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June 2, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 12 -The Journal Opinion- June 2, 1982 MacLean gives firsthand account of continuing unrest in Poland Editor's Note : This is the sixth in a series of articles we People of both sexes and all wife who was hiding behind a a chance and leave, group of demonstrators them. One tear gas canister this time it was mostly around part of have received from Bruce MacLean, an Oxbow social studies teacher on leave of absence while teaching at an American school in Warsaw, Poland. The first three articles chronicled the military takeover of Poland and described the struggle between the Polish people and their government. The fourth article told of MacLean's journey to Auschwitz, the site where over 4 million jews were killed during World War II. The fifth article began to describe the political unrest that continues in the country. The following article offers a detailed account of more violent demonstrations in the streets of Warsaw. Tuesday, May 4th the Cathedral. As if on cue, Yesterday after school, Solidarity banners by the my wife and I drove to the dozens, were unfolded by Old Town to witness the people at 4:00. As each flag planned Solidarity or banner was hoisted into demonstration. Ironically it the air, a round of cheering was the anniversary of the and clapping went up from signing of Europe's first the crowd. Chanting liberal constitution in 179I. "Solidarnosc-solidarnosc We were there by 3:30 and Lech Walesea-Lech and had a brief con- Walesea", rang out. versation with John Darnton Twenty minutes later, the of the New York Times, the crowd suddenly turned out of BBC reporter and other the road and headed for members of the Western Castle Square. By this time Press who were there to the riot police were lined up cover a potential story, just past the King Sigismund The focal point for the Column, one of the National assembly was again St. symbols of Poland-King Johns Cathedral where Sigismund III madeWarsaw Saturday's demonstration his capital in the late 16th began. Mass in celebration Century, which is situated of the anniversary of the on the edge of the square. constitution, was scheduled Events started to happen for 4:00, 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. quickly now. The whole At 4:00, thousands of people square had filled up with converged on the street by Solidarity supporters. ages were in attendance. Again shouts of "solidar- nosc-solidarnosc, free Lech, drop your batons and come join us", filled the air. The riot police, ZOMO, came on loudspeakers to tell the demonstrators that they were violating Martial Law Regulations. However, the loudspeakers were garbled and they were whistled down every time they tried to come over the speakers. Shouts of "Gestapo, Gestapo, Gestapo" came from the crowd. Red Flags, representing the Communist Party, were taken down from their stands and trampled on. Foreign film crews were busy filming the scene. At 4:30, the ZOMO sud- denly moved in on the crowd. tear gas was shot into the crowd, trucks with water cannons were hosing down the crowd and up to twenty thousand people retreated. As people desperately tried to escape the water cannons and tear gas by fleeing down the narrow alleys, the ZOMO started to attack with their long night sticks. By this time, the tear gas was almost unbearable. It got in my lungs and stung the eyes to the point that I could barely see. I grabbed my camera man and headed for the nearest alleyway. People were screaming and some were being trampled. For a moment I really wondered whether we would get out of there. A tear gas canister dropped by my feet and the effects were terrible. After what seemed an eternity, we managed to escape via a side door and along with about twenty other people, climbed a flight of stairs. I looked outside through a window and saw a ZOMO beat a young man senseless. The man fell to the ground but the policeman continued to heat him on his head. We stayed in the stairwell for a half hour. We, along with the other 20 people, kept gagging, coughing and tears kept streaming down our faces. The stench of the tear gas on our clothes was sickening. Outside, we continued to hear tear gas canisters being shot into the air. We all prayed that the ZOMO wouldn't fire tear gas into the area we were in, because there was just no escape and we were trapped. Some very anxious moments passed. As time wore on we were surprised to keep hearing tear gas being shot off, but at a far away distance. We decided to take As we got ouis-i-Je, the riot police were all around Castle square by the hundreds, but they did not make a move against us. The alley we walked down was littered with empty tear gas canisters. Shoes and pocketbooks could be seen everywhere. We quickly realized what had transpired in the last half hour. The demonstration had spread outside the Old Town. A counter demonstration had moved in behind the riot police and rioting had broken out in nearby Victory Square. Everywhere, demonstrators were being arrested and the ZOMO moved them along by hitting their legs with their trun- cheons. We got to our car and slowly made our way out of the area, trying to get home. Police kept diverting traffic as riot police trucks kept coming down roads. We found ourselves by the British Institute, about three quarters of a mile from our apartment, when another large group of demon- strators with Polish and Solidarnosc Flags waving, came marching down the road by the hundreds. I got out of the car and my wife drove home. As this new approached where I was gtanding, cheering and clapping came from people hanging out apartment windows. Cars going by honked their horns in sup- port. Like the demonstrators in the Old Town, they were flashing the victory sign and chanting slogans. Like others around me, I got swept up with the demon- stration and we walked another 100 yards, when more ZOMO's and their trucks were waiting for us across the road. Once again they charged and people scattered everywhere, screaming "Gestapo- Gestapo." I got home in a round about way by 7:00, just in time to witness another con- frontation, right outside my balcony, the apartment is on Jerozolimskie, one of the major streets here in Warsaw. At the end of the street I could hear tear gas being shot into the air, hundreds of demonstrators running down the street and trucks with water cannons, jeeps with multi barreled tear gas guns mounted on them and ZOMO's coming after them. Innocent bystanders were bowled over by the force of the water cannons being used against that was shot towards the demonstrators, was quickly picked up by a young man, who threw it back at the Police, scattering them for the moment. Then suddenly the ZOMO were quickly ordered into their trucks and rushed off to another trouble spot. This was the third time I had seen them go into action, only to be ordered into their trucks and driven off, sirens wailing. By this time it was becoming obvious that clashes between demon- strators and the riot police were springing up everywhere. As soon as the police had dispersed a group, another group would form and start marching. But was the whole city experiencing this? At this point I bad no idea. Throughout the af- ternoon I had noticed a helicopter flying back and forth over the city. Later on a Polish friend told me that he had picked up the frequency being used by the Police on his radio. As it turned out, they were getting their orders as to where to go in the city by the helicopter flying overhead. A friend who lived in the Old Town, called and said pitched battles between the police and demonstrators, by youths, was going on outside his window. He counted five ambulances that had driven into the area. A quarter of an hour later I called him back again. It was too late. The authorities had cut the phones again. I went to the American and British Embassy and when I came out of the British Embassy at 9:00, the place was surrounded by Army troops. When I got home, I found out that clashes had taken place again on Jerozolimskie. I stepped out on the balcony and saw the ZOMO firing tear gas again. My apartment is on the sixth floor, but the smell of the gas, even at that level was nauseating. One of the tear gas canisters fired by the police, went right through a window of a second story apartment. The apartment caught fire and was even- tually gutted. Back on the street, dozens of red flags were trampled and ripped apart. The ZOMO were experiencing some frustration with some of these demonstrators. AS they charged towards them, the youths would avoid arrest by jumping on the busses and trams that were constantly going by. This morning I drove trying to extent of violence. In Konsty-Tucji, littered the number of bi were smashed. friend who lives river, said chased across that at the end of Youths in their had torn apart cobbles in the hurled them at and their truckS. ternoon as I Old Town, happened. As the very same alley through 24 hoUrs ears began came into Everyone else in road was expert same problem. fired in such titles last night, the air. The streets empty tonight. after it was time curfew reimposed phones are again, the police force. YOUR CLOSE-UP TO SUMMER FUN Sl:Cial close-up setting catches summer fun from just 18 inches away! Advanced technology brings You automatic flash whenever you need more light, along with flash recharge and automatic film advance in just 11/3 seconds. Ultra-compact design fits in your hand. Full Five-Year Warranty on camera and Ultralife energy source." 6000 Camera Inclucles 2 discs of KODACOLOR HR Disc Film oo,,,, S89" ONLY "Ask us lOt details on Koclak's Five.Year Warranty, If your camera doesn't work wit11 normal care. return it to us. arid KOdal( will tel)air It without charge. CAMERA SHOP of Hanover Nugget Bldg. • Main Street • Hanover, N.H. i45 LEATHER TOGETHER This Father's Day... Give Dad The Rich Feel & Distinctive Look Of Genuine Leather WALLAWAY RECLINER BY BERKLINE Just $399 MOTHER NATURE MADE LEATHER DURABLE, SUPPLE& LUXURIOUS.. NOW BERKLINE HAS MADE IT AFFORDABLE! Kevin and Eliza Klose "k Moscow correspondent (continued from page 1) editor at the Washington Post. Klose told the very moving His many job titles included: story of Alexa Nakiten --Metropolitan staff reporter; honored in both the university Virginia State Editor; and the armed forces, a Maryland State Editor, member of the Communist where, among Other duties, party and an engineer at the mine in Daneska. In 1969 Nakiten began warning the mine directors of safety violations in the mine where he worked. For this he was fired and" expelled from the party. When the mine later exploded injuring many, causing a riot ,ikt the minehead, Nakiten waYsent to the "Special Psychiatric Hospital for the criminally insane". Thus began the past decade of incarceration and torture of Nakiten for at- tempting to improve working conditions. Klose does not forsee any general uprising in the Soviet Union. "These (people) are second and third generation from Stalin's bloodletting resulting the deaths of 20 million people. Previously, Russian workers were the most revolutionary, now they're the most docile." He said they use the psychological protests of drinking, missing work or working slower instead. Klose said, "Our leaders must bear in mind the enor- mons gulf between our society and theirs... The Soviet Union is not going to fall apart tomorrow. It is a great empire -- diamonds, platinum, oil, coal, and an amazingly tough people." Born in Canada Kevin Klose was born on Sept. 1, 1940 to American parents in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He is the third son of Woody and Virginia Fdose. Klose graduated cure laude from Harvard College with a B.A. in English Literature. He spent two years with the U.S. Navy Reserve with active duty aboard the guided missile frigate, USS Coontz. Begins career Klose started his journalism career at the Peughkeepsie Join'hal in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He worked their from 1964 to 19ffL Since 1967, Kloee has worked as a reporter and directed the Post's in- vestigation of Vice President Spiro Agnew; and City Editor. In 1976, Klose took a year's leave from the Post to study the Russian language and area studies at Georgetown University, in preparation for his assignment to the Soviet Union. Klose is married to the former Eliza Darcy Kellogg of Woodstock, Vt. They have three children, Cornelia Kellogg; 14; Brennan, 13; and Chandler Robbins, 10. * 00e00vork in Wells River (continued from page 5) sewer line will have to connect at the edge of the Village right-of-way to a stub provided under the contract, along with others that were neither crossed or in- terrupted. Every effort has been made to locate and in- form each property owner on these two legs as to his actual situation as to hooking up, said Trustee David Stevens. A similar effort will be made on all legs as they become eligible to accept sewage. If any property owner has any questions as to his in- dividual connection, he should contact Tom Key, Joe Provost, or the trustees. The trustees are expected to make an announcement as soon as any portion of the system can accept sewage. Any timeatter that, individual homeowners may connect and discharge sewage to the stub provided at their property line. Under the regulations, the Village cannot do any connection work on private property (except in a few circumstances where the Village has obtained an easement to lay a sewer main on private property). * IVoodsville High gets good (continued from page I) unanimous vote the central office's long-planned proposal to seek bids from retail computer firms throughout the state on nine "Apple" mini-computers. The pur- chase of the computer systems, to be paid for by funds from the non-profit Haverhill Academy Cor- poration (H.A.C.), would mean computer assisted in- struction for grades one through 12 in the district. Currently, only James A. Morrill Elementary in N. Haverhill employs an in- structional computer. Asked for a "ballpark figure" on the cost of the systems, Mullen responded, "Probably $3,000 each, with printer, monitor and soft- ware." This totals $27,000. Asked by board member Peter C. Kimball if taxpayers would share in the cost, Mullen replied, "Not a nickel." Mullen hopes to award the computer contract by June 9, and to schedule "at least three' workshops this summer "for the entire staff" of the district, he said, although no arrangements for the training sessions have been made yet. Staff Attitudes towards the coming computer assisted instruction range from reported "high level of teacher interest" in the grade schools to apprehension at higher grade levels, except among math teachers. Roof Repair The board voted to seek bids for roof repairs, beginning with the Bennett (shop) building at W.H.S. Superin- tendent Mullen, having consulted Robert F. Dunn of R. & S. Construction Services, Middlebury, Conn., whom he termed "a so-called expert" on roofing, favors a roofing system similar to one installed by Dunn's Middlebury firm at Blue Mountain Union School in Wells River. That system combines an insulating factor of R-20 with a rubber outside surface that can be patched like a tire, Mullen said. Included in the vote was a suggestion by board member Kimball to "investigate the possibility of adding a hip roof." An advantage of this slanted type of roof is that it would shed the snow load. Administrators of a public school in Lyme, to which a hip roof, has been added will he consulted. New Teachers The board accepted by unanimous vote four "nominations for employment made by the central office. The four are: Barry l.,eBarron who'll teach industrial arts at H.A.J.H. ; Diane Caron, fourth school should be allowed to grade at Morrill Elementary; take their funds with them. Alice Tobin, who will teach one of two sixth grade classes at Morrill; and Jane Tuttle, Woodsville Elementary Kindergarten. Milk and Propane Again acting unanimously, the hoard awarded next year's milk and propane gas con- tracts to, in both cases, the lower of two bidders. Kilfasset Dairy was awarded the milk contract over Lotta Rock, the district's current supplier. Pratt's Propane will supply the district's propane gas needs next year. The other bidder was Suburban Propane. Class Treasuries Board chairman Archie Steeaburgh read a letter sent to him by Mrs. Susan Harry of Woodsville complaining of the district practice of requiring the dispersal of class treasuries, raised by students, before graduation from schools in the district. Classes may not retain funds in their treasury when they go from elementary to junior high, or from junior high to high school. Harry wrote that she was "horrified" to see such class treasuries go to teachers in the form of gift certificates at the end of the school year. She claimed widespread support among parents for her position, which is that classes going on to another district sonalities!" to who asked for The Harry letter was excludiv discussed by the board in board and executive session. Mullen from justified the closed discussion examination of by shouting the word "Per- in the letter. DR. LEON FAY is pleased to ann the re-opening of VALLEY HEALTH on Monday, June 7, E. Thefford soldier is stationed in West Germany E. THETFORD--Airman Bruce A. Chamberlain, son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Cham- berlain of E. Thetford has arrived for duty at IAndsey Air Base, West Germany. Chamberlain, a com- munications equipment specialist with the llka6th Engineering Installation Group, was previously assigned at Kecsler Air Force Base, Miss. The airman is a 1981 graduate of Thetford Academy. in East Corinth for the practice of FAMILY MEDICINE by Appointment 802-439-5321 The Haggar 00i00ashable Guaranteed wash wash after wash after after wash Before After Unretoched photo of Washable Unretouched photo of Washable Suit Suit Id'orc laundering, rnschin˘ washings and drying. Hard to Haglpu guarant˘ this kind of your money hick. Page 12 -The Journal Opinion- June 2, 1982 MacLean gives firsthand account of continuing unrest in Poland Editor's Note : This is the sixth in a series of articles we People of both sexes and all wife who was hiding behind a a chance and leave, group of demonstrators them. One tear gas canister this time it was mostly around part of have received from Bruce MacLean, an Oxbow social studies teacher on leave of absence while teaching at an American school in Warsaw, Poland. The first three articles chronicled the military takeover of Poland and described the struggle between the Polish people and their government. The fourth article told of MacLean's journey to Auschwitz, the site where over 4 million jews were killed during World War II. The fifth article began to describe the political unrest that continues in the country. The following article offers a detailed account of more violent demonstrations in the streets of Warsaw. Tuesday, May 4th the Cathedral. As if on cue, Yesterday after school, Solidarity banners by the my wife and I drove to the dozens, were unfolded by Old Town to witness the people at 4:00. As each flag planned Solidarity or banner was hoisted into demonstration. Ironically it the air, a round of cheering was the anniversary of the and clapping went up from signing of Europe's first the crowd. Chanting liberal constitution in 179I. "Solidarnosc-solidarnosc We were there by 3:30 and Lech Walesea-Lech and had a brief con- Walesea", rang out. versation with John Darnton Twenty minutes later, the of the New York Times, the crowd suddenly turned out of BBC reporter and other the road and headed for members of the Western Castle Square. By this time Press who were there to the riot police were lined up cover a potential story, just past the King Sigismund The focal point for the Column, one of the National assembly was again St. symbols of Poland-King Johns Cathedral where Sigismund III madeWarsaw Saturday's demonstration his capital in the late 16th began. Mass in celebration Century, which is situated of the anniversary of the on the edge of the square. constitution, was scheduled Events started to happen for 4:00, 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. quickly now. The whole At 4:00, thousands of people square had filled up with converged on the street by Solidarity supporters. ages were in attendance. Again shouts of "solidar- nosc-solidarnosc, free Lech, drop your batons and come join us", filled the air. The riot police, ZOMO, came on loudspeakers to tell the demonstrators that they were violating Martial Law Regulations. However, the loudspeakers were garbled and they were whistled down every time they tried to come over the speakers. Shouts of "Gestapo, Gestapo, Gestapo" came from the crowd. Red Flags, representing the Communist Party, were taken down from their stands and trampled on. Foreign film crews were busy filming the scene. At 4:30, the ZOMO sud- denly moved in on the crowd. tear gas was shot into the crowd, trucks with water cannons were hosing down the crowd and up to twenty thousand people retreated. As people desperately tried to escape the water cannons and tear gas by fleeing down the narrow alleys, the ZOMO started to attack with their long night sticks. By this time, the tear gas was almost unbearable. It got in my lungs and stung the eyes to the point that I could barely see. I grabbed my camera man and headed for the nearest alleyway. People were screaming and some were being trampled. For a moment I really wondered whether we would get out of there. A tear gas canister dropped by my feet and the effects were terrible. After what seemed an eternity, we managed to escape via a side door and along with about twenty other people, climbed a flight of stairs. I looked outside through a window and saw a ZOMO beat a young man senseless. The man fell to the ground but the policeman continued to heat him on his head. We stayed in the stairwell for a half hour. We, along with the other 20 people, kept gagging, coughing and tears kept streaming down our faces. The stench of the tear gas on our clothes was sickening. Outside, we continued to hear tear gas canisters being shot into the air. We all prayed that the ZOMO wouldn't fire tear gas into the area we were in, because there was just no escape and we were trapped. Some very anxious moments passed. As time wore on we were surprised to keep hearing tear gas being shot off, but at a far away distance. We decided to take As we got ouis-i-Je, the riot police were all around Castle square by the hundreds, but they did not make a move against us. The alley we walked down was littered with empty tear gas canisters. Shoes and pocketbooks could be seen everywhere. We quickly realized what had transpired in the last half hour. The demonstration had spread outside the Old Town. A counter demonstration had moved in behind the riot police and rioting had broken out in nearby Victory Square. Everywhere, demonstrators were being arrested and the ZOMO moved them along by hitting their legs with their trun- cheons. We got to our car and slowly made our way out of the area, trying to get home. Police kept diverting traffic as riot police trucks kept coming down roads. We found ourselves by the British Institute, about three quarters of a mile from our apartment, when another large group of demon- strators with Polish and Solidarnosc Flags waving, came marching down the road by the hundreds. I got out of the car and my wife drove home. As this new approached where I was gtanding, cheering and clapping came from people hanging out apartment windows. Cars going by honked their horns in sup- port. Like the demonstrators in the Old Town, they were flashing the victory sign and chanting slogans. Like others around me, I got swept up with the demon- stration and we walked another 100 yards, when more ZOMO's and their trucks were waiting for us across the road. Once again they charged and people scattered everywhere, screaming "Gestapo- Gestapo." I got home in a round about way by 7:00, just in time to witness another con- frontation, right outside my balcony, the apartment is on Jerozolimskie, one of the major streets here in Warsaw. At the end of the street I could hear tear gas being shot into the air, hundreds of demonstrators running down the street and trucks with water cannons, jeeps with multi barreled tear gas guns mounted on them and ZOMO's coming after them. Innocent bystanders were bowled over by the force of the water cannons being used against that was shot towards the demonstrators, was quickly picked up by a young man, who threw it back at the Police, scattering them for the moment. Then suddenly the ZOMO were quickly ordered into their trucks and rushed off to another trouble spot. This was the third time I had seen them go into action, only to be ordered into their trucks and driven off, sirens wailing. By this time it was becoming obvious that clashes between demon- strators and the riot police were springing up everywhere. As soon as the police had dispersed a group, another group would form and start marching. But was the whole city experiencing this? At this point I bad no idea. Throughout the af- ternoon I had noticed a helicopter flying back and forth over the city. Later on a Polish friend told me that he had picked up the frequency being used by the Police on his radio. As it turned out, they were getting their orders as to where to go in the city by the helicopter flying overhead. A friend who lived in the Old Town, called and said pitched battles between the police and demonstrators, by youths, was going on outside his window. He counted five ambulances that had driven into the area. A quarter of an hour later I called him back again. It was too late. The authorities had cut the phones again. I went to the American and British Embassy and when I came out of the British Embassy at 9:00, the place was surrounded by Army troops. When I got home, I found out that clashes had taken place again on Jerozolimskie. I stepped out on the balcony and saw the ZOMO firing tear gas again. My apartment is on the sixth floor, but the smell of the gas, even at that level was nauseating. One of the tear gas canisters fired by the police, went right through a window of a second story apartment. The apartment caught fire and was even- tually gutted. Back on the street, dozens of red flags were trampled and ripped apart. The ZOMO were experiencing some frustration with some of these demonstrators. AS they charged towards them, the youths would avoid arrest by jumping on the busses and trams that were constantly going by. This morning I drove trying to extent of violence. In Konsty-Tucji, littered the number of bi were smashed. friend who lives river, said chased across that at the end of Youths in their had torn apart cobbles in the hurled them at and their truckS. ternoon as I Old Town, happened. As the very same alley through 24 hoUrs ears began came into Everyone else in road was expert same problem. fired in such titles last night, the air. The streets empty tonight. after it was time curfew reimposed phones are again, the police force. YOUR CLOSE-UP TO SUMMER FUN Sl:Cial close-up setting catches summer fun from just 18 inches away! Advanced technology brings You automatic flash whenever you need more light, along with flash recharge and automatic film advance in just 11/3 seconds. Ultra-compact design fits in your hand. Full Five-Year Warranty on camera and Ultralife energy source." 6000 Camera Inclucles 2 discs of KODACOLOR HR Disc Film oo,,,, S89" ONLY "Ask us lOt details on Koclak's Five.Year Warranty, If your camera doesn't work wit11 normal care. return it to us. arid KOdal( will tel)air It without charge. CAMERA SHOP of Hanover Nugget Bldg. • Main Street • Hanover, N.H. i45 LEATHER TOGETHER This Father's Day... Give Dad The Rich Feel & Distinctive Look Of Genuine Leather WALLAWAY RECLINER BY BERKLINE Just $399 MOTHER NATURE MADE LEATHER DURABLE, SUPPLE& LUXURIOUS.. NOW BERKLINE HAS MADE IT AFFORDABLE! Kevin and Eliza Klose "k Moscow correspondent (continued from page 1) editor at the Washington Post. Klose told the very moving His many job titles included: story of Alexa Nakiten --Metropolitan staff reporter; honored in both the university Virginia State Editor; and the armed forces, a Maryland State Editor, member of the Communist where, among Other duties, party and an engineer at the mine in Daneska. In 1969 Nakiten began warning the mine directors of safety violations in the mine where he worked. For this he was fired and" expelled from the party. When the mine later exploded injuring many, causing a riot ,ikt the minehead, Nakiten waYsent to the "Special Psychiatric Hospital for the criminally insane". Thus began the past decade of incarceration and torture of Nakiten for at- tempting to improve working conditions. Klose does not forsee any general uprising in the Soviet Union. "These (people) are second and third generation from Stalin's bloodletting resulting the deaths of 20 million people. Previously, Russian workers were the most revolutionary, now they're the most docile." He said they use the psychological protests of drinking, missing work or working slower instead. Klose said, "Our leaders must bear in mind the enor- mons gulf between our society and theirs... The Soviet Union is not going to fall apart tomorrow. It is a great empire -- diamonds, platinum, oil, coal, and an amazingly tough people." Born in Canada Kevin Klose was born on Sept. 1, 1940 to American parents in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He is the third son of Woody and Virginia Fdose. Klose graduated cure laude from Harvard College with a B.A. in English Literature. He spent two years with the U.S. Navy Reserve with active duty aboard the guided missile frigate, USS Coontz. Begins career Klose started his journalism career at the Peughkeepsie Join'hal in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He worked their from 1964 to 19ffL Since 1967, Kloee has worked as a reporter and directed the Post's in- vestigation of Vice President Spiro Agnew; and City Editor. In 1976, Klose took a year's leave from the Post to study the Russian language and area studies at Georgetown University, in preparation for his assignment to the Soviet Union. Klose is married to the former Eliza Darcy Kellogg of Woodstock, Vt. They have three children, Cornelia Kellogg; 14; Brennan, 13; and Chandler Robbins, 10. * 00e00vork in Wells River (continued from page 5) sewer line will have to connect at the edge of the Village right-of-way to a stub provided under the contract, along with others that were neither crossed or in- terrupted. Every effort has been made to locate and in- form each property owner on these two legs as to his actual situation as to hooking up, said Trustee David Stevens. A similar effort will be made on all legs as they become eligible to accept sewage. If any property owner has any questions as to his in- dividual connection, he should contact Tom Key, Joe Provost, or the trustees. The trustees are expected to make an announcement as soon as any portion of the system can accept sewage. Any timeatter that, individual homeowners may connect and discharge sewage to the stub provided at their property line. Under the regulations, the Village cannot do any connection work on private property (except in a few circumstances where the Village has obtained an easement to lay a sewer main on private property). * IVoodsville High gets good (continued from page I) unanimous vote the central office's long-planned proposal to seek bids from retail computer firms throughout the state on nine "Apple" mini-computers. The pur- chase of the computer systems, to be paid for by funds from the non-profit Haverhill Academy Cor- poration (H.A.C.), would mean computer assisted in- struction for grades one through 12 in the district. Currently, only James A. Morrill Elementary in N. Haverhill employs an in- structional computer. Asked for a "ballpark figure" on the cost of the systems, Mullen responded, "Probably $3,000 each, with printer, monitor and soft- ware." This totals $27,000. Asked by board member Peter C. Kimball if taxpayers would share in the cost, Mullen replied, "Not a nickel." Mullen hopes to award the computer contract by June 9, and to schedule "at least three' workshops this summer "for the entire staff" of the district, he said, although no arrangements for the training sessions have been made yet. Staff Attitudes towards the coming computer assisted instruction range from reported "high level of teacher interest" in the grade schools to apprehension at higher grade levels, except among math teachers. Roof Repair The board voted to seek bids for roof repairs, beginning with the Bennett (shop) building at W.H.S. Superin- tendent Mullen, having consulted Robert F. Dunn of R. & S. Construction Services, Middlebury, Conn., whom he termed "a so-called expert" on roofing, favors a roofing system similar to one installed by Dunn's Middlebury firm at Blue Mountain Union School in Wells River. That system combines an insulating factor of R-20 with a rubber outside surface that can be patched like a tire, Mullen said. Included in the vote was a suggestion by board member Kimball to "investigate the possibility of adding a hip roof." An advantage of this slanted type of roof is that it would shed the snow load. Administrators of a public school in Lyme, to which a hip roof, has been added will he consulted. New Teachers The board accepted by unanimous vote four "nominations for employment made by the central office. The four are: Barry l.,eBarron who'll teach industrial arts at H.A.J.H. ; Diane Caron, fourth school should be allowed to grade at Morrill Elementary; take their funds with them. Alice Tobin, who will teach one of two sixth grade classes at Morrill; and Jane Tuttle, Woodsville Elementary Kindergarten. Milk and Propane Again acting unanimously, the hoard awarded next year's milk and propane gas con- tracts to, in both cases, the lower of two bidders. Kilfasset Dairy was awarded the milk contract over Lotta Rock, the district's current supplier. Pratt's Propane will supply the district's propane gas needs next year. The other bidder was Suburban Propane. Class Treasuries Board chairman Archie Steeaburgh read a letter sent to him by Mrs. Susan Harry of Woodsville complaining of the district practice of requiring the dispersal of class treasuries, raised by students, before graduation from schools in the district. Classes may not retain funds in their treasury when they go from elementary to junior high, or from junior high to high school. Harry wrote that she was "horrified" to see such class treasuries go to teachers in the form of gift certificates at the end of the school year. She claimed widespread support among parents for her position, which is that classes going on to another district sonalities!" to who asked for The Harry letter was excludiv discussed by the board in board and executive session. Mullen from justified the closed discussion examination of by shouting the word "Per- in the letter. DR. LEON FAY is pleased to ann the re-opening of VALLEY HEALTH on Monday, June 7, E. Thefford soldier is stationed in West Germany E. THETFORD--Airman Bruce A. Chamberlain, son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Cham- berlain of E. Thetford has arrived for duty at IAndsey Air Base, West Germany. Chamberlain, a com- munications equipment specialist with the llka6th Engineering Installation Group, was previously assigned at Kecsler Air Force Base, Miss. The airman is a 1981 graduate of Thetford Academy. in East Corinth for the practice of FAMILY MEDICINE by Appointment 802-439-5321 The Haggar 00i00ashable Guaranteed wash wash after wash after after wash Before After Unretoched photo of Washable Unretouched photo of Washable Suit Suit Id'orc laundering, rnschin˘ washings and drying. Hard to Haglpu guarant˘ this kind of your money hick.