"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 1     (1 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 3, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




111111 NA IIMHIIII tyme Orford PBrmort HOver htil Woods ,lle Boh 111MON! TheHord [o,ie Wet forep IUodf ord ( Or ,n  T Op.,hcJm Newbvry Wel ff,vef lyegoTe GtoforL . 25' 59N3 I0 Number 22 Ser,;mg Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June 3, 1981 ) SERVICE--Service in Bradford Cemetery May 30 was one of numerous observances of Memorial Day in the Upper Valley area. MacAloon has of four board members. Only proper practice charges the Haverhill three of the seven members hearing scheduled for June 11, a plan for a were present, and a proposed contract for a for student Among the items postponed driver education program. Trade.offs are urged in fire',,.ood, wildlife WOODSVILLE--"The in- creased demand for firewood threatens the habitat of many wildlife species. Dead or dying trees that commonly are cut for firewood are vital to wildlife species that nest in tree cavities. Likewise healthy trees of many species preferred for firewood are important components of wildlife habitat." The above quotation is taken from U.S. Forest Service Research Note -- 229 which rates various tree species for their value as wildlife food and shelter as well as their value for firewood. Unfortunately most of the best species of trees for fuelwood use, also rate highly for wildlife food and habitat uses. Therefore this means that the woodland owner and his forest manager should carefully weight the situation and possibly make a few trade-offs in order to protect our wildlife resource, says Grafton County Forester Leslie S. Sargent. "One suggestion worth considering would be to maintain as much of a variety of species in the residual stand as possible. This means that rather than become species oriented in which trees to pl-opo0000 at Woo,00vi.00 Newbury votes to turn ',--Se ience because of a lack of a quorum were a response to an im- costs for the Could be as little but that he did HAVERHILL--Selectman exact figure. Chairman Richard Kinder has Archie said the town of Haverhill has told MacAloon to not yet determined if it is board a more liable for contamination of the which will be well of Mr. and Mrs. Rosario in deciding Martin. Selectman have agreed to the May27 look into the situation, in- were put over eluding a visit to the Martin June 10 Haverhill checks well complaint property. In other business at last week's meeting, Health Officer Everett Sawyer reported three problem areas, including a manure pile within 25 feet of a river in E. Haverhill; a complaint about a dump in Woodsville, and an inadequate septic system at a house. l .!.i i.! /i ,f ? streetlights back by L.F. BARNFS cost saving of $137'3 and an NEWBURY--Residents at the Annual Village Meeting May 26 voted to turn back on 22 streetlights that have been off for several weeks in an ex- periment to reduce costs and taxes. The voters rejected an article which would have kept the lights off for an annual estimated tax reduction of approximately 13 per cent. Prior to the meeting, the trustees received a petition in favor of all the village streetlights remaining on. This was signed by 140 residents, including 119 legally registered voters. Several residents spoke in Ryegate turns down clinic \\; RYEGATE--Selectrnen have turned down a proposal from Cottage Hospital to establish a satellite clinic in S. Ryegate. saying health care appears to be in reach of all residents at present. Selectmen and fire department officials have agreed that a location in the village would be preferable for the new fire station in order to speed fire service, and also to avoid the possibilities of vandalism or theft at a more remote location. In other business at last right-of-way to the town. He said snowmobile trails would have to be kept open along the line, and access would have to be allowed into Pine Mountain Forest. Selectmen agree the offer of the land transfer would be beneficial to the town. Town Clerk Reginald White reported he had sent letters to Sens. Robert Stafford and Patrick Leahy and Rep. James Jeffords protesting a required Federal revenue sharing audit so soon after the last one. The audit would cost the town about $2,500. Stafford week's meeting, William replied that he is seeking a Moulton of the Vermont waiver so the town would not Department of Forests and have toconducttheaudit. Parks outlined two Selectmen approved a tax stipulations to the proposed rate of 2.25, up from last transfer of the oil railroad year's2.05. tavor of the lights R.ev. Betty Stone, director of the Atkinson Home, said, "I do find it hazardous without the light at the entrance used by the ambulance. We would hope that this light, and all of them, are turned on." Patricia Dwyer said, "I would like to see people turn on a light in the front of the house--to look like a healthy lively community, a sixty- watt bulb costs about 2 cents a night." On a ballot vote, the article to keep the lights turned off Thetford will profit :from extra hauling job THETFORD--Selectmen have approved an extra job for the Thefford Highway Department in which the road crew will haul fill from Post Mills to Camp Lochearn and -earn some $2,000 for the town. No decision was made on what to do with the money, although selectmen discussed putting it into a special equipment to help .pay for maintenance. Lochearn, a private camp which has 130 children and 55 staff members in the summer, will use the fill to construct an additional riding ring. Town highway crewmen will only haul the fill and dump it, with camp workmen constructing the riding ring. The hauling job will take about four days. Selectman Chairman George P. Stowell said the extra money earned from the job will provide some finan- cial protection against unexpected costs. "We can put the money aside and earn interest. Then when we need it, it will be there," he said. Road CommiSsioner Claude Thurston said selectmen plan to keep the money in a separate account in order to figure how much expenses and profit are involved. "We have to prove to the taxpayer that the time is really worth it," said Selec- tman Drew Tallman. The road crew did a similar private job last year. Hearing set on low flying CONCORD--Raymond S. Burton, Executive Councilor for District One, urged all citizens who have an interest in aviation and tourism to attend the Federal Aviation Administration hearing June 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the LinWood High School in Lincoln. "There is a lot of interest in these low flying twin engine jet fighter planes conducting training missions 100 feet above the ground in the northern area of our state during our tourist season. I would urge everyone to get out and be heard in Lincoln on June 4," Burton said Minimum class size at Orford? ORFORI)- Administrators at Orford High School are ap- parently considering a plan to set a minimum class size for Robbins and Evelyn Morrill set the mood for eld in conjunction with Piermont Memorial Day parade. remove for fuel, we harvest a salvage wild apple trees wider variety and save some during harvesting and timber of the "weed" trees in a stand for game food. Save some of the dead snags for nesting for birds and small game. These snags are not competing with the growing timber anyway. It only means you will have to dry your wood in the wood- pile," Sargent said. The forest managers for many years have attempted to stand improvement operations. They have released these old trees from surrounding competition, pruned them in some in- stances and obtained a reasonable apple crop for wildlife. This effort has been fairly successful. Now we need to look at other species (please turn to page 8) the 1981-82 year, which could result in eliminating the smallest classes and com- bining some others. The high school has a small student body with an unusually low student to leacher ration of six to one. No formal discussions on the matter have been held, but school administrators reportedly have talked in- formally with several teache about the proposal. DUMP--Piermont dump youngsters. Piermont PIERMONT--A quantity of asbestos dumped in the town landfill by a private citizen has been ordered buried by officials. "Somebody brought in some asbestos and dumped it t)i[ there. Certain people called the state) Hazardous Waste Division and they told us to bury it, which we did," Selectman Chairman Fremont Ritchie told the Journa I Opinion. He said state authorities told Piermont officials to bury the asbestos at least six inches deep, and that it was buried even deeper than that. Some residents had ea- pressed concern that the asbestos might blow off onto a nearby baseball field where Little League games are held. Asbestos is considered by is at right, next to baseball field used by local orders asbestos buried environmental and health as it is dumped to prevent authorities as a possiblecause particles from blowing off, of lung cancer if particles are and then is covered with dirt. inhaled. Monitors also must make sure In Brattleboro, large the truck body is sprayed with quantities of asbestos have water after the dumping, he been buried in that town's landfill under strict monitoring procedures. Two state officials, a radiological expert and a solid waste specialist, watch the dumping procedure. Brattleboro Town Health Officer Dr. Lester Lovell said standard monitoring procedure is to check each truckload of waste, checking a random sample of l0 percent of the load, recording truck numbers and other shipping in- formation, and noting the type of container the waste is in. Monitors must also make sure the waste is misted with water ,said. Some 15 loads oi asbestos have been brought to the Brattleboro site since last November, mostly from other states, under a special dumping permit granted to the landfill. Lovell said much of the asbestos dumped in Brattleboro may have been removed from ceilings of homes and buildings after health authorities in many areas wrned that old asbestos coatings could flake off and present a health hazard. ON TIlE MARCH--Oxbow High School Band provides marching music for GraftonCountyHomepara Parade is big success at Grafton County Home WOOI)SVILLE--On May 27, Woodsville Police Officer American flags. Coming up Jeanie Adams, Polly Colby, music filled the air as the John MacDonald in the squad next was LPN Barbara Barbara Emerson. and Grafton County Home held its second annual Memorial Day Parade for the residents. Many residents watched from chairs on the lawn. Those that could not go outside watched from windows inside the complel. Leading off the parade was car, followed by the Oxbow Iligh School Band, with band leader Edward Ledwith. Following the band was Mrs. Jewell Lamphere carrying the Christian Flag; Mrs. Agnes Horne, Rev. Christine Quimby, and Mrs. l,orene Kelly, each carrying Norcross,, Nurse's Aides, residents, Diane Greene, Mary Hoffman, Pam Nellie Gray, and Roger Tetreault; Residents, Mary Howland. Fournier, Shirley Durgin, and A small tractor and trailer AnnaO'Malley. float decorated in red, white Next in line ,xas In-Service and blue, with the flag waving Director, Dorothy Moulton; in the breeze, was h'iven by Housekeeping Dept., Barbara ,lira ()'Shawnessev. Thayer, Jackie Gadwah, lpleaseturnto'pageT) 111111 NA IIMHIIII tyme Orford PBrmort HOver htil Woods ,lle Boh 111MON! TheHord [o,ie Wet forep IUodf ord ( Or ,n  T Op.,hcJm Newbvry Wel ff,vef lyegoTe GtoforL . 25' 59N3 I0 Number 22 Ser,;mg Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June 3, 1981 ) SERVICE--Service in Bradford Cemetery May 30 was one of numerous observances of Memorial Day in the Upper Valley area. MacAloon has of four board members. Only proper practice charges the Haverhill three of the seven members hearing scheduled for June 11, a plan for a were present, and a proposed contract for a for student Among the items postponed driver education program. Trade.offs are urged in fire',,.ood, wildlife WOODSVILLE--"The in- creased demand for firewood threatens the habitat of many wildlife species. Dead or dying trees that commonly are cut for firewood are vital to wildlife species that nest in tree cavities. Likewise healthy trees of many species preferred for firewood are important components of wildlife habitat." The above quotation is taken from U.S. Forest Service Research Note -- 229 which rates various tree species for their value as wildlife food and shelter as well as their value for firewood. Unfortunately most of the best species of trees for fuelwood use, also rate highly for wildlife food and habitat uses. Therefore this means that the woodland owner and his forest manager should carefully weight the situation and possibly make a few trade-offs in order to protect our wildlife resource, says Grafton County Forester Leslie S. Sargent. "One suggestion worth considering would be to maintain as much of a variety of species in the residual stand as possible. This means that rather than become species oriented in which trees to pl-opo0000 at Woo,00vi.00 Newbury votes to turn ',--Se ience because of a lack of a quorum were a response to an im- costs for the Could be as little but that he did HAVERHILL--Selectman exact figure. Chairman Richard Kinder has Archie said the town of Haverhill has told MacAloon to not yet determined if it is board a more liable for contamination of the which will be well of Mr. and Mrs. Rosario in deciding Martin. Selectman have agreed to the May27 look into the situation, in- were put over eluding a visit to the Martin June 10 Haverhill checks well complaint property. In other business at last week's meeting, Health Officer Everett Sawyer reported three problem areas, including a manure pile within 25 feet of a river in E. Haverhill; a complaint about a dump in Woodsville, and an inadequate septic system at a house. l .!.i i.! /i ,f ? streetlights back by L.F. BARNFS cost saving of $137'3 and an NEWBURY--Residents at the Annual Village Meeting May 26 voted to turn back on 22 streetlights that have been off for several weeks in an ex- periment to reduce costs and taxes. The voters rejected an article which would have kept the lights off for an annual estimated tax reduction of approximately 13 per cent. Prior to the meeting, the trustees received a petition in favor of all the village streetlights remaining on. This was signed by 140 residents, including 119 legally registered voters. Several residents spoke in Ryegate turns down clinic \\; RYEGATE--Selectrnen have turned down a proposal from Cottage Hospital to establish a satellite clinic in S. Ryegate. saying health care appears to be in reach of all residents at present. Selectmen and fire department officials have agreed that a location in the village would be preferable for the new fire station in order to speed fire service, and also to avoid the possibilities of vandalism or theft at a more remote location. In other business at last right-of-way to the town. He said snowmobile trails would have to be kept open along the line, and access would have to be allowed into Pine Mountain Forest. Selectmen agree the offer of the land transfer would be beneficial to the town. Town Clerk Reginald White reported he had sent letters to Sens. Robert Stafford and Patrick Leahy and Rep. James Jeffords protesting a required Federal revenue sharing audit so soon after the last one. The audit would cost the town about $2,500. Stafford week's meeting, William replied that he is seeking a Moulton of the Vermont waiver so the town would not Department of Forests and have toconducttheaudit. Parks outlined two Selectmen approved a tax stipulations to the proposed rate of 2.25, up from last transfer of the oil railroad year's2.05. tavor of the lights R.ev. Betty Stone, director of the Atkinson Home, said, "I do find it hazardous without the light at the entrance used by the ambulance. We would hope that this light, and all of them, are turned on." Patricia Dwyer said, "I would like to see people turn on a light in the front of the house--to look like a healthy lively community, a sixty- watt bulb costs about 2 cents a night." On a ballot vote, the article to keep the lights turned off Thetford will profit :from extra hauling job THETFORD--Selectmen have approved an extra job for the Thefford Highway Department in which the road crew will haul fill from Post Mills to Camp Lochearn and -earn some $2,000 for the town. No decision was made on what to do with the money, although selectmen discussed putting it into a special equipment to help .pay for maintenance. Lochearn, a private camp which has 130 children and 55 staff members in the summer, will use the fill to construct an additional riding ring. Town highway crewmen will only haul the fill and dump it, with camp workmen constructing the riding ring. The hauling job will take about four days. Selectman Chairman George P. Stowell said the extra money earned from the job will provide some finan- cial protection against unexpected costs. "We can put the money aside and earn interest. Then when we need it, it will be there," he said. Road CommiSsioner Claude Thurston said selectmen plan to keep the money in a separate account in order to figure how much expenses and profit are involved. "We have to prove to the taxpayer that the time is really worth it," said Selec- tman Drew Tallman. The road crew did a similar private job last year. Hearing set on low flying CONCORD--Raymond S. Burton, Executive Councilor for District One, urged all citizens who have an interest in aviation and tourism to attend the Federal Aviation Administration hearing June 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the LinWood High School in Lincoln. "There is a lot of interest in these low flying twin engine jet fighter planes conducting training missions 100 feet above the ground in the northern area of our state during our tourist season. I would urge everyone to get out and be heard in Lincoln on June 4," Burton said Minimum class size at Orford? ORFORI)- Administrators at Orford High School are ap- parently considering a plan to set a minimum class size for Robbins and Evelyn Morrill set the mood for eld in conjunction with Piermont Memorial Day parade. remove for fuel, we harvest a salvage wild apple trees wider variety and save some during harvesting and timber of the "weed" trees in a stand for game food. Save some of the dead snags for nesting for birds and small game. These snags are not competing with the growing timber anyway. It only means you will have to dry your wood in the wood- pile," Sargent said. The forest managers for many years have attempted to stand improvement operations. They have released these old trees from surrounding competition, pruned them in some in- stances and obtained a reasonable apple crop for wildlife. This effort has been fairly successful. Now we need to look at other species (please turn to page 8) the 1981-82 year, which could result in eliminating the smallest classes and com- bining some others. The high school has a small student body with an unusually low student to leacher ration of six to one. No formal discussions on the matter have been held, but school administrators reportedly have talked in- formally with several teache about the proposal. DUMP--Piermont dump youngsters. Piermont PIERMONT--A quantity of asbestos dumped in the town landfill by a private citizen has been ordered buried by officials. "Somebody brought in some asbestos and dumped it t)i[ there. Certain people called the state) Hazardous Waste Division and they told us to bury it, which we did," Selectman Chairman Fremont Ritchie told the Journa I Opinion. He said state authorities told Piermont officials to bury the asbestos at least six inches deep, and that it was buried even deeper than that. Some residents had ea- pressed concern that the asbestos might blow off onto a nearby baseball field where Little League games are held. Asbestos is considered by is at right, next to baseball field used by local orders asbestos buried environmental and health as it is dumped to prevent authorities as a possiblecause particles from blowing off, of lung cancer if particles are and then is covered with dirt. inhaled. Monitors also must make sure In Brattleboro, large the truck body is sprayed with quantities of asbestos have water after the dumping, he been buried in that town's landfill under strict monitoring procedures. Two state officials, a radiological expert and a solid waste specialist, watch the dumping procedure. Brattleboro Town Health Officer Dr. Lester Lovell said standard monitoring procedure is to check each truckload of waste, checking a random sample of l0 percent of the load, recording truck numbers and other shipping in- formation, and noting the type of container the waste is in. Monitors must also make sure the waste is misted with water ,said. Some 15 loads oi asbestos have been brought to the Brattleboro site since last November, mostly from other states, under a special dumping permit granted to the landfill. Lovell said much of the asbestos dumped in Brattleboro may have been removed from ceilings of homes and buildings after health authorities in many areas wrned that old asbestos coatings could flake off and present a health hazard. ON TIlE MARCH--Oxbow High School Band provides marching music for GraftonCountyHomepara Parade is big success at Grafton County Home WOOI)SVILLE--On May 27, Woodsville Police Officer American flags. Coming up Jeanie Adams, Polly Colby, music filled the air as the John MacDonald in the squad next was LPN Barbara Barbara Emerson. and Grafton County Home held its second annual Memorial Day Parade for the residents. Many residents watched from chairs on the lawn. Those that could not go outside watched from windows inside the complel. Leading off the parade was car, followed by the Oxbow Iligh School Band, with band leader Edward Ledwith. Following the band was Mrs. Jewell Lamphere carrying the Christian Flag; Mrs. Agnes Horne, Rev. Christine Quimby, and Mrs. l,orene Kelly, each carrying Norcross,, Nurse's Aides, residents, Diane Greene, Mary Hoffman, Pam Nellie Gray, and Roger Tetreault; Residents, Mary Howland. Fournier, Shirley Durgin, and A small tractor and trailer AnnaO'Malley. float decorated in red, white Next in line ,xas In-Service and blue, with the flag waving Director, Dorothy Moulton; in the breeze, was h'iven by Housekeeping Dept., Barbara ,lira ()'Shawnessev. Thayer, Jackie Gadwah, lpleaseturnto'pageT)