:00 p.m. Increasing Costs The Grafton County budget supports a number of services effecting local New Hamp- shire residents. Many of these services are not available from individual towns in the county. The county budget supports, among other things: a Superior Court, a correc- tional center, a public nursing home, and a county sheriff's department. The county commissioners now have to triple its share of expenses at the Grafton County Nursing Home. According to the com- missioners' budget figures, county welfare costs will balloon from $938,170 this year to $1,050,763 next year. The proposed budget for the sheriff's department next year will be $378,625 as compared to a budget of $310,135 this year. Increasing costs for jury trails has prompted the commissioners to increase the Superior Court budget next (please turn to page 5) ANNUAL FAIRLEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE FAIR-- These students at the Fairlee Elementary School are shown wat- ching a model rocket take off, as launched by Fairlee principal Paul Munn. The rocket exhibition was part of the school's annual science fair, held last week in the school's gymnasium, that featured a large number ef nifty projects displayed by the Fairlee students. Oxbow to end ,year with00'tn 1 982 budget BRADFORD-- The Oxbow ending its school year with $536 increase in funds for board that he had met with Al March 17 letter to Charles School board met last Thur- about $20,565 more in surplus student activities, an ad- LaCroix and Richard Ottina, Oxbow's vice principal sday night to discuss budget revenue than had been ditional $145 for department MacKenzie, two heads of the and athletic director. and personnel matters along with other ongoing business at the school. Orange East- District Superintendent John Fontana presented the school board with a list of updated budget figures that outlined "good news" for those on the board who had been worrying about how a number of recent ex- penditures had effected an expected surplus. Fontana said the school was planned in preparation of the school's budget earlier this year for the district's March School Meeting. Budget projections for the 1982-83 school year have also undergone some readjustment since March, according to Fontana. The budget projected for salaries has increased by about $5,203 since March. Other increases since March are: a $7,057 increase in salary benefits, a heads, $500 more for an adult education director, $500 more for research and develop- ment. However, Fontana also noted additional budget decreases of $2,966 since March. All things considered, Fontana said the school board would most likely end the year with about $10,528 to spare. Referees Principal Richard Rothenberg told the school Vermont State Board of "I would think the situation Approved Basketball Officials is much better now," said (VSBABO), to discuss "crowd Rothenberg. He said control." MacKenzie, LaCroix and The VSBABO is the referees himself had come to a number association that threatened to of agreements during their boycott Oxbow sporting meeting, including: events if school officials could -- an agreement whereby not restrain the conduct of officials would notify school Oxbow parent and fan George administrators of crovd Huntington. MacKenzie, who problems so the school's is secretary of the administration could handle organization, issued the threat the incident; on behalf of the VSBABO in a (please turn to page 5) Voter turn out .for annual Newbury meeting Woodsville High gets good marks from state School board approves computer by MARGARET BURKE WOODSVILLE-- Woodsville High School (W.H.S.) has received good marks from Frank W. Brown, Chief of the Division of Instruction of the New Hampshire Department of Education, after a day-long visit to the school on May 6. Brown reaffirmed the school's status as an "ap- proved comprehensive" high school, and, in an official "School Visitation Report," noted six items under the heading "Needs Continuing Study" and as well as several he termed "Strengths." Brown's report was presented to the Haverhill Cooperative school board at its May 26 meeting at W.H.S. by Principal Donald Evans, who stressed Brown's recommendations and ways they might be implemented. Evans told the board that "foreign languages are a concern." One teacher currently offers four levels of French and three of Latin, considered a heavy load. He also noted that the school's lone guidance counselor, who works one day a week at Haverhill Academy Junior High School in called the current "close quarters of the band room," and the administrative area. To follow Brawn's recom- mendations regarding the band room, Evans told the board, would be "expensive," requiring "extensive renovation." Improvement of locker rooms was also a concern of Browm Identified as "Strengths" of W.H.S. by Brown in his report were: a "dedicated staff; a comprehensive program for school of this size (300 students) ; and student's sense of pride in school." Superintendent Norman Mullen discussed with the board the state department of education's proposed changes for high schools which, Mullen said, "were presented to us around one month ago. I don't think we will be affected that much. I think we meet right now 95 percent of the new standards/' he added. W.H.S. Principal Evans concurred with Mullen's estimation. One of the changes would be the increase in the number of credits required for graduation to 18. "Industrial Arts may have to change sequences of offerings," by MARGARET BURKE NEWBURY-- Around 30 voters turned out for the annual Village Meeting held Tuesday, May 25. And, while the articles in the Village Warning were largely "ac- cepted and adopted as prin- ted" by voice vote of those assembled, several questions were raised concerning fiscal management and the ongoing water project. The meeting was convened at 8:00 p.m. and immediately went into recess while a table was sought for the trustees and clerk tosit at. A makeshift table comprised of a piece of plywood on several folding chairs was then pressed into service, and the meeting was resumed with the fulfilling of Article I, the election of village officers. These posts, all 9ne-year terms, were filled as follows: Moderator -- incumbent Gerry Brooks; Clerk -- Barbara Kiel; Treasurer-- Barbara Kiel; Auditor of Accounts-- incumbent Cecil Ross. Two three-year terms were initiated with the following elections: Trustee-- Allen Jacobs was reelected; Water Commissioner-- "Irving Chamberlain, to replace F. Dow Hamblin who has completed his three-year term. None of those elected faced opposition. Chairman of the Trustees Charles Cheney delivered a "plea" for someone to take on the job of dog officer, whose duties he described as "light, to pick up the occasional stray." There were no volunteers. A brief discussion followed in which the possibility of former dog of- ficer Richard Minchell, who was not present, again taking on the job was raised. Article two of the Warning was fulfilled next, with the acceptance and adoption of the reports of the trustees, farmers are charged $3 per water commissioners, auditor cow a year, up 20 percent from and landscape committee, last year. The Water Commissioners' Article three was passed, report sparked the most stating that "voters will discussion, since it deals with reserve all Revenue Sharing the ongoing project of Funds received during the developing an underground fiscal year for water system water source for the town and (please turn to page I0) a reservoir. Scott Mahoney asked the trustees what the annual rate charged other than residential customers is, since the water commissioners report stated only that it be a "comparable" percentage of the increase to the $50 per year charged residential water users. Trustee Cheney replied that Haverhill, "needs assistan- ce." Brown's report recom- mended a "Reduction of overload in providing guidance services." The Brown report stated several areas of the school that need "reorganization of space," including what Evans Evans noted, and recom- mended assigning a secretarial aide to the guidance office to free the counselor to spend more time with students. Computers The board approved by (please turn topage 10) correspondent living in area Alexei Kikitin. Nikitin, a coal . The workers never complain leave .from Washington Post [VER-- Kevin Moscow for the He has the Soviet 1981 Chief as news dealing affairs, social, matters., as IGose lvely He t Union is not the same as reporting in the United States. He said that his "copy" for transmission to England or the United States is not censured, but it is probably intercepted on the wire service, so they know what we are writing about. Klose lived with his wife and family in Moscow while on assignment. HIS children went to Soviet schools. Eliza Klose, his wife, said that the Soviet children did not associate with the Klose kids too much. No lastinl friendships developed during their two years at Soviet schools. Klose also said that alcoholism is a major problem in the Soviet Union. He said, "Moscow is like New York City... it is nothing like the rest of the country. The people are citypeople." He also said that in the outm" areas of the Soviet Union, people are more relaxed. Klose is presently living in South Pomfret, Vt. on Sab- batical leave from the Post. He is writing his fourth book Russian Today and Tomorrow. Scheduled publication date for his latest book is Autumn of 1983. Kiose's previous books include I Will Survive, The Typhoon Shipments, and Surprise.' Surprise' Talk at Rotary Club The title of his talk at the Rotary Club gathering was "Human Rights in the Soviet Union and Poland, the Fates of Two Worker Activists." Klose said he would compare what has happened to Lech Walesa, the leader of Solidarity, to the fate of a Societ counterpart of Walesa's, a man named mining engineer from the city of Donetsk in the Soviet Ukraine, also sought to defend workers' rights. But what happened to him at the hands of Soviet authorities reads like something out of Kafka. The contrast between the two men gives a very clear picture of the immense dif- ferences between the two countries and helps to make clear that the nations of Bloc are substantially different among themselves and cannot he considered in any way a monolithic mass." The USSR covers one-sixth of the earth's land mass and is made up of diverse peoples speaking over 200 languages. Their tradition of government is dramatically different from ours, as evidenced by this quote in 1783 by Josef, the Emperor of Austria, when touring Russia: "Here human life, effort count for nothing.. though they lack for everything. The master or- ders, the servants obey." Klose contrasted worker relations in Poland with those in the Soviet Union. In Poland, many have ties with family members in the West, the Catholic Church is a strong moral center, and some amount of labor activity has been tolerated. Disaffected intellectuals have joined with workers in the Committee for Social Self Defense (CORE). Out of this came Solidarity, the "brain and muscle of the Polish people". None of the above conditions exist in the Soviet Union, said Klose. Strict order is main- tained by police force. By a combination of prison, forced psychiatric hospitalization, hard labor and internal exile; perpetrators of any dissent "dissappear". (please turn to page I0) MOSCOW CORRESPONDENT-- Kevin Klose while on assignment in Moscow for .... the Washington Post, ilnl ItA MIINllU tyme Orford Piermon! Hover hdt Woodsvdle ioth VlIMoNT Thet ford Foirlee West fo,rtee |odford Corinth Topshom Newbuty Wells Rver Ryegote Groton . USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June2,1982 hearing scheduled for Grafton County budget A Public Hearing on the Grafton Commissioners' recent FY 1983 budget will be held on Monday, June 7, at the Courthouse in N. Haverhill beginning the commissioners -- Richard Campion, Arthur Snell and treasurer III -- are expected to be on hand to from the public regarding the newly will effect all the towns in Grafton figures released by the tom- week show that the county may need to 46 percent more in taxes for the coming For additional information see the lead s Journal Opinion. say the higher taxes are due and federal program cuts. Senior citizens go free to 49xbow High events From now on, senior citizens will be attend any public function at Oxbow High : of charge. This is a result of a new policy on admissions adopted by the Oxbow May 6. to the new policy, persons 60 years of age ,,est an annual pass to Oxbow public regular office hours at the school. The the pass must be made in person and also allows free admission to school can prove they are 60 years old or Evidence of age, membership cards citizens groups, and senior citizens Cards will suffice as proof, say school of- was adopted, say school officials, in order such events as plays ; at the school. Prb atwiculatral land case decision pending. A District Environmental Commission involved in a dispute over the tl land 10 days to submit arguments before the commission makes a involves a proposal from George Hun- Bradford land developer, seeking to build a homes on 23 acres of land that Thetford's and a number of state officials have prime agricultural land that should be has been cited as a "test case" for a Vermont's Act-250 (9-b) that requires a to prove his development will not reduce the potential of agricultural soils or that he can get a fair return from his using the land for non-agricultural project, the commission must the proposal meets the ten criteria Under the state's Act-250 law. The ten such issues as a project's effect on its on regional plans, and on a This in addition to how a project will agricultural. state parks are open for 1982 Vermont's State Park System of- for the 1982 summer season on May 28, Edward J. Knenemann, Director of including 35 campgrounds, have the opening. The Park Rangers are reservations for camping and picnic I be open through Labor Day weekend. will remain open until Columbus Day contact your nearest State of Forests, Parks, and , Vt., 05602. State and .federal cuts Grafton County taxes may soar N. HAVERHILL-- Our local compared to this year's Recent county and town budget will rise by a much county tax increase on each ot A public hearing on the say that because of federal Grafton County in New figures of $2,401,865. figures in our local New smaller 14 percent. The Grafton County's towns has proposed budget has been set and state cuts, the county will Hampshire will be asking its constituent towns for $1,098,108 more in taxes this year-- representing an in- crease of roughly 46 percent. Proposed and present budget figures, released last week by the Grafton County Commissioners, call for $3,499,973 to be raised in taxes for the fiscal year 1983 as ii The county commissioners appear to be facing a similar dilemna to the one that the Haverhill selectmen and budget committee have been calling attention toward since last fall. The problem is that state and federal cut- backs are causing local governments to foot more of the bill. Hampshire region show that budgetz are increasing, but at not nearly the rate at which revenue from traditional 'sources, other than property taxes, has been depleting. For example: while under the Grafton County Com- missioner's new proposed budget, taxes will jump by 46 percent -- the county's total proposed FY 1983 county not yet been determined. budget is $6,482,651 as corn- However, according to town pared to a 1982 budget of officials, the breakdown for $5,683,951. how property taxes from the Tax rates for individual Town of Haverhill are divided towns in New Hampshire are uplookslikethis: 69 percent of set by the state's Department the Haverhill property taxes of Revenue Administration at goes to the Haverhill the end of the fiscal year. A Cooperative School District; department spokesman said 25 percent goes to the town, six the effect of th proposed percent goes to the county. for Monday, June 7, at the Grafton County Courthouse in N. Haverhill. The hearing is scheduled to begin at 7:00 p.m. Increasing Costs The Grafton County budget supports a number of services effecting local New Hamp- shire residents. Many of these services are not available from individual towns in the county. The county budget supports, among other things: a Superior Court, a correc- tional center, a public nursing home, and a county sheriff's department. The county commissioners now have to triple its share of expenses at the Grafton County Nursing Home. According to the com- missioners' budget figures, county welfare costs will balloon from $938,170 this year to $1,050,763 next year. The proposed budget for the sheriff's department next year will be $378,625 as compared to a budget of $310,135 this year. Increasing costs for jury trails has prompted the commissioners to increase the Superior Court budget next (please turn to page 5) ANNUAL FAIRLEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE FAIR-- These students at the Fairlee Elementary School are shown wat- ching a model rocket take off, as launched by Fairlee principal Paul Munn. The rocket exhibition was part of the school's annual science fair, held last week in the school's gymnasium, that featured a large number ef nifty projects displayed by the Fairlee students. Oxbow to end ,year with00'tn 1 982 budget BRADFORD-- The Oxbow ending its school year with $536 increase in funds for board that he had met with Al March 17 letter to Charles School board met last Thur- about $20,565 more in surplus student activities, an ad- LaCroix and Richard Ottina, Oxbow's vice principal sday night to discuss budget revenue than had been ditional $145 for department MacKenzie, two heads of the and athletic director. and personnel matters along with other ongoing business at the school. Orange East- District Superintendent John Fontana presented the school board with a list of updated budget figures that outlined "good news" for those on the board who had been worrying about how a number of recent ex- penditures had effected an expected surplus. Fontana said the school was planned in preparation of the school's budget earlier this year for the district's March School Meeting. Budget projections for the 1982-83 school year have also undergone some readjustment since March, according to Fontana. The budget projected for salaries has increased by about $5,203 since March. Other increases since March are: a $7,057 increase in salary benefits, a heads, $500 more for an adult education director, $500 more for research and develop- ment. However, Fontana also noted additional budget decreases of $2,966 since March. All things considered, Fontana said the school board would most likely end the year with about $10,528 to spare. Referees Principal Richard Rothenberg told the school Vermont State Board of "I would think the situation Approved Basketball Officials is much better now," said (VSBABO), to discuss "crowd Rothenberg. He said control." MacKenzie, LaCroix and The VSBABO is the referees himself had come to a number association that threatened to of agreements during their boycott Oxbow sporting meeting, including: events if school officials could -- an agreement whereby not restrain the conduct of officials would notify school Oxbow parent and fan George administrators of crovd Huntington. MacKenzie, who problems so the school's is secretary of the administration could handle organization, issued the threat the incident; on behalf of the VSBABO in a (please turn to page 5) Voter turn out .for annual Newbury meeting Woodsville High gets good marks from state School board approves computer by MARGARET BURKE WOODSVILLE-- Woodsville High School (W.H.S.) has received good marks from Frank W. Brown, Chief of the Division of Instruction of the New Hampshire Department of Education, after a day-long visit to the school on May 6. Brown reaffirmed the school's status as an "ap- proved comprehensive" high school, and, in an official "School Visitation Report," noted six items under the heading "Needs Continuing Study" and as well as several he termed "Strengths." Brown's report was presented to the Haverhill Cooperative school board at its May 26 meeting at W.H.S. by Principal Donald Evans, who stressed Brown's recommendations and ways they might be implemented. Evans told the board that "foreign languages are a concern." One teacher currently offers four levels of French and three of Latin, considered a heavy load. He also noted that the school's lone guidance counselor, who works one day a week at Haverhill Academy Junior High School in called the current "close quarters of the band room," and the administrative area. To follow Brawn's recom- mendations regarding the band room, Evans told the board, would be "expensive," requiring "extensive renovation." Improvement of locker rooms was also a concern of Browm Identified as "Strengths" of W.H.S. by Brown in his report were: a "dedicated staff; a comprehensive program for school of this size (300 students) ; and student's sense of pride in school." Superintendent Norman Mullen discussed with the board the state department of education's proposed changes for high schools which, Mullen said, "were presented to us around one month ago. I don't think we will be affected that much. I think we meet right now 95 percent of the new standards/' he added. W.H.S. Principal Evans concurred with Mullen's estimation. One of the changes would be the increase in the number of credits required for graduation to 18. "Industrial Arts may have to change sequences of offerings," by MARGARET BURKE NEWBURY-- Around 30 voters turned out for the annual Village Meeting held Tuesday, May 25. And, while the articles in the Village Warning were largely "ac- cepted and adopted as prin- ted" by voice vote of those assembled, several questions were raised concerning fiscal management and the ongoing water project. The meeting was convened at 8:00 p.m. and immediately went into recess while a table was sought for the trustees and clerk tosit at. A makeshift table comprised of a piece of plywood on several folding chairs was then pressed into service, and the meeting was resumed with the fulfilling of Article I, the election of village officers. These posts, all 9ne-year terms, were filled as follows: Moderator -- incumbent Gerry Brooks; Clerk -- Barbara Kiel; Treasurer-- Barbara Kiel; Auditor of Accounts-- incumbent Cecil Ross. Two three-year terms were initiated with the following elections: Trustee-- Allen Jacobs was reelected; Water Commissioner-- "Irving Chamberlain, to replace F. Dow Hamblin who has completed his three-year term. None of those elected faced opposition. Chairman of the Trustees Charles Cheney delivered a "plea" for someone to take on the job of dog officer, whose duties he described as "light, to pick up the occasional stray." There were no volunteers. A brief discussion followed in which the possibility of former dog of- ficer Richard Minchell, who was not present, again taking on the job was raised. Article two of the Warning was fulfilled next, with the acceptance and adoption of the reports of the trustees, farmers are charged $3 per water commissioners, auditor cow a year, up 20 percent from and landscape committee, last year. The Water Commissioners' Article three was passed, report sparked the most stating that "voters will discussion, since it deals with reserve all Revenue Sharing the ongoing project of Funds received during the developing an underground fiscal year for water system water source for the town and (please turn to page I0) a reservoir. Scott Mahoney asked the trustees what the annual rate charged other than residential customers is, since the water commissioners report stated only that it be a "comparable" percentage of the increase to the $50 per year charged residential water users. Trustee Cheney replied that Haverhill, "needs assistan- ce." Brown's report recom- mended a "Reduction of overload in providing guidance services." The Brown report stated several areas of the school that need "reorganization of space," including what Evans Evans noted, and recom- mended assigning a secretarial aide to the guidance office to free the counselor to spend more time with students. Computers The board approved by (please turn topage 10) correspondent living in area Alexei Kikitin. Nikitin, a coal . The workers never complain leave .from Washington Post [VER-- Kevin Moscow for the He has the Soviet 1981 Chief as news dealing affairs, social, matters., as IGose lvely He t Union is not the same as reporting in the United States. He said that his "copy" for transmission to England or the United States is not censured, but it is probably intercepted on the wire service, so they know what we are writing about. Klose lived with his wife and family in Moscow while on assignment. HIS children went to Soviet schools. Eliza Klose, his wife, said that the Soviet children did not associate with the Klose kids too much. No lastinl friendships developed during their two years at Soviet schools. Klose also said that alcoholism is a major problem in the Soviet Union. He said, "Moscow is like New York City... it is nothing like the rest of the country. The people are citypeople." He also said that in the outm" areas of the Soviet Union, people are more relaxed. Klose is presently living in South Pomfret, Vt. on Sab- batical leave from the Post. He is writing his fourth book Russian Today and Tomorrow. Scheduled publication date for his latest book is Autumn of 1983. Kiose's previous books include I Will Survive, The Typhoon Shipments, and Surprise.' Surprise' Talk at Rotary Club The title of his talk at the Rotary Club gathering was "Human Rights in the Soviet Union and Poland, the Fates of Two Worker Activists." Klose said he would compare what has happened to Lech Walesa, the leader of Solidarity, to the fate of a Societ counterpart of Walesa's, a man named mining engineer from the city of Donetsk in the Soviet Ukraine, also sought to defend workers' rights. But what happened to him at the hands of Soviet authorities reads like something out of Kafka. The contrast between the two men gives a very clear picture of the immense dif- ferences between the two countries and helps to make clear that the nations of Bloc are substantially different among themselves and cannot he considered in any way a monolithic mass." The USSR covers one-sixth of the earth's land mass and is made up of diverse peoples speaking over 200 languages. Their tradition of government is dramatically different from ours, as evidenced by this quote in 1783 by Josef, the Emperor of Austria, when touring Russia: "Here human life, effort count for nothing.. though they lack for everything. The master or- ders, the servants obey." Klose contrasted worker relations in Poland with those in the Soviet Union. In Poland, many have ties with family members in the West, the Catholic Church is a strong moral center, and some amount of labor activity has been tolerated. Disaffected intellectuals have joined with workers in the Committee for Social Self Defense (CORE). Out of this came Solidarity, the "brain and muscle of the Polish people". None of the above conditions exist in the Soviet Union, said Klose. Strict order is main- tained by police force. By a combination of prison, forced psychiatric hospitalization, hard labor and internal exile; perpetrators of any dissent "dissappear". (please turn to page I0) MOSCOW CORRESPONDENT-- Kevin Klose while on assignment in Moscow for .... the Washington Post,