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June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
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June 3.1981-The Journal Opinlon-Page 3 Interior Design and Decorating 4ff Interiors, Inc Studio and Worl&lt;rooms GILBERTE BOGHOSIAN AIII Associate Point of View on the Farm by FRAN HYDE is all planted and sprayed, about 300 acres of it, !it is up. doesn't it? who plant corn, or anyone who plants a knows that for the time spent actually putting the the ground, much more is spent getting the ground luipment, seed and fertilizer ready and to the time. Arthur has been keeping a close record of how This indicates that for every hour spent run- in the field, two are spent getting ready. equipment to have it ready for Spring can great deal of time in the Winter. BUT that's no e of trouble-free operation when it's put into use. equipment probably rates even higher than weather when it comes to frustrating the far- let me point to the engine on our spray rig. time to use the sprayer the engine had been r by an engine service man. fine and a large percentage of the corn was When it gave out on Wednesday, May 20. Arthur took service man and by Saturday morning he'd t what the trouble was, but didn't have all the parts. a fast trip to Walpole, N.H., to get there before obtained the part, and by Wednesday afternoon got back. Arthur used it that evening and Thursday a short while when it stopped working again. That serviceman came to the farm and got the again. By Friday night the spraying was done luipment washed up and put away. Ul read on. years ago we needed an Ace pump part for the Arthur called the dealer in Walpole part. I drove the 80 miles to get it, only have it. To further complicate things they Century number for the Ace part, but they'd get us care of by ordering the part from Iowa to be sent 10 days to two weeks and no part arrived. in Walpole. called the Ace Pump Company, making the the Holiday Inn in White River Junction where he a meeting. They had the part on hand and another four or five days and called them again why it still hadn't come. After examining their found it had not been shipped. This time they right out air freight. . . still no part Another call. Part had fd ship it again that day. arrive. Another call to Ace. They told us it had and the flight on which it would arrive at the Berlin with the Berlin airport, no part yet. When it they please call us, and would they likn the Oh no, instructions for delivery would he on have the number. A call to Boston not languishing on a shelf there. It another call to Berlin. the package was there.., had been a couple of didn't call us? We did call. Where? This .. the Holiday Inn ! and $25 in@bone calls we had the $5 part for now as we retell it, but it was no joke then! Land is donated for Lime Kiln Cemetery by L.F. BARNES NEWBURY--Fred Swift is deeding to the Town of Newbury, one-third of an acre to expand the Lime Kiln cemetery of Topsham Rd. Swift said the land is being deeded to the town with "no strings attached. Anyone can be buried there with the permission of the selectmen." He reserved for his family an eight-grave plot, "wherever it would seem the most logical". The selectmen discussed the location of a road beside the present boundary fence. In other matters, the selectmen reviewed a proposal by David Longmoore for a 29-unit campground to be located on Route 302 on the high ground above his gravel pit. Frank Tilghman, of the Wells River Savings Bank discussed with the selectmen the ad- vantages of setting up a cash management program, that would assist the selectmen in handling their cash flow problems. The selectmen agreed to consider such a program prior to the start of their next fiscal year. A motion was passed to raise the fee for an on-site septic system design to $140 due to the increased charge of $125 to the town. A subcommittee of the planning commission is writing a job description for the zoning administrator and intends to run an ad- vertisement stating the opening for the position. The selectmen approved payment of $300 to the Two Rivers-Ottauquechee Regional Planning Com- mission to help pay the cost of printing new zoning ordinance booklets. The selectmen asked Edward Vervoort to arrange for the brush cutting of three small cemeteries. Vervoort was also thanked for his work in organizing "Green-Up Day" May 23. About 25 to 30 young people and adults picked up trash along the roadways of Newbury Village, W. Newbury, and Newbury Center Higher Ground Camp has food program WENTWORTH--Higher Ground Camp on Ellsworth Hill Road has been given the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program for children. Children in attendance from families whose size and in- come level meet the gover- nmental guidelines ate eligible for free meals. The same meals are made available to all children regardless of race, color, creed, national origin or handicapping condition. The camp, directed by Don and Loraine Sandblom, offers crafts, nature study, sports, good food and an opportunity for Bible study. Families with three or more campers attending at the same time will be eligible for special rates. Needy campers may apply for scholarship funds. One week of orientation and training are available for high school and. college age men and women who wish to dedicate their summer as counselors or camp workers. June 29 to July 4 will be orientation week for them. They are advised to send for an application to" Higher Ground Camp, Box 15, Wentworth, N.H. 03282. N. Haveddll O.E.S. meets N. HAVERHILL--A meeting Installation. The Worthy of Iona-Lafayette Chapter No. Matron asked if there were 39, O.E.S. was held May 12 at the Masonic Temple in N. Haverhill. As this was family night, preceeding the meeting a pot luck supper was held in the dining room for the members and their families who had been invited to attend the supper and the entertainment which was to follow the meeting: Presiding at the meeting were, Edith Hammond, Worthy Matron, and Dean Hammond, Worthy Patron. The Worthy Matron thanked those members who helped on the lunch for the Masonic any ill members to report on. At the close of the meeting, the members joined their families and friends in the dining room for the en- tertainment which was, square-dancing by the Lit- tleton Squares Club. This was much enjoyed by all. Following the entertainment, refreshments were served by Sylvia and Paul Robertson and their committee. The next meeting will be June 9 at 8 p.m. The Past Matrons and Patrons will be honored at this meeting. All Past Matrons and Patrons are 'oordially invited to attend. Bradford UCC revises bylaws "-Traeey Tilson (left)and parents, Mr. and Tilson, hold double celebration honoring This was the first revision graduation from University of New Ham- since 1970 and was adopted with minor changes by the parents' Silver Wedding anniversary, assembled members. celebration Tilson family communications and was on lgratulations the Dean's List three years. BRADFORD--A revised Moderator for the meeting constitution and bylaws was was Frances Hyde, the Clerk the major item of business at was Eris Eastman, and the the recent 170th Annual Rev. John Knight offered the Meeting of the Bradford opening prayer. United Church of Christ. New officers elected for the coming year were Moderator Byron Tomlinson, Assistant MOderator Martins Stever, Finance Chairman William Trustee John Melahn in-Sanborn, Assistant Finance troduced another item of Chairman Frances Hyde, business which brought lively Assistant Treasurer Gilbert discussion concerning the Cole. results of the recent energy audit of the church and par- sonage. The guest speaker of the evening was the Rev. Hal Harrison, Associate Minister of the Vermont Conference. 1 Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Oliver Waits River Mr. and Mrs Stanley Oliver were recent guests of honor at a 45th anniversary party at the Waits River Fellowship Hall. Eighty relatives and guests gathered to greet the honored couple. A corsage of daisies was presented Mrs. Oliver by her daughter Jean and a boutonniere was presented Mr. Oliver by a grand- daughter Kimberly Sulham. They received many gifts, money and cards. Arrangements for the party were made by their four daughters, Mrs. William (Eleanor) Gendron Waits River; Mrs. Homer (Jean) Sulham, Ascutney; Mrs. Richard (Shirley) Sickle, Fresno, Calif.; Mrs. Arthur (Agnes) Renfrew, S. Newbury..They also have 14 grandchildren. Dainty refreshments were served together with a beautiful three-tiered cake made and served by their daughter Eleanor Gendron. Eclipse Grange news Seminar is set for town clerks FAIRLEE--A Vermont Municipal Clerks Informal Seminar will be held June 11 at the Lake Mercy Inn, Fairlee. The day-long agenda will include discusgions of town clerks liability in Vermont, problems and attempts to deal with them and new laws John Yacavoni, Vermont Public Records Division, will moderate a panel of ex- perienced Town Clerks for the community problems session. Panel members include. Vivian Coburn, Strafford; Betty Holton, Westminister; Kenneth Mason, Barre Town; Ruth Nye, South Hero and Margaret Picard, South Burlington. Reservations are required. The $10 fee includes lunch, coffee breaks and in- formational materials. Contact Barry Stryker, UVM Extension Service, 162 Elm Street, Montpelier 05602 (802- 223-2389). This program is sponsored by the UVM Extension Ser- vice, Vermont Municipal Clerks and Treasurers Mrs. Clinton Sawyer Association, Vermont Department of Housing and itllul I 439-5445 Community Affairs, Office of Greetings by phone were Public Records and Office of received from their daughter the Secretary of State. Shirley in California who was unable to attend. Other guests were present from Gilman, Wells River, Newbury,  I4Fomema2Lrs Bradford, Barre, St. John- sbury, Vt.; Hoosick, N.Y.; meet in Orange Woodsville, NH. and nearby towns. Congratulations to Mr. ORANGE--The Orange and Mrs. Oliver. County omemakers Spring Fifteen members of Council Meeting was held May Riverside Grange were in 14 at the Orange Elementary Thetford Monday evening School. May 18, for inspection and to Several items concerning participate in the degree of upcoming state and national Pomona, which were con- conventions were discussed. ferred on three candidates. New officers for the coming State Master and Mrs. Harold two .years were announced: Burgeron and Deputy and Secretary Lillian Lamb and Mrs. Chuck Emmons as well Treasurer Sandra Button. as other state officers were A copy of all business present, transacted will he forwarded Mrs. Evelyn Tillotson was in to all Club Presidents. Randolph Sunday to attend the Linda Roberts led the graduation of her grand- Council in a delightfully daughter Cristin Lamson of nostalgic sing-a-long. V.TC. The pastoral parish Everyone enjoyed remem- committee met Saturday at bering good old songs from Groton to interview a new 1920on. pastor. Adele Dawson, well-known herbalist and writer from Marshfield, shared bits of her background, Her love for herbs and her experiences by JEAN M.STOWELL University Grange on their withthem. THETFORD--On May 17, YouthNight June3, andtojoin The next County Council Orange County Pomona Chelsea Grange for their Pink Meeting wiil be held in the fall. members met at Eclipse Sash night. June  were read Paus ,' be auuouued at a Grange hail for inspection and accepted, later date. rehearsal. May 18 was Guest pianist was Samuel Pomona inspection of the fifth Porter of Riverside Grange, degree. All officers were and Mrs. Porter. The mem- present, and threecandidates bet's of Eclipse are very joined Pomona at this time. grateful to Sam for helping at Besides Deputy Clark this important meeting. DIAMONDS WATCHES Emmons and Mrs. Emmons, Eclipse will not have a we were honored to have as meeting June 9, because the We RepairACCUTRON, TIMEX. guests the State Grange members will be going to and AllMakes. Master Harold Bergeron and Chelsea that night. The next HASKELLJL=tAfELER$ Mrs. Bergeron. meeting will be June 23 and .... Eclipse held its own regular the annual Citizens Award will Littleton, NH 0:3581 meeting May 26 with W.M. be presented at that time. Jane Stowell presiding. This was also inspection night, and , the third degree was done on three candidates for in- spection. The fourth degree was also conferred on the candidates. Two officers were absent. The inspection was done by Deputy Gregory Perreault, who was accompanied by Mrs. Perreault and tiny Heather Lynn. Invitations to join Berkley Ray hunches BITS OF INFORMATION A group of kittens is known a a kindle. .:Q4" "" : Smoldn Largest Suppfles selection of corduroy calicos & double faced cotton solids Greenhouse workshop set RICE'S MILLS--A workshop formation, call Kate Curtis- on greenhouse growing will be McLane at 785-4343. held June 9 from 7-9 p.m. at the Rice's Mills Community NEW ARRIVAL Center. Janet Taylor of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Crossroads Farm and Alan Shipman of Piermont are the Ricketts of Windrush Nursery parents of a baby daughter, and Closey Dickey will par- Emily Gerard, horn May 27 at ticipate in a panel discussion Alice Peck Day Hospital. on greenhouse growing. The workshop is sponsored by the Vermont Rural Energy BITS OF Center. Cost is $2 per person. INFORMATION Pre-registration is not We owe the potato to the required. For further in- farmers of the Inca empire. Ill I I I Ill 1Ill -- 'TorN/ Spe00lOc00 !l .o,o ,.- .W i t0 k"" !0.////.:,,; French I Stop in and let us show you our newest styles designed to enhance your diamonds. S.F. McAIIIster quai00 Jmolm 03) 747-34 Go Bass or Go Barefoot Bass Suqjuns, nedy now to take yiu right through spring and summer, on a uniqt|.,k, cushl)n..J sole that puts spng in xur step and a smile tm your face Bob-O-Link news by BECKY KENISTON N. HAVERHILL--May 8 was the Grafton County Fashion Revue and songfest. Participating for the Bob-O- Link 4-H Club in the Fashion Revue were Jennie Veratti, penny Bruce, Donna Citeroni, Regina Citeroni, Sheila Fabrizio, Nicole Eno, Becky Keniston, Karen Keniston, Karla-Mari Lane, Amy Morrill, Stephanie Page, Pare Reed, Jessica Schablein, Samantha Stoddard, and Angola Thayer. The large Songfest group of 36 girls came in third. The small group came in third community in Virginia by MARCELLA HOFFMANN WENTWORTH--Berkley Ray, who owned the village store for many years and was postmaster of Wentworth about 25 years ago, has a new project. On a 66.acre tract in Ciarksville, Virginia, he plans to establish a community for retiree's and senior citizens on a limited income. He has named the community "JustyNuff". With his brother-in-law, Ben Worthington, Ray is developing his plans. He has bull{ a scale model of the village. Each model has two, three, and four bedroom houses radiating from a central hub. This section has stores and community All the residents will own their own homes but would b asked to participate in community life according to their talents, gardening and tailoring business management. A country boy, Ray expects that the production of vegetables and meat will help in the feeding. His reasoning is that folks don't want to live alone. They want things to benefit them and to associate with other persons. "The economy necessitates self-sufficiency," Ray said. "Ours will be a cooperative venture." His ideas were revealed in a letter to his friends, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Newton of East Side Road. order of the She anticipates going in to home of Mr. television and radio work. Tilsonwhen At college, Tracey, a friends and member of the Chi Omega to help Sorority was on the Alcohol events: their Administration Task Force, anniversary representing the Greek of their system on campus, Alice, from A member of the Woman's of New Varsity Track team, she ran relay and placed first and second in shot put not only in white Durham, but also at Chico, Band Calif., State College, where and she was one of 20 exchange students. Tilson knew Tracey was second runner- graders in up in a Miss Winnipesaukee Island and contest. She was also a finalist continued and named Miss Hospitality in the Miss Lilac Mall Pageant in they have a Rochester, the last pageant is a cor- at which 'Bert Parks of. a Hampton ficiated. a daughter, Last summer, Tracey had at Plymouth an internship at WLNH, Laconia, doing interviewing also. her B.A. in and reporting. ury streetlights back on changes in the charter all buildings for $2,000 by the passed by a margin of about 20 inhabitants of School District elected votes. These were basically No. 4. Brooks, small changes in wording and ,et Cham, were endorsed by the original clerk and charter committee. auditor The landscape committee ipresented a landscape plan Was elected and most discussion centerea one year and around who ownS the Com- mie as trustee for mon. It was listed in the Appendi as owned by the village. Clerk Irma Hastings read ,r water from the ded of Jan. 31, 1888, tree Years. from John Keech, purchasing to make seven acres and the seminary District No. 3 covered north of Pine St.; district 4, the rest of the village Both have since been dissolved. "If you look over the minutes of the school board and the village, you'll see this issue's been decided once or twice," Carson said. Mowing expenses of the common are shared by the Bailey Club and the school board. School board chairman gathering Spots. agreement mendations of the landscape committee regarding Common." In other Delores Drugach said, ,,Cooperation is more im- portant than the question of whether the town (village) or school owns the Common." Brooks said, "Let's keep the spirit of the landscape plan, even if we don't knew who owns the Common." The landscape plan was accepted by a vote of 34-13. The following motion was made by Drugach, and passed: "That the school directors be informed of and consulted with by the land- scape committee to reach on recom- the matters, the villagers passed a budget of $3,6o0. They voted to expend all remaining available Revenue Sharing Funds of $3,441 for water system improvemenl  voted not to list eThey names of delinquent tax- payers in the annual village report. June 3.1981-The Journal Opinlon-Page 3 Interior Design and Decorating 4ff Interiors, Inc Studio and Worl<rooms GILBERTE BOGHOSIAN AIII Associate Point of View on the Farm by FRAN HYDE is all planted and sprayed, about 300 acres of it, !it is up. doesn't it? who plant corn, or anyone who plants a knows that for the time spent actually putting the the ground, much more is spent getting the ground luipment, seed and fertilizer ready and to the time. Arthur has been keeping a close record of how This indicates that for every hour spent run- in the field, two are spent getting ready. equipment to have it ready for Spring can great deal of time in the Winter. BUT that's no e of trouble-free operation when it's put into use. equipment probably rates even higher than weather when it comes to frustrating the far- let me point to the engine on our spray rig. time to use the sprayer the engine had been r by an engine service man. fine and a large percentage of the corn was When it gave out on Wednesday, May 20. Arthur took service man and by Saturday morning he'd t what the trouble was, but didn't have all the parts. a fast trip to Walpole, N.H., to get there before obtained the part, and by Wednesday afternoon got back. Arthur used it that evening and Thursday a short while when it stopped working again. That serviceman came to the farm and got the again. By Friday night the spraying was done luipment washed up and put away. Ul read on. years ago we needed an Ace pump part for the Arthur called the dealer in Walpole part. I drove the 80 miles to get it, only have it. To further complicate things they Century number for the Ace part, but they'd get us care of by ordering the part from Iowa to be sent 10 days to two weeks and no part arrived. in Walpole. called the Ace Pump Company, making the the Holiday Inn in White River Junction where he a meeting. They had the part on hand and another four or five days and called them again why it still hadn't come. After examining their found it had not been shipped. This time they right out air freight. . . still no part Another call. Part had fd ship it again that day. arrive. Another call to Ace. They told us it had and the flight on which it would arrive at the Berlin with the Berlin airport, no part yet. When it they please call us, and would they likn the Oh no, instructions for delivery would he on have the number. A call to Boston not languishing on a shelf there. It another call to Berlin. the package was there.., had been a couple of didn't call us? We did call. Where? This .. the Holiday Inn ! and $25 in@bone calls we had the $5 part for now as we retell it, but it was no joke then! Land is donated for Lime Kiln Cemetery by L.F. BARNES NEWBURY--Fred Swift is deeding to the Town of Newbury, one-third of an acre to expand the Lime Kiln cemetery of Topsham Rd. Swift said the land is being deeded to the town with "no strings attached. Anyone can be buried there with the permission of the selectmen." He reserved for his family an eight-grave plot, "wherever it would seem the most logical". The selectmen discussed the location of a road beside the present boundary fence. In other matters, the selectmen reviewed a proposal by David Longmoore for a 29-unit campground to be located on Route 302 on the high ground above his gravel pit. Frank Tilghman, of the Wells River Savings Bank discussed with the selectmen the ad- vantages of setting up a cash management program, that would assist the selectmen in handling their cash flow problems. The selectmen agreed to consider such a program prior to the start of their next fiscal year. A motion was passed to raise the fee for an on-site septic system design to $140 due to the increased charge of $125 to the town. A subcommittee of the planning commission is writing a job description for the zoning administrator and intends to run an ad- vertisement stating the opening for the position. The selectmen approved payment of $300 to the Two Rivers-Ottauquechee Regional Planning Com- mission to help pay the cost of printing new zoning ordinance booklets. The selectmen asked Edward Vervoort to arrange for the brush cutting of three small cemeteries. Vervoort was also thanked for his work in organizing "Green-Up Day" May 23. About 25 to 30 young people and adults picked up trash along the roadways of Newbury Village, W. Newbury, and Newbury Center Higher Ground Camp has food program WENTWORTH--Higher Ground Camp on Ellsworth Hill Road has been given the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program for children. Children in attendance from families whose size and in- come level meet the gover- nmental guidelines ate eligible for free meals. The same meals are made available to all children regardless of race, color, creed, national origin or handicapping condition. The camp, directed by Don and Loraine Sandblom, offers crafts, nature study, sports, good food and an opportunity for Bible study. Families with three or more campers attending at the same time will be eligible for special rates. Needy campers may apply for scholarship funds. One week of orientation and training are available for high school and. college age men and women who wish to dedicate their summer as counselors or camp workers. June 29 to July 4 will be orientation week for them. They are advised to send for an application to" Higher Ground Camp, Box 15, Wentworth, N.H. 03282. N. Haveddll O.E.S. meets N. HAVERHILL--A meeting Installation. The Worthy of Iona-Lafayette Chapter No. Matron asked if there were 39, O.E.S. was held May 12 at the Masonic Temple in N. Haverhill. As this was family night, preceeding the meeting a pot luck supper was held in the dining room for the members and their families who had been invited to attend the supper and the entertainment which was to follow the meeting: Presiding at the meeting were, Edith Hammond, Worthy Matron, and Dean Hammond, Worthy Patron. The Worthy Matron thanked those members who helped on the lunch for the Masonic any ill members to report on. At the close of the meeting, the members joined their families and friends in the dining room for the en- tertainment which was, square-dancing by the Lit- tleton Squares Club. This was much enjoyed by all. Following the entertainment, refreshments were served by Sylvia and Paul Robertson and their committee. The next meeting will be June 9 at 8 p.m. The Past Matrons and Patrons will be honored at this meeting. All Past Matrons and Patrons are 'oordially invited to attend. Bradford UCC revises bylaws "-Traeey Tilson (left)and parents, Mr. and Tilson, hold double celebration honoring This was the first revision graduation from University of New Ham- since 1970 and was adopted with minor changes by the parents' Silver Wedding anniversary, assembled members. celebration Tilson family communications and was on lgratulations the Dean's List three years. BRADFORD--A revised Moderator for the meeting constitution and bylaws was was Frances Hyde, the Clerk the major item of business at was Eris Eastman, and the the recent 170th Annual Rev. John Knight offered the Meeting of the Bradford opening prayer. United Church of Christ. New officers elected for the coming year were Moderator Byron Tomlinson, Assistant MOderator Martins Stever, Finance Chairman William Trustee John Melahn in-Sanborn, Assistant Finance troduced another item of Chairman Frances Hyde, business which brought lively Assistant Treasurer Gilbert discussion concerning the Cole. results of the recent energy audit of the church and par- sonage. The guest speaker of the evening was the Rev. Hal Harrison, Associate Minister of the Vermont Conference. 1 Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Oliver Waits River Mr. and Mrs Stanley Oliver were recent guests of honor at a 45th anniversary party at the Waits River Fellowship Hall. Eighty relatives and guests gathered to greet the honored couple. A corsage of daisies was presented Mrs. Oliver by her daughter Jean and a boutonniere was presented Mr. Oliver by a grand- daughter Kimberly Sulham. They received many gifts, money and cards. Arrangements for the party were made by their four daughters, Mrs. William (Eleanor) Gendron Waits River; Mrs. Homer (Jean) Sulham, Ascutney; Mrs. Richard (Shirley) Sickle, Fresno, Calif.; Mrs. Arthur (Agnes) Renfrew, S. Newbury..They also have 14 grandchildren. Dainty refreshments were served together with a beautiful three-tiered cake made and served by their daughter Eleanor Gendron. Eclipse Grange news Seminar is set for town clerks FAIRLEE--A Vermont Municipal Clerks Informal Seminar will be held June 11 at the Lake Mercy Inn, Fairlee. The day-long agenda will include discusgions of town clerks liability in Vermont, problems and attempts to deal with them and new laws John Yacavoni, Vermont Public Records Division, will moderate a panel of ex- perienced Town Clerks for the community problems session. Panel members include. Vivian Coburn, Strafford; Betty Holton, Westminister; Kenneth Mason, Barre Town; Ruth Nye, South Hero and Margaret Picard, South Burlington. Reservations are required. The $10 fee includes lunch, coffee breaks and in- formational materials. Contact Barry Stryker, UVM Extension Service, 162 Elm Street, Montpelier 05602 (802- 223-2389). This program is sponsored by the UVM Extension Ser- vice, Vermont Municipal Clerks and Treasurers Mrs. Clinton Sawyer Association, Vermont Department of Housing and itllul I 439-5445 Community Affairs, Office of Greetings by phone were Public Records and Office of received from their daughter the Secretary of State. Shirley in California who was unable to attend. Other guests were present from Gilman, Wells River, Newbury,  I4Fomema2Lrs Bradford, Barre, St. John- sbury, Vt.; Hoosick, N.Y.; meet in Orange Woodsville, NH. and nearby towns. Congratulations to Mr. ORANGE--The Orange and Mrs. Oliver. County omemakers Spring Fifteen members of Council Meeting was held May Riverside Grange were in 14 at the Orange Elementary Thetford Monday evening School. May 18, for inspection and to Several items concerning participate in the degree of upcoming state and national Pomona, which were con- conventions were discussed. ferred on three candidates. New officers for the coming State Master and Mrs. Harold two .years were announced: Burgeron and Deputy and Secretary Lillian Lamb and Mrs. Chuck Emmons as well Treasurer Sandra Button. as other state officers were A copy of all business present, transacted will he forwarded Mrs. Evelyn Tillotson was in to all Club Presidents. Randolph Sunday to attend the Linda Roberts led the graduation of her grand- Council in a delightfully daughter Cristin Lamson of nostalgic sing-a-long. V.TC. The pastoral parish Everyone enjoyed remem- committee met Saturday at bering good old songs from Groton to interview a new 1920on. pastor. Adele Dawson, well-known herbalist and writer from Marshfield, shared bits of her background, Her love for herbs and her experiences by JEAN M.STOWELL University Grange on their withthem. THETFORD--On May 17, YouthNight June3, andtojoin The next County Council Orange County Pomona Chelsea Grange for their Pink Meeting wiil be held in the fall. members met at Eclipse Sash night. June  were read Paus ,' be auuouued at a Grange hail for inspection and accepted, later date. rehearsal. May 18 was Guest pianist was Samuel Pomona inspection of the fifth Porter of Riverside Grange, degree. All officers were and Mrs. Porter. The mem- present, and threecandidates bet's of Eclipse are very joined Pomona at this time. grateful to Sam for helping at Besides Deputy Clark this important meeting. DIAMONDS WATCHES Emmons and Mrs. Emmons, Eclipse will not have a we were honored to have as meeting June 9, because the We RepairACCUTRON, TIMEX. guests the State Grange members will be going to and AllMakes. Master Harold Bergeron and Chelsea that night. The next HASKELLJL=tAfELER$ Mrs. Bergeron. meeting will be June 23 and .... Eclipse held its own regular the annual Citizens Award will Littleton, NH 0:3581 meeting May 26 with W.M. be presented at that time. Jane Stowell presiding. This was also inspection night, and , the third degree was done on three candidates for in- spection. The fourth degree was also conferred on the candidates. Two officers were absent. The inspection was done by Deputy Gregory Perreault, who was accompanied by Mrs. Perreault and tiny Heather Lynn. Invitations to join Berkley Ray hunches BITS OF INFORMATION A group of kittens is known a a kindle. .:Q4" "" : Smoldn Largest Suppfles selection of corduroy calicos & double faced cotton solids Greenhouse workshop set RICE'S MILLS--A workshop formation, call Kate Curtis- on greenhouse growing will be McLane at 785-4343. held June 9 from 7-9 p.m. at the Rice's Mills Community NEW ARRIVAL Center. Janet Taylor of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Crossroads Farm and Alan Shipman of Piermont are the Ricketts of Windrush Nursery parents of a baby daughter, and Closey Dickey will par- Emily Gerard, horn May 27 at ticipate in a panel discussion Alice Peck Day Hospital. on greenhouse growing. The workshop is sponsored by the Vermont Rural Energy BITS OF Center. Cost is $2 per person. INFORMATION Pre-registration is not We owe the potato to the required. For further in- farmers of the Inca empire. Ill I I I Ill 1Ill -- 'TorN/ Spe00lOc00 !l .o,o ,.- .W i t0 k"" !0.////.:,,; French I Stop in and let us show you our newest styles designed to enhance your diamonds. S.F. McAIIIster quai00 Jmolm 03) 747-34 Go Bass or Go Barefoot Bass Suqjuns, nedy now to take yiu right through spring and summer, on a uniqt|.,k, cushl)n..J sole that puts spng in xur step and a smile tm your face Bob-O-Link news by BECKY KENISTON N. HAVERHILL--May 8 was the Grafton County Fashion Revue and songfest. Participating for the Bob-O- Link 4-H Club in the Fashion Revue were Jennie Veratti, penny Bruce, Donna Citeroni, Regina Citeroni, Sheila Fabrizio, Nicole Eno, Becky Keniston, Karen Keniston, Karla-Mari Lane, Amy Morrill, Stephanie Page, Pare Reed, Jessica Schablein, Samantha Stoddard, and Angola Thayer. The large Songfest group of 36 girls came in third. The small group came in third community in Virginia by MARCELLA HOFFMANN WENTWORTH--Berkley Ray, who owned the village store for many years and was postmaster of Wentworth about 25 years ago, has a new project. On a 66.acre tract in Ciarksville, Virginia, he plans to establish a community for retiree's and senior citizens on a limited income. He has named the community "JustyNuff". With his brother-in-law, Ben Worthington, Ray is developing his plans. He has bull{ a scale model of the village. Each model has two, three, and four bedroom houses radiating from a central hub. This section has stores and community All the residents will own their own homes but would b asked to participate in community life according to their talents, gardening and tailoring business management. A country boy, Ray expects that the production of vegetables and meat will help in the feeding. His reasoning is that folks don't want to live alone. They want things to benefit them and to associate with other persons. "The economy necessitates self-sufficiency," Ray said. "Ours will be a cooperative venture." His ideas were revealed in a letter to his friends, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Newton of East Side Road. order of the She anticipates going in to home of Mr. television and radio work. Tilsonwhen At college, Tracey, a friends and member of the Chi Omega to help Sorority was on the Alcohol events: their Administration Task Force, anniversary representing the Greek of their system on campus, Alice, from A member of the Woman's of New Varsity Track team, she ran relay and placed first and second in shot put not only in white Durham, but also at Chico, Band Calif., State College, where and she was one of 20 exchange students. Tilson knew Tracey was second runner- graders in up in a Miss Winnipesaukee Island and contest. She was also a finalist continued and named Miss Hospitality in the Miss Lilac Mall Pageant in they have a Rochester, the last pageant is a cor- at which 'Bert Parks of. a Hampton ficiated. a daughter, Last summer, Tracey had at Plymouth an internship at WLNH, Laconia, doing interviewing also. her B.A. in and reporting. ury streetlights back on changes in the charter all buildings for $2,000 by the passed by a margin of about 20 inhabitants of School District elected votes. These were basically No. 4. Brooks, small changes in wording and ,et Cham, were endorsed by the original clerk and charter committee. auditor The landscape committee ipresented a landscape plan Was elected and most discussion centerea one year and around who ownS the Com- mie as trustee for mon. It was listed in the Appendi as owned by the village. Clerk Irma Hastings read ,r water from the ded of Jan. 31, 1888, tree Years. from John Keech, purchasing to make seven acres and the seminary District No. 3 covered north of Pine St.; district 4, the rest of the village Both have since been dissolved. "If you look over the minutes of the school board and the village, you'll see this issue's been decided once or twice," Carson said. Mowing expenses of the common are shared by the Bailey Club and the school board. School board chairman gathering Spots. agreement mendations of the landscape committee regarding Common." In other Delores Drugach said, ,,Cooperation is more im- portant than the question of whether the town (village) or school owns the Common." Brooks said, "Let's keep the spirit of the landscape plan, even if we don't knew who owns the Common." The landscape plan was accepted by a vote of 34-13. The following motion was made by Drugach, and passed: "That the school directors be informed of and consulted with by the land- scape committee to reach on recom- the matters, the villagers passed a budget of $3,6o0. They voted to expend all remaining available Revenue Sharing Funds of $3,441 for water system improvemenl  voted not to list eThey names of delinquent tax- payers in the annual village report.