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June 3, 1981     Journal Opinion
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June 3, 1981
 

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Apollo I I Crew King Thomas A. Edison long been part of the American cultural landscape, though the kinds Babe Ruth admire change with and reflect the times. These portraits are of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, American heroes Long live the hero by David M. Maxfield Smithsonian News Service "There are no more American heroes."--llerbert Gold, author. "We do have heroes; we have had them throughout history.' '--Jack Santino, folklorist. For some years now, many Americans have said they felt something missing in their lives: heroes, those charismatic, larger-than-life public personalities once so deeply entwined in the nation's identity. "We have no heroic leaders, no religious or philosophic or artistic heroes, no inspiring military heroes," novelist- critic Herbert Gold wrote when the American hostages relurned home in January. In their place, he and others see nothing but a fast-changing clutter of celebrities, "the fast-food throwaway version of a hero," extending even to the freed Americans. Viewing these men and women as heroes is wishful thinking, I)r. Robert Jay Lifton, professor of psychiatry at Yale University, believes. "Americans are really hungry for heroes," he says, "and there's a great temptation to project onto the hostages that role." But wait; take a second look, suggest Jack Santino, the Smithsonian Institution's Folklife Program expert on American heroes and folklore. "The hostages truly were heroic," he says. "They behaved well under a certain set of circumstances; they behaved with grace, courage and dignity." Moreover, he believes they are the latest in the long line of American heroes, a varied and complex cast that has mirrored the nation's history, changing images with its cultural development. American history divides into four major periods, each with its own particular life style and set of hero figures, folklore historian Richard M. Dorson writes in America in Legend. The first, the time of the religious man, dominated the nation's Colonial period. Heroes then were godly men, Puritan leaders like William Bradford, John Winthrop and Cotton Mather, who dedicated their lives to serving the Lord and safeguarding their new religious societies. Next came the era of the democratic man, lasting well into the 19th century. The heroes were paternalistic, aristocratic statesmen yet advocates of democratic ideals--George Washington, father of the nation; Thomas Jefferson, architect of the Declaration of Independence. Following their lead came more common men: Andrew Jackson, "The Hero" to Americans moving westward, and then log-cabin-born Abe Lincoln, savior of the Republic and to Dorson "the most legendary of our presidents." Davy Crockett, perhaps the quintessential American folk hero, appeared, too, "a rough, full-blooded hero who somehow seemed to spring from the people," Santino says, "one who represented their drives, ambitions, labor and humor." The third era, that of the economic mall, beginning in the mid-19th century, yielded a glittering roster of self-made Americans, the captains of steel, rails, banking and other industry. "But they did not capture the people's imagination," Santino says. Celebrated instead were U.S. workers, who had been ex- ploited and foreclosed by business interests, and famous outlaw figures such as Jesse James. The labor movement, struggle for in- dividual rights and the nation's world wars later added to the U.S. stock of heroes. Along about the 1960s, a fourth period emerged, the time of the human man, represented, perhaps, by the late John Lennon, whose message in lyrics seemed to be that 20th-century man was too aggressive and needed to change his ways. But other heroes concurrently crossed the cultural landscape: political and sports figures, media stars, those who have achieved the unusual or ex- (please turn to page 2A) i i i i Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June3, 1981 i i i project Running champ Wo 00dsville man Hall o[ Famer many ways to go design around ready- metal boxes that you create from scratch, thing. The postal doesn't much the size of the box; Suggest that the box be )Y cutting the post to a adding and 3 with nails. of the box with driven into part No. 3. Add then the top. .and top, use glue waterproof; it demands that box-height be so much above grade and so far from pavement or road. The point is, nothing should interfere with the carrier's need to place or remove mail. The flag too -- place it so your t4AILBOX # l Materials Llst 3'/2 x 3 x pressure-treated I IX:. lumber, length to suit 2 pcs. 1 x 3Vz x 24 lumber 1 pc. I J, x 3 Ih x 16 lumber 2 pcs. - x 8 x 22 lumber I pc.  x 6Jh x 18 lumber I pc. K x 12 x 24 lumber I pc. x 3 x 6 lumber 1 pc. lumber, size optional postperson can easily reach it. Questions: Easily answered by your carrier or the local post office. Chances are that one of the designs shown here will meet your needs esthetically and practically. Start by cutting the vertical pieces (parts No. 1 and 2) to correct length. Both parts can be standard 2 x 10 boards (actually lt2" x 9t4"). The front board is used full-width, the back one is ripped to an 8" width. The rabbets in the front board are easy to cut on a table saw or with a portable circular saw. If they are a problem to do, reduce the width of the front board to 8" (to match the back piece) and increase the width of the sides (part No. 3) by i,./,. Then both tLe front and back vertical pieces will attach to the sides with simple butt joints. In either case, attach sides with waterproof glue and 8d nails. Next step is to add the bottom of the box, using glue and 8d nails that are driven into the top edge of the front piece and through the sides. Finally, add the top, also with glue and 8d nails. Two holes will be needed to set this project in the ground. Concrete is required in only { please turn to page 5A MARATHONER--This large trophy cup was Cliff Home's prize for finishing second In the 1915 Boston Marathon. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 I N TRODUCTION--CIIfton T. Horne of Woodsville (left) with Ernie Young, sports historian and Hall of Fame committee member of Haverhill, Mass., who introduced Horne at ceremonies. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 HAPPY BIRTHDAY--Clifton T. Home of Woodsvllle gets 90th birthday cake from Bob Tandy (left), a member of Haverhill, Mass., Hall of Fame Committee. PRESENTATION--Massachusetts State Rep. Frank Emilio presents citation from Massachusetts House of Representatives to Cliff Horne. WOODSvlLLE--Ninety-year- and Mrs. Reagan, was New old Clifton T. Horne of England 10-mile running Woodsville, whowas oneofthe champion in 1913, 1914, 1915 nation's best long-distance runners in younger years, was inducted into the Sport.s Hall of Fame of Haverhill, Mass., his original home town, May 23. Horne, who received a flood of official congratulations including one from President (please turn to page 5A) BRADFORD SOUTH END MARKET Fore y Maple Syrup (your container) .... $14.50 gal. Vt. Cheddor (mild) ........ $ 1.89 lb. Vt. Cheddor (reed.) ........ $1.99 lb. Fresh Produce every Fridcv Natural Foods RUNNER--Clifton T. Home of Woodsvllle as he looked at the height of his championship running career more than half a century ago. PHOTOGRAPHY by GARY QUACKENBUSH 603-353-9833 PERSONALIZED PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY Capturing the Spirit of Your Wedding ALL 1981 WEDDINGS BOOKED IN JUNE 10 PERCENT OFF WITH THIS AD. Apollo I I Crew King Thomas A. Edison long been part of the American cultural landscape, though the kinds Babe Ruth admire change with and reflect the times. These portraits are of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, American heroes Long live the hero by David M. Maxfield Smithsonian News Service "There are no more American heroes."--llerbert Gold, author. "We do have heroes; we have had them throughout history.' '--Jack Santino, folklorist. For some years now, many Americans have said they felt something missing in their lives: heroes, those charismatic, larger-than-life public personalities once so deeply entwined in the nation's identity. "We have no heroic leaders, no religious or philosophic or artistic heroes, no inspiring military heroes," novelist- critic Herbert Gold wrote when the American hostages relurned home in January. In their place, he and others see nothing but a fast-changing clutter of celebrities, "the fast-food throwaway version of a hero," extending even to the freed Americans. Viewing these men and women as heroes is wishful thinking, I)r. Robert Jay Lifton, professor of psychiatry at Yale University, believes. "Americans are really hungry for heroes," he says, "and there's a great temptation to project onto the hostages that role." But wait; take a second look, suggest Jack Santino, the Smithsonian Institution's Folklife Program expert on American heroes and folklore. "The hostages truly were heroic," he says. "They behaved well under a certain set of circumstances; they behaved with grace, courage and dignity." Moreover, he believes they are the latest in the long line of American heroes, a varied and complex cast that has mirrored the nation's history, changing images with its cultural development. American history divides into four major periods, each with its own particular life style and set of hero figures, folklore historian Richard M. Dorson writes in America in Legend. The first, the time of the religious man, dominated the nation's Colonial period. Heroes then were godly men, Puritan leaders like William Bradford, John Winthrop and Cotton Mather, who dedicated their lives to serving the Lord and safeguarding their new religious societies. Next came the era of the democratic man, lasting well into the 19th century. The heroes were paternalistic, aristocratic statesmen yet advocates of democratic ideals--George Washington, father of the nation; Thomas Jefferson, architect of the Declaration of Independence. Following their lead came more common men: Andrew Jackson, "The Hero" to Americans moving westward, and then log-cabin-born Abe Lincoln, savior of the Republic and to Dorson "the most legendary of our presidents." Davy Crockett, perhaps the quintessential American folk hero, appeared, too, "a rough, full-blooded hero who somehow seemed to spring from the people," Santino says, "one who represented their drives, ambitions, labor and humor." The third era, that of the economic mall, beginning in the mid-19th century, yielded a glittering roster of self-made Americans, the captains of steel, rails, banking and other industry. "But they did not capture the people's imagination," Santino says. Celebrated instead were U.S. workers, who had been ex- ploited and foreclosed by business interests, and famous outlaw figures such as Jesse James. The labor movement, struggle for in- dividual rights and the nation's world wars later added to the U.S. stock of heroes. Along about the 1960s, a fourth period emerged, the time of the human man, represented, perhaps, by the late John Lennon, whose message in lyrics seemed to be that 20th-century man was too aggressive and needed to change his ways. But other heroes concurrently crossed the cultural landscape: political and sports figures, media stars, those who have achieved the unusual or ex- (please turn to page 2A) i i i i Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June3, 1981 i i i project Running champ Wo adsville man Hall o[ Famer many ways to go design around ready- metal boxes that you create from scratch, thing. The postal doesn't much the size of the box; Suggest that the box be )Y cutting the post to a adding and 3 with nails. of the box with driven into part No. 3. Add then the top. .and top, use glue waterproof; it demands that box-height be so much above grade and so far from pavement or road. The point is, nothing should interfere with the carrier's need to place or remove mail. The flag too -- place it so your t4AILBOX # l Materials Llst 3'/2 x 3 x pressure-treated I IX:. lumber, length to suit 2 pcs. 1 x 3Vz x 24 lumber 1 pc. I J, x 3 Ih x 16 lumber 2 pcs. - x 8 x 22 lumber I pc.  x 6Jh x 18 lumber I pc. K x 12 x 24 lumber I pc. x 3 x 6 lumber 1 pc. lumber, size optional postperson can easily reach it. Questions: Easily answered by your carrier or the local post office. Chances are that one of the designs shown here will meet your needs esthetically and practically. Start by cutting the vertical pieces (parts No. 1 and 2) to correct length. Both parts can be standard 2 x 10 boards (actually lt2" x 9t4"). The front board is used full-width, the back one is ripped to an 8" width. The rabbets in the front board are easy to cut on a table saw or with a portable circular saw. If they are a problem to do, reduce the width of the front board to 8" (to match the back piece) and increase the width of the sides (part No. 3) by i,./,. Then both tLe front and back vertical pieces will attach to the sides with simple butt joints. In either case, attach sides with waterproof glue and 8d nails. Next step is to add the bottom of the box, using glue and 8d nails that are driven into the top edge of the front piece and through the sides. Finally, add the top, also with glue and 8d nails. Two holes will be needed to set this project in the ground. Concrete is required in only { please turn to page 5A MARATHONER--This large trophy cup was Cliff Home's prize for finishing second In the 1915 Boston Marathon. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 I N TRODUCTION--CIIfton T. Horne of Woodsville (left) with Ernie Young, sports historian and Hall of Fame committee member of Haverhill, Mass., who introduced Horne at ceremonies. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 HAPPY BIRTHDAY--Clifton T. Home of Woodsvllle gets 90th birthday cake from Bob Tandy (left), a member of Haverhill, Mass., Hall of Fame Committee. PRESENTATION--Massachusetts State Rep. Frank Emilio presents citation from Massachusetts House of Representatives to Cliff Horne. WOODSvlLLE--Ninety-year- and Mrs. Reagan, was New old Clifton T. Horne of England 10-mile running Woodsville, whowas oneofthe champion in 1913, 1914, 1915 nation's best long-distance runners in younger years, was inducted into the Sport.s Hall of Fame of Haverhill, Mass., his original home town, May 23. Horne, who received a flood of official congratulations including one from President (please turn to page 5A) BRADFORD SOUTH END MARKET Fore y Maple Syrup (your container) .... $14.50 gal. Vt. Cheddor (mild) ........ $ 1.89 lb. Vt. Cheddor (reed.) ........ $1.99 lb. Fresh Produce every Fridcv Natural Foods RUNNER--Clifton T. Home of Woodsvllle as he looked at the height of his championship running career more than half a century ago. PHOTOGRAPHY by GARY QUACKENBUSH 603-353-9833 PERSONALIZED PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY Capturing the Spirit of Your Wedding ALL 1981 WEDDINGS BOOKED IN JUNE 10 PERCENT OFF WITH THIS AD.