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June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal opinion-June 3, 1981 t H tl t 0 tt t tttt tlllttt t t I NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal II Opinion Wookly nmMlr IHhd in bdld, Vonant. Slnzrlp o • Vormlmd Now hmpok • $t.N per yeer; $6.00 for Six monb|; ovt of stere • $12.00 pot year ond $7.00 for six mootk|; Solder ˘ithtell dhont $2.00. Second cJeJs poltego potd It Irodford, Ferment 09013. fvkSekod by Norfkeost Ptddbiq Compony, Inc., P.O. |o 378, Bradford. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher v Bradford   ; Woodsville S02-222-5281  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial ..... J : Who benefits from Blue Law? In case Vermonters wondered why their local supermarket was closed tast Sunday, it wasn't because of Memorial Day, but because officials are threatening to jail store managers and possibly other employees for violating the state's recently rewritten "blue law." One supermarket chain, Grand Union, has already been haled into court on charges of violating the Sunday closing law in Windham and Bennington counties. Grand Union and other major store chains are fighting the law on grounds that it discriminates against larger stores because stores with 5,000 square feet of space or less are exempt and can legally operate on Sundays. The issue is almost certain to wind up i,aeonstitutional court ....... '° est ,n the VerSt Supreme Court. ........... hile,mostGrand Union, A & P, P & C and First National stores will close Sundays under threat of prosecution. From where we sit, the law raises a number of questions which should be straightened out either by the legislature or the courts, or both. The most obvious one, of course, is the question of discrimination. If it is in the interests of the state and its people to forbid a large store from operating on Sundays, what's the rationale for letting a smaller store cash in on it by selling the very same items, sometimes at a higher price, that the closed store usually sells? Another question of special significance to the Upper Valley area is the effect on chasing Sunday business into nearby New Hampshire, where most stores remain open. That's deliberately forcing tax- payers to spend Vermont dollars in New Hampshire, or for those who live in ottmr areas, to spend them in nearby New York state or Massachusetts stores. For a state like Vermont with its troubled economy, that doesn't make much sense. And of course, shopping dollars forced into adjoining states include tax dollars that otherwise would have been collected in Vermont but are lost forever on purchases in other states. Finally, there is the issue of the whole philosophy behind so-called "'blue laws" like the Vermont Sunday closing statute. They trace hack to an earlier day when Sunday was set aside for worship and little else by tacit agreement of the entire com- munity. We live in a different world today and the question is how much good does a law like'the Vermont Sunday closing law really do in persuading people to go to church instead of going shopping, if that really is the intent behind the law. And if it iS, it raises the deeper constitutional question of separation of church and state. Should the legislature and law enforcement officials be dabbling in efforts to make us more conscious of the religious value of Sunday, or is that something that should be left to the churches and to the individual consciences of Vermonters? Did church attendance rise dramatically when shoppers found stores closed last Sunday? We don't pretend to have any simple answers for these questions but we think they should be studied carefully by state officials, the courts, and by the people of the state. We know one thing. In this day and age, the Sunday afternoon drive i's a fact of life, even despite the high cost of gasoline. Lot's of people go to church in the morning and then go for a drive in the afternoon. And if they need a loaf of bread that they can't get in Vermont because supermarkets are closed, they'll drive across the Connecticut River and get it in New Hampshire. Executive Councilor l)uring the first 6 months on my 24 momh erm l have had three student interns - Dick Rudolph of.Plymouth Slaty Bruce Berke of New England College, and Craig Downing of Keene 5tote. Dick Rudolph's projects included doing a survey of some of the general needs of the 102 towns in this council district. Shortly after Town Meeting of 1981. Dick sent out a questionnaire to all the towns in the district and got back some interesting responses which have been I allied as follows: t. What do you feel are the greatest problems facing your community? a :7 per cent said schools h Jo per cent said growth & planning c 2o per cent said property taxes d. water, sewers and economic development followed. 2. & 3, What per cent of your town is seasonal residents? ilow strongly does your town depend on tourism? 45 per cent of the towns had less than to per cent seasonal residents and 45 per cent did not depend on tourism at all. 25 per cent of the towns moderately depended on tourism: 25 per cent strongly depended on tourism, 4. Do you feel that state government has been responsive to the needs of your town ? 60 per cen! said yes, 20 per cent said Raymond S. Burton no, 20 per cent did not respond. Other questions in the survey were run through a computer analysis, cross- tabulating the responses. Some  the findings included: 1. 35 per cent of those towns which lacked industry found problems with growth and planning-development. 2.34 per cent of the towns which lacked retail trade also found problems with growth and planning. Conversely, towns which were heavily endowed with industry and or reta il business did not cite growth and planning as problematic in their communities. 3. Towns with a high percentage of seasonal residents depended moderately to high on tourism-recreation for economic base. 4. School problems did not seem to be characteristic of towns with any particular economic base. but rather a general problem evenly distributed throughout district one, regardless of their em- ployment-tax base. Any reader of this column who has a comment or thought about the result of this survey would be most welcome to write or call me... Ray Burton, RFD No. I, Woodsville, N.H. 03785 Tel. (603) 747- 3662. Newbury's bicentennial and Century Farm Rogers farm, 1774 the farm; he also opened his part of community and church Josiah Rogers first came home as a tavern. The farm affairs. He was long to West Newbury in 1774, was later divided between bringing with him hiswifeand Samuel's sons Oliver and children, also his widowed Azro. Oliver told his brother mother. Although his mother that he would pay $25 for his heartily disliked the wilder- choice of halves. Azro agreed, ness, she was destined to so Oliver chose the half that remain here for 40 years, until grew the best wheat, even she died at the age of 99 years though it was not the half that and 8 months, was adjacent to his house. Child's Orange County Gazetteer (1888) says of Oliver Rogers Josiah: "He and his resolute Oliver was a "pillar of the wife came on horseback from church", but also a quick- Londonderry, bringing a few spoken man, and a family articles with them packed story says that one day when behind their saddles, among he was asking the blessing at a which was an old arm chair, meal when guests were still well preserved at the old present, his eyes roving over homestead. His claim in- the table noticed that his wife cluded a fine tract of woodland Polly Ann had forgotten the of over 400 acres, upon which butter. He closed his blessing he built a log cabin on the as usual."ForChrist'ssake." exact site of the present fine "Where's the butter, Polly residence of his grandson, Ann?" he asked so quickly Azro B. Rogers. He. with the help of his sturdy sons, soon cleared a fine farm. They carefully saved the ashes of the burnt timber, which they manufactured into "salts" and exchanged at Haverhill for merchandise, which they carried home, a distance of four miles, suspended from a pole borne on their shoulders, and guided only by marked trees. Their nearest neighbors were at South Newbury, three miles distant. "The brooks swarmed with trout, and wild animals roamed the forests. Bears were especially troublesome. One afternoon an enormous hear seized the mother of a numerous litter of young pigs, upon which he made his that his amazed guests thought that Uncle Oliver had changed his usual reverent habits. Byron Rogers Oliver had two daughters. but only one son. Byron. a brilliant young man who seemed destined for political advancement. At one time he taught a district school in Wondsville (probably around 1785) and bearded at the old Cobleigh Tavern, which had become a boardinghouse, and later became the first Cottage Hospital. Byron felt a degree of loyalty for the old family farm, but finances were such that he expected (and hoped) to leave the farm when his supper, in the woods a short parents died. However. one of distance from the cabin. A his sisters had married a portion of the remains served prosperous man in the to bait a trap into which Bruin Midwest and she was able to fell and lost his life by his buy the farm to keep it in the rashness " family until Byron could pay Josiah had plenty of help back his debt to her. So Byron in clearing his farm -- he had was there tostay. eleven children, six 0L them Although Byron spent .boys..His son Samuel was the many yeas oLhardtbor on one who stayed home to work the farm. he wasvery much a MONEY SENSE by WILLIAM ROSE. JR. The Mutual Savings Bank To " . . . promote the general good of the state." that is what the Commissioner of Banking must determine before a mutual savings bank receives the privilege of a charter. What is a mutual savings bank? Who owns a mutual savings bank? And, equally important, who controls a mutual savings bank? Mutual savings banks have been a part of the community for a good many years, coming into existence in the early part of the 19th century. Chartered todo business in 18 states, mostly in the northeast, they currently perform two basic functions:  accept time deposits (savings) and make home mortgage loans. In recent years they have added checking accounts in the form of "Negotiable Order of Withdrawal" (NOW accounts) and have performed some activity in the nature of consumer loans. But basically, they take your money in the form of savings and lend it to you, as long as the demand is there, for the purchase of a home. Notice I said, "As long as the demand is there." It's true we are in a "tight" money period at the present time but that has not always'been the case nor will it always be that way in the future. When a bank has excess funds from an inflow of savings, that money has to be put to work, and if the local market is unable or unwilling to use it, a bank has several alternatives. A mutual savings bank can invest their excess funds in bonds, notes and certain stocks or purchase insured mor- tgages from a mortgage broker or another bank. In order to assure an available supply of funds to be placed in the home mortgage market, mutual savings banks are allowed to pay a slightly higher dividend on savings and time deposits than so-called commercial banks t National banks, trust companies). This "edge" has developed considerable controversy over the years and will he reviewed at a later date. As trying as today's mortgage market has become, with banks literally besieged for mortgage money, the mutual savings banks have done an admirable job of making some money available to local home buyers at a rate one would have to consider reasonable considering the yield on alter- native types of investment. You can not purchase "shares" of a mutual savings hank because they do not have stockholders. A mutual savings bank is owned by its depositors. Simple enough. Simple, that is, unless or until a mutual savings bank wishes to change its charter to a stockholder type of institution such as a trust company or national association. Extensive litigation is usually involved and few attempts at conversion have been made. Most mutual savings banks recognize the need they are fulfilling in their community and are content to continue under the mutual charter. As a depositor of a mutual savings bank, you are represented by corporators. Meeting on an annual basis they elect a president, vicepresidents and a board of trustees. A savings bank is regulated by law as to the minimum and maximum number of corporators it can have. Although the officers and trustees carry out the day-to-day operation of the bank, the corporators, as representatives of the depositors, exercise control. It is important to note that directors of other financial instituti0rm can he corporators of a mutual savings bank but are forbidden by law to hold the pesttion of trustee as long as tl]ey are currently serving as a bank director. Not too many years ago this was not the case and it was not uncommon to have "interlocking' boards. Because it is impoasib to anticipate all of your questions in the limited space o this column, any questions of general Interest will be covered in the future if they are addressed to the author e-o the JOURNAL OPINION. remembered for his Fourth of July picnics and his part in planning Newbury's sesquicentennial in 1912. Byron served as justice of the peace for many years. He wrote as many wills and deeds as if he had been a lawyer. Byron's farm letterhead listed the specialties of Rogers Hill Farms as "Fine maple sugar and Morgan horses." Their Morgans went to buyers from near and far -- their mare Polly was sold to a wealthy New Yorker, and her colt Bodette to Arthur Peters of Bradford, another Morgan breeder. The Rogers' last Morgan, another colt of Polly's, was Liberty Bell, horn on the Fourth of July, but he met an untimely accidental death. The maples were sud- denly gone, too, blown down by the hurricane of 1938 but enough maples have grown back so Rogers Hill Farms is now back in the sugaring business, with new modern equipment that would he a marvel to Josiah and his sons, who in 1776 boiled down their sap in iron kettles. Present-day generations Byron was in his forty- second year before he married. He had long been considered a very eligible bachelor, but he finally found the right bride a girl of 18. To them, as to his parents, were born two daughters and one son -- Faith, Hope, and Lloyd. A Bicentennial Farm can be a heavy responsibility on the shoulders of an only son, but Lloyd has "hung in there" and stayed on the farm, and now has three sons and several grandchildren. His son Steven is now carrying on the farm. In 1976, the Rogers family was officially honored for their Bicentennial Farm. At that time, Lloyd's sister Hope Kjeilerup published a book, 202 Years on a Vermont Hilltop, which tells the history of the family and farm, also some entertaining stories of the family and oldtime schooldays in the Town of Newbury. John Smith farm, 1836 John Smith's "Alpenglo Farm" on HaLl's Meadow in South Newbury was originally the John Atwoed place, which was bought by Joseph Smith in 1836. Joseph was the son of Col. John Smith, who had served in the Battle of Bunker Hill, under the name of John Vance. When John discovered that he had been adopted by the Vance family after his mother and father had been separated, he had his name legally changed to his original family name of Smith. John ran a tavern and was active in the Vermont Militia, serving in the Wr of 1812 and reaching the rank of colonel. His son Joseph lived first in West Newbury, then in West Topsham, before settling in 1836 on the present family farm. He built here a brick house, which burned in 1888, along with the barns. The present house was finished the next year, and a large barn built to replace the former several small ones. Suc- cessive generations on the farm have been Jonathan Jenness Smith, John Bliss Smith. and John Bliss Smith Jr. (present owner), whose partner on the farm is bis son John Bradway Smith. Sugaring was a 'major activity on the farm in the time of Jonathan, with a maple orchard and sugarhouse on the home place, but when tile price .of syrup went below a dollar a gallon, his son did not continue the business. Sugaring has been resumed in recent years, on land the family owns in Vershire.' In the early days the Smiths used to raise sheep, but they had such a problem with dogs that they gave it up around 1900. John (present ownery says that his father didn't care much about either sugaring or sheep, but he did like cows, and enlarged their herd of Guernseys. John needed to produce more milk and began shifting to Holsteins, which now com- prise most of his herd, (please turn to page 7)" GROUNDED--This humming bird flew in the door of Ezra Mann's store in Woodsville as he opened it for early church goers last Sunda crashed into several window panes in a desperate effort to escape, knocking itself out after colliding with the rear door. Mann picked stunned bird and placed it outside under a shrub, where it lay five minutes, then sat up for another five minutes trying from the wild flight in the drug store. Finally, it fluttered its win a few seconds, then climbed some 50 feet and whizzed off. Proving, that bird's best friend is Mann. Letters to the Edit Where were you? To the Editor: Wednesday night seven local residents were kind enough to share with us their thoughts and ideas about the drug and alcohol problems in the Haverhill area. This group of dedicated individuals might have found it a lot easier to go home after work and just sit down and relax• Instead, they cared enough about the community and the kids that they were willing to spend three and a half warm hours in the Woodsville Elementary School gym discussing drugs and alcohol. It is our obligation to work with them. That means parents, and yes you, senior citizens, who with your years of experience, could be in- valuable. Mr. Bagonzi wrote a fine article a few weeks ago about what is happening to our kids, and is making a conscientious effort to turn things around in the schools. Perhaps it's time we take a closer look at our- selves, and wonder ,what kind of an example we are setting for the kids. Does alcohol have to play such a big part of our daily lives? Does every little Why were there so few problem have to be resolved people at this talk? If this by taking an anti,anxiety were a fair or an auction, the , medication such as Na!ium place would have been  vhich iSTtbe ni one packed. Does the welfare of prescribed oral medication our kids mean so little to you now, and for the past several that you couldn't break years? yourself'away from the T.V. Haverhill is a beautiful for a few hours? Is it because town, and a fine place to raise you are afraid to face the kids. It won't be, however, if reality that in Haverhill we do not have a utopia, nor are we living in a fortress free of drugs, alcohol and crime. It is time that we reallze that our problems cannot be solved by the educators and our law enforcement agents. we don't pull our heads out of the sand, face reality, and join the fight with educators and law enforcement agents to fight the abuse of alcohol and drugs. Gerald R. Gherardi Pike, N.H. the To the editor: The Majority screams, victim of incest or to rid her termath of the hear no outcry group against or use of the weapons conceived. Has Moral Ma Hiroshima so know that nerve in the Pentagon they accident in 1968 6,000 sheep in they ever i of total more breath to I And do they the wa What is this murder and who said: "Thou  except by nuclear bombs fragmenting thou shalt not wrapped in patriotism ?" Misleading sta00ments from time to time • To the Editor: In a front page article of the May 27, 1981 issue of your paper it says that the Vermont Association of Conservation Districts will be raising its fee from $75 to $125 per site. It also says that "the fee from a private engineer for com- parable work would be about $300". In addition to the $125 collected from the homeowner the VACD is getting a $115,200 state subsidy for this fiscal year. It will do about 700 designs (probably less) in that year. This is $165 per design; when added to the $125, it can be seen that they get about $300 per design. I am not aware of any engineer that charges "about $300" per design, for a one- family household septic system. I am presently doing that service for $75, in almost all cases, in towns nearby, including the pre-cover-up inspection. This will not change this calendar year, and if it increases next year, will be to $90 or less. Engineers get no subsidies. The VACD does make misleading statements from time to time, and if they find their way into print, must be corrected. Robert M. Carter Professional Engineer Corinth, Vt. Already over.extended To the Editor: last few years, and with this We wish to bring to the have come increased attention of the members of the State Senate and House of Representatives that a recent newspaper article dealing with the growth of state government employment cited the Department of Resources and Economic Development as the exception to the general rule. DRED was listed as having 2 fewer em- ployees now than in 1971, in contrast with most other state agencies, which have grown. Why then is DRED along with only one other department out of all of state government targeted in House Bill 600 for a 10 per cent reduction in funds for classified state em/ pioyees? There are more state parks and forests to mange and maintain now than there were ten years ago. Inquiries and requests for assistance in historic preservation, com- munity recreation, and conservation programs in- crease every year from cities and towns all over the state. Wood as an energy source has increased in importance in the demands on forestry per- sonnel. Economic develop- ment, industrial development, and vacation travel promotion all have even more im- portance today when the state is in fiscal crisis and is searching for more revenue. Recreation facilities nearer to home have become more important for New Hampshire citizens and our nearby neigh- bors since the cost of automobile vacation trips to other parts of the country has increased. Historic preser- vation projects have returned derelict buildings and neigh- borhoods to productive life rekindling local pride in New Hampshire's communities. The Department of Resources and Economic Development has managed well to accommodate in- creased demand for services with fewer staff, and the employees have so far maintained efficiency under increased workloads. However it is urmaonable to assume that 10 per cent less (please turn to page 7 ) Where is simply said, kill?" e- To the Editor: Can the Allen or Calvin longer rest in reading report? This listed the which reliance receiving more per capita tha states; 43 centS for each dollar Hampshire for To the Editor: I'm all for shake in our but I Hooker's scrutinized. have pos.ition of willing to for any If the man then by a him in because he's house calls patient lose I also a character come from 3,000 miles. t Page 4-The Journal opinion-June 3, 1981 t H tl t 0 tt t tttt tlllttt t t I NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal II Opinion Wookly nmMlr IHhd in bdld, Vonant. Slnzrlp o • Vormlmd Now hmpok • $t.N per yeer; $6.00 for Six monb|; ovt of stere • $12.00 pot year ond $7.00 for six mootk|; Solder ˘ithtell dhont $2.00. Second cJeJs poltego potd It Irodford, Ferment 09013. fvkSekod by Norfkeost Ptddbiq Compony, Inc., P.O. |o 378, Bradford. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher v Bradford   ; Woodsville S02-222-5281  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial ..... J : Who benefits from Blue Law? In case Vermonters wondered why their local supermarket was closed tast Sunday, it wasn't because of Memorial Day, but because officials are threatening to jail store managers and possibly other employees for violating the state's recently rewritten "blue law." One supermarket chain, Grand Union, has already been haled into court on charges of violating the Sunday closing law in Windham and Bennington counties. Grand Union and other major store chains are fighting the law on grounds that it discriminates against larger stores because stores with 5,000 square feet of space or less are exempt and can legally operate on Sundays. The issue is almost certain to wind up i,aeonstitutional court ....... '° est ,n the VerSt Supreme Court. ........... hile,mostGrand Union, A & P, P & C and First National stores will close Sundays under threat of prosecution. From where we sit, the law raises a number of questions which should be straightened out either by the legislature or the courts, or both. The most obvious one, of course, is the question of discrimination. If it is in the interests of the state and its people to forbid a large store from operating on Sundays, what's the rationale for letting a smaller store cash in on it by selling the very same items, sometimes at a higher price, that the closed store usually sells? Another question of special significance to the Upper Valley area is the effect on chasing Sunday business into nearby New Hampshire, where most stores remain open. That's deliberately forcing tax- payers to spend Vermont dollars in New Hampshire, or for those who live in ottmr areas, to spend them in nearby New York state or Massachusetts stores. For a state like Vermont with its troubled economy, that doesn't make much sense. And of course, shopping dollars forced into adjoining states include tax dollars that otherwise would have been collected in Vermont but are lost forever on purchases in other states. Finally, there is the issue of the whole philosophy behind so-called "'blue laws" like the Vermont Sunday closing statute. They trace hack to an earlier day when Sunday was set aside for worship and little else by tacit agreement of the entire com- munity. We live in a different world today and the question is how much good does a law like'the Vermont Sunday closing law really do in persuading people to go to church instead of going shopping, if that really is the intent behind the law. And if it iS, it raises the deeper constitutional question of separation of church and state. Should the legislature and law enforcement officials be dabbling in efforts to make us more conscious of the religious value of Sunday, or is that something that should be left to the churches and to the individual consciences of Vermonters? Did church attendance rise dramatically when shoppers found stores closed last Sunday? We don't pretend to have any simple answers for these questions but we think they should be studied carefully by state officials, the courts, and by the people of the state. We know one thing. In this day and age, the Sunday afternoon drive i's a fact of life, even despite the high cost of gasoline. Lot's of people go to church in the morning and then go for a drive in the afternoon. And if they need a loaf of bread that they can't get in Vermont because supermarkets are closed, they'll drive across the Connecticut River and get it in New Hampshire. Executive Councilor l)uring the first 6 months on my 24 momh erm l have had three student interns - Dick Rudolph of.Plymouth Slaty Bruce Berke of New England College, and Craig Downing of Keene 5tote. Dick Rudolph's projects included doing a survey of some of the general needs of the 102 towns in this council district. Shortly after Town Meeting of 1981. Dick sent out a questionnaire to all the towns in the district and got back some interesting responses which have been I allied as follows: t. What do you feel are the greatest problems facing your community? a :7 per cent said schools h Jo per cent said growth & planning c 2o per cent said property taxes d. water, sewers and economic development followed. 2. & 3, What per cent of your town is seasonal residents? ilow strongly does your town depend on tourism? 45 per cent of the towns had less than to per cent seasonal residents and 45 per cent did not depend on tourism at all. 25 per cent of the towns moderately depended on tourism: 25 per cent strongly depended on tourism, 4. Do you feel that state government has been responsive to the needs of your town ? 60 per cen! said yes, 20 per cent said Raymond S. Burton no, 20 per cent did not respond. Other questions in the survey were run through a computer analysis, cross- tabulating the responses. Some  the findings included: 1. 35 per cent of those towns which lacked industry found problems with growth and planning-development. 2.34 per cent of the towns which lacked retail trade also found problems with growth and planning. Conversely, towns which were heavily endowed with industry and or retail business did not cite growth and planning as problematic in their communities. 3. Towns with a high percentage of seasonal residents depended moderately to high on tourism-recreation for economic base. 4. School problems did not seem to be characteristic of towns with any particular economic base. but rather a general problem evenly distributed throughout district one, regardless of their em- ployment-tax base. Any reader of this column who has a comment or thought about the result of this survey would be most welcome to write or call me... Ray Burton, RFD No. I, Woodsville, N.H. 03785 Tel. (603) 747- 3662. Newbury's bicentennial and Century Farm Rogers farm, 1774 the farm; he also opened his part of community and church Josiah Rogers first came home as a tavern. The farm affairs. He was long to West Newbury in 1774, was later divided between bringing with him hiswifeand Samuel's sons Oliver and children, also his widowed Azro. Oliver told his brother mother. Although his mother that he would pay $25 for his heartily disliked the wilder- choice of halves. Azro agreed, ness, she was destined to so Oliver chose the half that remain here for 40 years, until grew the best wheat, even she died at the age of 99 years though it was not the half that and 8 months, was adjacent to his house. Child's Orange County Gazetteer (1888) says of Oliver Rogers Josiah: "He and his resolute Oliver was a "pillar of the wife came on horseback from church", but also a quick- Londonderry, bringing a few spoken man, and a family articles with them packed story says that one day when behind their saddles, among he was asking the blessing at a which was an old arm chair, meal when guests were still well preserved at the old present, his eyes roving over homestead. His claim in- the table noticed that his wife cluded a fine tract of woodland Polly Ann had forgotten the of over 400 acres, upon which butter. He closed his blessing he built a log cabin on the as usual."ForChrist'ssake." exact site of the present fine "Where's the butter, Polly residence of his grandson, Ann?" he asked so quickly Azro B. Rogers. He. with the help of his sturdy sons, soon cleared a fine farm. They carefully saved the ashes of the burnt timber, which they manufactured into "salts" and exchanged at Haverhill for merchandise, which they carried home, a distance of four miles, suspended from a pole borne on their shoulders, and guided only by marked trees. Their nearest neighbors were at South Newbury, three miles distant. "The brooks swarmed with trout, and wild animals roamed the forests. Bears were especially troublesome. One afternoon an enormous hear seized the mother of a numerous litter of young pigs, upon which he made his that his amazed guests thought that Uncle Oliver had changed his usual reverent habits. Byron Rogers Oliver had two daughters. but only one son. Byron. a brilliant young man who seemed destined for political advancement. At one time he taught a district school in Wondsville (probably around 1785) and bearded at the old Cobleigh Tavern, which had become a boardinghouse, and later became the first Cottage Hospital. Byron felt a degree of loyalty for the old family farm, but finances were such that he expected (and hoped) to leave the farm when his supper, in the woods a short parents died. However. one of distance from the cabin. A his sisters had married a portion of the remains served prosperous man in the to bait a trap into which Bruin Midwest and she was able to fell and lost his life by his buy the farm to keep it in the rashness " family until Byron could pay Josiah had plenty of help back his debt to her. So Byron in clearing his farm -- he had was there tostay. eleven children, six 0L them Although Byron spent .boys..His son Samuel was the many yeas oLhardtbor on one who stayed home to work the farm. he wasvery much a MONEY SENSE by WILLIAM ROSE. JR. The Mutual Savings Bank To " . . . promote the general good of the state." that is what the Commissioner of Banking must determine before a mutual savings bank receives the privilege of a charter. What is a mutual savings bank? Who owns a mutual savings bank? And, equally important, who controls a mutual savings bank? Mutual savings banks have been a part of the community for a good many years, coming into existence in the early part of the 19th century. Chartered todo business in 18 states, mostly in the northeast, they currently perform two basic functions:  accept time deposits (savings) and make home mortgage loans. In recent years they have added checking accounts in the form of "Negotiable Order of Withdrawal" (NOW accounts) and have performed some activity in the nature of consumer loans. But basically, they take your money in the form of savings and lend it to you, as long as the demand is there, for the purchase of a home. Notice I said, "As long as the demand is there." It's true we are in a "tight" money period at the present time but that has not always'been the case nor will it always be that way in the future. When a bank has excess funds from an inflow of savings, that money has to be put to work, and if the local market is unable or unwilling to use it, a bank has several alternatives. A mutual savings bank can invest their excess funds in bonds, notes and certain stocks or purchase insured mor- tgages from a mortgage broker or another bank. In order to assure an available supply of funds to be placed in the home mortgage market, mutual savings banks are allowed to pay a slightly higher dividend on savings and time deposits than so-called commercial banks t National banks, trust companies). This "edge" has developed considerable controversy over the years and will he reviewed at a later date. As trying as today's mortgage market has become, with banks literally besieged for mortgage money, the mutual savings banks have done an admirable job of making some money available to local home buyers at a rate one would have to consider reasonable considering the yield on alter- native types of investment. You can not purchase "shares" of a mutual savings hank because they do not have stockholders. A mutual savings bank is owned by its depositors. Simple enough. Simple, that is, unless or until a mutual savings bank wishes to change its charter to a stockholder type of institution such as a trust company or national association. Extensive litigation is usually involved and few attempts at conversion have been made. Most mutual savings banks recognize the need they are fulfilling in their community and are content to continue under the mutual charter. As a depositor of a mutual savings bank, you are represented by corporators. Meeting on an annual basis they elect a president, vicepresidents and a board of trustees. A savings bank is regulated by law as to the minimum and maximum number of corporators it can have. Although the officers and trustees carry out the day-to-day operation of the bank, the corporators, as representatives of the depositors, exercise control. It is important to note that directors of other financial instituti0rm can he corporators of a mutual savings bank but are forbidden by law to hold the pesttion of trustee as long as tl]ey are currently serving as a bank director. Not too many years ago this was not the case and it was not uncommon to have "interlocking' boards. Because it is impoasib to anticipate all of your questions in the limited space o this column, any questions of general Interest will be covered in the future if they are addressed to the author e-o the JOURNAL OPINION. remembered for his Fourth of July picnics and his part in planning Newbury's sesquicentennial in 1912. Byron served as justice of the peace for many years. He wrote as many wills and deeds as if he had been a lawyer. Byron's farm letterhead listed the specialties of Rogers Hill Farms as "Fine maple sugar and Morgan horses." Their Morgans went to buyers from near and far -- their mare Polly was sold to a wealthy New Yorker, and her colt Bodette to Arthur Peters of Bradford, another Morgan breeder. The Rogers' last Morgan, another colt of Polly's, was Liberty Bell, horn on the Fourth of July, but he met an untimely accidental death. The maples were sud- denly gone, too, blown down by the hurricane of 1938 but enough maples have grown back so Rogers Hill Farms is now back in the sugaring business, with new modern equipment that would he a marvel to Josiah and his sons, who in 1776 boiled down their sap in iron kettles. Present-day generations Byron was in his forty- second year before he married. He had long been considered a very eligible bachelor, but he finally found the right bride a girl of 18. To them, as to his parents, were born two daughters and one son -- Faith, Hope, and Lloyd. A Bicentennial Farm can be a heavy responsibility on the shoulders of an only son, but Lloyd has "hung in there" and stayed on the farm, and now has three sons and several grandchildren. His son Steven is now carrying on the farm. In 1976, the Rogers family was officially honored for their Bicentennial Farm. At that time, Lloyd's sister Hope Kjeilerup published a book, 202 Years on a Vermont Hilltop, which tells the history of the family and farm, also some entertaining stories of the family and oldtime schooldays in the Town of Newbury. John Smith farm, 1836 John Smith's "Alpenglo Farm" on HaLl's Meadow in South Newbury was originally the John Atwoed place, which was bought by Joseph Smith in 1836. Joseph was the son of Col. John Smith, who had served in the Battle of Bunker Hill, under the name of John Vance. When John discovered that he had been adopted by the Vance family after his mother and father had been separated, he had his name legally changed to his original family name of Smith. John ran a tavern and was active in the Vermont Militia, serving in the Wr of 1812 and reaching the rank of colonel. His son Joseph lived first in West Newbury, then in West Topsham, before settling in 1836 on the present family farm. He built here a brick house, which burned in 1888, along with the barns. The present house was finished the next year, and a large barn built to replace the former several small ones. Suc- cessive generations on the farm have been Jonathan Jenness Smith, John Bliss Smith. and John Bliss Smith Jr. (present owner), whose partner on the farm is bis son John Bradway Smith. Sugaring was a 'major activity on the farm in the time of Jonathan, with a maple orchard and sugarhouse on the home place, but when tile price .of syrup went below a dollar a gallon, his son did not continue the business. Sugaring has been resumed in recent years, on land the family owns in Vershire.' In the early days the Smiths used to raise sheep, but they had such a problem with dogs that they gave it up around 1900. John (present ownery says that his father didn't care much about either sugaring or sheep, but he did like cows, and enlarged their herd of Guernseys. John needed to produce more milk and began shifting to Holsteins, which now com- prise most of his herd, (please turn to page 7)" GROUNDED--This humming bird flew in the door of Ezra Mann's store in Woodsville as he opened it for early church goers last Sunda crashed into several window panes in a desperate effort to escape, knocking itself out after colliding with the rear door. Mann picked stunned bird and placed it outside under a shrub, where it lay five minutes, then sat up for another five minutes trying from the wild flight in the drug store. Finally, it fluttered its win a few seconds, then climbed some 50 feet and whizzed off. Proving, that bird's best friend is Mann. Letters to the Edit Where were you? To the Editor: Wednesday night seven local residents were kind enough to share with us their thoughts and ideas about the drug and alcohol problems in the Haverhill area. This group of dedicated individuals might have found it a lot easier to go home after work and just sit down and relax• Instead, they cared enough about the community and the kids that they were willing to spend three and a half warm hours in the Woodsville Elementary School gym discussing drugs and alcohol. It is our obligation to work with them. That means parents, and yes you, senior citizens, who with your years of experience, could be in- valuable. Mr. Bagonzi wrote a fine article a few weeks ago about what is happening to our kids, and is making a conscientious effort to turn things around in the schools. Perhaps it's time we take a closer look at our- selves, and wonder ,what kind of an example we are setting for the kids. Does alcohol have to play such a big part of our daily lives? Does every little Why were there so few problem have to be resolved people at this talk? If this by taking an anti,anxiety were a fair or an auction, the , medication such as Na!ium place would have been  vhich iSTtbe ni one packed. Does the welfare of prescribed oral medication our kids mean so little to you now, and for the past several that you couldn't break years? yourself'away from the T.V. Haverhill is a beautiful for a few hours? Is it because town, and a fine place to raise you are afraid to face the kids. It won't be, however, if reality that in Haverhill we do not have a utopia, nor are we living in a fortress free of drugs, alcohol and crime. It is time that we reallze that our problems cannot be solved by the educators and our law enforcement agents. we don't pull our heads out of the sand, face reality, and join the fight with educators and law enforcement agents to fight the abuse of alcohol and drugs. Gerald R. Gherardi Pike, N.H. the To the editor: The Majority screams, victim of incest or to rid her termath of the hear no outcry group against or use of the weapons conceived. Has Moral Ma Hiroshima so know that nerve in the Pentagon they accident in 1968 6,000 sheep in they ever i of total more breath to I And do they the wa What is this murder and who said: "Thou  except by nuclear bombs fragmenting thou shalt not wrapped in patriotism ?" Misleading sta00ments from time to time • To the Editor: In a front page article of the May 27, 1981 issue of your paper it says that the Vermont Association of Conservation Districts will be raising its fee from $75 to $125 per site. It also says that "the fee from a private engineer for com- parable work would be about $300". In addition to the $125 collected from the homeowner the VACD is getting a $115,200 state subsidy for this fiscal year. It will do about 700 designs (probably less) in that year. This is $165 per design; when added to the $125, it can be seen that they get about $300 per design. I am not aware of any engineer that charges "about $300" per design, for a one- family household septic system. I am presently doing that service for $75, in almost all cases, in towns nearby, including the pre-cover-up inspection. This will not change this calendar year, and if it increases next year, will be to $90 or less. Engineers get no subsidies. The VACD does make misleading statements from time to time, and if they find their way into print, must be corrected. Robert M. Carter Professional Engineer Corinth, Vt. Already over.extended To the Editor: last few years, and with this We wish to bring to the have come increased attention of the members of the State Senate and House of Representatives that a recent newspaper article dealing with the growth of state government employment cited the Department of Resources and Economic Development as the exception to the general rule. DRED was listed as having 2 fewer em- ployees now than in 1971, in contrast with most other state agencies, which have grown. Why then is DRED along with only one other department out of all of state government targeted in House Bill 600 for a 10 per cent reduction in funds for classified state em/ pioyees? There are more state parks and forests to mange and maintain now than there were ten years ago. Inquiries and requests for assistance in historic preservation, com- munity recreation, and conservation programs in- crease every year from cities and towns all over the state. Wood as an energy source has increased in importance in the demands on forestry per- sonnel. Economic develop- ment, industrial development, and vacation travel promotion all have even more im- portance today when the state is in fiscal crisis and is searching for more revenue. Recreation facilities nearer to home have become more important for New Hampshire citizens and our nearby neigh- bors since the cost of automobile vacation trips to other parts of the country has increased. Historic preser- vation projects have returned derelict buildings and neigh- borhoods to productive life rekindling local pride in New Hampshire's communities. The Department of Resources and Economic Development has managed well to accommodate in- creased demand for services with fewer staff, and the employees have so far maintained efficiency under increased workloads. However it is urmaonable to assume that 10 per cent less (please turn to page 7 ) Where is simply said, kill?" e- To the Editor: Can the Allen or Calvin longer rest in reading report? This listed the which reliance receiving more per capita tha states; 43 centS for each dollar Hampshire for To the Editor: I'm all for shake in our but I Hooker's scrutinized. have pos.ition of willing to for any If the man then by a him in because he's house calls patient lose I also a character come from 3,000 miles. t