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Bradford , Vermont
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June 9, 1982     Journal Opinion
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June 9, 1982
 

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Sire/IIAMPSNIIN tyme Odord Ptermonl HQverhi|l Woodsvdle Both VelMOeIT Thotford Foot|to Wost Forlee Brodford Corinth Topshom Nowbury Wells R,ver Ryegote Groton Number 23 secures reappraisal; to 14 The Town of Piermont Selectmen a contract Monday with a private appraisal assure the first reappraisal in the town in according to Piermont Selectmen's .F. Green Company of Keene, N.H., said is the company the town has settled with. voters at ,their annual Town Meeting in an article that called for an ap- ,000 to go for the reappraisal. had been sought by petition the said Stevens. said property in the town is currently ap- roughly 34 percent of the town's grand list. E.F. Green Company would begin the on Monday, June 14, with a completion 31. woman appointed Fish and Game Board Joyce Wark, wildlife artist has been replace Gary the remainder of Vermont e first rathe history of the . sit on the board, as )pointment. Joyce Wark resigned from his position on the board last to become Deputy Commissioner of the and Game Department. Wark will serve of Moore's term, which will expire in and mother of four, Wark is an who enjoys both hunting and fishing. that among the issues currently facing the is in favor of a new fish hatchery for the loans still available; urged to hurry Student loans may be harder to but they are still available, ac- state college president. Dr. Janet Murphy, president of Lyndon issued a press release urging all Who to need a federal guaranteed to apply as soon as Murphy said in would reduce clear how far Congress will go in reducing said Murphy. Federally subsidized Pell not effected by the last wave of legislative are still eligible for Guaranteed Student family income level is under $30,000. A a family of four with an income of $15,000 could under current guidelines, still be to $5,100 in assistance from a corn- Guaranteed Supplemental Educational Oppor- and college work-study programs. teacher 00r/evances by school board Two disputes over the elimination of and two aid positions at Oxbow are arbitration. grievances from the Oxbow Teachers the school board is expected to see the decided by a third party, or arbitrator, . th disputes. chopping block this year were a humanities department and two study hall aide positions. In another School board recently denied grievances teachers fighting to retain their jobs officials maintain were to have been Positions. were filed by social studies teachers and John MacKenzie who had taken the teachers who had left on leaves of absence / begun teaching not actually specify in writing that would be temporary, but maintain a board meeting, Chairman Arolino the board felt "the only issue is the temporary contracts . . . (and) the violated the law." t.iob: Orford police chief the hot seat.., again job of police chief for the Town of to be a tough, if not controversial' L May. has come under of town residents recently who way he has been handling his duties. ' and Sandra Wood, have circulating a petition they hope to selectmen and possibly state law m said to include a call for May's Wood's complaints against May's from allegedly failing to follow of incidents occurring at their possibly over-reacting in his criticism in April for his haw that resulted in his shooting a dog and Loretta Pmhae. The ,town's had stood behind May in his Will meet Wy night, June 9, where the petition and the '4 USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont . June 9, 1982 Two outside buyers seeking rairlee okays to control Bradford National Bank budget BRADFORD--Two separate Chittenden Corporation of Haverhill, are the two 8O percent of BNB's 25,000 largest commercial bank) never presented with Chit- parties last week announced Burlington, Vt. The separate parties now actively shares at $75 per share, would hurt his bank's ability tenden's offer." they are considering plans to acquisition of a majority purchase a majority share of share of BNB stock by sale or stock at the Bradford National tender offer would upset Bank (BNB) in attempts to current plans by BNB officials take over control of the bank. for a joint affiliation with The These announcements First National Bank of Ver- followed the rejection of an mont, of Springfield. acquisition offer to BNB's Chittenden Corporation and board of directors from the Edward Patten, of N. considering tender offers for a majority share of BNB stock. A tender offer is made when a buyer bypasses a company's management going directly to the shareholders, offering to purchase their shares. Chittenden Corporation last week had offered to purchase BMU to seek grants .for special project .funding by MARGARET BURKE Geared to grade levels five school for specific projects WELLS RIVER-- The Blue through 12, this program will be developed." Mountain Union District 21 would provide 4 micro- "Pre-School Program" -- School Board has authorized computers and software to he To serve all District 21 pre- Superintendent A. Keith Ober housed in the library. Ober's kindergarten children, the to seek up to $38,400 in Federal report to the board states, plan states, "A part-time funds, funnelled through the "Computer assisted in- person (early education state department of struction and increased teacher) will he contracted to education, for six specific computer literacy will be the provide information for pre- projects, focus, including staff training school parents,- screen These include a program in the instrlltonal use of students, and provide titled "Prevention of computers." Cost of the orientation to Kindergarten." Delinquency" designed, in the project is listed in the report It calls for "Parent in- words of a memo from Ober to as $7,610. volvement, using the 'Parent- the board, "to reduce the "Parent-Community Community lnvolvement Data likelihood of delinquency, Involvement Data Base" -- Base.' " Cost of the project is substance abuse, truancy, and Designed to take into account $2,050. other disruptive behaviors by all children in the district, "Professional Develop- juveniles prior to their contact from infancy through grade ment" -- Designed to improve with law enforcement 12, this program, according to educational practices con- agencies or other Ober's plan, would use cerning all BMU gradelevels, authorities." Up to $16,000 can "census data ' to develop "a this program would provide be applied for to implement permanent record system... "mini-grants" of up to $100 to the project, for every pre-K student (pre- I0 staff members, "for the This program, if state of- school age) in the district," improvement of their specific ficials agree to fund it, would and "a parent list, composed teaching skills or program. provide training for of in-school and pre-school Half of the funds will be elementary school staff to children." The plan further reserved for readlng-language help them "t identify early, states, ,'Using a phone survey, arts. Eligible expenses in- kids who may be headed for with written follow-up, a list of clude materials, tuition, trouble," Ober told the board, community members willing substitutes, conference It calls for a high degree of to volunteer services to the (please turn to page 3) community involvement, with QUEST program training of Bradford National Bank stock has a book value of $80 per share, but is currently selling at about $62 per share. Patten told the Journal Opinion last Friday that he is prepared to purchase 12,501 shares (51 percent) of BNB stock, matching Chittenden's offer of $75 per share through a tender offer. Chittenden President Hilton Wick, said following rejection of his company's acquisition offer last week, that he would also be considering going to BNB's stockholders with Chit- tenden's offer. Patten said his decision to come into the picture last week was prompted by BNB's rejection of Chittenden's acquisition offer. "There is no question," said Patten, "that Chit- tenden's offer is much fairer to the stockholders than the Springfield bank's." Patten is a N. Haverhill businessman and a former BNB director who resigned in 1980 over disagreements with the bank's management policies. Small Businesses Bradford National Bank President Paul Gallerani said in announcing the rejection of Chittenden's offer, "The directors believe that to pursue negotiations with Chittenden Corp. would jeopardize the bank's con- tinuing ability to fully meet the business priorities which the directors have previously established." Gallerani said he feels an affiliation with a bank the size of Chittenden (Vermont's to continue serving small businesses and communities in the Bradford area as it has in the past. He said BNB's planned affiliation with The First National Bank of Vermont would enable the bank to preserve its local policies while increasing its base by forming a partnership with a similar bank. Plans for the affiliation were announced last month in the Journal Opinion. Bradford National Bank recorded assets of $30 million in December of 1981; The First National Bank of Ver- mont recorded assets of $67 million in December. Brad- ford National Bank has branch offices in Newbury, Fairlee, and E. Tbetford, in addition to its main office in BracKord Village. The First National Bank has branch offices in Fair Haven, Nor- thfield, Windsor, and St. Johnsbury, with its main offices in Springfield. But Patten said under the present terms of the BNB -- First National affiliation shareholders are expected to receive about 3.5 shares of a joint BNB -- First National holding company for every one BNB share. Both Chit- tenden's Wick and Patten say The First National Bank of Vermont stock is worth about $15 per share. "This would leave Bradford shareholders with stock worth about $52 per share," said Patten, "which is nowhere near what Chittenden or we're now offering... I just think its too bad the shareholders were Disputed Figures Gallerani disputes both the figures on the price of First National stock and the 3.5 share agreement but is declining to offer specifics. However, he says a prospectus will be available to BNB shareholders within the next two months. Chittenden Corporation is a holding company that includes among its subsidiaries the Chittenden Trust Company, the state's largest commercial bank, and Mountain Trust, in Stowe. The corporation has reportedly recorded assets of $422 million. Wick claims Chittenden only wants to own the Bradford bank and has no present plans to change its board of direc- tors. Patten, who says his offer is there "in case the Chittenden offer doesn't go through," has different plans. He said, if his tender offer was successful, he would change the entire board of directors and the bank's top management. "I'd install directors who reflected my business philosophy," he said, "but I'd stay out of the picture." Patten said he was not in- terested in running a bank, but instead regards his tender offer as an "investment." He confirmed reports that said his various business en- terprises would allow him to come up with the $937,000 needed for the tender offer without having to borrow money. Gallerani said he would not comment on Patten's tender (please turn to page I0) community volunteers and the have overstepped their esO00,,s00men00o00a"O00e00,oo Trustees may board," among other provisions. o, vo,00n00r00 thwarted anyway "would work with some first authority; bar plan offenders who haven't hurt anyone." Ober said, adding, "A community-based diversion board would make Other bar proposa/s/n the works the program self-replacing." BRADFORD-- When Brad- received a letter from the Plans call for the funding and ford's Village Trustees used a trustees that said the two operation of the program for newly re-enforced village Randolph men could now one year only. entertainment ordinance to receive the entertainment "We're addressing a need block the plans of two Ran- permit they had been denied you know too well," Ober told dolph men seekingtoestablish earlier if they agreed to a the board prior to their a nightclub on Main Street number of rules and passage, with one disenting here, they were successful, guidelines under which the vote, of a motion approving But the end may not have nightclub wouldoperate. the funding application at the justified the means. Clements is not happy with June 2 BMU school board After seeking an opinion the trustee's timing, among meeting, from an attorney to find out if other things. Robert Niebling At the board's previous denying thepermitwaslegal, and Richard Storm, the meeting, May 26, it expelled a the trustees found out that it initiators of the Bradford student who had been a was not. What they found was nightclub proposal and owners disciplinary problem, and that, according to their of Ashley's nightclub in "had failed to comply with lawyer, they are required by Randolph, say their plans for conditions for re-entry," as law to provide sufficient a nightclub in Bradford are that meeting's minutes state, grounds or reasons for history. BlecGrant denying entertainment per- The two have decided to The five other projects for mits, according to village take their nightclub elsewhere which funding will be sought come under the category of Federal funding known as "Chapter two and as "bloc grants." This means that school districts are given wide latitude in how they use the money. Five Programs The five programs are the District 21 administration's attempt to meet objectives for BMU that were identified in officials, and are looking at a site in Last week, Allan Clements, White River Junction, ac- owner of the Main Street cording toStorm. building in which the bar After the trustees flatly would have been located, denied them an entertainment permit at a regular trustees meeting last month, Niebling had not been optimistic. Asked if he and his partners could effectively proceed with their plans in Bradford without an entertainment permit, Niebling had said, "No . . . that's all we are, a nightclub with entertainment." The trustees had just recently adopted (or re- enforced) the old 1890 or- dinance in the village's bylaws that requires trustee approval in the form of a permit for entertainment in the village. The move. initiated by trustee Larry Drew, was aimed at village control over future nightspots and dances at which alcohol would be con- sumed. Selectmen Approval The town's selectmen had approved Niebling and Storm's proposal in April, saying they were satisfied that the two seemed willing to cooperate with a number of regulations the selectmen, as the town's local liquor cOntrol board, could set down. The would-be bar owners had come prepared with a number of voluntary regulations the selectmen also were pleased with. Niebling and Storm took the same proposal to the trustees but did not get very far. They found the trustees steadfast in their desire to avoid another nightclub situation like that which had involved the now defunct King Arthur's Disco. King Arthur's had lost its liquor license for a number of violations and had allegedly been the source of a number of incidents that kept area police busy until it closed for financial reasons last year, according to state police Corporal Robert Haradon. Contacted early this week, Village Administrator Susan Spaulding said that she had not actually seen any legal advice on paper but had been assured of its authenticity by trustee chairman K. Donald Welch. Clements told the Journal Opinion that he had originally pressured the trustees into checking the legality of the situation following their permit decision in May. "The original decision was badly handled," said Clements. "The taxpayers are fortunate that those two (Niebling and Storm) don't take legal action for saying 'no' without chocking into it first." However, Clements would not say whether he was considering some kind of legal action against the trustees. "Nine out of ten kids in this town are good kids," said (please turn to page 10) Dr. DouKlas Harris iob July 1 order of priority by the school's staff, board, and WELLS RIVER-- The search sylvania native holds degrees parents over a period of for, a principal for Blue in Secondary Education, Mountain Union School Library and Media Science, several months. The culminated Saturday, May 29 and recently wa awarded a programs are: with the selection of Douglas Ph.D. from Kent State "Computer Instruction" -- Harris of Bentleyville, Pa. University in Special The 31 year old Penn-EducationAdministration. BMU school finds a new principal IT'S A HIT-- Little League aetiea In Weedsvllle between the American Legion and Coach and Paddock teams last week. His previous experiences include teaching high school English, serving as a district director of library and media services, teaching un- dergraduate and graduate courses in education, and serving as a curriculum consultant to over 70 school districts in Ohio, Penn- sylvania, and West Virginia. Active professionally, Dr. Harris has made presen- tations to the American Theater Association and the Ohio Association for Gifted Children; is a life member of the National Education Association; member of the National education honor fraternity, Phi Delta Kappa; and is an active participant in the National Association for Gifted Children. He also was honored by receiving op- portunities to study two summers at York University, England, a part of an ex- change program for educators. Harris will take over the Harris has multiple decision was based on Harris' principal's position from William Randall, who had been the school's principal for the past eight years. Randall is expected to stay on at BMU in the newly created position of Special Services Coordinator- Instructor. He is also scheduled to teach dramatics at the school next year. Working at the school since it first opened in 1970, Randall began as a junior high English teacher. He will oversee special education programs, academic counseling, special education programs, and coordinate special services at the school in his new role in addition to a number of ex- tracurricular duties. Randall holds a Masters degree in special education. Harris will take over as principal on July 1, said a school spokesman. In addition to an interest in talented and gifted education, professional certifications, including K through 12 principal, K through 12 library science, and seven through 12 English, and Driver Education. Personal interests have included an active par- ticipation in religious education, local fire depar- tments, Lions International, Fraternal Order of Eagles, and community sports. Once drafted by the Kansas City Royals, he continues to stay in shape by running, officiating sports events, hiking, bicycling, and playing "slow- pitch" softball. Other in- terests include reading and writing. The search process covered over two months, and resulted in nearly 70 applicants. The final selection, made May 29, involved over 30 student, staff, and community par- ticipants, in addition to the full School Board. The final qualifications, in addition to his attitude toward the potential of education at BMU said a school spokesman. When asked why he wanted to come to Vermont, Harris said, "I would come to Blue Mountain Union if it were located in Utah, or Florida. Being in Vermont, is an added bonus. I am excited about the potential for K through 12 education under one principal, in one building. It is a rare opportunity." Commenting on the quality of candidates, Board Chair- man Stephen Allen noted: "It is a pleasure to have to deal with the 'problem' of so many competent candidates. We have high hopes for the tenure of Dr. Harris at Blue Mt. Union School," Dr. and Mrs. Harris, together with their infant son, will be moving into the Blue Mt. community in the near future. FAIRLEE-- About 40 voters turned up at last week's Annual Town of Fairlee School Meeting where they approved a budget that was a little higher than the present one of 1981-82, but also an amount to be raised in taxes that will save taxpayers in the town over $22,000. The new 1982-83 budget recommended by the Fairlee School Board and Orange East District Administration asked for $335,786. Voters approved the budget with no amend- ments. The new budget is 5.8 per- cent or $18,423 higher than this year's budget. However, according to Orange East District Superintendent John Fontana, Fairlee school taxes will be dropping this year by about 7.4 percent. Fontana attributed the expected dr@ in the amount to be raised in Fairlee school taxes to basic differences in the way the money was spent this year. "Last year we ended up the year with a deficit of about $20,000," he said, "this year we ended up with a surplus of around $20,000." "That's a difference of about $40,000 and that's where the difference in taxes is coming from," said Fontana. Another factor contributing to the expected school tax decrease is a jump in the amount of state aid to education the Town of Fairlee is expected to receive this year. According to figures released by the state, the Town of Fairlee is expected to receive $12,656 this year under the new state aid to education formula passed by Vermont's legislature during its last session. Fairlee would have received $9,177 under the old state education plan. The projected amount to he raised in school taxes for the Town of Fairlee now stands at $285,553 or $22,970 lower than the current fiscal year. This would drop the school portion of the town's tax rate to $11.06 from $11.50 per $1000 of assessed property valuation, according to Fontana. Voters at the meeting were also told that the school board has shelved their plans to seek better insulation of the roof at the Fairlee Elementary School. Initial estimates for the project called for an ex- penditure of up to $50,000. School officials say they are still looking for a more economical solution to the problem. Toward the end of the meeting, some voters questioned whether the meeting was in fact binding or legal because the warning for the meeting may not have been posted by the deadline. Fontana told the group he would look into the legality of the situation. ..... :i:': =' .... Sire/IIAMPSNIIN tyme Odord Ptermonl HQverhi|l Woodsvdle Both VelMOeIT Thotford Foot|to Wost Forlee Brodford Corinth Topshom Nowbury Wells R,ver Ryegote Groton Number 23 secures reappraisal; to 14 The Town of Piermont Selectmen a contract Monday with a private appraisal assure the first reappraisal in the town in according to Piermont Selectmen's .F. Green Company of Keene, N.H., said is the company the town has settled with. voters at ,their annual Town Meeting in an article that called for an ap- ,000 to go for the reappraisal. had been sought by petition the said Stevens. said property in the town is currently ap- roughly 34 percent of the town's grand list. E.F. Green Company would begin the on Monday, June 14, with a completion 31. woman appointed Fish and Game Board Joyce Wark, wildlife artist has been replace Gary the remainder of Vermont e first rathe history of the . sit on the board, as )pointment. Joyce Wark resigned from his position on the board last to become Deputy Commissioner of the and Game Department. Wark will serve of Moore's term, which will expire in and mother of four, Wark is an who enjoys both hunting and fishing. that among the issues currently facing the is in favor of a new fish hatchery for the loans still available; urged to hurry Student loans may be harder to but they are still available, ac- state college president. Dr. Janet Murphy, president of Lyndon issued a press release urging all Who to need a federal guaranteed to apply as soon as Murphy said in would reduce clear how far Congress will go in reducing said Murphy. Federally subsidized Pell not effected by the last wave of legislative are still eligible for Guaranteed Student family income level is under $30,000. A a family of four with an income of $15,000 could under current guidelines, still be to $5,100 in assistance from a corn- Guaranteed Supplemental Educational Oppor- and college work-study programs. teacher 00r/evances by school board Two disputes over the elimination of and two aid positions at Oxbow are arbitration. grievances from the Oxbow Teachers the school board is expected to see the decided by a third party, or arbitrator, . th disputes. chopping block this year were a humanities department and two study hall aide positions. In another School board recently denied grievances teachers fighting to retain their jobs officials maintain were to have been Positions. were filed by social studies teachers and John MacKenzie who had taken the teachers who had left on leaves of absence / begun teaching not actually specify in writing that would be temporary, but maintain a board meeting, Chairman Arolino the board felt "the only issue is the temporary contracts . . . (and) the violated the law." t.iob: Orford police chief the hot seat.., again job of police chief for the Town of to be a tough, if not controversial' L May. has come under of town residents recently who way he has been handling his duties. ' and Sandra Wood, have circulating a petition they hope to selectmen and possibly state law m said to include a call for May's Wood's complaints against May's from allegedly failing to follow of incidents occurring at their possibly over-reacting in his criticism in April for his haw that resulted in his shooting a dog and Loretta Pmhae. The ,town's had stood behind May in his Will meet Wy night, June 9, where the petition and the '4 USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont . June 9, 1982 Two outside buyers seeking rairlee okays to control Bradford National Bank budget BRADFORD--Two separate Chittenden Corporation of Haverhill, are the two 8O percent of BNB's 25,000 largest commercial bank) never presented with Chit- parties last week announced Burlington, Vt. The separate parties now actively shares at $75 per share, would hurt his bank's ability tenden's offer." they are considering plans to acquisition of a majority purchase a majority share of share of BNB stock by sale or stock at the Bradford National tender offer would upset Bank (BNB) in attempts to current plans by BNB officials take over control of the bank. for a joint affiliation with The These announcements First National Bank of Ver- followed the rejection of an mont, of Springfield. acquisition offer to BNB's Chittenden Corporation and board of directors from the Edward Patten, of N. considering tender offers for a majority share of BNB stock. A tender offer is made when a buyer bypasses a company's management going directly to the shareholders, offering to purchase their shares. Chittenden Corporation last week had offered to purchase BMU to seek grants .for special project .funding by MARGARET BURKE Geared to grade levels five school for specific projects WELLS RIVER-- The Blue through 12, this program will be developed." Mountain Union District 21 would provide 4 micro- "Pre-School Program" -- School Board has authorized computers and software to he To serve all District 21 pre- Superintendent A. Keith Ober housed in the library. Ober's kindergarten children, the to seek up to $38,400 in Federal report to the board states, plan states, "A part-time funds, funnelled through the "Computer assisted in- person (early education state department of struction and increased teacher) will he contracted to education, for six specific computer literacy will be the provide information for pre- projects, focus, including staff training school parents,- screen These include a program in the instrlltonal use of students, and provide titled "Prevention of computers." Cost of the orientation to Kindergarten." Delinquency" designed, in the project is listed in the report It calls for "Parent in- words of a memo from Ober to as $7,610. volvement, using the 'Parent- the board, "to reduce the "Parent-Community Community lnvolvement Data likelihood of delinquency, Involvement Data Base" -- Base.' " Cost of the project is substance abuse, truancy, and Designed to take into account $2,050. other disruptive behaviors by all children in the district, "Professional Develop- juveniles prior to their contact from infancy through grade ment" -- Designed to improve with law enforcement 12, this program, according to educational practices con- agencies or other Ober's plan, would use cerning all BMU gradelevels, authorities." Up to $16,000 can "census data ' to develop "a this program would provide be applied for to implement permanent record system... "mini-grants" of up to $100 to the project, for every pre-K student (pre- I0 staff members, "for the This program, if state of- school age) in the district," improvement of their specific ficials agree to fund it, would and "a parent list, composed teaching skills or program. provide training for of in-school and pre-school Half of the funds will be elementary school staff to children." The plan further reserved for readlng-language help them "t identify early, states, ,'Using a phone survey, arts. Eligible expenses in- kids who may be headed for with written follow-up, a list of clude materials, tuition, trouble," Ober told the board, community members willing substitutes, conference It calls for a high degree of to volunteer services to the (please turn to page 3) community involvement, with QUEST program training of Bradford National Bank stock has a book value of $80 per share, but is currently selling at about $62 per share. Patten told the Journal Opinion last Friday that he is prepared to purchase 12,501 shares (51 percent) of BNB stock, matching Chittenden's offer of $75 per share through a tender offer. Chittenden President Hilton Wick, said following rejection of his company's acquisition offer last week, that he would also be considering going to BNB's stockholders with Chit- tenden's offer. Patten said his decision to come into the picture last week was prompted by BNB's rejection of Chittenden's acquisition offer. "There is no question," said Patten, "that Chit- tenden's offer is much fairer to the stockholders than the Springfield bank's." Patten is a N. Haverhill businessman and a former BNB director who resigned in 1980 over disagreements with the bank's management policies. Small Businesses Bradford National Bank President Paul Gallerani said in announcing the rejection of Chittenden's offer, "The directors believe that to pursue negotiations with Chittenden Corp. would jeopardize the bank's con- tinuing ability to fully meet the business priorities which the directors have previously established." Gallerani said he feels an affiliation with a bank the size of Chittenden (Vermont's to continue serving small businesses and communities in the Bradford area as it has in the past. He said BNB's planned affiliation with The First National Bank of Vermont would enable the bank to preserve its local policies while increasing its base by forming a partnership with a similar bank. Plans for the affiliation were announced last month in the Journal Opinion. Bradford National Bank recorded assets of $30 million in December of 1981; The First National Bank of Ver- mont recorded assets of $67 million in December. Brad- ford National Bank has branch offices in Newbury, Fairlee, and E. Tbetford, in addition to its main office in BracKord Village. The First National Bank has branch offices in Fair Haven, Nor- thfield, Windsor, and St. Johnsbury, with its main offices in Springfield. But Patten said under the present terms of the BNB -- First National affiliation shareholders are expected to receive about 3.5 shares of a joint BNB -- First National holding company for every one BNB share. Both Chit- tenden's Wick and Patten say The First National Bank of Vermont stock is worth about $15 per share. "This would leave Bradford shareholders with stock worth about $52 per share," said Patten, "which is nowhere near what Chittenden or we're now offering... I just think its too bad the shareholders were Disputed Figures Gallerani disputes both the figures on the price of First National stock and the 3.5 share agreement but is declining to offer specifics. However, he says a prospectus will be available to BNB shareholders within the next two months. Chittenden Corporation is a holding company that includes among its subsidiaries the Chittenden Trust Company, the state's largest commercial bank, and Mountain Trust, in Stowe. The corporation has reportedly recorded assets of $422 million. Wick claims Chittenden only wants to own the Bradford bank and has no present plans to change its board of direc- tors. Patten, who says his offer is there "in case the Chittenden offer doesn't go through," has different plans. He said, if his tender offer was successful, he would change the entire board of directors and the bank's top management. "I'd install directors who reflected my business philosophy," he said, "but I'd stay out of the picture." Patten said he was not in- terested in running a bank, but instead regards his tender offer as an "investment." He confirmed reports that said his various business en- terprises would allow him to come up with the $937,000 needed for the tender offer without having to borrow money. Gallerani said he would not comment on Patten's tender (please turn to page I0) community volunteers and the have overstepped their esO00,,s00men00o00a"O00e00,oo Trustees may board," among other provisions. o, vo,00n00r00 thwarted anyway "would work with some first authority; bar plan offenders who haven't hurt anyone." Ober said, adding, "A community-based diversion board would make Other bar proposa/s/n the works the program self-replacing." BRADFORD-- When Brad- received a letter from the Plans call for the funding and ford's Village Trustees used a trustees that said the two operation of the program for newly re-enforced village Randolph men could now one year only. entertainment ordinance to receive the entertainment "We're addressing a need block the plans of two Ran- permit they had been denied you know too well," Ober told dolph men seekingtoestablish earlier if they agreed to a the board prior to their a nightclub on Main Street number of rules and passage, with one disenting here, they were successful, guidelines under which the vote, of a motion approving But the end may not have nightclub wouldoperate. the funding application at the justified the means. Clements is not happy with June 2 BMU school board After seeking an opinion the trustee's timing, among meeting, from an attorney to find out if other things. Robert Niebling At the board's previous denying thepermitwaslegal, and Richard Storm, the meeting, May 26, it expelled a the trustees found out that it initiators of the Bradford student who had been a was not. What they found was nightclub proposal and owners disciplinary problem, and that, according to their of Ashley's nightclub in "had failed to comply with lawyer, they are required by Randolph, say their plans for conditions for re-entry," as law to provide sufficient a nightclub in Bradford are that meeting's minutes state, grounds or reasons for history. BlecGrant denying entertainment per- The two have decided to The five other projects for mits, according to village take their nightclub elsewhere which funding will be sought come under the category of Federal funding known as "Chapter two and as "bloc grants." This means that school districts are given wide latitude in how they use the money. Five Programs The five programs are the District 21 administration's attempt to meet objectives for BMU that were identified in officials, and are looking at a site in Last week, Allan Clements, White River Junction, ac- owner of the Main Street cording toStorm. building in which the bar After the trustees flatly would have been located, denied them an entertainment permit at a regular trustees meeting last month, Niebling had not been optimistic. Asked if he and his partners could effectively proceed with their plans in Bradford without an entertainment permit, Niebling had said, "No . . . that's all we are, a nightclub with entertainment." The trustees had just recently adopted (or re- enforced) the old 1890 or- dinance in the village's bylaws that requires trustee approval in the form of a permit for entertainment in the village. The move. initiated by trustee Larry Drew, was aimed at village control over future nightspots and dances at which alcohol would be con- sumed. Selectmen Approval The town's selectmen had approved Niebling and Storm's proposal in April, saying they were satisfied that the two seemed willing to cooperate with a number of regulations the selectmen, as the town's local liquor cOntrol board, could set down. The would-be bar owners had come prepared with a number of voluntary regulations the selectmen also were pleased with. Niebling and Storm took the same proposal to the trustees but did not get very far. They found the trustees steadfast in their desire to avoid another nightclub situation like that which had involved the now defunct King Arthur's Disco. King Arthur's had lost its liquor license for a number of violations and had allegedly been the source of a number of incidents that kept area police busy until it closed for financial reasons last year, according to state police Corporal Robert Haradon. Contacted early this week, Village Administrator Susan Spaulding said that she had not actually seen any legal advice on paper but had been assured of its authenticity by trustee chairman K. Donald Welch. Clements told the Journal Opinion that he had originally pressured the trustees into checking the legality of the situation following their permit decision in May. "The original decision was badly handled," said Clements. "The taxpayers are fortunate that those two (Niebling and Storm) don't take legal action for saying 'no' without chocking into it first." However, Clements would not say whether he was considering some kind of legal action against the trustees. "Nine out of ten kids in this town are good kids," said (please turn to page 10) Dr. DouKlas Harris iob July 1 order of priority by the school's staff, board, and WELLS RIVER-- The search sylvania native holds degrees parents over a period of for, a principal for Blue in Secondary Education, Mountain Union School Library and Media Science, several months. The culminated Saturday, May 29 and recently wa awarded a programs are: with the selection of Douglas Ph.D. from Kent State "Computer Instruction" -- Harris of Bentleyville, Pa. University in Special The 31 year old Penn-EducationAdministration. BMU school finds a new principal IT'S A HIT-- Little League aetiea In Weedsvllle between the American Legion and Coach and Paddock teams last week. His previous experiences include teaching high school English, serving as a district director of library and media services, teaching un- dergraduate and graduate courses in education, and serving as a curriculum consultant to over 70 school districts in Ohio, Penn- sylvania, and West Virginia. Active professionally, Dr. Harris has made presen- tations to the American Theater Association and the Ohio Association for Gifted Children; is a life member of the National Education Association; member of the National education honor fraternity, Phi Delta Kappa; and is an active participant in the National Association for Gifted Children. He also was honored by receiving op- portunities to study two summers at York University, England, a part of an ex- change program for educators. Harris will take over the Harris has multiple decision was based on Harris' principal's position from William Randall, who had been the school's principal for the past eight years. Randall is expected to stay on at BMU in the newly created position of Special Services Coordinator- Instructor. He is also scheduled to teach dramatics at the school next year. Working at the school since it first opened in 1970, Randall began as a junior high English teacher. He will oversee special education programs, academic counseling, special education programs, and coordinate special services at the school in his new role in addition to a number of ex- tracurricular duties. Randall holds a Masters degree in special education. Harris will take over as principal on July 1, said a school spokesman. In addition to an interest in talented and gifted education, professional certifications, including K through 12 principal, K through 12 library science, and seven through 12 English, and Driver Education. Personal interests have included an active par- ticipation in religious education, local fire depar- tments, Lions International, Fraternal Order of Eagles, and community sports. Once drafted by the Kansas City Royals, he continues to stay in shape by running, officiating sports events, hiking, bicycling, and playing "slow- pitch" softball. Other in- terests include reading and writing. The search process covered over two months, and resulted in nearly 70 applicants. The final selection, made May 29, involved over 30 student, staff, and community par- ticipants, in addition to the full School Board. The final qualifications, in addition to his attitude toward the potential of education at BMU said a school spokesman. When asked why he wanted to come to Vermont, Harris said, "I would come to Blue Mountain Union if it were located in Utah, or Florida. Being in Vermont, is an added bonus. I am excited about the potential for K through 12 education under one principal, in one building. It is a rare opportunity." Commenting on the quality of candidates, Board Chair- man Stephen Allen noted: "It is a pleasure to have to deal with the 'problem' of so many competent candidates. We have high hopes for the tenure of Dr. Harris at Blue Mt. Union School," Dr. and Mrs. Harris, together with their infant son, will be moving into the Blue Mt. community in the near future. FAIRLEE-- About 40 voters turned up at last week's Annual Town of Fairlee School Meeting where they approved a budget that was a little higher than the present one of 1981-82, but also an amount to be raised in taxes that will save taxpayers in the town over $22,000. The new 1982-83 budget recommended by the Fairlee School Board and Orange East District Administration asked for $335,786. Voters approved the budget with no amend- ments. The new budget is 5.8 per- cent or $18,423 higher than this year's budget. However, according to Orange East District Superintendent John Fontana, Fairlee school taxes will be dropping this year by about 7.4 percent. Fontana attributed the expected dr@ in the amount to be raised in Fairlee school taxes to basic differences in the way the money was spent this year. "Last year we ended up the year with a deficit of about $20,000," he said, "this year we ended up with a surplus of around $20,000." "That's a difference of about $40,000 and that's where the difference in taxes is coming from," said Fontana. Another factor contributing to the expected school tax decrease is a jump in the amount of state aid to education the Town of Fairlee is expected to receive this year. According to figures released by the state, the Town of Fairlee is expected to receive $12,656 this year under the new state aid to education formula passed by Vermont's legislature during its last session. Fairlee would have received $9,177 under the old state education plan. The projected amount to he raised in school taxes for the Town of Fairlee now stands at $285,553 or $22,970 lower than the current fiscal year. This would drop the school portion of the town's tax rate to $11.06 from $11.50 per $1000 of assessed property valuation, according to Fontana. Voters at the meeting were also told that the school board has shelved their plans to seek better insulation of the roof at the Fairlee Elementary School. Initial estimates for the project called for an ex- penditure of up to $50,000. School officials say they are still looking for a more economical solution to the problem. Toward the end of the meeting, some voters questioned whether the meeting was in fact binding or legal because the warning for the meeting may not have been posted by the deadline. Fontana told the group he would look into the legality of the situation. ..... :i:': =' ....