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June 2, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-June 2, 1982 BTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Wetly amnpep*r pldidml b edgwd. Vermin,. f, wkxdpokm reo - Vmm,  Now Sempsk - $9.00 po0' year; 16.00 for six n4mtks; eel el steoo . $11.00 pot yeer end $LlO Io0' six neaetl0J; Sonier citt#em $oN4 t4s smp  et |mod, Venmmt 05033. PwkWkl by Nkst Pdfllsk ComH, IK., P.O. hs 311, |Mm'h,4. Robert F Huminskl President & Publisher Bradford 802-222.5281   Woodsville j 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper i Editorial A time of peaceful remembrance Democracy Freedom. The American experience and spirit is founded on these words. In times of peril our servicemen have defended this spirit with dedication and courage. Many have given their lives to preserve it. Today, young men.and women from our communities are continuing, to uphold tradition. Our hearts and thoughts are with them, and with all those men and women before them. Memorial Day is a time for quiet reflection. A time to honor our ser- vicemen of pastand present. And, as we rekindle the memory of what they have given to their country and to each of us, we also prayerfully work and hope for peace. Across the land, there were parades and speeches of commemoration. It's our way to proudly and reverently give thanks. In the good old days ... Moosiluuke Lumber & Bobbin Co, I Letters to the Ed Ma+ is .foster care month To the Editor: May is foster care onth. It is a time when well-deserved recognition is given to the many families who open their homes to youngsters in need. This year Upper Valley Youth Services would like to take the For around fifty years, Mr. Eichorn wrote in his plagued by fires, in 1940 and opportunity to also thank bobbin blanks, hardwood memoirs that he gave the again in 1950. After the 1940community members who furniture stock and other wood Gleneliff mill his special at- fire, Mr. Eichorn rebuilt the have strengthened our products were manufactured tention, securing orders for a company's former blacksmith agency's adolescent foster at various times in Pike, considerable period ahead. He shop into a furniture stock and care program in another way. Glencliff and Warren. The also added to the bobbin and bobbin mill. After the next fire As many know, UVYS' original bobbin business, set speeder departments a he rebuilt on a smaller scale programs were threatened by up by E. Bertram Pike and separate section for making for making furniture stock reductions in government Peter Lavoie, was known as hardwood square stock for and shipping crate stock, also funds. In December of last Pike & Lavoie. Of the many furniture factories, which added a dry kiln, using live year we began an active fund- worked in nicely with the bobbin-making. The mill was so busy that some of its sur- plus business was sublet to the Pike Manufacturing Company to help them with their fuel problem (evidently by the use of scrap wood from the bob- bin-making). There were two fires at the Glencliff mill, both in 1944, the squarestock mill building burning in May and the bobbin mill in September. This was the end of bobbin-making in Glencliff, but the company set up another mill in Warren, near the present town garage and the hank. (There also was a separate bobbin mill in Warren run by the Ames Brothers. This mill burned in 1969. ) Meanwhile, Pike Manufacturing Company had had fires in 1923 and 1926. After'* that, Mr. Eichorn was asked to take over whatever could be salvaged of the old plant in Pike, on his own, and pot it into some profitable venture. He finally agreed, and was able to establish a woodworking mill in Pike, with five different depart- ments. However, they were still and varied business and manufacturing enterprises of Mr. Pike, this was one of the few in which he had a partner. The company was later known as Moosilauke Lumber & Bobbin Company. Around I910, Pike & Lavoie started operating a bobbin mill in GlencliH. It was supplied by its own logging crews, who harvested some of the many hundreds of acres of woodland owned by Mr. Pike. In later years the mill bought its logs from other loggers. William Elchorn's memoirs Considerable information about the bobbin mills is in- cluded in the memoirs of William Eicborn (his wife Marguerite has copies). He had come to Pike in 1918 to work as an accountant for E. Bertram Pike, and that same year he also became treasurer of the Mnosilauke Lumber & Bobbin Company. He had joint charge of the mill in Glencliff, commuting back and forth from Pike by train. After Mr. Pike's death in 1926, Mr. Eichorn had full responsibility for the mill, and in 1928 became president of the bobbin company. When I went to school by EARLE G. HOOD the box stove and a pipe would warm up. from the woods and made a After a while, I went to the E. TOPSHAM i started go through the entire  Omyearatwehada table to have lunch on. The Village Sc My fit school when I was five years the school room. The chimney plump teacher. She was a teacher and mothers made teache/" thereeently diedat old. My cousin was my first was always in the back of the good teacher. And there were two gallons of ice cream. That 104 years old. I am 84 years old teacher. I was an odd chicken room. .two girls about my age in day we had our first scoop of as of last September20th and I and wouldn't go to classes for To get our water, one of the class. We would take turns ice cream. A neighbor brought the first week. Instead, I Older boys would walk to a sitting beside our teacher, one a plate-talking machine. It started the next week. My neighbor near the school and on either side of her. And how was the first time we heard a teacher-cousin snapped out at me and said, "Young man, you are going to school. No more trouble". In those days, they hired teachers only one term at a time. Our Superintendent was a young fellow who came to school on a bicycle. We had to walk to school most of the time, about two miles from horo unless someone happened to come along. Our neighbor had a hig boy and a girl going to school. The girl was my age. t that time we didn't have a urnace and no hot and cold running water or a flush toilet. We had to go through the wood shed to reach the outhouse. There were no windows, and boys and girls used the same outhouse. We burned two foot logs in For drinking water, we used those days. We didn't have a to have water in the school bus either. You got to galvanized pails with a long- school the best way you could. handled dipper. We all drank You got home the same way. from the same dipper. What We didn't have any electric we didn't drink from the lights either: dipper, we put back in the pail. Kasma Bridge School Itdidn'tkillanyofus. This was how it was at Getting ready for school, we Kason Bridge School. I had to wash up in cold water remember one last day of or sometimes we would put school at Kasou Bridge. The the wash dish on the stove to older boys carried boards with a long pole with a hook on she would hug us. It seemed record player. The boys made the end, dip a galvanized she could lmst our sides in, she a stage for ns kids to speak on water pail into the well. The hugged us so hard. This and to sing songs. water was ice cold. She, in- teacher took her lunch to Chuck'sdllemma cidentally, had a pump to school in a two-and-one-half This same teacher had a draw her water, quart lard pail like some of us gold watch with a hunting While going to school, I kids. She would have some scene on the front and back of used to have nose bleeds. The cold cooked potatoes and slice the case. When you pressed on teacher would send me down them up in the pail cover. She the stem, it would open. Part to the well and she would put a would then put grease or of the time she would carry it cloth, rung out in the icy well butter on them and warm on her belt and on other oc- water to the back of my neck them up over the stove, casions she would pin it on her and to my temple. I didn't have a hot lunch in dress. One of the bigger boys sat in the back seat of the classroom. It seems he had smeared eggs on his desk and the wall behind him. The teacher told him to get some water and a rag and wash the desk and wall. He refused to do it, so she told him he bad just so long to get it done. She . Newbury Village (continued from Page 1 ) improvements." The sum involved is $4,264 Article four-- To see if the voters will authorize the Trustees to borrow money in anticipation of taxes,"-- was passed, though Moderator Brooks noted that such borrowing hadn't been necessary in the immediate past and was not likely to take place next year. Article five was passed with he following specifications: "To vote a sum of money"- S15,225 to b raised by taxm-- "to pay expenses for the year ensuing. To fix a date of n " payme t -- Sept. 15, 1982 "with costs and interest" the maximum statutory limit per month interest -- "after delinquency date" "- November 1, 1982. Article six, "To transact any further business to come before said meeting," was passed, although no further business came up. One item in the financial report of the water depart- ment that sparked con- siderable discussion was a disbursement of $28,003.50 to N. Haverhill Plumbing con- tractor James Hood, for "water source development work." When questioned about this disbursement. Trustee Cheney explained that it is "partial payment for work Hood did this winter up in the watershed, including laying took her watch off and handed it to one of the older girls. When the time was finally up, she walked to his desk, grabbed him by the neck and shoot him from side to side like a dogwood tree. Chuck kept saying, "Don't break my glasses". When she finally let him go, he washed the desk. Another time during that winter, the doors to the schoolhouse were open. Chuck threw a snowball into the classroom and it landed right in front of the side blackboard. So, when the bell rang and the children all came in, she told Chuck to get a dust pan and "clean it up". He did it like a good little boy. A woman who lived near the school use to have big bronze turkeys and they would be by the side road in front of her house. The oi' gobbler would strut up and down that side road and gobble. He looked pretty 'mean' to me. Many times I would turn around and go home because of that turkey. The old cider mill We had a cider mill just above the schoolhouse. There they ground apples with a horse and a sweep. The horse would go around and around the grinder which was made of wood. Then they shoveled the ground apples into a press and mixed the apples with some straw so that the gronnd apples would slip through the press. They used two iron jacks to press out the cider which ran into a wooden sap holder. It was similar to how they stored sap in the old sugar houses. The cider would be thick and sweet and we ould drink all we wanted. 11m Village School 400 feet of perforated pipe,.. Annual Report. to get our water from un- Scott Maheney questioned dergronnd rather than from Cheney on the amount of the brook, as in the last 65 return on Village funds that years." are banked, and was told that Village resident Bill five-and-one-half percent Ellithorpe asked why such a interest is received on revenue large job wasn't put out for sharing funds in a savings bids, and Cheney responded, ,,Do account. Mahoney asxen, "Because we felt that Jim we get connsel, or have a Hood understood our system, policy, on how we can best and we were confident in invest money very con- him." Ellithorpe was critical of the maximumServatively'return?",t getHe notedthe decision, stating, "I think it's that a $1,000 certificate of a mlstake to put out a contract deposit would garner "a lot worth thousands of dollars more than five-and-a-balf without even getting other percent." estimates.,, He later called Cheney responded, "The the action irresponsible with difference would be miniscule. taxpayers'mouey." The money's not in long Another voter at the enough." meeting, Kenneth Welch, Other topics raised at the pointed out the incmmistancy meeting" included snow in requiring bids for some removal from around Village village projects. "You wanted fire hydrants, publication of an estimate from me nn these the warning in the local media triangles, a $300 job," he toad (which was not done this year) Cheney from the floor, and the number of days before At one point, before the the meeting that the warning adoption of this years' figure is required to be posted. of $15,225 to he raised in taxes, a move from the floor was made that that figure be BEfit OPPRESS reduced by $2,000. That Rnsnable amount appeared to be left Two remmm why women don't wear last year's gowns: over from the last fiscal year. They don't walt to and they The motion was withdrawn after Cheney explained, "We can't. can't do it. We can't get by 'til .T. Cmm la. tax money comes in m October." He gave a detailed NOTES&COMMEWll$ account of current Village The boy who phum his liabilities, referring to page I0 course and completes him job of the 1982 Newbur7 Village is getting to be a man. am the oldest person in town that was born here. I still live in the same house that I was born in. Our house was home for all 15 of my brothers and sisters. There was a pond next to the Village School that ran machinery at a wood working shop. They did blacksmithing work too. That winter, one of the big boys dragged me out on the pond. My father had told me to keep off the pond and I was afraid to go out on it. Another time, we had a teacher who would give a couple of the boys a licking mt every day for something someone else had done. One day the teacher told my cousin to cut a stick near the pond and bring it back to her. He did, but first he cut the stick part way through so that when the teacher went to lick the boys, the stick broke. I used to be an awful fellow when it came to laughing. I used to get laughing and couldn't stop. So one day the teacher told me to come to her desk when I was laughing. She made me hold my hand out with a book on it. When she took her hand from beneath mine, I would let the book drop. She finally, in frustration, told me to take my seat. Too many iickings But there were two boys she would lick most every day. Sometimes for something they did, and sometimes for what somebody else had done. One day the boy's sister went home and told her folks about the lickings. So, the next day, their father went to see the state's attorney. A few days later they had a hearing at the town clerk's office. Some of the big boys and girls went to the hearing and later went to Chelsea Court. The teacher lost her license to teach for the rest of her life. We had another teacher almost as had. She would laugh and grin as she was lucking us. One of the boys in our school was a good marksman. It was winter time and no one liked the superintendent. So one of the big boys made an icy snowball and gave it to the marksman to knock off the superintendent's cap. He took aim and threw it and knocked the cap down over the superintendent's eyes. He tin'ned around and looked as if he would like to take hold of us. The Village School also did not have hot or cold water. It , only had a brook in back of the New Images, Trumbull backs, UVYS has Nelson Construction, own spending Wheelock Associates, and WNNE-TV. is $110,000. Our thanks also extend to raised to date, other businesses giving the Upper Valley anonymously, and to Dart- Foster care mouth student organizations, helping families. steam and hot air, which he raising drive. The community said was the first one for response has been generous furniture squares (stock) in and heartening. Contributions the North Country. y Upper Valley business and Over a period of time he .erchants, local and regional found that it was not practical !oundations, and individual to run the business on a small onors have moved us steadily basis with the facilities he .-loser to reaching our 1982 had, and he closed down in undraising goal. Others have 1966. He helped set up a iven generously of time and similar enterprise in Littleton, :xpertise. and eventually sold out to Among themanybusinesses Floyd Chase ofWoodsville, vho have helped are AMCA nternational, G.W. Plastics, Other reminiscences g-Ross Building Supplies, Mrs. Eichorn has shared 4ew England Equipment, area churches, and individual munity can donors who have generously proud of the contributed, supports this In order', to respond realistically and responsibly to the federal and state cut- be Won't you loin usY To the Editor: We are foster parents. We work with the Department of S.R.S. in providing a home for teenagers and younger children who must tem- porarily live away from their own families. We, as foster parents, take pride in the fact that in some small way we are helping a youngster and his family in a ! time of need and that through our efforts, we are helping to make our community a better place in which to live. Won't you join us in sharing your recollections of the bobbin mill days, along with her friend and neighbor, Eva Glidden, whose husband, Joseph, was a "stationary engineer", keeping the boilers and steam engines repaired and running. Mr. Glidden had first come to Pike in 1909 and worked at Pike Manufac- turing, then in 1914 went to work at the T.B. sanitarium in Glencliff. He stayed there for five years, then Mr. Eichorn persuaded him to come and take charge of the boilers at the bobbin mill in Glencliff. He later helped out in Pike when needed, eventually taking over the Pike boilers, until he retired around 1952. Mrs. Glidden remembers the early days in Moosilauke Lumber's logging camps, as she worked there as a cook. There was a big crew in the woods at that time, and Mrs. Glidden says that two of the teamsters whose names she remembers were Dominic Fillian and Philip DeRosia. Mrs. Glidden says that during the early 1920's the company also made bobbins in part of the building at the laundry for the Lake Tarleton Club. She remembers her son, Harley, who was about ten years old at the time, playing tricks on the workers there, such as by hiding under a school house. We would take lunch pails down to the brook if we wanted a drink. In the winter, we had to stump on the ice and break it so we could dip the cover in. School addition scoofter I was done with 1, the town cut off the south end of the schoolhouse laundry basket and moving it across the floor. Pike and Glencliff were booming places in those days, and one of the busiest spots was the Pike Station Store. Mrs. Eichorn and Mrs. Glidden say that you could buy anything there -- and they recall with amusement that all the heaviest things, such as stoves and furniture, seemed to be kept on the top floor. Mrs. Eichorn says that her husband was in bed with the flu at the time of one of the fires, and Dr. McKinlay called her and said emphatically, "Now, don't you let him get out of bed !" Fred Page says that the Glencliff mill had a regular assembly line, and in its heyday used to turn out 10,000 bobbin blanks a day. Fred Reed of Pike came here from Colebrook in 1933 and worked in both the Pike and Glencliff mills, for a total of 23 years. He used to fire the boilers, in which they had to keep up steam around,the- cloek Vith two or tlweeslgfls a day. The man on the night shift also served as night watchman, making an in- spection trip around the entire premises every hour, and winding the watchman's clock. The boilers were fueled with waste wood from the mill, plus additional wood in the winter. When Mr. Reed first came, they were generating some of their own electric power with the steam boilers. In the winter, the frozen logs had to be thawed out by steaming them in "frost boxes" before they could be home with a child while "his" is being rebuilt. backside of the school. Ehen Boyce's father was the mason who built the new chimney. Later, J.D. Miller sent an order to Sears & Roebuck and purchased a bell to put on the roof. When I went to school, the teacher had a little bell which she rang in her hand. I still remember where there had been 17 schools, some before my day. One was a poank school. We never bad but one room, and one teacher, about 20 children or more per class. Only one or two of my teachers are still alive. The last time I saw her, she lived in Washington, D.C. If any others are Still alive, they would be more than 90 years old. We lost two last year. One was 104 years old and the other died at 91 years old. There is only one schoolmate left from my old school at Kason Bridge. And there are only five left from the Village School. All are over 80 years old. One is 90 years old. The school at the Village has been sold and fixed ove into a house now. Before the school was built, there was a house which burned down. The last few years that I went to the Village School, they installed iron desks and seats that turned up when you got up. Only one person could sit in them. The old wooden desks, two could sit together. We bad a wall clock about the same time. During the last part of my going to school, my father was not very well. I bad to stay home two or three days a week. So, I didn't go through 8th grade. and moved it out to add an sawed into blocks and split. additional room. They built a Furniture stock was shaped cement wall to set it on and by sawing, but the bobbin built and dug aceller in bet- blanks were made by splitting ween. They had George Hall, -- using a big blade which split Henry Bowen, and Erwin the blocks lengthwise, then Hood do the work. J.D. Miller they were turned and split was the school director at the lengthwise the other way, time. He took his team and making square sticks which hauled brick from Boltonville were then turned on a lathe to to build the chimney on the approximate bobbin shape, and finally were dried and shipped. Most of the wood used here was maple, along with a little birch. At one time the mill was making "shooks", which were stock for boxes, to be assembled in Littleton for shipping Whet- stones. They also made little oak boxes in Pike for shipping the smaller whetstones, such as oilstones. All of this work had its hazards. Mr. Reed says that now and then a man would cut off a finger in one of the saws. One time an insurance man came to check out a claim for George Patten, after he had cut off a finger at the mill, and while describing how he did it, without thinking George stuck another finger into the saw and cut it almost all the way off, too. George's wife Mildred has further details of this "believe it or not" story. She says George was taken up to Dr. McKinlay's office in North Haverhill, and he sewed the finger back together. It healed back on, but there never was much feeling in it after that. While it was being sewed, George refused to take anything to relieve the pain-- perhaps because he felt so foolish that it had happened, and if it hurt plenty he would remember not to do it again. Before coming to Pike, George had worked for nearly 20 years in Chubb's fish rod factory in Post Mills. He came to Pike in 1933 and worked almost another 20 years here, serving as foreman of the box department, also being in charge of maintenance of motors and electrical wiring. (Next week: William Eicbarn's life story.) Thank you, . Yvonne & Howard' Pres., Eileen & Fred Woodstock, Barbara James & vadia mEETIn Wednesday, June 2 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m.  NEWBURY: Trustees, 7:30p.m. W. FAIRLEE: School Board, 7:30 p.m. WELLS RIVER: BMU School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Thursday, June 3 BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 4 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.l. Monday, June 7 N. HAVERHILL: Count) WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, June 8 NEwBuRY: School Board, 7:30 p.m. BRADFORD: Special Town Meeting on tax 7:30p.m. BRADFORD: Chamber of Town Meeting. , Wednesday, June 9 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7: 0 p.m. HAVERHILL: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. "Our Ame_ r/can Essay Contest V.F.W. AUXILIARY 8th Grade I believe that there is no such thing as nation, but of all mankind. All through our nation, we have fought to protect arises, so does a man fully equal to the task. The first man was General Georg in our moment of need raised, trained and army, completely by himself to dependence over two centuries ago. commander-in-chief of the Continental Army our first President. Many since him have name, and some have become famous in right . . . George Washington Carver, the (peanut putterer ) for example. Next was James Madison, until Great Britain had been harassing us in an way. Madison issued an ultimatium, "Knock it off or else. They chose the latter the stuffing out of them in the war of 1812. Our next great leader was Abraham southern leaders had vowed to secede elected in 1860. "Honest Abe" was voted South seceded. President Lincoln acted as was wrong until Confederate forces Sumter. Lincoln would not be pushed no shoved back hard. War is never glorious, and civil war is you are not fighting a faceless foe who speaks tongue, but friends, neighbors, and relatives who believe in what they are much as you do. He bated what he was doing, but Lincoln to do it. It took four years of senseless killing, again we were whole. Forty six years later, down at a fair. In his stead came a veteran of the Spanlsh-Ameriean War, Secretary of State, Theodore Roosevelt. The' President", "Teddy" his friends, proved to! man. In his terms, he passed many as the first "Progressive President'. responsible for the construction of He started the trust-busting polic) his successors. In 1932, Teddy's fourth cousin, Roosevelt, was elected. He guided the out of the Great Depression and th in history, World War If. He was 1940, and 1944 for an unprecedented four terms. Unfortunately his brilliant came to an end shortly before the when he died of a ruptured embolysm. In 1960, we elected a bright young Ambassador's son to the nations Fitzgerald Kennedy proved to he one energetic Presidents. He forced the down when we got proof that they with missiles, for example. But, this to an assassin's bullet. There is stil over this matter however and it still mystery. A year ago last elected into the White House by a years old, Ronald Wilson President, has been praised as happen to the United States in years. are concerned about the scandals that have cabinet. Only reeentl he has beea the errors of his predeceaso among them' farmer, and a rancher. Without these men and cotmfless others, history would have to be rewritten. remember, that of We, The People... Page 4-The Journal Opinion-June 2, 1982 BTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal i Opinion Wetly amnpep*r pldidml b edgwd. Vermin,. f, wkxdpokm reo - Vmm,  Now Sempsk - $9.00 po0' year; 16.00 for six n4mtks; eel el steoo . $11.00 pot yeer end $LlO Io0' six neaetl0J; Sonier citt#em $oN4 t4s smp  et |mod, Venmmt 05033. PwkWkl by Nkst Pdfllsk ComH, IK., P.O. hs 311, |Mm'h,4. Robert F Huminskl President & Publisher Bradford 802-222.5281   Woodsville j 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper i Editorial A time of peaceful remembrance Democracy Freedom. The American experience and spirit is founded on these words. In times of peril our servicemen have defended this spirit with dedication and courage. Many have given their lives to preserve it. Today, young men.and women from our communities are continuing, to uphold tradition. Our hearts and thoughts are with them, and with all those men and women before them. Memorial Day is a time for quiet reflection. A time to honor our ser- vicemen of pastand present. And, as we rekindle the memory of what they have given to their country and to each of us, we also prayerfully work and hope for peace. Across the land, there were parades and speeches of commemoration. It's our way to proudly and reverently give thanks. In the good old days ... Moosiluuke Lumber & Bobbin Co, I Letters to the Ed Ma+ is .foster care month To the Editor: May is foster care onth. It is a time when well-deserved recognition is given to the many families who open their homes to youngsters in need. This year Upper Valley Youth Services would like to take the For around fifty years, Mr. Eichorn wrote in his plagued by fires, in 1940 and opportunity to also thank bobbin blanks, hardwood memoirs that he gave the again in 1950. After the 1940community members who furniture stock and other wood Gleneliff mill his special at- fire, Mr. Eichorn rebuilt the have strengthened our products were manufactured tention, securing orders for a company's former blacksmith agency's adolescent foster at various times in Pike, considerable period ahead. He shop into a furniture stock and care program in another way. Glencliff and Warren. The also added to the bobbin and bobbin mill. After the next fire As many know, UVYS' original bobbin business, set speeder departments a he rebuilt on a smaller scale programs were threatened by up by E. Bertram Pike and separate section for making for making furniture stock reductions in government Peter Lavoie, was known as hardwood square stock for and shipping crate stock, also funds. In December of last Pike & Lavoie. Of the many furniture factories, which added a dry kiln, using live year we began an active fund- worked in nicely with the bobbin-making. The mill was so busy that some of its sur- plus business was sublet to the Pike Manufacturing Company to help them with their fuel problem (evidently by the use of scrap wood from the bob- bin-making). There were two fires at the Glencliff mill, both in 1944, the squarestock mill building burning in May and the bobbin mill in September. This was the end of bobbin-making in Glencliff, but the company set up another mill in Warren, near the present town garage and the hank. (There also was a separate bobbin mill in Warren run by the Ames Brothers. This mill burned in 1969. ) Meanwhile, Pike Manufacturing Company had had fires in 1923 and 1926. After'* that, Mr. Eichorn was asked to take over whatever could be salvaged of the old plant in Pike, on his own, and pot it into some profitable venture. He finally agreed, and was able to establish a woodworking mill in Pike, with five different depart- ments. However, they were still and varied business and manufacturing enterprises of Mr. Pike, this was one of the few in which he had a partner. The company was later known as Moosilauke Lumber & Bobbin Company. Around I910, Pike & Lavoie started operating a bobbin mill in GlencliH. It was supplied by its own logging crews, who harvested some of the many hundreds of acres of woodland owned by Mr. Pike. In later years the mill bought its logs from other loggers. William Elchorn's memoirs Considerable information about the bobbin mills is in- cluded in the memoirs of William Eicborn (his wife Marguerite has copies). He had come to Pike in 1918 to work as an accountant for E. Bertram Pike, and that same year he also became treasurer of the Mnosilauke Lumber & Bobbin Company. He had joint charge of the mill in Glencliff, commuting back and forth from Pike by train. After Mr. Pike's death in 1926, Mr. Eichorn had full responsibility for the mill, and in 1928 became president of the bobbin company. When I went to school by EARLE G. HOOD the box stove and a pipe would warm up. from the woods and made a After a while, I went to the E. TOPSHAM i started go through the entire  Omyearatwehada table to have lunch on. The Village Sc My fit school when I was five years the school room. The chimney plump teacher. She was a teacher and mothers made teache/" thereeently diedat old. My cousin was my first was always in the back of the good teacher. And there were two gallons of ice cream. That 104 years old. I am 84 years old teacher. I was an odd chicken room. .two girls about my age in day we had our first scoop of as of last September20th and I and wouldn't go to classes for To get our water, one of the class. We would take turns ice cream. A neighbor brought the first week. Instead, I Older boys would walk to a sitting beside our teacher, one a plate-talking machine. It started the next week. My neighbor near the school and on either side of her. And how was the first time we heard a teacher-cousin snapped out at me and said, "Young man, you are going to school. No more trouble". In those days, they hired teachers only one term at a time. Our Superintendent was a young fellow who came to school on a bicycle. We had to walk to school most of the time, about two miles from horo unless someone happened to come along. Our neighbor had a hig boy and a girl going to school. The girl was my age. t that time we didn't have a urnace and no hot and cold running water or a flush toilet. We had to go through the wood shed to reach the outhouse. There were no windows, and boys and girls used the same outhouse. We burned two foot logs in For drinking water, we used those days. We didn't have a to have water in the school bus either. You got to galvanized pails with a long- school the best way you could. handled dipper. We all drank You got home the same way. from the same dipper. What We didn't have any electric we didn't drink from the lights either: dipper, we put back in the pail. Kasma Bridge School Itdidn'tkillanyofus. This was how it was at Getting ready for school, we Kason Bridge School. I had to wash up in cold water remember one last day of or sometimes we would put school at Kasou Bridge. The the wash dish on the stove to older boys carried boards with a long pole with a hook on she would hug us. It seemed record player. The boys made the end, dip a galvanized she could lmst our sides in, she a stage for ns kids to speak on water pail into the well. The hugged us so hard. This and to sing songs. water was ice cold. She, in- teacher took her lunch to Chuck'sdllemma cidentally, had a pump to school in a two-and-one-half This same teacher had a draw her water, quart lard pail like some of us gold watch with a hunting While going to school, I kids. She would have some scene on the front and back of used to have nose bleeds. The cold cooked potatoes and slice the case. When you pressed on teacher would send me down them up in the pail cover. She the stem, it would open. Part to the well and she would put a would then put grease or of the time she would carry it cloth, rung out in the icy well butter on them and warm on her belt and on other oc- water to the back of my neck them up over the stove, casions she would pin it on her and to my temple. I didn't have a hot lunch in dress. One of the bigger boys sat in the back seat of the classroom. It seems he had smeared eggs on his desk and the wall behind him. The teacher told him to get some water and a rag and wash the desk and wall. He refused to do it, so she told him he bad just so long to get it done. She . Newbury Village (continued from Page 1 ) improvements." The sum involved is $4,264 Article four-- To see if the voters will authorize the Trustees to borrow money in anticipation of taxes,"-- was passed, though Moderator Brooks noted that such borrowing hadn't been necessary in the immediate past and was not likely to take place next year. Article five was passed with he following specifications: "To vote a sum of money"- S15,225 to b raised by taxm-- "to pay expenses for the year ensuing. To fix a date of n " payme t -- Sept. 15, 1982 "with costs and interest" the maximum statutory limit per month interest -- "after delinquency date" "- November 1, 1982. Article six, "To transact any further business to come before said meeting," was passed, although no further business came up. One item in the financial report of the water depart- ment that sparked con- siderable discussion was a disbursement of $28,003.50 to N. Haverhill Plumbing con- tractor James Hood, for "water source development work." When questioned about this disbursement. Trustee Cheney explained that it is "partial payment for work Hood did this winter up in the watershed, including laying took her watch off and handed it to one of the older girls. When the time was finally up, she walked to his desk, grabbed him by the neck and shoot him from side to side like a dogwood tree. Chuck kept saying, "Don't break my glasses". When she finally let him go, he washed the desk. Another time during that winter, the doors to the schoolhouse were open. Chuck threw a snowball into the classroom and it landed right in front of the side blackboard. So, when the bell rang and the children all came in, she told Chuck to get a dust pan and "clean it up". He did it like a good little boy. A woman who lived near the school use to have big bronze turkeys and they would be by the side road in front of her house. The oi' gobbler would strut up and down that side road and gobble. He looked pretty 'mean' to me. Many times I would turn around and go home because of that turkey. The old cider mill We had a cider mill just above the schoolhouse. There they ground apples with a horse and a sweep. The horse would go around and around the grinder which was made of wood. Then they shoveled the ground apples into a press and mixed the apples with some straw so that the gronnd apples would slip through the press. They used two iron jacks to press out the cider which ran into a wooden sap holder. It was similar to how they stored sap in the old sugar houses. The cider would be thick and sweet and we ould drink all we wanted. 11m Village School 400 feet of perforated pipe,.. Annual Report. to get our water from un- Scott Maheney questioned dergronnd rather than from Cheney on the amount of the brook, as in the last 65 return on Village funds that years." are banked, and was told that Village resident Bill five-and-one-half percent Ellithorpe asked why such a interest is received on revenue large job wasn't put out for sharing funds in a savings bids, and Cheney responded, ,,Do account. Mahoney asxen, "Because we felt that Jim we get connsel, or have a Hood understood our system, policy, on how we can best and we were confident in invest money very con- him." Ellithorpe was critical of the maximumServatively'return?",t getHe notedthe decision, stating, "I think it's that a $1,000 certificate of a mlstake to put out a contract deposit would garner "a lot worth thousands of dollars more than five-and-a-balf without even getting other percent." estimates.,, He later called Cheney responded, "The the action irresponsible with difference would be miniscule. taxpayers'mouey." The money's not in long Another voter at the enough." meeting, Kenneth Welch, Other topics raised at the pointed out the incmmistancy meeting" included snow in requiring bids for some removal from around Village village projects. "You wanted fire hydrants, publication of an estimate from me nn these the warning in the local media triangles, a $300 job," he toad (which was not done this year) Cheney from the floor, and the number of days before At one point, before the the meeting that the warning adoption of this years' figure is required to be posted. of $15,225 to he raised in taxes, a move from the floor was made that that figure be BEfit OPPRESS reduced by $2,000. That Rnsnable amount appeared to be left Two remmm why women don't wear last year's gowns: over from the last fiscal year. They don't walt to and they The motion was withdrawn after Cheney explained, "We can't. can't do it. We can't get by 'til .T. Cmm la. tax money comes in m October." He gave a detailed NOTES&COMMEWll$ account of current Village The boy who phum his liabilities, referring to page I0 course and completes him job of the 1982 Newbur7 Village is getting to be a man. am the oldest person in town that was born here. I still live in the same house that I was born in. Our house was home for all 15 of my brothers and sisters. There was a pond next to the Village School that ran machinery at a wood working shop. They did blacksmithing work too. That winter, one of the big boys dragged me out on the pond. My father had told me to keep off the pond and I was afraid to go out on it. Another time, we had a teacher who would give a couple of the boys a licking mt every day for something someone else had done. One day the teacher told my cousin to cut a stick near the pond and bring it back to her. He did, but first he cut the stick part way through so that when the teacher went to lick the boys, the stick broke. I used to be an awful fellow when it came to laughing. I used to get laughing and couldn't stop. So one day the teacher told me to come to her desk when I was laughing. She made me hold my hand out with a book on it. When she took her hand from beneath mine, I would let the book drop. She finally, in frustration, told me to take my seat. Too many iickings But there were two boys she would lick most every day. Sometimes for something they did, and sometimes for what somebody else had done. One day the boy's sister went home and told her folks about the lickings. So, the next day, their father went to see the state's attorney. A few days later they had a hearing at the town clerk's office. Some of the big boys and girls went to the hearing and later went to Chelsea Court. The teacher lost her license to teach for the rest of her life. We had another teacher almost as had. She would laugh and grin as she was lucking us. One of the boys in our school was a good marksman. It was winter time and no one liked the superintendent. So one of the big boys made an icy snowball and gave it to the marksman to knock off the superintendent's cap. He took aim and threw it and knocked the cap down over the superintendent's eyes. He tin'ned around and looked as if he would like to take hold of us. The Village School also did not have hot or cold water. It , only had a brook in back of the New Images, Trumbull backs, UVYS has Nelson Construction, own spending Wheelock Associates, and WNNE-TV. is $110,000. Our thanks also extend to raised to date, other businesses giving the Upper Valley anonymously, and to Dart- Foster care mouth student organizations, helping families. steam and hot air, which he raising drive. The community said was the first one for response has been generous furniture squares (stock) in and heartening. Contributions the North Country. y Upper Valley business and Over a period of time he .erchants, local and regional found that it was not practical !oundations, and individual to run the business on a small onors have moved us steadily basis with the facilities he .-loser to reaching our 1982 had, and he closed down in undraising goal. Others have 1966. He helped set up a iven generously of time and similar enterprise in Littleton, :xpertise. and eventually sold out to Among themanybusinesses Floyd Chase ofWoodsville, vho have helped are AMCA nternational, G.W. Plastics, Other reminiscences g-Ross Building Supplies, Mrs. Eichorn has shared 4ew England Equipment, area churches, and individual munity can donors who have generously proud of the contributed, supports this In order', to respond realistically and responsibly to the federal and state cut- be Won't you loin usY To the Editor: We are foster parents. We work with the Department of S.R.S. in providing a home for teenagers and younger children who must tem- porarily live away from their own families. We, as foster parents, take pride in the fact that in some small way we are helping a youngster and his family in a ! time of need and that through our efforts, we are helping to make our community a better place in which to live. Won't you join us in sharing your recollections of the bobbin mill days, along with her friend and neighbor, Eva Glidden, whose husband, Joseph, was a "stationary engineer", keeping the boilers and steam engines repaired and running. Mr. Glidden had first come to Pike in 1909 and worked at Pike Manufac- turing, then in 1914 went to work at the T.B. sanitarium in Glencliff. He stayed there for five years, then Mr. Eichorn persuaded him to come and take charge of the boilers at the bobbin mill in Glencliff. He later helped out in Pike when needed, eventually taking over the Pike boilers, until he retired around 1952. Mrs. Glidden remembers the early days in Moosilauke Lumber's logging camps, as she worked there as a cook. There was a big crew in the woods at that time, and Mrs. Glidden says that two of the teamsters whose names she remembers were Dominic Fillian and Philip DeRosia. Mrs. Glidden says that during the early 1920's the company also made bobbins in part of the building at the laundry for the Lake Tarleton Club. She remembers her son, Harley, who was about ten years old at the time, playing tricks on the workers there, such as by hiding under a school house. We would take lunch pails down to the brook if we wanted a drink. In the winter, we had to stump on the ice and break it so we could dip the cover in. School addition scoofter I was done with 1, the town cut off the south end of the schoolhouse laundry basket and moving it across the floor. Pike and Glencliff were booming places in those days, and one of the busiest spots was the Pike Station Store. Mrs. Eichorn and Mrs. Glidden say that you could buy anything there -- and they recall with amusement that all the heaviest things, such as stoves and furniture, seemed to be kept on the top floor. Mrs. Eichorn says that her husband was in bed with the flu at the time of one of the fires, and Dr. McKinlay called her and said emphatically, "Now, don't you let him get out of bed !" Fred Page says that the Glencliff mill had a regular assembly line, and in its heyday used to turn out 10,000 bobbin blanks a day. Fred Reed of Pike came here from Colebrook in 1933 and worked in both the Pike and Glencliff mills, for a total of 23 years. He used to fire the boilers, in which they had to keep up steam around,the- cloek Vith two or tlweeslgfls a day. The man on the night shift also served as night watchman, making an in- spection trip around the entire premises every hour, and winding the watchman's clock. The boilers were fueled with waste wood from the mill, plus additional wood in the winter. When Mr. Reed first came, they were generating some of their own electric power with the steam boilers. In the winter, the frozen logs had to be thawed out by steaming them in "frost boxes" before they could be home with a child while "his" is being rebuilt. backside of the school. Ehen Boyce's father was the mason who built the new chimney. Later, J.D. Miller sent an order to Sears & Roebuck and purchased a bell to put on the roof. When I went to school, the teacher had a little bell which she rang in her hand. I still remember where there had been 17 schools, some before my day. One was a poank school. We never bad but one room, and one teacher, about 20 children or more per class. Only one or two of my teachers are still alive. The last time I saw her, she lived in Washington, D.C. If any others are Still alive, they would be more than 90 years old. We lost two last year. One was 104 years old and the other died at 91 years old. There is only one schoolmate left from my old school at Kason Bridge. And there are only five left from the Village School. All are over 80 years old. One is 90 years old. The school at the Village has been sold and fixed ove into a house now. Before the school was built, there was a house which burned down. The last few years that I went to the Village School, they installed iron desks and seats that turned up when you got up. Only one person could sit in them. The old wooden desks, two could sit together. We bad a wall clock about the same time. During the last part of my going to school, my father was not very well. I bad to stay home two or three days a week. So, I didn't go through 8th grade. and moved it out to add an sawed into blocks and split. additional room. They built a Furniture stock was shaped cement wall to set it on and by sawing, but the bobbin built and dug aceller in bet- blanks were made by splitting ween. They had George Hall, -- using a big blade which split Henry Bowen, and Erwin the blocks lengthwise, then Hood do the work. J.D. Miller they were turned and split was the school director at the lengthwise the other way, time. He took his team and making square sticks which hauled brick from Boltonville were then turned on a lathe to to build the chimney on the approximate bobbin shape, and finally were dried and shipped. Most of the wood used here was maple, along with a little birch. At one time the mill was making "shooks", which were stock for boxes, to be assembled in Littleton for shipping Whet- stones. They also made little oak boxes in Pike for shipping the smaller whetstones, such as oilstones. All of this work had its hazards. Mr. Reed says that now and then a man would cut off a finger in one of the saws. One time an insurance man came to check out a claim for George Patten, after he had cut off a finger at the mill, and while describing how he did it, without thinking George stuck another finger into the saw and cut it almost all the way off, too. George's wife Mildred has further details of this "believe it or not" story. She says George was taken up to Dr. McKinlay's office in North Haverhill, and he sewed the finger back together. It healed back on, but there never was much feeling in it after that. While it was being sewed, George refused to take anything to relieve the pain-- perhaps because he felt so foolish that it had happened, and if it hurt plenty he would remember not to do it again. Before coming to Pike, George had worked for nearly 20 years in Chubb's fish rod factory in Post Mills. He came to Pike in 1933 and worked almost another 20 years here, serving as foreman of the box department, also being in charge of maintenance of motors and electrical wiring. (Next week: William Eicbarn's life story.) Thank you, . Yvonne & Howard' Pres., Eileen & Fred Woodstock, Barbara James & vadia mEETIn Wednesday, June 2 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m.  NEWBURY: Trustees, 7:30p.m. W. FAIRLEE: School Board, 7:30 p.m. WELLS RIVER: BMU School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Thursday, June 3 BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 4 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.l. Monday, June 7 N. HAVERHILL: Count) WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, June 8 NEwBuRY: School Board, 7:30 p.m. BRADFORD: Special Town Meeting on tax 7:30p.m. BRADFORD: Chamber of Town Meeting. , Wednesday, June 9 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7: 0 p.m. HAVERHILL: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. "Our Ame_ r/can Essay Contest V.F.W. AUXILIARY 8th Grade I believe that there is no such thing as nation, but of all mankind. All through our nation, we have fought to protect arises, so does a man fully equal to the task. The first man was General Georg in our moment of need raised, trained and army, completely by himself to dependence over two centuries ago. commander-in-chief of the Continental Army our first President. Many since him have name, and some have become famous in right . . . George Washington Carver, the (peanut putterer ) for example. Next was James Madison, until Great Britain had been harassing us in an way. Madison issued an ultimatium, "Knock it off or else. They chose the latter the stuffing out of them in the war of 1812. Our next great leader was Abraham southern leaders had vowed to secede elected in 1860. "Honest Abe" was voted South seceded. President Lincoln acted as was wrong until Confederate forces Sumter. Lincoln would not be pushed no shoved back hard. War is never glorious, and civil war is you are not fighting a faceless foe who speaks tongue, but friends, neighbors, and relatives who believe in what they are much as you do. He bated what he was doing, but Lincoln to do it. It took four years of senseless killing, again we were whole. Forty six years later, down at a fair. In his stead came a veteran of the Spanlsh-Ameriean War, Secretary of State, Theodore Roosevelt. The' President", "Teddy" his friends, proved to! man. In his terms, he passed many as the first "Progressive President'. responsible for the construction of He started the trust-busting polic) his successors. In 1932, Teddy's fourth cousin, Roosevelt, was elected. He guided the out of the Great Depression and th in history, World War If. He was 1940, and 1944 for an unprecedented four terms. Unfortunately his brilliant came to an end shortly before the when he died of a ruptured embolysm. In 1960, we elected a bright young Ambassador's son to the nations Fitzgerald Kennedy proved to he one energetic Presidents. He forced the down when we got proof that they with missiles, for example. But, this to an assassin's bullet. There is stil over this matter however and it still mystery. A year ago last elected into the White House by a years old, Ronald Wilson President, has been praised as happen to the United States in years. are concerned about the scandals that have cabinet. Only reeentl he has beea the errors of his predeceaso among them' farmer, and a rancher. Without these men and cotmfless others, history would have to be rewritten. remember, that of We, The People...