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June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
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June 3, 1981
 

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Page 8-The Journal Opinion-June 3, 1981 Vermont President of the Jaycees, Raymond Aremburg poses for a picture with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Aremburg of Haverhill, N.H. Aremburg was elected 29th President last weekend at BoRon Valley. Ray Arenburg named president of Jaycees BOLTON VALLEY -- the Connecticut Valley the 29th President of Raymond Aremburg of Jaycees has been elected the Vermont Jaycees at their annual convention last weekend at Bolton Valley Inn. 0PEN Hogs[ Aremburg will be overseeing 21 chapters and 650 young men between the ages of 18 and 36 in his new post. The Oxbow Vocational Center will hold an Open Aremburg has been a House at the student built Building Trades member ofConnecticutValley Jaycees since 1974 and has project on Saturday, June6, 1981from 1:00P.M. held the office of local to4:00P.M, president twice in that time, as well as holding various EVERYONE INVITED state offices. Last year he was one of the state district directors. According to Aremburg, "I have a debt to pay to the many friends I have made throughout the state in MASSEY the past seven years through Jaycees. By serving the Vermont Jayeees as their FERGUSON president is the best way to repay that debt." The statewide vote totaled 67 to 23 470 Diesel in favor of Aremburg being elected President for 1981-82. Loader Aremburg named three local residents to his cabinet. Michael Polli as treasurer, w/1 ptd brctet. G running ndition. u.. sc.ouer, assistant treasurer and Vidian Roe, editor of NOW Magazine, the official publication of the Vermont Jaycees. Connecticut Valley Jaycees meet the first and third Wednesday evenings at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradford Academy. Everyone is ONE OF_THE MANY GOOD BUYS AT: welcome to attend. NEW ENGLAND EQUIPMENT Co Inc NEWBURY--The Newbury Historical Society will meet in (802)295"7553 Rt. 14, White RV. Jct., Vt. the W. Newbury Church Hall - June 20 at 8 p.m. i, III mer Furniture "00'UNT JV 20% DIS( Hale Furniture & Carpet Bradford, Vermont "k Trade.offs urged (continued from page 1) from cut tree stumps are a more carefully in our real source of food for deer, fuelwood and other timber stand improvement work, he added "Species such as cherry, oak, beech, maples and aspen are all important food species for native wildlife. Therefore we will want to consider leaving some of these trees mixed into our improved areas. Most of the cone bearing softvoods also serve as shelter and food for our birds and animals," he said. "Woodland owners should not be mislead into trying to save all the trees beneficial to wildlife. Remember, sprouts rabbits, etc. We must also keep in mind that a healthy, vigoriously growing forest with scattered openings is the best wildlife habitat --01d, over mature stagnated stands are not where the action is when it comes to creatures of the forest," Sargent added. For assistance in deciding what, when and where to harvest your firewood, con- tact your County Forester at P.O. Box 191, Woodsville, N.H. 03785, the Grafton County Extension Service, or phone 787-6944 to discuss your particular needs. Our by GEOFF DATES Millions of dollars have been spent by the federal and state governments to come up with a blueprint for the protection and development of the Connecticut River Valley's resources and to deal with its flood problems. Between the mid-sixties and the mid-seventies, two large studies were con- ducted--one by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (with other federal and state agencies) and one by the New England River Basins Commission (NERBC). The first study was called the Comprehensive Investigation, (actually the title was much longer, but space is short). This took some five years to complete and nine volumes to contain the information. It remains the best (if not the most readable) source of information pertaining to water quality and supply, recreation, erosion control, navigation, electric power, fish and wildlife and other resources. General policies or strategies are recommended to guide their use and development. Flooding is another matter. As Mr. Michenfelder explained in a previous column, the Comprehensive Investigation recommended that seven dams be constructed in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts to complete a flood control system authorized by Congress in 1938. This system would protect cities in Massachusetts and Connecticut floodplains from catastrophic losses of life and property in the event of major flood. However, only part of the system was built. The cities were (and are) still vulnerable. The Comprehensive Investigation recommended completing the system by constructing seven more dams on upstream tributaries. This did not sit too well with many people in the Valley. They suggested that alternatives ought to be examined. NERBC conducted a study of the alternatives in the mid- seventies. This became a report called the River's Reach. NERBC concluded that a different approach was needed. Instead of building large expensive dams to keep floods away from people, the River's Reach recommended that people stay away from floodplains, whenever possible. In developed areas, local dikes, levees, and flood proofing could solve the problem. In undeveloped areas, the recommendation was simply to stay out of the floodplain. Did I say simple? Simple to recommend, maybe--not so simple to do. There is a difficult question here. Should people be allowed to live in dangerous areas if they choose to? A floodplain is an extremely dangerous area. If you don't believe it, ask someone who has lived through a flood to ho what it's like But floods of the magnitude we're talking at don't occur very frequently. Again, I refer to Mr. Michenfeider's discussion--gambling with lives and property is serious business. Then there is the whole question of flood damages and who should pay them. Damages are paid by the federal gover- nment in the form of flood insurance and disaster assistance. Flood insurance requires that communities manage their floodplains by regulation and flood proofing. The intent is to condition the availability of insurance at subsidized rates (subsidized by you and me through our tax dollars) on proper floodplain management. Disaster assistance is basically clean up and rebuild money, again provided by our tax dollars. In this country, we make choices based on our con- sideration of the costs involved. However, when someone else pays part of the costs, your choices will be quite different than if you pay them all yourself. After all, if the federal government will rebuild my home or business after a flood, why not live in the floodplain? Assume for a moment that I want to build a home in the floodplain and that I am aware of the risk. The town zoning regulations allow me to do it. I build my home, live quite comfortably for many years until one spring the dice come up snake eyes. There is a rapid thaw, heavy rain and frozen ground. The river reaches beyond its bank to use my laud to store flood water. The first floor of my home is under 2 feet of water. Fortunately, my family and I escape to a neighbor's home on high ground. The flood water subsides and we survey the damage--our home is a total wreck. I shake my fist at the river and curse the layers of mud in my living room, the structural damage to my house and my ill luck. I apply for federal disaster assistance to rebuild my home. I'll ,stop here, and ask you, the reader, a few questions: Should I receive federal aid? Put differently, would you like your tax money to go to rebuilding my house in the flood hazard area? Or should I be forced to bear the cost for my decision to live in the floodplain? Should I even be allowed to rebuild in the floodplain--should local regulations be enacted to prohibit this? Finally, let's broaden our perspective a bit. Suppose Congress once again considers constructing the remaining seven flood control dams in the tributaries. Would yon support this (again using your tax money) to protect Nor- thampton, Springfield, Chicopee, Holyoke and West Springfield in Massachusetts, and East Hartford in Con- necticut? Or should these cities bear the costs of their floodplain location by adopting proper floodplain management? We've come back to the basic question: if people choose to live in flood hazard areas, who should pay the costs of flood damages? EDITOR'S NO The three authors of this column would like to hear from you. If you have comments, questions or Connecticut River issues you would like to see addressed here, please let us know. We want to begin a dialogue here and be responsive to your interests. Write Our River, c-o Journal Opinion, Box 378, Bradford, Vt. 05033. MrroouaJ# a new/oca//y oww and ojxwat company with a ntonoy IVll w comLlJ In wmr w41fl drilling. DI Affordable wells through proven innovations DRILLING Member of Oxbow Union forestry team competes in bow sawing competition. Christ is coming again! We believe: "In the personal premillennial and imminent coming Lord Jesus Christ and that this Hope' has a vital bearing on the life and service of the believer." You will find a group of believers are eagerly awaiting His coming at: Bradford Evangelical Free Worship Service ! i :00 ROUTE 5 Sunday LOWER PLAIN Bill Wick, M. Div., Pastor (802) 222-9021 Oxbow wins event at VO.AG forestry meet JERICHO--The vocational agriculture forestry team from Brattleboro Union High School walked off with top honors at the second annual state-wide forestry com- petition. The c.ontest was held at the research forest of the University of Vermont and was co-sponsored by the Extension Service and Forestry Department of UVM and the state vocational education division. The team from Vergennes Union High School placed second. Inthird place was the team from Missisquoi Union High School. Winners of other events were: surveying and log scaling, Oxbow Union, Bradford; Orienteering, chain saw and cross cut saw cutting, Missisquoi Union; log rolling, Vergennes; bow sawing, Middlebury Union. Mid- dlebury and Missisquoi tied in the lumber scaling com- petition. Representing Oxbow were Duane Placey, David Thur- ston, Clinton Schwartz and James Allen. Vicki Lee Bacon Vicki Lee Bacon receives degree THETFORD--Vicki Lee Bacon, daughter of Priscilla LaMott and Talbert Bacon of E. Thetford, graduated recently from Hesser College in Manchester, N.H. with an Associate Degree in Business Science. She majored in the Executive Secretarial Program. Miss Bacon is employed by Dartmouth College With The Continuing Strike By The Mines, Production InThe Anthraolte Been Greatly Reduced. Naturally, Every Lost Production On The Part Of The U. Operations Reduces The Anthracite For The Calendar Year 1981. THIS WILL FURTHER SHORTAGE OF ANTHRACITE DURING THEMONTHS AHEAD. We Are Currently Booking Orders For The Months. If You Have The Facilities To Store We Encourap You To Place Your Orders In Very Near Future. Remember The Miner's In Late June And July Will Further Curtail Production. We Look Forward To Hearing From You Serving You With Quality Anthracite Please Place Your Order Today To Avoid Possible Price InCreases, And To Insure Adequate Supply For Next Winter. BRADFORD OIL CO. Inc. Junction 5 & 25 Bradford,. Vt. Call 802-222-5251 Or 603-787-6391 LUorne,r Pre-Sehool Co-Op to meet Monday BRADFORD--The Valley Co- operative pre-school organization is having its annual meeting June 8 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradford Elementary School. The meeting is open to everyone and the pre-school encourages parents interested in sending their children to the program to come to the meeting, and to join the organization. The purpose of the annual meeting is to elect officers of the organization and to vote on the budget. It is imperative that old members and new members alike, do come to participate, for it is at this meeting that major decisions will be made, and the tone for the following school year will be set. If there are any questions about the annual meeting or the pre-school, call Ann McCormack at (603) 272-4942. 1 USE YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNT Whimsies TM Daywear and Foundations Our newest delectable collectableS one's whims as well as their clotlq and absolutely luscious. They'r Antror III nylon, trimmed in YOUR FA,LY DEPARTMENT STORE St. Johnsbury, Vt. * Woodsville, N.H. i Page 8-The Journal Opinion-June 3, 1981 Vermont President of the Jaycees, Raymond Aremburg poses for a picture with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Aremburg of Haverhill, N.H. Aremburg was elected 29th President last weekend at BoRon Valley. Ray Arenburg named president of Jaycees BOLTON VALLEY -- the Connecticut Valley the 29th President of Raymond Aremburg of Jaycees has been elected the Vermont Jaycees at their annual convention last weekend at Bolton Valley Inn. 0PEN Hogs[ Aremburg will be overseeing 21 chapters and 650 young men between the ages of 18 and 36 in his new post. The Oxbow Vocational Center will hold an Open Aremburg has been a House at the student built Building Trades member ofConnecticutValley Jaycees since 1974 and has project on Saturday, June6, 1981from 1:00P.M. held the office of local to4:00P.M, president twice in that time, as well as holding various EVERYONE INVITED state offices. Last year he was one of the state district directors. According to Aremburg, "I have a debt to pay to the many friends I have made throughout the state in MASSEY the past seven years through Jaycees. By serving the Vermont Jayeees as their FERGUSON president is the best way to repay that debt." The statewide vote totaled 67 to 23 470 Diesel in favor of Aremburg being elected President for 1981-82. Loader Aremburg named three local residents to his cabinet. Michael Polli as treasurer, w/1 ptd brctet. G running ndition. u.. sc.ouer, assistant treasurer and Vidian Roe, editor of NOW Magazine, the official publication of the Vermont Jaycees. Connecticut Valley Jaycees meet the first and third Wednesday evenings at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradford Academy. Everyone is ONE OF_THE MANY GOOD BUYS AT: welcome to attend. NEW ENGLAND EQUIPMENT Co Inc NEWBURY--The Newbury Historical Society will meet in (802)295"7553 Rt. 14, White RV. Jct., Vt. the W. Newbury Church Hall - June 20 at 8 p.m. i, III mer Furniture "00'UNT JV 20% DIS( Hale Furniture & Carpet Bradford, Vermont "k Trade.offs urged (continued from page 1) from cut tree stumps are a more carefully in our real source of food for deer, fuelwood and other timber stand improvement work, he added "Species such as cherry, oak, beech, maples and aspen are all important food species for native wildlife. Therefore we will want to consider leaving some of these trees mixed into our improved areas. Most of the cone bearing softvoods also serve as shelter and food for our birds and animals," he said. "Woodland owners should not be mislead into trying to save all the trees beneficial to wildlife. Remember, sprouts rabbits, etc. We must also keep in mind that a healthy, vigoriously growing forest with scattered openings is the best wildlife habitat --01d, over mature stagnated stands are not where the action is when it comes to creatures of the forest," Sargent added. For assistance in deciding what, when and where to harvest your firewood, con- tact your County Forester at P.O. Box 191, Woodsville, N.H. 03785, the Grafton County Extension Service, or phone 787-6944 to discuss your particular needs. Our by GEOFF DATES Millions of dollars have been spent by the federal and state governments to come up with a blueprint for the protection and development of the Connecticut River Valley's resources and to deal with its flood problems. Between the mid-sixties and the mid-seventies, two large studies were con- ducted--one by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (with other federal and state agencies) and one by the New England River Basins Commission (NERBC). The first study was called the Comprehensive Investigation, (actually the title was much longer, but space is short). This took some five years to complete and nine volumes to contain the information. It remains the best (if not the most readable) source of information pertaining to water quality and supply, recreation, erosion control, navigation, electric power, fish and wildlife and other resources. General policies or strategies are recommended to guide their use and development. Flooding is another matter. As Mr. Michenfelder explained in a previous column, the Comprehensive Investigation recommended that seven dams be constructed in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts to complete a flood control system authorized by Congress in 1938. This system would protect cities in Massachusetts and Connecticut floodplains from catastrophic losses of life and property in the event of major flood. However, only part of the system was built. The cities were (and are) still vulnerable. The Comprehensive Investigation recommended completing the system by constructing seven more dams on upstream tributaries. This did not sit too well with many people in the Valley. They suggested that alternatives ought to be examined. NERBC conducted a study of the alternatives in the mid- seventies. This became a report called the River's Reach. NERBC concluded that a different approach was needed. Instead of building large expensive dams to keep floods away from people, the River's Reach recommended that people stay away from floodplains, whenever possible. In developed areas, local dikes, levees, and flood proofing could solve the problem. In undeveloped areas, the recommendation was simply to stay out of the floodplain. Did I say simple? Simple to recommend, maybe--not so simple to do. There is a difficult question here. Should people be allowed to live in dangerous areas if they choose to? A floodplain is an extremely dangerous area. If you don't believe it, ask someone who has lived through a flood to ho what it's like But floods of the magnitude we're talking at don't occur very frequently. Again, I refer to Mr. Michenfeider's discussion--gambling with lives and property is serious business. Then there is the whole question of flood damages and who should pay them. Damages are paid by the federal gover- nment in the form of flood insurance and disaster assistance. Flood insurance requires that communities manage their floodplains by regulation and flood proofing. The intent is to condition the availability of insurance at subsidized rates (subsidized by you and me through our tax dollars) on proper floodplain management. Disaster assistance is basically clean up and rebuild money, again provided by our tax dollars. In this country, we make choices based on our con- sideration of the costs involved. However, when someone else pays part of the costs, your choices will be quite different than if you pay them all yourself. After all, if the federal government will rebuild my home or business after a flood, why not live in the floodplain? Assume for a moment that I want to build a home in the floodplain and that I am aware of the risk. The town zoning regulations allow me to do it. I build my home, live quite comfortably for many years until one spring the dice come up snake eyes. There is a rapid thaw, heavy rain and frozen ground. The river reaches beyond its bank to use my laud to store flood water. The first floor of my home is under 2 feet of water. Fortunately, my family and I escape to a neighbor's home on high ground. The flood water subsides and we survey the damage--our home is a total wreck. I shake my fist at the river and curse the layers of mud in my living room, the structural damage to my house and my ill luck. I apply for federal disaster assistance to rebuild my home. I'll ,stop here, and ask you, the reader, a few questions: Should I receive federal aid? Put differently, would you like your tax money to go to rebuilding my house in the flood hazard area? Or should I be forced to bear the cost for my decision to live in the floodplain? Should I even be allowed to rebuild in the floodplain--should local regulations be enacted to prohibit this? Finally, let's broaden our perspective a bit. Suppose Congress once again considers constructing the remaining seven flood control dams in the tributaries. Would yon support this (again using your tax money) to protect Nor- thampton, Springfield, Chicopee, Holyoke and West Springfield in Massachusetts, and East Hartford in Con- necticut? Or should these cities bear the costs of their floodplain location by adopting proper floodplain management? We've come back to the basic question: if people choose to live in flood hazard areas, who should pay the costs of flood damages? EDITOR'S NO The three authors of this column would like to hear from you. If you have comments, questions or Connecticut River issues you would like to see addressed here, please let us know. We want to begin a dialogue here and be responsive to your interests. Write Our River, c-o Journal Opinion, Box 378, Bradford, Vt. 05033. MrroouaJ# a new/oca//y oww and ojxwat company with a ntonoy IVll w comLlJ In wmr w41fl drilling. DI Affordable wells through proven innovations DRILLING Member of Oxbow Union forestry team competes in bow sawing competition. Christ is coming again! We believe: "In the personal premillennial and imminent coming Lord Jesus Christ and that this Hope' has a vital bearing on the life and service of the believer." You will find a group of believers are eagerly awaiting His coming at: Bradford Evangelical Free Worship Service ! i :00 ROUTE 5 Sunday LOWER PLAIN Bill Wick, M. Div., Pastor (802) 222-9021 Oxbow wins event at VO.AG forestry meet JERICHO--The vocational agriculture forestry team from Brattleboro Union High School walked off with top honors at the second annual state-wide forestry com- petition. The c.ontest was held at the research forest of the University of Vermont and was co-sponsored by the Extension Service and Forestry Department of UVM and the state vocational education division. The team from Vergennes Union High School placed second. Inthird place was the team from Missisquoi Union High School. Winners of other events were: surveying and log scaling, Oxbow Union, Bradford; Orienteering, chain saw and cross cut saw cutting, Missisquoi Union; log rolling, Vergennes; bow sawing, Middlebury Union. Mid- dlebury and Missisquoi tied in the lumber scaling com- petition. Representing Oxbow were Duane Placey, David Thur- ston, Clinton Schwartz and James Allen. Vicki Lee Bacon Vicki Lee Bacon receives degree THETFORD--Vicki Lee Bacon, daughter of Priscilla LaMott and Talbert Bacon of E. Thetford, graduated recently from Hesser College in Manchester, N.H. with an Associate Degree in Business Science. She majored in the Executive Secretarial Program. Miss Bacon is employed by Dartmouth College With The Continuing Strike By The Mines, Production InThe Anthraolte Been Greatly Reduced. Naturally, Every Lost Production On The Part Of The U. Operations Reduces The Anthracite For The Calendar Year 1981. THIS WILL FURTHER SHORTAGE OF ANTHRACITE DURING THEMONTHS AHEAD. We Are Currently Booking Orders For The Months. If You Have The Facilities To Store We Encourap You To Place Your Orders In Very Near Future. Remember The Miner's In Late June And July Will Further Curtail Production. We Look Forward To Hearing From You Serving You With Quality Anthracite Please Place Your Order Today To Avoid Possible Price InCreases, And To Insure Adequate Supply For Next Winter. BRADFORD OIL CO. Inc. Junction 5 & 25 Bradford,. Vt. Call 802-222-5251 Or 603-787-6391 LUorne,r Pre-Sehool Co-Op to meet Monday BRADFORD--The Valley Co- operative pre-school organization is having its annual meeting June 8 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bradford Elementary School. The meeting is open to everyone and the pre-school encourages parents interested in sending their children to the program to come to the meeting, and to join the organization. The purpose of the annual meeting is to elect officers of the organization and to vote on the budget. It is imperative that old members and new members alike, do come to participate, for it is at this meeting that major decisions will be made, and the tone for the following school year will be set. If there are any questions about the annual meeting or the pre-school, call Ann McCormack at (603) 272-4942. 1 USE YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNT Whimsies TM Daywear and Foundations Our newest delectable collectableS one's whims as well as their clotlq and absolutely luscious. They'r Antror III nylon, trimmed in YOUR FA,LY DEPARTMENT STORE St. Johnsbury, Vt. * Woodsville, N.H. i