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Bradford , Vermont
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June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
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June 3, 1981
 

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June 3, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 : i i ' iiii i)i i :: PAR#:DF_,--A- Contingent of VFW and American Legion members from Bradford leads the Memorial Day parade at Piermont. / in Piermont Memorial Day parade make their way Thoughts on the by Gary W. Moore I VALLEY FISHING TOURNAMENT NOTICE 4 K.M. thru June 21, 12 Noo prlr to June 20 or on June 20, 2 - 6 P,M. or kme 21. $ A.M. - 10 A.M. No Oe will be eHqLble tor prizes U not then reqistered. Buqbee Landinq, Bradford, Vt. (N,'rLh et qoU court). June 21, $ A.M. - 12 Noon, MUST check in by 12 Noon. In cram of tie - first rials checked wtnJ. CotuaeeUeut River from Wilder Dam to Wells River Sridqe. Wilder, North TheUord, Bradford and Newbury, Vt. l'kmOver mad Orford, N.H. mad N,H. or Non-Restdat N.H. Walleye, Small or Lm'qe Mouth Black Ba, Plcker Northern Pike, and Horned Pout. und NEW N.H. Laws available at H.Q. 14' Canc ( All who R#ster will be EUqtble). Plul Pdz for the heaviost ol each of the 7 Sll 1 award at 1 P.M., June 21. a bo available. UPSET WITH BOARD ACTIONS of Environmental Conservation Agency Whittaker the Vermont Fish and Game meeting in Montpelier last Wednesday s concerns about the antlerless IOns set the week before. were presented with a several page out the concerns of the department. They Chief biologist Ben Day and chief warden positions on the subject. to the department the board made two One adds the overlooked section VIII to have in your possession an an- to another. The other change was as to a definition. The depart- regulation on reporting to read nearest board members did not want to make his deer home to report it at his local not stopped at the first reporting The wardens felt that this would not let With a deer and take the report if the was arrived at and the word "first available." was upset about were not their proposal to give permits permission only signs and the is. Also the board stayed with who did not get a permit last year the and made available through Act and then petitions for es will be accepted. This affords the to comment on the proposal and the History talk set at W. Newbury N E WB URY--Architectural appeared in the spring issue of historian John Page will speak "Vermont ttistory," the to the next meeting of the Vermont Historical Society's Newbury ttistorical Society quarterly journal. June l0 at 7:30 p.m. at the W. Page has been staff Newburytlall. historian for a Burlington Pae will speak on "Ver- survey, field architectural mon(;s Prontier and historian for the Vermont Revolutionary Years". , Division for Historic He said he will speak "with Preservation, and has particular reference to the prepared seven National social and economic forces Register nominations. He which prompted the state's lives in Waterville. early settlement, and to the revolution within a revolution out of which Vermont was born. As much as possible, I will try to bring Newbury's role in the state's early history into the discussion." Page is the author of an article on the topic which CARD PARTY BRADFORD--A card party is scheduled every Friday at l p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. * Tourney trying to nail the speeding Carbee at third, she scored. The scoring was over, but not the excitement. Although pitching a one- hitter, hurler Pam Humphrey was in trouble most of the day, allowing nine walks and striking out seven. After leaving three runners on in the first two innings, Harwood mounted a scoring threat in the third, only to be denied by the alert Oxbow defense. With one out, and a runner at third, Lumbra who singled to center in the first for the only Harwood hit, was at the plate. She hit a bouncer to Carbee at third to start the play of the day. Carhee fielded the ball cleanly and faked the runner back to third, then fired the ball to first baseman Janine Teeter for the out. Andi Elwell then broke for the plate, but a perfect throw from Teeter to Tena David- son, the Oxbow catcher, blocking the plate nicely, put the tag on Elwell. A great doubleplay and Oxbow was out of the inning. Between the fourth and sixth innings the Highlanders stranded five runners in a futile effort to get on the scoreboard. One final threat in the top of the seventh for Harwood had the hundred or so fans on the edge of their seats. A pop up to shortstop Angle Dobbins marked the first out. Candy Guyette and Sue Kero then walked, and advanced to second and third on a wi!d pitch. With two runners m scoring position, ttarwood's coach had her ninth batter swining on a 3-1 pitch, flying to Carhee behind third base. Another free pass loaded the bases, with Lumbra at the plate. A hit would have brought in the tying runs, but it wasn't to be. Carbee fielded a two bouncer just off the bag and tagged third for the final out. For the afternoon, Oxbow collected six hits. Marsha Carbee garnered two, with Humphrey, Teeter, Brooks and Herman adding one each. Although savoring the win, CoaCh Paul Munn was less than pleased with the game. "We left too many runners on base today (eleven) and failed Geraldine Welch dies after long illness GROTON- Geraldine Welch, 65. formerly of Nashua, N.H. and Lebanon died Saturday at the Cottage ltospital in Woodsville after a long illness. She was born June 5, 1915 in Newport. Vt., and was a resident ot' Groton for six Groton; one son, Kenneth Welch of Derry, N.H.; one daughter, Donna Foote of Lebanon; one sister, Virginia tlenshon of W. Yarmouth, Mass., and four grand- children. Funeral services were held years. She had lived in Lebanon and was a ward clerk in the Mary tlitchcock Memorial tlospital. Mrs. Welch was a member of Corinthian Chapter No. 42 of the Order of Eastern Star in Wells River, and of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Wood- sville. She is survived by her husband, Austin Welch of David Whitman settled on the farm on ttall's Lake in West Newbury in 1854. His son Levi was proprietor of boats on the lake for many years. Levi's son Horace had the local telephone exchange in his home, and his wife Elvira worked as the operator from 1944 to 1966. She says that everyone in the family learned to operate it, and it was very rare that they were all gone away from home .so that they had to get someone else in. The cattle on the farm were sold in 1955, but Elvira and her son Stanley and his family still have their home there. Vt. 05819 or the Cottage Hospital, Swiftwater Road, Woodsville, N.H. 03785. Mrs. Kathryn Ward dies; a resident of Glencliff at the Ricker Funeral Home, GLENCLIFF--Mrs. Kathryn matron of lona-Lafayette Birch Lane, Woodsville. Ward, 83, died Saturday at Chapter No. 39 OES of N. Burial will be at a later date in Sceva Speare Memorial Haverhill, a member of Mount the Groton Village Cemetery. ttospitai, Plymouth. Moosilauke Lodge No. 68 OES Memorial donations may be Born in Newton, Mass., she of Warren and a member of made to the Caledonia Home" was a resident of Gleneliff for American Legion Auxiliary ltealth (;are, in care of Joan the past 60 years. Unit No. 429 of Littleton. Blankenship, St. Johnsbury, Mrs. Ward was a past Mass., a past member of the White Cross Shrine No. 5 of E.F. VhitehJ]l die, Concord, and a past worthy * Over the river .4 (contmuedfrompage4) family farm to a place of his Whitman farm, 1854 own. In 1866 he bought the "Old Town Farm" and renamed it "Maplewood Farm". Through the years the place has been famous for its maple products, especially during the time of William's son Dudley and grandson Arthur. Dudley won the first prize and producer's sweepstakes at the Vermont Maple Sugar Makers' Con- ventions in 1899, 1902, and 1903. Arthur served as president of the Vermont Maple Sugar Makers' Association from 1912 to 1917, traveling extensively to publicize the maple industry. Most of the Carletons' 3000 sugar maples were destroyed by the hurricane of 1938. Arthur's son Harold and grandson Donald turned their attention to the development of a herd of Registered Holstein cattle. At the present time, Donald is experimenting with the process of tran- splanting embryos from his highest producing cows. It has been successful enough so that he intends to continue. (More about embryo transplants later. ) Carleton farm, t866 Dudley Carleton came from Massachusetts to Newbury in 1776, settling first on Musquash Meadow (now Russell Carson's Harkdale Farm). He was skilled as a cabinet-maker, making a great variety of furniture, clocks, cider mills, etc. In 1798 he moved to a farm in West Newbury. Dudley's grandson William moved from the / - SMILING THROUGH--Behind the clown's makeup is Mary Jean Diamond of Bath, a volunteer at Grafton County Home. CLOWNINCr--The clown in Grafton County Home Memorial Day parade is Amy Emerson of Groton. activity director at the Home. Orford librarian attends meeting 4r Letters (continued from page 4) personnel can carry the workload of those laid off, when they are already over- extended. It is not in the best interest of the state to cut back imprudently a department of state government which has remained lean. We urgently and respectfully request your reconsideration of the 10 per cent cut in DRED personnel. Members of DRED Chapter 32 and 43 of the State Employees Association Concord, N.H. ORFORD--Sheila Thomson, representing Orford Social Library, attended the 12th annual conference of the New Hampshire Library Council May 18 at the White Mountain Conference Center in Waterville Valley. Attendance at this con- ference provided an op- portunity to learn of the issues, problems and new developments in today's library service and operations. The New Hampshire Library Council is an um- brella organization for library groups in the state, sponsoring the only state-wide library conference, and working throughout the year to coordinate the activities of member organizations. MclNDOE FALLS--Ernest F. high priestess of the Wblte Whitehill, 87, died at his home Shrine of Littleton. following a long illness. A Members of her family retired farmer, he had lived include her husband, Ralph B. here for the past two years. Ward of Glencliff, and many Born in South Ryegate, May nieces and nephews. 28, 1893, he was son of Mr. and The funeral will be con- Mrs. tlenry Whitehill. ducted at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Surviving are five sons, the Ricker Funeral Home, Arnold Whitehill, Unadilla, Birch Lane, Woodsville. The N.Y., Ivan Whitehili, Con- Rev. Ruth Williamson will stable, N.Y.; Austin Whitehill, officiate. Peacham; Bruce Whitehill, Interment will follow in Moira, N.Y., and Norman Warren Village Cemetery. Whitehill, Groton; three Memorial donations may be daughters, Mrs. Mildred made to the Warren FAST Richardson, Claremont; Mrs. Squad, care of Kenneth Viola Noyes, Peacham, and Mosholder, Main Street, Mrs. Evelyn Shields, Groton, Warren, N.H., 03279. as well as several grand- children and great- grandchildren. His funeral service was held in the Ricker Funeral Home, Birch Lane, Woedsville. The Rev. Nell Bradley officiated. Burial was in Pinehurst Cemetery in South Ryegate. WANTED-- Dump truck driver job available im- mediately. Experience necessary. Equal opportunity employer. 802584-3391. 1t--6- 3---c LNjr000000$TAT00 * i|111 ii II Doris R. Colton Real [state East Thetford, Vermont 05043 Tel. 3334644 6-- IA Acres + or -. Garage with work space. Town water. Nice garden area. $29,500. 4 ROOM LOG CABIN-- Wooded setting. Year round gravel road. I acre + or -. $46,000. ar..00erritt v6,enc00, 00nc. 00ealt00 PAUL MAY, Assiate 603-747-3372 Home: 187-i270 List No. 2-- Be different[ This one hundred year old school house has been remodeled into a cozy 3 bedroom home . . . large L-shaped eat-in kit- chen -- brand new Franklin fireplace in living room. 11'4" x 26' family room. :. oil FHA heat. 2 car detached log garage. 4.5 acres + or - of partially cleared land with large garden space. 2 utility sheds . . . nice mountain views -- in small town. $35,900. List No. 2.14.-- Turn of the century 7 room house needs some work outside. 4 bedrooms, 1% baths.., oil FHW heat. Almost % acre in small village. Walk to stores.., a real bargain at $21,500. iili ! I LOVE A PARADE--Diane Green, a resident of Grafton County Home, joins in the Home's Memorial Day parade. * Parade a big success (continued from page i ) Two anonymous, white- faced happy clown,s followed the float. Next in line was Mrs. Bernice llanson with daughter Shanna and daughter Deanna riding her decorated tricycle. Also on bikes, were Krista Young and volunteer, Mary ,lane Diamond, dressed as a white4aced clown. She rode happily, stopping to pass out heart stickers to some of the residents on the lawn. Next was Mary Jane's two children, Soloman, and Laura, No, 4316--WELLS RIVER. This beautifully maintained 1839 home has 8 rooms and is located on a very nice lot. There are two baths, 2 zone, hot water baseboard heat and a 2 car garage. It is well insulated, has nice por- ches and a good garden spot. Taxes are approximately $80o.00 per year. Price $45.000.00 No. 4317--NEWBURY. New, custom crafted, white" cedar, log home. Four rooms, expandable'to six, with full basement and well insulated. Beautiful kitchen with spacious custom-built cabinets, lovely living area with custom-made chandelier. This well-built home, has a wood-gas combination heating system for low heat bill and is situated on 2 beautiful acres. Drive out tedayand see this lovely home I mile from route 302 on Scotch Hollow Road. Price $49,900.00. No. 4321 I0 acres. Newbury. VT.. $4,000; on Class 4 road for mile; same distance from electricity; good growing hardwoods; good for recreation and in- vestment, but at present not good for year-round living; owner will flnnnce. N0, 4326,--15.5 acres. Plermont. Nil -- 18,525; a few hundred feet from maintained road; one-third open, two-thirds wooded; good views to west; brook; good terms from owners. the area of Addison County to right in its claim that the time is right zone F. This is the area the board 11 season. The department had be opened for the first time this year. Phone 444.2742 Call collect. -up end center service Woodsville, N .H. RS ROEBUCK, _.^uAv Wells River. Vt --- RE pike, - .... PIKESTO , . E Corinth, Vt. to hit the ball with any authority. Our fielding was good and the execution on key plays (errorless ball) couldn't be faulted. In this league, .a walk is as good as a hit m certain situations and we were fortunate to keep them from scoring. Hitting will be the emphasis on the practice field on Monday as well as resting Humphrey's arms for the game against Winooski/' Game details were too late for press deadline. SON ARRIVES . Mr. and Mrs David Fox of Bradford are the parents of a baby son, David Allen For- sythe If, born May 22 at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. dressed in red, white and blue, The Laundry Dept. was next with a float manned by Alan Robinson. The Maintenance Truck was driven by Orrin (;lark with residents Jimmy Smith and Sammy Tilt. Last but not least was Activity Aide Mark George with resident Sid Smith. The parade was a big success for all the Grafton tlome residents and residents from the Giencliff Home who were invited to join the celebration. 200 acres, Corinth, $60,000, open and wooded, brook, secluded. NO. 4274 Old farmhouse on 47 acres, Newbury, Vt. House needs work, but is liveable; Good location; good investment; owner may finance. $57,OOO. NO. 42B---!0.7 acres, Vershire, Vt., near Juogement Ridge, $7,500. Wooded, views, town road. One acre, Newbury $3,000; good secluded building site. N_9,.A;lta.32 acres, Groton, Vt., $10,900; near Levi Pond and Groton State Forest; improved woodland, good for investment and recreation. Terms from owner. June 3, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 : i i ' iiii i)i i :: PAR#:DF_,--A- Contingent of VFW and American Legion members from Bradford leads the Memorial Day parade at Piermont. / in Piermont Memorial Day parade make their way Thoughts on the by Gary W. Moore I VALLEY FISHING TOURNAMENT NOTICE 4 K.M. thru June 21, 12 Noo prlr to June 20 or on June 20, 2 - 6 P,M. or kme 21. $ A.M. - 10 A.M. No Oe will be eHqLble tor prizes U not then reqistered. Buqbee Landinq, Bradford, Vt. (N,'rLh et qoU court). June 21, $ A.M. - 12 Noon, MUST check in by 12 Noon. In cram of tie - first rials checked wtnJ. CotuaeeUeut River from Wilder Dam to Wells River Sridqe. Wilder, North TheUord, Bradford and Newbury, Vt. l'kmOver mad Orford, N.H. mad N,H. or Non-Restdat N.H. Walleye, Small or Lm'qe Mouth Black Ba, Plcker Northern Pike, and Horned Pout. und NEW N.H. Laws available at H.Q. 14' Canc ( All who R#ster will be EUqtble). Plul Pdz for the heaviost ol each of the 7 Sll 1 award at 1 P.M., June 21. a bo available. UPSET WITH BOARD ACTIONS of Environmental Conservation Agency Whittaker the Vermont Fish and Game meeting in Montpelier last Wednesday s concerns about the antlerless IOns set the week before. were presented with a several page out the concerns of the department. They Chief biologist Ben Day and chief warden positions on the subject. to the department the board made two One adds the overlooked section VIII to have in your possession an an- to another. The other change was as to a definition. The depart- regulation on reporting to read nearest board members did not want to make his deer home to report it at his local not stopped at the first reporting The wardens felt that this would not let With a deer and take the report if the was arrived at and the word "first available." was upset about were not their proposal to give permits permission only signs and the is. Also the board stayed with who did not get a permit last year the and made available through Act and then petitions for es will be accepted. This affords the to comment on the proposal and the History talk set at W. Newbury N E WB URY--Architectural appeared in the spring issue of historian John Page will speak "Vermont ttistory," the to the next meeting of the Vermont Historical Society's Newbury ttistorical Society quarterly journal. June l0 at 7:30 p.m. at the W. Page has been staff Newburytlall. historian for a Burlington Pae will speak on "Ver- survey, field architectural mon(;s Prontier and historian for the Vermont Revolutionary Years". , Division for Historic He said he will speak "with Preservation, and has particular reference to the prepared seven National social and economic forces Register nominations. He which prompted the state's lives in Waterville. early settlement, and to the revolution within a revolution out of which Vermont was born. As much as possible, I will try to bring Newbury's role in the state's early history into the discussion." Page is the author of an article on the topic which CARD PARTY BRADFORD--A card party is scheduled every Friday at l p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. * Tourney trying to nail the speeding Carbee at third, she scored. The scoring was over, but not the excitement. Although pitching a one- hitter, hurler Pam Humphrey was in trouble most of the day, allowing nine walks and striking out seven. After leaving three runners on in the first two innings, Harwood mounted a scoring threat in the third, only to be denied by the alert Oxbow defense. With one out, and a runner at third, Lumbra who singled to center in the first for the only Harwood hit, was at the plate. She hit a bouncer to Carbee at third to start the play of the day. Carhee fielded the ball cleanly and faked the runner back to third, then fired the ball to first baseman Janine Teeter for the out. Andi Elwell then broke for the plate, but a perfect throw from Teeter to Tena David- son, the Oxbow catcher, blocking the plate nicely, put the tag on Elwell. A great doubleplay and Oxbow was out of the inning. Between the fourth and sixth innings the Highlanders stranded five runners in a futile effort to get on the scoreboard. One final threat in the top of the seventh for Harwood had the hundred or so fans on the edge of their seats. A pop up to shortstop Angle Dobbins marked the first out. Candy Guyette and Sue Kero then walked, and advanced to second and third on a wi!d pitch. With two runners m scoring position, ttarwood's coach had her ninth batter swining on a 3-1 pitch, flying to Carhee behind third base. Another free pass loaded the bases, with Lumbra at the plate. A hit would have brought in the tying runs, but it wasn't to be. Carbee fielded a two bouncer just off the bag and tagged third for the final out. For the afternoon, Oxbow collected six hits. Marsha Carbee garnered two, with Humphrey, Teeter, Brooks and Herman adding one each. Although savoring the win, CoaCh Paul Munn was less than pleased with the game. "We left too many runners on base today (eleven) and failed Geraldine Welch dies after long illness GROTON- Geraldine Welch, 65. formerly of Nashua, N.H. and Lebanon died Saturday at the Cottage ltospital in Woodsville after a long illness. She was born June 5, 1915 in Newport. Vt., and was a resident ot' Groton for six Groton; one son, Kenneth Welch of Derry, N.H.; one daughter, Donna Foote of Lebanon; one sister, Virginia tlenshon of W. Yarmouth, Mass., and four grand- children. Funeral services were held years. She had lived in Lebanon and was a ward clerk in the Mary tlitchcock Memorial tlospital. Mrs. Welch was a member of Corinthian Chapter No. 42 of the Order of Eastern Star in Wells River, and of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Wood- sville. She is survived by her husband, Austin Welch of David Whitman settled on the farm on ttall's Lake in West Newbury in 1854. His son Levi was proprietor of boats on the lake for many years. Levi's son Horace had the local telephone exchange in his home, and his wife Elvira worked as the operator from 1944 to 1966. She says that everyone in the family learned to operate it, and it was very rare that they were all gone away from home .so that they had to get someone else in. The cattle on the farm were sold in 1955, but Elvira and her son Stanley and his family still have their home there. Vt. 05819 or the Cottage Hospital, Swiftwater Road, Woodsville, N.H. 03785. Mrs. Kathryn Ward dies; a resident of Glencliff at the Ricker Funeral Home, GLENCLIFF--Mrs. Kathryn matron of lona-Lafayette Birch Lane, Woodsville. Ward, 83, died Saturday at Chapter No. 39 OES of N. Burial will be at a later date in Sceva Speare Memorial Haverhill, a member of Mount the Groton Village Cemetery. ttospitai, Plymouth. Moosilauke Lodge No. 68 OES Memorial donations may be Born in Newton, Mass., she of Warren and a member of made to the Caledonia Home" was a resident of Gleneliff for American Legion Auxiliary ltealth (;are, in care of Joan the past 60 years. Unit No. 429 of Littleton. Blankenship, St. Johnsbury, Mrs. Ward was a past Mass., a past member of the White Cross Shrine No. 5 of E.F. VhitehJ]l die, Concord, and a past worthy * Over the river .4 (contmuedfrompage4) family farm to a place of his Whitman farm, 1854 own. In 1866 he bought the "Old Town Farm" and renamed it "Maplewood Farm". Through the years the place has been famous for its maple products, especially during the time of William's son Dudley and grandson Arthur. Dudley won the first prize and producer's sweepstakes at the Vermont Maple Sugar Makers' Con- ventions in 1899, 1902, and 1903. Arthur served as president of the Vermont Maple Sugar Makers' Association from 1912 to 1917, traveling extensively to publicize the maple industry. Most of the Carletons' 3000 sugar maples were destroyed by the hurricane of 1938. Arthur's son Harold and grandson Donald turned their attention to the development of a herd of Registered Holstein cattle. At the present time, Donald is experimenting with the process of tran- splanting embryos from his highest producing cows. It has been successful enough so that he intends to continue. (More about embryo transplants later. ) Carleton farm, t866 Dudley Carleton came from Massachusetts to Newbury in 1776, settling first on Musquash Meadow (now Russell Carson's Harkdale Farm). He was skilled as a cabinet-maker, making a great variety of furniture, clocks, cider mills, etc. In 1798 he moved to a farm in West Newbury. Dudley's grandson William moved from the / - SMILING THROUGH--Behind the clown's makeup is Mary Jean Diamond of Bath, a volunteer at Grafton County Home. CLOWNINCr--The clown in Grafton County Home Memorial Day parade is Amy Emerson of Groton. activity director at the Home. Orford librarian attends meeting 4r Letters (continued from page 4) personnel can carry the workload of those laid off, when they are already over- extended. It is not in the best interest of the state to cut back imprudently a department of state government which has remained lean. We urgently and respectfully request your reconsideration of the 10 per cent cut in DRED personnel. Members of DRED Chapter 32 and 43 of the State Employees Association Concord, N.H. ORFORD--Sheila Thomson, representing Orford Social Library, attended the 12th annual conference of the New Hampshire Library Council May 18 at the White Mountain Conference Center in Waterville Valley. Attendance at this con- ference provided an op- portunity to learn of the issues, problems and new developments in today's library service and operations. The New Hampshire Library Council is an um- brella organization for library groups in the state, sponsoring the only state-wide library conference, and working throughout the year to coordinate the activities of member organizations. MclNDOE FALLS--Ernest F. high priestess of the Wblte Whitehill, 87, died at his home Shrine of Littleton. following a long illness. A Members of her family retired farmer, he had lived include her husband, Ralph B. here for the past two years. Ward of Glencliff, and many Born in South Ryegate, May nieces and nephews. 28, 1893, he was son of Mr. and The funeral will be con- Mrs. tlenry Whitehill. ducted at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Surviving are five sons, the Ricker Funeral Home, Arnold Whitehill, Unadilla, Birch Lane, Woodsville. The N.Y., Ivan Whitehili, Con- Rev. Ruth Williamson will stable, N.Y.; Austin Whitehill, officiate. Peacham; Bruce Whitehill, Interment will follow in Moira, N.Y., and Norman Warren Village Cemetery. Whitehill, Groton; three Memorial donations may be daughters, Mrs. Mildred made to the Warren FAST Richardson, Claremont; Mrs. Squad, care of Kenneth Viola Noyes, Peacham, and Mosholder, Main Street, Mrs. Evelyn Shields, Groton, Warren, N.H., 03279. as well as several grand- children and great- grandchildren. His funeral service was held in the Ricker Funeral Home, Birch Lane, Woedsville. The Rev. Nell Bradley officiated. Burial was in Pinehurst Cemetery in South Ryegate. WANTED-- Dump truck driver job available im- mediately. Experience necessary. Equal opportunity employer. 802584-3391. 1t--6- 3---c LNjr000000$TAT00 * i|111 ii II Doris R. Colton Real [state East Thetford, Vermont 05043 Tel. 3334644 6-- IA Acres + or -. Garage with work space. Town water. Nice garden area. $29,500. 4 ROOM LOG CABIN-- Wooded setting. Year round gravel road. I acre + or -. $46,000. ar..00erritt v6,enc00, 00nc. 00ealt00 PAUL MAY, Assiate 603-747-3372 Home: 187-i270 List No. 2-- Be different[ This one hundred year old school house has been remodeled into a cozy 3 bedroom home . . . large L-shaped eat-in kit- chen -- brand new Franklin fireplace in living room. 11'4" x 26' family room. :. oil FHA heat. 2 car detached log garage. 4.5 acres + or - of partially cleared land with large garden space. 2 utility sheds . . . nice mountain views -- in small town. $35,900. List No. 2.14.-- Turn of the century 7 room house needs some work outside. 4 bedrooms, 1% baths.., oil FHW heat. Almost % acre in small village. Walk to stores.., a real bargain at $21,500. iili ! I LOVE A PARADE--Diane Green, a resident of Grafton County Home, joins in the Home's Memorial Day parade. * Parade a big success (continued from page i ) Two anonymous, white- faced happy clown,s followed the float. Next in line was Mrs. Bernice llanson with daughter Shanna and daughter Deanna riding her decorated tricycle. Also on bikes, were Krista Young and volunteer, Mary ,lane Diamond, dressed as a white4aced clown. She rode happily, stopping to pass out heart stickers to some of the residents on the lawn. Next was Mary Jane's two children, Soloman, and Laura, No, 4316--WELLS RIVER. This beautifully maintained 1839 home has 8 rooms and is located on a very nice lot. There are two baths, 2 zone, hot water baseboard heat and a 2 car garage. It is well insulated, has nice por- ches and a good garden spot. Taxes are approximately $80o.00 per year. Price $45.000.00 No. 4317--NEWBURY. New, custom crafted, white" cedar, log home. Four rooms, expandable'to six, with full basement and well insulated. Beautiful kitchen with spacious custom-built cabinets, lovely living area with custom-made chandelier. This well-built home, has a wood-gas combination heating system for low heat bill and is situated on 2 beautiful acres. Drive out tedayand see this lovely home I mile from route 302 on Scotch Hollow Road. Price $49,900.00. No. 4321 I0 acres. Newbury. VT.. $4,000; on Class 4 road for mile; same distance from electricity; good growing hardwoods; good for recreation and in- vestment, but at present not good for year-round living; owner will flnnnce. N0, 4326,--15.5 acres. Plermont. Nil -- 18,525; a few hundred feet from maintained road; one-third open, two-thirds wooded; good views to west; brook; good terms from owners. the area of Addison County to right in its claim that the time is right zone F. This is the area the board 11 season. The department had be opened for the first time this year. Phone 444.2742 Call collect. -up end center service Woodsville, N .H. RS ROEBUCK, _.^uAv Wells River. Vt --- RE pike, - .... PIKESTO , . E Corinth, Vt. to hit the ball with any authority. Our fielding was good and the execution on key plays (errorless ball) couldn't be faulted. In this league, .a walk is as good as a hit m certain situations and we were fortunate to keep them from scoring. Hitting will be the emphasis on the practice field on Monday as well as resting Humphrey's arms for the game against Winooski/' Game details were too late for press deadline. SON ARRIVES . Mr. and Mrs David Fox of Bradford are the parents of a baby son, David Allen For- sythe If, born May 22 at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. dressed in red, white and blue, The Laundry Dept. was next with a float manned by Alan Robinson. The Maintenance Truck was driven by Orrin (;lark with residents Jimmy Smith and Sammy Tilt. Last but not least was Activity Aide Mark George with resident Sid Smith. The parade was a big success for all the Grafton tlome residents and residents from the Giencliff Home who were invited to join the celebration. 200 acres, Corinth, $60,000, open and wooded, brook, secluded. NO. 4274 Old farmhouse on 47 acres, Newbury, Vt. House needs work, but is liveable; Good location; good investment; owner may finance. $57,OOO. NO. 42B---!0.7 acres, Vershire, Vt., near Juogement Ridge, $7,500. Wooded, views, town road. One acre, Newbury $3,000; good secluded building site. N_9,.A;lta.32 acres, Groton, Vt., $10,900; near Levi Pond and Groton State Forest; improved woodland, good for investment and recreation. Terms from owner.