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Bradford , Vermont
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June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 2-The Journal Opinion-June 3, 1981 i. Arts and Entertainment J ,+%tit and Light church concert |]I{A[)FOI.D-r-On Sunday wilt be in concert at the evening, June 7th, at 7:30p.m. Bradford Evangelical Free tile contemporary Christian Church. music group, Salt and Light, These musicians, num- bering between eight and twelve, come from Windsor and are associated with the Trinity Evangelical Free Church there. Their first album is aired regularly on radio throughout the Upper Valley area. The public is welcome to share this musical event with the congregation of Bradford EFC. For more information call 222-9021. Ill.- SAT. - SUN. , Blood Beach Rated R I ('O-FEATUllE .......... The 3oogey Man LIBRARY MEETING BRAI)FORD--The Bradford Rated It IJbrary trustees will meet at .................................... the library June 8 at 7:30 p.m. 1 2 The LAST METRO - Come Have The Time Of Your Life And Listen To The Great Sounds Of... I I I Ill ilL  I I Saturday June 6 "'RE-UNITED" FREE BOOKS--Selecting from free book offerings in RIF (Reading is Fundamental) program at Thetford Elementary School are, from left, First Graders Jason Bacon, Janus Crossett and Chelsea Blanger. W|th Bob Hanley Raffle to benefit Thetford Day Care TttFTFORD--Maplc Leaf Day Care Center in Thetford is sponsoring a fundraising raffle, offering a meal for two at two Upper Valley restaurants to a total of five winners. The proceeds of the raffle will be used to offset a deficit in the center's 1980-81 operating budget. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5 and are available by calling Maple Leaf Day Care Center at 785- 2o74. The raffle drawing will be held Aug. 8 at the Thctford llill Fair. The l0 area restaurants which have donated the meals to be raffled include the Third Rail in Fairlee, Carpenter Street in Norwich, the Stone ltousc Inn in North Thetford, Jesse's in Hanover, Stone Soup in South Stratford, the ('olatina Exit in Bradford, China Lite in West Lebanon, the Point in White River Junction, 50lde Nugget Alley in Hanover, and the Norwich Inn in Norwich. BIRTHDAY BOY--Travis James Allen of Bradford celebrated his first bir- thday May 20. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen Jr. of Bradford. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Sam Longley of Danville, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen Sr. of Wood- stock. V l II { Ill till l l CHOOSING BOOKS--Third Graders, from left, Dani Boyd, Cathy Caldwell and Jesse Hoffman choose from RIF (Reading is Fundamental) books at Thetford Elementary School Library. Books diswibuted at Thefford school THETFORD--The Fourth letting children choose from a RIF (Reading Is Fun- wide variety of paperbacks, damental) distribution was the books they want; and by made at Thetford Elementary letting them keep the books as For Your Reservation, Call Before 7:00 P.M. " Tel. (603) 747-2505 or 747-2840. PIERMONT--Abby Metealf he did not look up or see it. It ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: called Police Officer Bill Deal crossed the garden, jumped a Dinner will benefit Orford Child Center ORFORD--The Orford Child salad bar will be available for Center Inc. will try on June 6 to surpass the success of its first Annual International Dinner. The Second International Dinner, to be held at the Orford Congregational Church on Main Street, is a com- munity effort. "More than 85 people helped with the event last year," said Linda Linbergh, the Center's Program Coordinator, "and we hope for an even larger participation this year." In an attempt to ac- commodate more patrons, Ms. Linbergh has scheduled sittings at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and will take reser- vations at 353-4583. "We have tried to make it a truely pleasurable culinary experience at a very reasonable price, $4 for adults, $2.50 for children under 12, and free for children under 3," she said. "A variety of international cuisine will be featured with several Oriental favorites being prepared on the premises. Traditional American favorites will also be served along with many School in the library May 25- their own. exotic desserts. We have 26. Freedom of choice and pride decided to try.something new With 240 Childreh, Lhechooi of ownership of books  the in eommun/y dners. A huge has given out 960 books this two primary motivating ,, year. factors. , ,: ,,. RIF promotes reading by BITS OF INFORMATION Americans spend about 35 Moose visits Piermont percent of their total food dollar on eating out. BABY ARRIVES b. ,, /  at about 3 o'clock last Thur- stone wall, jumped a fence, Mr. andMrs. Byron Aldrich sday to report a creature in ,,so easily and gracefully," of Swiftwater are the parents her yard and ask what she according to Phyllis, and of a baby daughter born May Styled : shoulddoahoutit. Bill told her disappeared into the woods to 19 at Cottage Hospital. The to do nothing but perhaps he'd the north, -- haven, at last. baby weighed 7 pounds. I O Dul)nt Antron Nylon those who like to 'make your own.' All in all, it should be a very pleasant experience," she said. GALAXY TRAVEL, INC. 103 S. Main St. W. Lebanon, IMH 603-298-8782 Dan Et Linda Westney k White, pale pink, sly blue, lemonade, lilac, caady Szos 34-42. $13,00 ,. St. lohnsbury, Vt, Woodsvilie, N.H. get the patrol car out and t t guard against its being hit by a car if it got on the road. Bill opened his front door and found himself face to face with a moose. It is a question who was the more surprised. It was the first time he had ever found a moose on his doorstep and he wondered if Last week we visited the W. he should ask it if it had come Newbury Cooperative Nur- t to register a complaint. It sery School. There, in a one- looked to him like a pony with room country school that 6-foot legs. It did not choose to closed its doors to elementary t come in but went down the scholars a dozen years ago,  road toward the village, the preschoolers meet. They t Lovers Lane looked more climb the jungle-gym and the inviting, however, and it gnarled old trees, watch the turned up there picking up cows in, a neighboringpasture, speed. t and the downy woodpecker on The Robert Mitcheils had the tree in their play-yard.  seen it going up the lane as Coming up from the river, its they came along in their car a pleasure to find the lilacs and decided to turn and follow still in full fragrant bloom. it for a better look but it was The schoolhouse is owned by too fast for them. the Newbury Historical Phyllis Wilson looked out Society, whose membershave t t her window in time to see it encouraged this lively  coming up the lane. She utilizationoftheirschool. thought at first it was a large The mothers organized the horse but decided it was a school and work closely with young moose. Itpassed Floyd the teacher, Marlene Man- Smith, who was cutting wood ning. but, good woodsman that he is, Here are a few suggestions KORNER by L.F. BARNES For the wee folk from Marlene of games to make for children. One is "Oddball Out": Make ten cards out of posterboard, 8 by lO inches or slightly smaller. On each card, print a numeral, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then from magazines cut pictures of groups of things and paste them on the cards. On each card. have three that correspond with the number and one that does not--that is i he "oddball". The child looks through the cards and puts a HOUSE COUNTRY Specializing in * Italian Cooking * Seafood & Steaks * Banquet Facilities RESTAURANT "  & OXBOW LOUNGE Marie D. Lorenzini and Robert C. Brault Your Hosts 276 N. Main St., Barre, Vt. For Reservations 05641 802 - 476.4282 button, or paper X on the one that does not match as he learns to count. Another game is to "go fishing" with a string with a magnet on the end. Put let- ters, numbers, shapes or pictures in envelopes closed with a paper clip. The clip sticks to the magnet and is "caught". The child reads or describes what is inside. The day we visited, the children drew a vegetable man. Ills head was a carrot, his body a tomato, his arms beans, and so on. It can be any vegetables the children choose. There's a song that goes: There was a man who lived on the moon. And his name was Aiken Drum lie played upon a ladle... For a head he had a carrot (lettuce, tomato, plum, you choose ) And his name was Aiken Drum... March of Dimes walk is planned BRADFORD--An 18-mile March of Dimes Walk will be held June 14, starting at the P & C store parking lot in Bradford, around Lake Mercy, then back up to Oxbow High School. There will be check in points and rest periods throughout the route. There will be a chicken and spaghetti plate for the walkers at Oxbow High School. All walkers and helpers will be served free. Others pay $5 a meal. If it rains the walk will be the following Sunday, June 21. The walk starts at 9:30 a.m. Following the Dinner, Sue Kling, Summer Program Director and 3rd grade teacher at the Orfordville School, will discuss current plans for what promises to he an exciting eight-week summer program. Ms. Kling has planned activities for children aged 2-10 which will include water sports, creative arts and crafts, games, and field trips, beginning June 29th. The summer program will also encompass the current nursery program for pre- schoolers from 8:30-11:30 a.m. daily, taught by Meriel Hall, as well as a morning program for the older children. All meals and snacks are provided for the children at no cost. Enrollment in this program is limited to 25 and Ms. Kling would like to en- courage parents to reserve a spot for their children early. The Center is currently. engaged in other fund raising activities to upgrade the playground area and purchase equipment and supplies for the summer program. The annual community calendar drive will begin in June. In addition to day care services, the center also administers the highly suc- cessful Sponsorship Program. Ms. Linbergh, as Program Director, explained that this program furnishes "m d formation on food a nutrition to 35 individual day care home providers. Many of these homes are in Bradford. Kathy Blanchard, president of the Board of Directors and a teacher at Oxbow, is very enthusiastic about the Cen- ter's varied programs. "It is unfortunate that many day care centers face an uncertain future due to federal and state cutbacks at a time when there is an increasing need for day care as more mothers and single parents take jobs outside the home. Our fund raising committee intends to work harder to raise money to maintain the ex- cellent quality of our programs for area children," she said. River's Reach ' ballet recital NEWBURY--The children of Rivers Reach dance classes will perform in a recital June 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the Newbury Town Hall. The public is invited and admission is free. There will be a sampling of work in ballet, improvisation, mime and rhythm as well as tap steps. The River's Reach Arts ::: Association has been able to provide these ballet and jazz classes this year with the cooperation of the Newbury Elementary School and two dedicated instructors, Sue Picknell of Bath and Janet Warner-Ashley of St. John- sbury. Sue, who taught pre-school through kindergarten age, is a former nursery school teacher and studied ballet at the Littleton Dance School and locally. Her class includes Celieia Fadden, Kate Tilgh- man, Melissa Tilghman, Maggie Webster, Kim McLure, Andrea Nelson, Rise Finley, Melissa Gates, Ramee Harris, JoAnn Roy, Kara Alden, Erin Odell, Stacey AUCTION--Auctioneer William A. Smith ell auctions off Boston rocker at on Street property of the Klunder famib Antiques F, by JOANNA GILBRIDE RugglesandChelseaPicknell. BRADFORD--William A. "l-Sth century Janet taught kindergarten Smith was in fine form when finest we've through third grade cbildren he auctioned off antiques, brought an as well as adult classes. Her accessories and architectural Other younger class includes items on the grounds of the cluded a curly Rachael Rossi, Andrea Main Street property here nonball bed Gravelin, Kristen Wolf, Carol owned by the Klunders. headboard, $225; Elliot, Allison Conrad, Smith always manages to cradle, $135, Christine Cushing, Joy provide some good humor and table, $425; Whalen, Kimberly Roy, easy laughs as he swiftly stoneware crock Kathleen Roy, Nikki Bushi, moves the lots in a most bird, $205; tin Windy Fortier, and Samantha professional manner. The with heart Stoddard. muggy weather didn't Burlington lidded! Janet has studied with the dampen the auctioneer's four refinished State Ballet of Rhode "Island performance Saturday, nor chairs, $240; and was a member of Festival the crowd'senthusiasm, stretcher-based Ballet in Rhode Island, as well A horse-drawn milk wagon brought $400. as with Alexander Bennet of marked "E.L. Moore, There were a the Royal Ballet at the Durham, N.H." drew baskets -- Burklyn Ballet Theater and the top bid of the day for any laundry, apple, with Chert Noble of the single item at $1,550. Another prices Pennsylvia Ballet Company. smaller coach used to ad- over $100 She has also studied modern, vertise "Teddy's Grill" style Mrican, Brazilian and Jazz brought $425. Ther( dance at Connecticut College.  -- Dance classes will resume in the fall. For further in- formation call Jeanne Tilgh- man, (802) 429-2239. Benefit Concert set in Bradford BRADFORD--The North Country Chorus is planning a concert tour in England in June of 1982. Many groups in the Chorus have money-raising projectw ' going, and the Bradford area group will be putting on a supper and concert July 5 at the Congregational Church. Playing in the concert will be Joseph Castello, trombone, accompanied by Katrina Munn. Castello is a Woodsville native presently teaching at the University of Western Ontario. In the summer of 1978, Castello and Miss Munn gave a recital in Bradford. Marjorie Drysdale, soprano, and Janet Hass, piano, will also be performing in the concert. Also playing in the concert will be the piano trio com- posed of Margaret Smith, violin, Marnie Cardozo, cello, and Katrina Munn, piano. Tickets will go on sale at a later date, and reservations for the supper will be requested. NOTES & COMMENTS It's surprising how most people, though uninformed, will talk authoritatively about any subject. Wednesday, June 3 NEWBURY: A Community Health Services, Inc. Town Nurse will check hypertension, weight and glaucoma, 2-4 p.m., Bailey Club. WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon, United Church of Christ vestry, serving at noon. Reservation: 757-2206. WELLS RIVER: A Community Health Services, Inc. Town Nurse will check hypertension, weight and glaucoma, 2-4 p.m., U.C.C. Church. BRADFORD: Bingo, Legion Hall, every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 5 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Oxbow Vocational Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations requested: (802) 222-4782. BRADFORD: Card party at Senior Citizens Center, every Friday at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 6 THETFORD: "La SerVa Padrona," comic opera --Parish Players production at the Grange Hall, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 7 THETFORD: "La Serva Padrona," comic opera. Per- formance at 3 p.m., Grange Hall. Monday, June 8 BRADFORD: Bradford Library Trustees, 7:30 p.m. at the library. BRADFORD: Annual meeting of the Valley Cooperative Pre- school, 7:30 p.m. at Bradford Elementary School. NEWBURY: Volleyball for age 13 - adult, 7-9 p.m., Town Hall. Sponsored by Newbury Athletic Council. Tuesday, June 9 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Oxbow Vocational Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations requested: (802) 222-4782. Wednesday, June 10 NEWBURY: Newbury Historical Society, W. Newbury Church Hall, 8 p.m. WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon, United Church of Christ vestry, serving at noon. Reservations: 757-2206. CHEAP TRANSPORTATION--This nifty for $425 at auction in Bradford May 30. A wonderful creamware the new piggy brought $40; a sale terms refinished four-slat lad- adopted by a derback mmsing one slat, $80; auction houses. wicker settee and chairs, $475; The "10 & refinished sawbuck table, policy calls $400; wicker sewing stand, seller sharing the $125; Italian Madonna-like commission fees small oil on canvas in carved In other words in frame, $80; genre oil-on- successful bidder canvas painting of a street- table, for say sweeper (Brooklyn, N.Y.) additional $5 with a number of small tears, he l $55; old standing drying rack, -- $35; pewter mug with no touch -mark, $105; reconstructed (as advertised) harvest table, $375; ice scale, $25; Bradley & i Hubbard hanging lamp with .... replaced shade, $90; ...... decorated snuffer tray, $9; Oriental prayer rug $350; old SHOTGUN" buggy lamp, $40; mahogany Bradford veneered Empire card table with vase-shaped pedestal brought $900. base, Sit0; lapped covered The audience furkin, $50; crank phonograph whelmingly with horn, $400; small country "10&10." Onl hanging cupboard, $60; old favor of the scroll-toed ice skates, $50, and Smith framed sandpaper pastel, $20. crowd before A well proportioned auction dropleaf table with drawer adopted this drew a final bid of $165 and a tracting, iadderback armchair was sold good estates for $110. business Smith called a two-drawer auctioneers blanket chest in old red paint under a 20 per Orientals in varying sizes and fee. these brought $50-$375 depending, again, on age, condition, color, etc. During the course of the auction Smith polled the every crowd on the acceptability of p.m. at m i Wednesday, june 3 NEWBURY: Village trustees, 7: 30 p.m. WELLS RIVER: Blue Mountain Union p.m. Thursday, June 4 BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 pjn. Friday, June 5 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, Monday, June 8 HAVERHILL: Selectmen, 7 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8 p.m. RYEGATE: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m. TOPSHAM: Selectmen, 8 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen, 7 p.m. BATH: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 10 BRADFORD: Village trustees, 7:30 p.m. HAVERHILL: Cooperative School Board, 7 BRADFORD: Bradford Academy Graded p.m. FAIRLEE: Planning Board, 7: 30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Improvement Corp., Page 2-The Journal Opinion-June 3, 1981 i. Arts and Entertainment J ,+%tit and Light church concert |]I{A[)FOI.D-r-On Sunday wilt be in concert at the evening, June 7th, at 7:30p.m. Bradford Evangelical Free tile contemporary Christian Church. music group, Salt and Light, These musicians, num- bering between eight and twelve, come from Windsor and are associated with the Trinity Evangelical Free Church there. Their first album is aired regularly on radio throughout the Upper Valley area. The public is welcome to share this musical event with the congregation of Bradford EFC. For more information call 222-9021. Ill.- SAT. - SUN. , Blood Beach Rated R I ('O-FEATUllE .......... The 3oogey Man LIBRARY MEETING BRAI)FORD--The Bradford Rated It IJbrary trustees will meet at .................................... the library June 8 at 7:30 p.m. 1 2 The LAST METRO - Come Have The Time Of Your Life And Listen To The Great Sounds Of... I I I Ill ilL  I I Saturday June 6 "'RE-UNITED" FREE BOOKS--Selecting from free book offerings in RIF (Reading is Fundamental) program at Thetford Elementary School are, from left, First Graders Jason Bacon, Janus Crossett and Chelsea Blanger. W|th Bob Hanley Raffle to benefit Thetford Day Care TttFTFORD--Maplc Leaf Day Care Center in Thetford is sponsoring a fundraising raffle, offering a meal for two at two Upper Valley restaurants to a total of five winners. The proceeds of the raffle will be used to offset a deficit in the center's 1980-81 operating budget. Tickets are $1 each or six for $5 and are available by calling Maple Leaf Day Care Center at 785- 2o74. The raffle drawing will be held Aug. 8 at the Thctford llill Fair. The l0 area restaurants which have donated the meals to be raffled include the Third Rail in Fairlee, Carpenter Street in Norwich, the Stone ltousc Inn in North Thetford, Jesse's in Hanover, Stone Soup in South Stratford, the ('olatina Exit in Bradford, China Lite in West Lebanon, the Point in White River Junction, 50lde Nugget Alley in Hanover, and the Norwich Inn in Norwich. BIRTHDAY BOY--Travis James Allen of Bradford celebrated his first bir- thday May 20. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen Jr. of Bradford. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Sam Longley of Danville, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen Sr. of Wood- stock. V l II { Ill till l l CHOOSING BOOKS--Third Graders, from left, Dani Boyd, Cathy Caldwell and Jesse Hoffman choose from RIF (Reading is Fundamental) books at Thetford Elementary School Library. Books diswibuted at Thefford school THETFORD--The Fourth letting children choose from a RIF (Reading Is Fun- wide variety of paperbacks, damental) distribution was the books they want; and by made at Thetford Elementary letting them keep the books as For Your Reservation, Call Before 7:00 P.M. " Tel. (603) 747-2505 or 747-2840. PIERMONT--Abby Metealf he did not look up or see it. It ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: called Police Officer Bill Deal crossed the garden, jumped a Dinner will benefit Orford Child Center ORFORD--The Orford Child salad bar will be available for Center Inc. will try on June 6 to surpass the success of its first Annual International Dinner. The Second International Dinner, to be held at the Orford Congregational Church on Main Street, is a com- munity effort. "More than 85 people helped with the event last year," said Linda Linbergh, the Center's Program Coordinator, "and we hope for an even larger participation this year." In an attempt to ac- commodate more patrons, Ms. Linbergh has scheduled sittings at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and will take reser- vations at 353-4583. "We have tried to make it a truely pleasurable culinary experience at a very reasonable price, $4 for adults, $2.50 for children under 12, and free for children under 3," she said. "A variety of international cuisine will be featured with several Oriental favorites being prepared on the premises. Traditional American favorites will also be served along with many School in the library May 25- their own. exotic desserts. We have 26. Freedom of choice and pride decided to try.something new With 240 Childreh, Lhechooi of ownership of books  the in eommun/y dners. A huge has given out 960 books this two primary motivating ,, year. factors. , ,: ,,. RIF promotes reading by BITS OF INFORMATION Americans spend about 35 Moose visits Piermont percent of their total food dollar on eating out. BABY ARRIVES b. ,, /  at about 3 o'clock last Thur- stone wall, jumped a fence, Mr. andMrs. Byron Aldrich sday to report a creature in ,,so easily and gracefully," of Swiftwater are the parents her yard and ask what she according to Phyllis, and of a baby daughter born May Styled : shoulddoahoutit. Bill told her disappeared into the woods to 19 at Cottage Hospital. The to do nothing but perhaps he'd the north, -- haven, at last. baby weighed 7 pounds. I O Dul)nt Antron Nylon those who like to 'make your own.' All in all, it should be a very pleasant experience," she said. GALAXY TRAVEL, INC. 103 S. Main St. W. Lebanon, IMH 603-298-8782 Dan Et Linda Westney k White, pale pink, sly blue, lemonade, lilac, caady Szos 34-42. $13,00 ,. St. lohnsbury, Vt, Woodsvilie, N.H. get the patrol car out and t t guard against its being hit by a car if it got on the road. Bill opened his front door and found himself face to face with a moose. It is a question who was the more surprised. It was the first time he had ever found a moose on his doorstep and he wondered if Last week we visited the W. he should ask it if it had come Newbury Cooperative Nur- t to register a complaint. It sery School. There, in a one- looked to him like a pony with room country school that 6-foot legs. It did not choose to closed its doors to elementary t come in but went down the scholars a dozen years ago,  road toward the village, the preschoolers meet. They t Lovers Lane looked more climb the jungle-gym and the inviting, however, and it gnarled old trees, watch the turned up there picking up cows in, a neighboringpasture, speed. t and the downy woodpecker on The Robert Mitcheils had the tree in their play-yard.  seen it going up the lane as Coming up from the river, its they came along in their car a pleasure to find the lilacs and decided to turn and follow still in full fragrant bloom. it for a better look but it was The schoolhouse is owned by too fast for them. the Newbury Historical Phyllis Wilson looked out Society, whose membershave t t her window in time to see it encouraged this lively  coming up the lane. She utilizationoftheirschool. thought at first it was a large The mothers organized the horse but decided it was a school and work closely with young moose. Itpassed Floyd the teacher, Marlene Man- Smith, who was cutting wood ning. but, good woodsman that he is, Here are a few suggestions KORNER by L.F. BARNES For the wee folk from Marlene of games to make for children. One is "Oddball Out": Make ten cards out of posterboard, 8 by lO inches or slightly smaller. On each card, print a numeral, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then from magazines cut pictures of groups of things and paste them on the cards. On each card. have three that correspond with the number and one that does not--that is i he "oddball". The child looks through the cards and puts a HOUSE COUNTRY Specializing in * Italian Cooking * Seafood & Steaks * Banquet Facilities RESTAURANT "  & OXBOW LOUNGE Marie D. Lorenzini and Robert C. Brault Your Hosts 276 N. Main St., Barre, Vt. For Reservations 05641 802 - 476.4282 button, or paper X on the one that does not match as he learns to count. Another game is to "go fishing" with a string with a magnet on the end. Put let- ters, numbers, shapes or pictures in envelopes closed with a paper clip. The clip sticks to the magnet and is "caught". The child reads or describes what is inside. The day we visited, the children drew a vegetable man. Ills head was a carrot, his body a tomato, his arms beans, and so on. It can be any vegetables the children choose. There's a song that goes: There was a man who lived on the moon. And his name was Aiken Drum lie played upon a ladle... For a head he had a carrot (lettuce, tomato, plum, you choose ) And his name was Aiken Drum... March of Dimes walk is planned BRADFORD--An 18-mile March of Dimes Walk will be held June 14, starting at the P & C store parking lot in Bradford, around Lake Mercy, then back up to Oxbow High School. There will be check in points and rest periods throughout the route. There will be a chicken and spaghetti plate for the walkers at Oxbow High School. All walkers and helpers will be served free. Others pay $5 a meal. If it rains the walk will be the following Sunday, June 21. The walk starts at 9:30 a.m. Following the Dinner, Sue Kling, Summer Program Director and 3rd grade teacher at the Orfordville School, will discuss current plans for what promises to he an exciting eight-week summer program. Ms. Kling has planned activities for children aged 2-10 which will include water sports, creative arts and crafts, games, and field trips, beginning June 29th. The summer program will also encompass the current nursery program for pre- schoolers from 8:30-11:30 a.m. daily, taught by Meriel Hall, as well as a morning program for the older children. All meals and snacks are provided for the children at no cost. Enrollment in this program is limited to 25 and Ms. Kling would like to en- courage parents to reserve a spot for their children early. The Center is currently. engaged in other fund raising activities to upgrade the playground area and purchase equipment and supplies for the summer program. The annual community calendar drive will begin in June. In addition to day care services, the center also administers the highly suc- cessful Sponsorship Program. Ms. Linbergh, as Program Director, explained that this program furnishes "m d formation on food a nutrition to 35 individual day care home providers. Many of these homes are in Bradford. Kathy Blanchard, president of the Board of Directors and a teacher at Oxbow, is very enthusiastic about the Cen- ter's varied programs. "It is unfortunate that many day care centers face an uncertain future due to federal and state cutbacks at a time when there is an increasing need for day care as more mothers and single parents take jobs outside the home. Our fund raising committee intends to work harder to raise money to maintain the ex- cellent quality of our programs for area children," she said. River's Reach ' ballet recital NEWBURY--The children of Rivers Reach dance classes will perform in a recital June 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the Newbury Town Hall. The public is invited and admission is free. There will be a sampling of work in ballet, improvisation, mime and rhythm as well as tap steps. The River's Reach Arts ::: Association has been able to provide these ballet and jazz classes this year with the cooperation of the Newbury Elementary School and two dedicated instructors, Sue Picknell of Bath and Janet Warner-Ashley of St. John- sbury. Sue, who taught pre-school through kindergarten age, is a former nursery school teacher and studied ballet at the Littleton Dance School and locally. Her class includes Celieia Fadden, Kate Tilgh- man, Melissa Tilghman, Maggie Webster, Kim McLure, Andrea Nelson, Rise Finley, Melissa Gates, Ramee Harris, JoAnn Roy, Kara Alden, Erin Odell, Stacey AUCTION--Auctioneer William A. Smith ell auctions off Boston rocker at on Street property of the Klunder famib Antiques F, by JOANNA GILBRIDE RugglesandChelseaPicknell. BRADFORD--William A. "l-Sth century Janet taught kindergarten Smith was in fine form when finest we've through third grade cbildren he auctioned off antiques, brought an as well as adult classes. Her accessories and architectural Other younger class includes items on the grounds of the cluded a curly Rachael Rossi, Andrea Main Street property here nonball bed Gravelin, Kristen Wolf, Carol owned by the Klunders. headboard, $225; Elliot, Allison Conrad, Smith always manages to cradle, $135, Christine Cushing, Joy provide some good humor and table, $425; Whalen, Kimberly Roy, easy laughs as he swiftly stoneware crock Kathleen Roy, Nikki Bushi, moves the lots in a most bird, $205; tin Windy Fortier, and Samantha professional manner. The with heart Stoddard. muggy weather didn't Burlington lidded! Janet has studied with the dampen the auctioneer's four refinished State Ballet of Rhode "Island performance Saturday, nor chairs, $240; and was a member of Festival the crowd'senthusiasm, stretcher-based Ballet in Rhode Island, as well A horse-drawn milk wagon brought $400. as with Alexander Bennet of marked "E.L. Moore, There were a the Royal Ballet at the Durham, N.H." drew baskets -- Burklyn Ballet Theater and the top bid of the day for any laundry, apple, with Chert Noble of the single item at $1,550. Another prices Pennsylvia Ballet Company. smaller coach used to ad- over $100 She has also studied modern, vertise "Teddy's Grill" style Mrican, Brazilian and Jazz brought $425. Ther( dance at Connecticut College.  -- Dance classes will resume in the fall. For further in- formation call Jeanne Tilgh- man, (802) 429-2239. Benefit Concert set in Bradford BRADFORD--The North Country Chorus is planning a concert tour in England in June of 1982. Many groups in the Chorus have money-raising projectw ' going, and the Bradford area group will be putting on a supper and concert July 5 at the Congregational Church. Playing in the concert will be Joseph Castello, trombone, accompanied by Katrina Munn. Castello is a Woodsville native presently teaching at the University of Western Ontario. In the summer of 1978, Castello and Miss Munn gave a recital in Bradford. Marjorie Drysdale, soprano, and Janet Hass, piano, will also be performing in the concert. Also playing in the concert will be the piano trio com- posed of Margaret Smith, violin, Marnie Cardozo, cello, and Katrina Munn, piano. Tickets will go on sale at a later date, and reservations for the supper will be requested. NOTES & COMMENTS It's surprising how most people, though uninformed, will talk authoritatively about any subject. Wednesday, June 3 NEWBURY: A Community Health Services, Inc. Town Nurse will check hypertension, weight and glaucoma, 2-4 p.m., Bailey Club. WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon, United Church of Christ vestry, serving at noon. Reservation: 757-2206. WELLS RIVER: A Community Health Services, Inc. Town Nurse will check hypertension, weight and glaucoma, 2-4 p.m., U.C.C. Church. BRADFORD: Bingo, Legion Hall, every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 5 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Oxbow Vocational Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations requested: (802) 222-4782. BRADFORD: Card party at Senior Citizens Center, every Friday at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 6 THETFORD: "La SerVa Padrona," comic opera --Parish Players production at the Grange Hall, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 7 THETFORD: "La Serva Padrona," comic opera. Per- formance at 3 p.m., Grange Hall. Monday, June 8 BRADFORD: Bradford Library Trustees, 7:30 p.m. at the library. BRADFORD: Annual meeting of the Valley Cooperative Pre- school, 7:30 p.m. at Bradford Elementary School. NEWBURY: Volleyball for age 13 - adult, 7-9 p.m., Town Hall. Sponsored by Newbury Athletic Council. Tuesday, June 9 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Oxbow Vocational Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations requested: (802) 222-4782. Wednesday, June 10 NEWBURY: Newbury Historical Society, W. Newbury Church Hall, 8 p.m. WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' luncheon, United Church of Christ vestry, serving at noon. Reservations: 757-2206. CHEAP TRANSPORTATION--This nifty for $425 at auction in Bradford May 30. A wonderful creamware the new piggy brought $40; a sale terms refinished four-slat lad- adopted by a derback mmsing one slat, $80; auction houses. wicker settee and chairs, $475; The "10 & refinished sawbuck table, policy calls $400; wicker sewing stand, seller sharing the $125; Italian Madonna-like commission fees small oil on canvas in carved In other words in frame, $80; genre oil-on- successful bidder canvas painting of a street- table, for say sweeper (Brooklyn, N.Y.) additional $5 with a number of small tears, he l $55; old standing drying rack, -- $35; pewter mug with no touch -mark, $105; reconstructed (as advertised) harvest table, $375; ice scale, $25; Bradley & i Hubbard hanging lamp with .... replaced shade, $90; ...... decorated snuffer tray, $9; Oriental prayer rug $350; old SHOTGUN" buggy lamp, $40; mahogany Bradford veneered Empire card table with vase-shaped pedestal brought $900. base, Sit0; lapped covered The audience furkin, $50; crank phonograph whelmingly with horn, $400; small country "10&10." Onl hanging cupboard, $60; old favor of the scroll-toed ice skates, $50, and Smith framed sandpaper pastel, $20. crowd before A well proportioned auction dropleaf table with drawer adopted this drew a final bid of $165 and a tracting, iadderback armchair was sold good estates for $110. business Smith called a two-drawer auctioneers blanket chest in old red paint under a 20 per Orientals in varying sizes and fee. these brought $50-$375 depending, again, on age, condition, color, etc. During the course of the auction Smith polled the every crowd on the acceptability of p.m. at m i Wednesday, june 3 NEWBURY: Village trustees, 7: 30 p.m. WELLS RIVER: Blue Mountain Union p.m. Thursday, June 4 BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 pjn. Friday, June 5 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, Monday, June 8 HAVERHILL: Selectmen, 7 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8 p.m. RYEGATE: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m. TOPSHAM: Selectmen, 8 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen, 7 p.m. BATH: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 10 BRADFORD: Village trustees, 7:30 p.m. HAVERHILL: Cooperative School Board, 7 BRADFORD: Bradford Academy Graded p.m. FAIRLEE: Planning Board, 7: 30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Improvement Corp.,