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June 9, 1982     Journal Opinion
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June 9, 1982
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-June 9, 1982 llll IHI I i NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly Onwspeper published in IIredferd, Vermt. $vbscr|ption fetes - Vermon! end Now Sempskire - $9.00 per onr; $i.00 let six menNm; out of state $1|.00 per year end $7.00 for sin months; Senier cttisea diNonm $2.N. Second ClaSs pespe pd lit Ilmdferd, Yermont 05055. PvbU|ked by Sortkonst Pebliskla| Cempony, Inc., P.O. hi 371, |miHoA. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford /  Woodsville I02-222-5281  j 603-747-2016 i ]l i i i1, An Independent Newspaper I,,. Editorial t J The bottom line Throughout this year, as in years past, we have chronicled many of the large and varied issues that have been hashed out between our local school boards, their administrations, and teacher groups. Our articles offer an important service, they provide our readers, in many cases property taxpayers, with an account of how taxpayers' money is being spent. But in all the accounts of budgets, salaries, energy costs, roof leaks, teacher grievances, and the usual issues battled over at school board meetings, it sometimes seems as though the single, real issue behind all this discussion gets lost in the shuffle. At the heart of all the peripheral jumble is the bottom line: the education of a now generation. Excluding occasional sidetracks, it is this bottom line that is at stake when school boards approve or deny a new curriculdm policy or weigh the merits and c. of p Proposed computer education program. Our area is one in which taxpayers pay more to fund their schools than they do to fund their municipal governments. Despite the fact that salaries in professions that require comparable educational backgrounds, may argue that a large group of the taxpayers paying our schools' salaries bring home even less. Concerned school officials face a much deeper problem. Is it fair to send students out into the world with little more than the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic? Times have changed and change continues to 1gather momentum. Our educators rightfully assert that our schools' curriculum must also reflect changes in the world in which their students must survive and hopefully prosper. This is not to belittle the fact that the total cost of education is often effected by matters that have very little to do with education. Many school budgets in our area reflect to a large extent skyrocketing costs that seem to come standard with sprawling one or two story buildings with flat roofs. Changing times have also brought searing energy and maintenance costs. Recent history has shown us that change can cost a great deal of money when it comes to education. So the numbers will probably continue to fly back and forth at school board meetings like that in a corporate boardroom -- some will likely con- tinue to grow, others may decline. But please note: if you aregoing to follow you have to consider the You can get a very good idea of what has really been happening at our local school board meetings between school boards, administrators, and teachers by attending one of the many graduation ceremonies at our area high schools in the coming weeks. Look deep into the faces of those students who are leaving our schools as a product of the institutions you may be paying for. Then consider the enormous responsibility that our school officials have when they must convert those faces to numbers that, combined, determine the educational price tag we call a school tax rate. 00Letters to the Editor Seeking New Hampshire GJ.'s Plant sale To the Editor: state's history. $C88f- The Western Australia The 197th Antiaircraft Coastal Defense Historical Artillery Group, New Ham- To the Editor: Committee, Perth, Australia, pshire Army National Guard, The Board of Directors and is seeking hfformation and was mobilized for WW II on the staff of United Cerebral memorabilia from former September 16, 1940 and, Palsy of Vermont wish to members of the 197th following a training period at extend their thanks to Antiaircraft Artillery (AAA) Camp Hulen, Texas, was everyone who gave their Regiment who served in assigned to the defense of enthusiastic support to our Australia during 1942. West Australia. Annual Mother's Day Plant The committee is recording Former members of the Sale. With the help of many information about 197th AAA 197th AAA Regiment, who good people, we were able to Group members, their served in West Australia, are make the sale a grand suc- military activities while in encouraged to send their cess. Australia, gathering photos and memorabilia in preparation for Australia's Bi- centennial celebrations in 1988. The plan is to publish the material as part of the military history of Australia's coastal defense and to preserve it as part of the McLaughr+" or Ledbetter for Senate? Tot he Editor: Two years ago I supported It is generally agreed that Ledbetter vigorously in the 6- Sen. Stafford, with his fine way primary. He won with Democrat or liberal voting only 35 percent of the vote, record, his refusal to speak largely because for many against Sen. Leahy two years voters it was a toss-up bet- ago because their voting ween him and Evslin; they records were so much alike, split a major voting sector. etc., for This time I support and McLaughry, not because over: Ledbetter's political due retirement, philosophy is any different The question: Who is most than it was but because I likely to defeat him in a 4-way believe McLaughry will draw primary -- a primary in which more votes from Stafford than a simple plurality, rather than will Ledbetter. Stafford and a clear majority, can decide. L4dbetter set themselves up name and current address to Thanks also to Vida and Jim Lt. Col. (Bet) Frederick M. Perry of Perry's Fuel and Wood, 19 Pearl Street, Con- Appliance Store for providing cord, N.H. 03301. He will serve us the space to hold the sale, to as liaison between New Robert Chipman of Green Hampshire and the Australian Frog Nursery for his HistoricalCommittee. assistance and to Ben FrederickM. Wood Weissman for his great Concord, N.H. organizing. Thank you! William Aswad Board President, UCP of Vermont peared December 2, 1981, the job of Advisor to the staff of William Eichorn of Germany and "-"" the OxbowNewshasbeenone . J[-e of increasing exhilaration and excitement. The staff has been William Eichorn of Pike, in May of 1912 on the steamer bookkeeping system. This consistently good, oc- known to many as Bill, Bremen. meant often working from 7 casionally excellent, and originally came from Ger- Ten days later they were a.m. to 10 p.m. For Bill it was brilliant on one or two oc- greeted in New York by friends who had already come over from Germany, and who had made arrangements for them for lodging with a family in the Bronx. They were wonderful people and made the boys feel right at home. During their first breakfast, Bill remarked to his friend, "They eat cake in the mor- ning," not relizing that it was soft white bread, which was quite different from the coarse rye bread they were used to. Later on they had a good many laughs over that. Bill's arrival in New York was at a time of nationwide business un- certainty, but he was con- fident of getting a job He went immediately to the New York office of the Pike Manufac- turing Company, where he presented his letter of recommendation from the whetstone distributor's office in Sennenburg where he had worked. His application was sent up to the home office in New Hampshire, but word went back that they didn't need anyone at that time. Bill started making the rounds of all the places in New York where he might get a job, taking into account his fluent German and his not-so- fluent English. He finally found work as a foreign in- voice clerk in Macy's department store, where he worked for two years. During many, where he wa born in Sonneberg, Thuringia, in 1893. His family, like many in the village, manufactured toys and dolls in a home workshop. Bill's earliest recollections included cages of canaries singing along with his father while he was at work, also windowsills full of flowering plants. Bill shared in the family duties in the shop, particularly after the early death of his father. Many times they would work until ten o'clock at night -- but he always managed to sneak in some time for reading his "Buffalo Bill" stories: Saturday was always busy, being delivery day, and Bill and his sister would fill big baskets with the week's production of dolls and toys and carry them to the export houses. Bill acted as cashier for the family, and soon developed an interest in commercial enterprises. Saturday afternoon was the time for the weekly rehearsal of the church choir, which Bill joined at the age of seven. It was a group of 60 to 80 children and was famous throughout Thuringia. Every summer they went on a two- week, walking tour through different regions of the Thuringian mountains, and at each village they would sing while marching through, sometimes being treated to lemonade and frankfurters. At night they would sleep on piles of straw in some public hail -- and it would take quite a while for their director, or Kantor, and the other teachers ac- companying them. to get the excited children quieted down for the night Bill recalled with particular pleasure one trip into Saxony where their Kantor took the choir on a surprise visit to a friend of his who ran a chocolate factory. The children serenaded the old gentleman early in the morning in front of his villa, and he was so pleased that he invited all 80 of them to break- fast on his lawn. After a tour of the chocolate factory he gave each of the children a bar of chocolate -- besides the various, tidbits of chocolate they had picked up while touring the factory Much of this loot went into the knap- sacks, and the children con- taued on their journey -- but after a day of hiking in the hot sun they found the bottom of their knapsacks covered with melted chocolate. Bill also took a great in- terest in athletics, especially gymnastics, and more than once was carried on the shoulders of his jubilant friends to receive his award of wreath and ribbons. One time, while he was still a little boy, a neighbor girl came over to his house and excitedly told him that an American was visiting her family, and she wanted Bill to come over and meet him. The visitor turned out to be E. Bertram Pike, of Pike, N.H., who had cpme to Germany on a business trip. The neighbor girl's father was president of a company which imported great quantities of Pike whetstones to distribute throughout Europe and Russia. Later on, while Bill was attending commercial college, he worked for his neighbor's importing company and became well acquainted with Mr. Pike during his visits to Germany. Coming to America Besides his contacts with Mr. Pike, Bill had met other American businessmen during his childhood in the toy business, and after he finished college he made up his mind to travel to America and look for work. In spite of the ap- prehension aroused by the sinking of the Titanic, only a month earlier, Bill and a frientl embarked for America C00xlaow N ................ Castl !i this time he had plenty of opportunity to brush up on his English, meanwhile helping the president of the company, Mr. Straus, to improve his German. Bill also spent two years with a firm of certified public accountants, followed by two more years with the exporting house of Neuss, Hesselin & Co., where he was in charge of the department exporting dry goods to South America. However, at the outbreak of World War I, the president of the company was called to Washington and was asked how many Germans, Austrians and Hungarians he employed. He reported that he had 40, all of them good men, dependable and very much needed -- but he was told that these employees were through next Saturday -- and Bill and the others were out on the street with one month's salary, and that was that. Bill tried everywhere to find work, but it did no good, as all the Germans were blacklisted. Finally Bill tried again for a job with Pike Manufac- turing, this time writing a letter directly to E. Bertram Pike who wired back im- mediately that he would meet Bill at the New York office that same week. This time there was an opening at Pike for somebody with bookkeeping experience, and Mr. Pike asked Bill when he could come up to Pike. He said, "Tomorrow." When Bill got to Pike, everyone there was ap- preheusive about this German in their midst, as if he might be carrying bombs or something in his suitcase. One day he told Mr. Pike that the narrow-minded talk was getting to be more than he could stand, but Mr. Pike told him, "Eichorn, just let it go in one ear and out the other." As time went by, Bill earned the confidence and friendship of'everyone, and he became an active member of the community, singing in the choir, and attending picnics, skiing and all. Working in Pike , Bill soon found that he had his hands full with Mr. Pike's bookkeeping, as he was in- volved in eight different en- terprises, with boxes and boxes of various papers and documents which had to be organized. For some of the businesses, Bill had to start from scratch and set up a a great challenge, and his accomplishments were genuinely appreciated and fully praised by Mr. Pike. One of the Pike en- terprises was the establish- ment of the summer resort at Lake Tarleton, with all the construction, landscaping and organizing that were necessary. On Saturdays Bill used to take the Lake Tarleton Club payroll in a money hag slung over his shoulder and walk out there the five miles from Pike, pay off the boys, then walk hack. Another responsibility was the bobbin mill at Glencliff, of which Bill shortly became treasurer, and later president after Mr. Pike's death. casions. Of paramount im- portance however, every deadline every week, has been met which stands as a monument to the responsible dedication of the staff. An advisor to the current staff of the Oxbow News is in a privileged position because of the motivation and diligence shown by each member. Assignments are written with care, each issue is examined carefully for ways in which to improve it, and interviews are conducted with tact and in- telligence. Although every article is edited about five times before being submitted, the advisor has not had to sp}ll a drop of ink since mid- January this year; everything has been student researched KA, THERINE I,RTLEY Carbee, Lm,E xzx College; Greg TOM RATHBURN BHANNE WRIGHT Embry-Riddle Phelmler ......... -- KRISTIN flBtW ,M'dr ................ ARNOLD SHIELDS Olympic coach of Oxbow says that "Special Olympics is a year round sports program for the mentally handicapped. "Over one-million mentally handicapped individuals took part during 1978-79 and 1400 of these individuals were from Vermont. Joslyn says that "Special Olympics is open to any mentally handicapped child or adult, age eight and up. Special Olympics are held in all 50 states and in over 30 foreign countries." The next event will be the state track and field meet. This will be held June 11, 12 and 13 at the University of Vermont (UVM), in Burlington. Senior Plans The Senior Class at Oxbow High School has many In 1920, Bill received word that his mother, back home in Germany, was ciritically ill. Mr. Pike told Bill, "You go." This was difficult, because Bill had only his first citizenship papers, but Mr. Pike called up his friend, Senator Henry W. Keyes, and through him Bill had the required passport and visa in no time. When he reached Germany he found that his mother had already died, but he still had a welcome op- portunity to visit his family and hometown -- or what was left of them after the war. While in Germany, Bill also made contact with a whetstone importing office at Glen Larkham, Huntington, SanU Plante, John College; Ted P Anne Ford, Sn Read Carlan, L: College; Champlain Emerson, Fred Aliard, Thurston, Technical Osgood, VTC; ,- . IAI 00o00kow0000i, Vocational Tecnm  (NHVTC) Clare . Lefebvre, Lynd i[ t'' College; Kell  C Welch, NHVTC Grow, WorceS Technical; Ann,_ John s College; e,...   ,E Thompson LFN;  e Emerson, NH r Gary Hayward, V, Louisville; sandY Yll le - ,emm, NHVTC - Clarew/llC?? Emerson, :' "t s { . cmm?00tYi00l002*00300 and written. , students who have been ac- NHVTC - | th This advisor is pleased and cepted and are going to Emerson  s proud to have been a part of!colleg e or other forms of S the Oxbow News team for this further education. The seniors Some chosen for the .,/I 1981-82 academic year. will be going to all parts of the Ar hag p ', for Departing Seniors will be United States. Below the The student'sna missed; the exquisite writing senior's names are listed below adjacent to theii style of Leslie Kasprzak, the adjacent to the college they they will be joini  fine investigative reporting'of will be attending. David Higg" .  a., - amplain "  "] National Guara!l ee Teeter, Wheeler, Verm witi Daniel .-1, Il Marisa Fatherley, the ex- Brenda Oliver, Champlain National cellently researched articles College; Rick and good photography of University of Maine; Karin GuardNAi:vyF; CBNe!;'-'-21.'i.'i -' Kristin Herman. The Dwyer, Cornell University; Army: : : remaining staff, lead by Barbara Carson, Bates r Editor Judy Augustine is College; Bruce Jacobs, capable of extending the Marietta College; Babette mont Nationala'  journalistic excellence of the Gendron, Vermont College; Allen, U.S. Na;i"- h Oxbow News. Brian Page, Vermont Borkowski, ' Planetarium Program Technical College (VTC); (Reserve). The students of the Newbury David Melahn, VTC; Richard _._-----i2 - w, Elementary School in Pike, VTC; Kathy Peterson, as "moderates," though St.-respect, self-help, in-tally on election night, no Stafford's voting record is ternational integrity, candidate scores a majority of more "liberal" (Democrat) monetary honesty, state and all votes cast, the low man on than "moderate". They will local control over and the "totem pole" is dropped split a voting sector, responsibility for government, and the second choices on his McLaughry, reflecting a I have great respect for both ballots are distributed among nation-wide determination to McLaughry and Ledbetter the remaining candidates. regain some of the yet, because of Vermont's Thus a voter canbe assured philophica! high ground on.plurality-rule primary that even, 0ugh  first which his republican (small system, must vote for only choice canoidate may  ne "r") form of government was one. A primary election will not have ,thrownhis vote originally based, stands change is long over-due, in away" -- i.e. his second clearly apart  a well defined favor of "preferential" (old- preference will still be conservative Republican, style Town Meeting)voting. counted. This will usually determined to work with like Under this method a voter produce a majority winner minded Senators to restore to may indicate his 1st, 2nd and although a third "dropping" this nation such concepts as 3rd choices. If, on the first may be needed in close .con- Hamburg, where he had been instructed by Mr. Pike to inquire about the prospects of trade, now that the war was over. They wanted a large quantity of whetstones right away, and in spite of the postwar problems they had money already on deposit in New York with which to pay fOr them. However, when Bill returned to America and reported to Mr. Pike, the anti- German feeling was still so strong in this country that the management of the Pike company decided not to resume trade with Hamburg. This news was devastating to Bill, because this foreign trade was such a large part of the company's business that he could forsee this as the beginning of the end for the company. And he was right. When the German company was unable to obtain whetstones from Pike, it developed its own process for manufac- turing artificial stones to fill its needs. Actually the use of natural whetstones was doomed anyway, as artificial abrasives were being developed n the United States also around that time. Bill was on another trip to Europe in 1926 when he was urgently summoned home by the death of Mr. Pike. As Mr. Pike's former right-hand- man, Bill was essential in assisting to settle the estate, involving the numerous business enterprises. This was made more difficult by the fire which destroyed the Pike Manufacturing buildings about two months after Mr. Pike's death. During the fire Bill made great efforts to save the three steel safes which contained Mr. Pike's business papers. The safes dropped through a burned floor and were burst open, and the ends of the papers were singed -- but they were not a total less, and could be rewritten, which was an enormous task for Bill. Bill continued his work with the Moilauke Lumber & Bobbin Company until it went out of business in 1966. He retired in 1969 and died five years later. Newbury, Vermont, recently had an opportunity to learn more about the stars. John Sanborn, Principal at Newbury Elementary, coordinated this program from the students of grades 1- 6. Tom Estill, Science teacher at Oxbow High School and district planetarium director, presented an introductory planetarium program to the students on Monday, May 31. The students learned such things as: what sara are, why they appear to move, how to find the North Star, and how to identify some of the com- monly known constellations. Irene Vielleux, Sixth grade Science teacher at Newbury, continued presenting planetarium programs to the students throughout the week. Eighth Grade Class Trip On May 21 and 22, the eighth grade class at Oxbow High School went on an overnight camping trip to Fort Dummer near Brattleboro, Vermont. Approximately 52 eighth grade students went on the trip accompanied by five chaperones: Nessa Flax, English Teacher at Oxbow, John MacKenzie, Social Studies teacher at Oxbow, David lmhoff, Science and math teacher at Oxbow, and BOb and Linda Wilds of South Newbury, Vt. Some of the students and adults went to the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant in Vernon, Vermont on Friday. Others who did not wish to go to the power plant played softball and other games at Ft. Dummer. After these activities everyone went to Mountain Park, an amusement park in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The class earned money for the cost of the trip and the school bus through selling jewelry and collecting class dues from each student. Special Olympics Dave Joslyn, Special Education teacher at Oxbow High School and Special returning from a trip to (Note: Bill's .wife, Europe with her family a Marguerite, still lives in Pike, week after the sinking of the and has copies of his memoirs, Titanic, the same as Bill first of which this is a con-cameoverfromGermany. densation. Marguerite says Bill and Marguerite have that there was an interesting two daughters, Shirley Hall of coincidence, long before she Pike and Joan Patten of Troy, met Bill. As a child, she was N.H. tests. This is the principle of the old-style Town Meeting, where voting is repeated until one candidate scores a clear majority. Thus might a voter, come September, mark McLaughry as first choice, with Ledbetter as second. If, on the first tally, McLaughry Should be low man, the voter's second choice goes to Ledbetter -- not to Stafford-- and Ledbetter, now supported by the McLaughry people, may well emerge as the majority candidate. The McLaughry people will be sad but not nearly as sad as if Stafford had been given six more years of mis-guided "seniority". So -- make it McLaughry this time, retire Stafford, and urge your Vermont legislators to work for a "preferential" primary two years from now. Herbert G, Ogde Hartland, Vt. 'QUOTE "He who does not know e force of words cannot know man." Confucius Lyndon State College; Leslie LYME Kasprzak, LaSalle College; LYME-- There John White, University of meeting of the Vermont (UVM); Una Smit, Board on Northeastern University; at the Lyme Robert Borkowski, Lyndon meeting, which State College; Alan Jesseman, p.m., is open to the[ Rhode Island School of  --. Design; Marisa Fatherley, L   University of Miami; Angela UNION 36 pB CORINTH-- a] Dobbins, UVM; Kris Herman, Elementary SCh  in Tufts University; Annette registration and i w Brooks, McConnell School; screening will be lNe Mark Fortunati, Champlain 14. For an ap College; Robert Bruleigh, Emerson. UVM ; Brian Peter Richards I Johnson State College; principa l, at 439- e I A Woman's Point of View I Life on the by FRAN HYDE m Good morning. Have you a few minutes 't, ,] ning? How about joining me for a walk down on we won't be gone long enough to get soaked. As we walk out of the yard we go a fe blacktop which is old Route 5, then down culvert which carries the set-back water necticut river, through the underpasses way and the railroad, over the wooden bridge brook and then onto the meadow.  i k , Maybe you have a favorite walk and a favorite I one of mine. I never tire of the sun and sl mountains, and even today when the mountai Ih by clouds, I still enjoy the scenery as we w brook and the way the view opens up as we g , from the bridge onto the meadow, v  I Looking around us we find that pestiferous li I iy over-the-field. It s bright purple blossoms are v r[ about the time it usurps large sections of la differently.  No, those beautiful yellow blossoms are n  Sl The plant is iron weed, and watch out for the st': juice in the stems. See blossoms i  the elderberry { there are the trilliums and jack-in-the-pul W Hopefully they'll increase now. 't  14 t There's a honeysucke or beauty bush. I d t ,l seeing one here before. This is great; I've near the house, a days ago e rl It seems only few these ostrich f ... fiddlehead stage and see them now. Later  through here will have lots of jewel weed. :'e plaot, don't you, with it's yellow and orange blossoms. When the stems are crushed, their J : clearing up poison ivy when applied to the ra.i an Indian legend about the Great Spirit pl.t'tk tl, near the poison. We tried it, and sure enough dried down. ."  In a while, this damp place on the left will i  forget.me-nots, and on the right, that plant u-- through in such numbers is nettles, t See that log in the set-back on the left? We.,..ews the summer as there are sometimes turtle w%; the sun. These mares and their colts belong toO  These underpasses take us beneath the tra'..i and railway and make great places for Clw" periment with voices and echoes. These cows also belong to the neighbors. See what I mean by the view opening the mountains, Haverhill Village and That's Dream and Do Farm and we keep on their fields as we work on ours. The few elms you see here are t that once stretched toward the river. up elm branches Arthur and I saw the lady bugs on them that we'd ever seen, the branches appeared red when we first pick them up. I don't know about you, but this wind is for me. Let's head back. There's a king l swallows swooping to catch their food. for them. You should be here when we're ping grass. They're really busy then. small hawks sitting on the wire fence ducks, kingfmhers, occasionally sea gulls hobo41nks, red-winged blackbirds, sometimes bugsards. Hear that horn? That's the signal that I' the house, but even as we hurry grapevines, meadow rue, woodbine, cucumbers . . . oh, if .I could only grow cousins with such successl i  i: Thanks for keeping me company; come and see the change. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-June 9, 1982 llll IHI I i NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly Onwspeper published in IIredferd, Vermt. $vbscr|ption fetes - Vermon! end Now Sempskire - $9.00 per onr; $i.00 let six menNm; out of state $1|.00 per year end $7.00 for sin months; Senier cttisea diNonm $2.N. Second ClaSs pespe pd lit Ilmdferd, Yermont 05055. PvbU|ked by Sortkonst Pebliskla| Cempony, Inc., P.O. hi 371, |miHoA. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford /  Woodsville I02-222-5281  j 603-747-2016 i ]l i i i1, An Independent Newspaper I,,. Editorial t J The bottom line Throughout this year, as in years past, we have chronicled many of the large and varied issues that have been hashed out between our local school boards, their administrations, and teacher groups. Our articles offer an important service, they provide our readers, in many cases property taxpayers, with an account of how taxpayers' money is being spent. But in all the accounts of budgets, salaries, energy costs, roof leaks, teacher grievances, and the usual issues battled over at school board meetings, it sometimes seems as though the single, real issue behind all this discussion gets lost in the shuffle. At the heart of all the peripheral jumble is the bottom line: the education of a now generation. Excluding occasional sidetracks, it is this bottom line that is at stake when school boards approve or deny a new curriculdm policy or weigh the merits and c. of p Proposed computer education program. Our area is one in which taxpayers pay more to fund their schools than they do to fund their municipal governments. Despite the fact that salaries in professions that require comparable educational backgrounds, may argue that a large group of the taxpayers paying our schools' salaries bring home even less. Concerned school officials face a much deeper problem. Is it fair to send students out into the world with little more than the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic? Times have changed and change continues to 1gather momentum. Our educators rightfully assert that our schools' curriculum must also reflect changes in the world in which their students must survive and hopefully prosper. This is not to belittle the fact that the total cost of education is often effected by matters that have very little to do with education. Many school budgets in our area reflect to a large extent skyrocketing costs that seem to come standard with sprawling one or two story buildings with flat roofs. Changing times have also brought searing energy and maintenance costs. Recent history has shown us that change can cost a great deal of money when it comes to education. So the numbers will probably continue to fly back and forth at school board meetings like that in a corporate boardroom -- some will likely con- tinue to grow, others may decline. But please note: if you aregoing to follow you have to consider the You can get a very good idea of what has really been happening at our local school board meetings between school boards, administrators, and teachers by attending one of the many graduation ceremonies at our area high schools in the coming weeks. Look deep into the faces of those students who are leaving our schools as a product of the institutions you may be paying for. Then consider the enormous responsibility that our school officials have when they must convert those faces to numbers that, combined, determine the educational price tag we call a school tax rate. 00Letters to the Editor Seeking New Hampshire GJ.'s Plant sale To the Editor: state's history. $C88f- The Western Australia The 197th Antiaircraft Coastal Defense Historical Artillery Group, New Ham- To the Editor: Committee, Perth, Australia, pshire Army National Guard, The Board of Directors and is seeking hfformation and was mobilized for WW II on the staff of United Cerebral memorabilia from former September 16, 1940 and, Palsy of Vermont wish to members of the 197th following a training period at extend their thanks to Antiaircraft Artillery (AAA) Camp Hulen, Texas, was everyone who gave their Regiment who served in assigned to the defense of enthusiastic support to our Australia during 1942. West Australia. Annual Mother's Day Plant The committee is recording Former members of the Sale. With the help of many information about 197th AAA 197th AAA Regiment, who good people, we were able to Group members, their served in West Australia, are make the sale a grand suc- military activities while in encouraged to send their cess. Australia, gathering photos and memorabilia in preparation for Australia's Bi- centennial celebrations in 1988. The plan is to publish the material as part of the military history of Australia's coastal defense and to preserve it as part of the McLaughr+" or Ledbetter for Senate? Tot he Editor: Two years ago I supported It is generally agreed that Ledbetter vigorously in the 6- Sen. Stafford, with his fine way primary. He won with Democrat or liberal voting only 35 percent of the vote, record, his refusal to speak largely because for many against Sen. Leahy two years voters it was a toss-up bet- ago because their voting ween him and Evslin; they records were so much alike, split a major voting sector. etc., for This time I support and McLaughry, not because over: Ledbetter's political due retirement, philosophy is any different The question: Who is most than it was but because I likely to defeat him in a 4-way believe McLaughry will draw primary -- a primary in which more votes from Stafford than a simple plurality, rather than will Ledbetter. Stafford and a clear majority, can decide. L4dbetter set themselves up name and current address to Thanks also to Vida and Jim Lt. Col. (Bet) Frederick M. Perry of Perry's Fuel and Wood, 19 Pearl Street, Con- Appliance Store for providing cord, N.H. 03301. He will serve us the space to hold the sale, to as liaison between New Robert Chipman of Green Hampshire and the Australian Frog Nursery for his HistoricalCommittee. assistance and to Ben FrederickM. Wood Weissman for his great Concord, N.H. organizing. Thank you! William Aswad Board President, UCP of Vermont peared December 2, 1981, the job of Advisor to the staff of William Eichorn of Germany and "-"" the OxbowNewshasbeenone . J[-e of increasing exhilaration and excitement. The staff has been William Eichorn of Pike, in May of 1912 on the steamer bookkeeping system. This consistently good, oc- known to many as Bill, Bremen. meant often working from 7 casionally excellent, and originally came from Ger- Ten days later they were a.m. to 10 p.m. For Bill it was brilliant on one or two oc- greeted in New York by friends who had already come over from Germany, and who had made arrangements for them for lodging with a family in the Bronx. They were wonderful people and made the boys feel right at home. During their first breakfast, Bill remarked to his friend, "They eat cake in the mor- ning," not relizing that it was soft white bread, which was quite different from the coarse rye bread they were used to. Later on they had a good many laughs over that. Bill's arrival in New York was at a time of nationwide business un- certainty, but he was con- fident of getting a job He went immediately to the New York office of the Pike Manufac- turing Company, where he presented his letter of recommendation from the whetstone distributor's office in Sennenburg where he had worked. His application was sent up to the home office in New Hampshire, but word went back that they didn't need anyone at that time. Bill started making the rounds of all the places in New York where he might get a job, taking into account his fluent German and his not-so- fluent English. He finally found work as a foreign in- voice clerk in Macy's department store, where he worked for two years. During many, where he wa born in Sonneberg, Thuringia, in 1893. His family, like many in the village, manufactured toys and dolls in a home workshop. Bill's earliest recollections included cages of canaries singing along with his father while he was at work, also windowsills full of flowering plants. Bill shared in the family duties in the shop, particularly after the early death of his father. Many times they would work until ten o'clock at night -- but he always managed to sneak in some time for reading his "Buffalo Bill" stories: Saturday was always busy, being delivery day, and Bill and his sister would fill big baskets with the week's production of dolls and toys and carry them to the export houses. Bill acted as cashier for the family, and soon developed an interest in commercial enterprises. Saturday afternoon was the time for the weekly rehearsal of the church choir, which Bill joined at the age of seven. It was a group of 60 to 80 children and was famous throughout Thuringia. Every summer they went on a two- week, walking tour through different regions of the Thuringian mountains, and at each village they would sing while marching through, sometimes being treated to lemonade and frankfurters. At night they would sleep on piles of straw in some public hail -- and it would take quite a while for their director, or Kantor, and the other teachers ac- companying them. to get the excited children quieted down for the night Bill recalled with particular pleasure one trip into Saxony where their Kantor took the choir on a surprise visit to a friend of his who ran a chocolate factory. The children serenaded the old gentleman early in the morning in front of his villa, and he was so pleased that he invited all 80 of them to break- fast on his lawn. After a tour of the chocolate factory he gave each of the children a bar of chocolate -- besides the various, tidbits of chocolate they had picked up while touring the factory Much of this loot went into the knap- sacks, and the children con- taued on their journey -- but after a day of hiking in the hot sun they found the bottom of their knapsacks covered with melted chocolate. Bill also took a great in- terest in athletics, especially gymnastics, and more than once was carried on the shoulders of his jubilant friends to receive his award of wreath and ribbons. One time, while he was still a little boy, a neighbor girl came over to his house and excitedly told him that an American was visiting her family, and she wanted Bill to come over and meet him. The visitor turned out to be E. Bertram Pike, of Pike, N.H., who had cpme to Germany on a business trip. The neighbor girl's father was president of a company which imported great quantities of Pike whetstones to distribute throughout Europe and Russia. Later on, while Bill was attending commercial college, he worked for his neighbor's importing company and became well acquainted with Mr. Pike during his visits to Germany. Coming to America Besides his contacts with Mr. Pike, Bill had met other American businessmen during his childhood in the toy business, and after he finished college he made up his mind to travel to America and look for work. In spite of the ap- prehension aroused by the sinking of the Titanic, only a month earlier, Bill and a frientl embarked for America C00xlaow N ................ Castl !i this time he had plenty of opportunity to brush up on his English, meanwhile helping the president of the company, Mr. Straus, to improve his German. Bill also spent two years with a firm of certified public accountants, followed by two more years with the exporting house of Neuss, Hesselin & Co., where he was in charge of the department exporting dry goods to South America. However, at the outbreak of World War I, the president of the company was called to Washington and was asked how many Germans, Austrians and Hungarians he employed. He reported that he had 40, all of them good men, dependable and very much needed -- but he was told that these employees were through next Saturday -- and Bill and the others were out on the street with one month's salary, and that was that. Bill tried everywhere to find work, but it did no good, as all the Germans were blacklisted. Finally Bill tried again for a job with Pike Manufac- turing, this time writing a letter directly to E. Bertram Pike who wired back im- mediately that he would meet Bill at the New York office that same week. This time there was an opening at Pike for somebody with bookkeeping experience, and Mr. Pike asked Bill when he could come up to Pike. He said, "Tomorrow." When Bill got to Pike, everyone there was ap- preheusive about this German in their midst, as if he might be carrying bombs or something in his suitcase. One day he told Mr. Pike that the narrow-minded talk was getting to be more than he could stand, but Mr. Pike told him, "Eichorn, just let it go in one ear and out the other." As time went by, Bill earned the confidence and friendship of'everyone, and he became an active member of the community, singing in the choir, and attending picnics, skiing and all. Working in Pike , Bill soon found that he had his hands full with Mr. Pike's bookkeeping, as he was in- volved in eight different en- terprises, with boxes and boxes of various papers and documents which had to be organized. For some of the businesses, Bill had to start from scratch and set up a a great challenge, and his accomplishments were genuinely appreciated and fully praised by Mr. Pike. One of the Pike en- terprises was the establish- ment of the summer resort at Lake Tarleton, with all the construction, landscaping and organizing that were necessary. On Saturdays Bill used to take the Lake Tarleton Club payroll in a money hag slung over his shoulder and walk out there the five miles from Pike, pay off the boys, then walk hack. Another responsibility was the bobbin mill at Glencliff, of which Bill shortly became treasurer, and later president after Mr. Pike's death. casions. Of paramount im- portance however, every deadline every week, has been met which stands as a monument to the responsible dedication of the staff. An advisor to the current staff of the Oxbow News is in a privileged position because of the motivation and diligence shown by each member. Assignments are written with care, each issue is examined carefully for ways in which to improve it, and interviews are conducted with tact and in- telligence. Although every article is edited about five times before being submitted, the advisor has not had to sp}ll a drop of ink since mid- January this year; everything has been student researched KA, THERINE I,RTLEY Carbee, Lm,E xzx College; Greg TOM RATHBURN BHANNE WRIGHT Embry-Riddle Phelmler ......... -- KRISTIN flBtW ,M'dr ................ ARNOLD SHIELDS Olympic coach of Oxbow says that "Special Olympics is a year round sports program for the mentally handicapped. "Over one-million mentally handicapped individuals took part during 1978-79 and 1400 of these individuals were from Vermont. Joslyn says that "Special Olympics is open to any mentally handicapped child or adult, age eight and up. Special Olympics are held in all 50 states and in over 30 foreign countries." The next event will be the state track and field meet. This will be held June 11, 12 and 13 at the University of Vermont (UVM), in Burlington. Senior Plans The Senior Class at Oxbow High School has many In 1920, Bill received word that his mother, back home in Germany, was ciritically ill. Mr. Pike told Bill, "You go." This was difficult, because Bill had only his first citizenship papers, but Mr. Pike called up his friend, Senator Henry W. Keyes, and through him Bill had the required passport and visa in no time. When he reached Germany he found that his mother had already died, but he still had a welcome op- portunity to visit his family and hometown -- or what was left of them after the war. While in Germany, Bill also made contact with a whetstone importing office at Glen Larkham, Huntington, SanU Plante, John College; Ted P Anne Ford, Sn Read Carlan, L: College; Champlain Emerson, Fred Aliard, Thurston, Technical Osgood, VTC; ,- . IAI 00o00kow0000i, Vocational Tecnm  (NHVTC) Clare . Lefebvre, Lynd i[ t'' College; Kell  C Welch, NHVTC Grow, WorceS Technical; Ann,_ John s College; e,...   ,E Thompson LFN;  e Emerson, NH r Gary Hayward, V, Louisville; sandY Yll le - ,emm, NHVTC - Clarew/llC?? Emerson, :' "t s { . cmm?00tYi00l002*00300 and written. , students who have been ac- NHVTC - | th This advisor is pleased and cepted and are going to Emerson  s proud to have been a part of!colleg e or other forms of S the Oxbow News team for this further education. The seniors Some chosen for the .,/I 1981-82 academic year. will be going to all parts of the Ar hag p ', for Departing Seniors will be United States. Below the The student'sna missed; the exquisite writing senior's names are listed below adjacent to theii style of Leslie Kasprzak, the adjacent to the college they they will be joini  fine investigative reporting'of will be attending. David Higg" .  a., - amplain "  "] National Guara!l ee Teeter, Wheeler, Verm witi Daniel .-1, Il Marisa Fatherley, the ex- Brenda Oliver, Champlain National cellently researched articles College; Rick and good photography of University of Maine; Karin GuardNAi:vyF; CBNe!;'-'-21.'i.'i -' Kristin Herman. The Dwyer, Cornell University; Army: : : remaining staff, lead by Barbara Carson, Bates r Editor Judy Augustine is College; Bruce Jacobs, capable of extending the Marietta College; Babette mont Nationala'  journalistic excellence of the Gendron, Vermont College; Allen, U.S. Na;i"- h Oxbow News. Brian Page, Vermont Borkowski, ' Planetarium Program Technical College (VTC); (Reserve). The students of the Newbury David Melahn, VTC; Richard _._-----i2 - w, Elementary School in Pike, VTC; Kathy Peterson, as "moderates," though St.-respect, self-help, in-tally on election night, no Stafford's voting record is ternational integrity, candidate scores a majority of more "liberal" (Democrat) monetary honesty, state and all votes cast, the low man on than "moderate". They will local control over and the "totem pole" is dropped split a voting sector, responsibility for government, and the second choices on his McLaughry, reflecting a I have great respect for both ballots are distributed among nation-wide determination to McLaughry and Ledbetter the remaining candidates. regain some of the yet, because of Vermont's Thus a voter canbe assured philophica! high ground on.plurality-rule primary that even, 0ugh  first which his republican (small system, must vote for only choice canoidate may  ne "r") form of government was one. A primary election will not have ,thrownhis vote originally based, stands change is long over-due, in away" -- i.e. his second clearly apart  a well defined favor of "preferential" (old- preference will still be conservative Republican, style Town Meeting)voting. counted. This will usually determined to work with like Under this method a voter produce a majority winner minded Senators to restore to may indicate his 1st, 2nd and although a third "dropping" this nation such concepts as 3rd choices. If, on the first may be needed in close .con- Hamburg, where he had been instructed by Mr. Pike to inquire about the prospects of trade, now that the war was over. They wanted a large quantity of whetstones right away, and in spite of the postwar problems they had money already on deposit in New York with which to pay fOr them. However, when Bill returned to America and reported to Mr. Pike, the anti- German feeling was still so strong in this country that the management of the Pike company decided not to resume trade with Hamburg. This news was devastating to Bill, because this foreign trade was such a large part of the company's business that he could forsee this as the beginning of the end for the company. And he was right. When the German company was unable to obtain whetstones from Pike, it developed its own process for manufac- turing artificial stones to fill its needs. Actually the use of natural whetstones was doomed anyway, as artificial abrasives were being developed n the United States also around that time. Bill was on another trip to Europe in 1926 when he was urgently summoned home by the death of Mr. Pike. As Mr. Pike's former right-hand- man, Bill was essential in assisting to settle the estate, involving the numerous business enterprises. This was made more difficult by the fire which destroyed the Pike Manufacturing buildings about two months after Mr. Pike's death. During the fire Bill made great efforts to save the three steel safes which contained Mr. Pike's business papers. The safes dropped through a burned floor and were burst open, and the ends of the papers were singed -- but they were not a total less, and could be rewritten, which was an enormous task for Bill. Bill continued his work with the Moilauke Lumber & Bobbin Company until it went out of business in 1966. He retired in 1969 and died five years later. Newbury, Vermont, recently had an opportunity to learn more about the stars. John Sanborn, Principal at Newbury Elementary, coordinated this program from the students of grades 1- 6. Tom Estill, Science teacher at Oxbow High School and district planetarium director, presented an introductory planetarium program to the students on Monday, May 31. The students learned such things as: what sara are, why they appear to move, how to find the North Star, and how to identify some of the com- monly known constellations. Irene Vielleux, Sixth grade Science teacher at Newbury, continued presenting planetarium programs to the students throughout the week. Eighth Grade Class Trip On May 21 and 22, the eighth grade class at Oxbow High School went on an overnight camping trip to Fort Dummer near Brattleboro, Vermont. Approximately 52 eighth grade students went on the trip accompanied by five chaperones: Nessa Flax, English Teacher at Oxbow, John MacKenzie, Social Studies teacher at Oxbow, David lmhoff, Science and math teacher at Oxbow, and BOb and Linda Wilds of South Newbury, Vt. Some of the students and adults went to the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant in Vernon, Vermont on Friday. Others who did not wish to go to the power plant played softball and other games at Ft. Dummer. After these activities everyone went to Mountain Park, an amusement park in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The class earned money for the cost of the trip and the school bus through selling jewelry and collecting class dues from each student. Special Olympics Dave Joslyn, Special Education teacher at Oxbow High School and Special returning from a trip to (Note: Bill's .wife, Europe with her family a Marguerite, still lives in Pike, week after the sinking of the and has copies of his memoirs, Titanic, the same as Bill first of which this is a con-cameoverfromGermany. densation. Marguerite says Bill and Marguerite have that there was an interesting two daughters, Shirley Hall of coincidence, long before she Pike and Joan Patten of Troy, met Bill. As a child, she was N.H. tests. This is the principle of the old-style Town Meeting, where voting is repeated until one candidate scores a clear majority. Thus might a voter, come September, mark McLaughry as first choice, with Ledbetter as second. If, on the first tally, McLaughry Should be low man, the voter's second choice goes to Ledbetter -- not to Stafford-- and Ledbetter, now supported by the McLaughry people, may well emerge as the majority candidate. The McLaughry people will be sad but not nearly as sad as if Stafford had been given six more years of mis-guided "seniority". So -- make it McLaughry this time, retire Stafford, and urge your Vermont legislators to work for a "preferential" primary two years from now. Herbert G, Ogde Hartland, Vt. 'QUOTE "He who does not know e force of words cannot know man." Confucius Lyndon State College; Leslie LYME Kasprzak, LaSalle College; LYME-- There John White, University of meeting of the Vermont (UVM); Una Smit, Board on Northeastern University; at the Lyme Robert Borkowski, Lyndon meeting, which State College; Alan Jesseman, p.m., is open to the[ Rhode Island School of  --. Design; Marisa Fatherley, L   University of Miami; Angela UNION 36 pB CORINTH-- a] Dobbins, UVM; Kris Herman, Elementary SCh  in Tufts University; Annette registration and i w Brooks, McConnell School; screening will be lNe Mark Fortunati, Champlain 14. For an ap College; Robert Bruleigh, Emerson. UVM ; Brian Peter Richards I Johnson State College; principa l, at 439- e I A Woman's Point of View I Life on the by FRAN HYDE m Good morning. Have you a few minutes 't, ,] ning? How about joining me for a walk down on we won't be gone long enough to get soaked. As we walk out of the yard we go a fe blacktop which is old Route 5, then down culvert which carries the set-back water necticut river, through the underpasses way and the railroad, over the wooden bridge brook and then onto the meadow.  i k , Maybe you have a favorite walk and a favorite I one of mine. I never tire of the sun and sl mountains, and even today when the mountai Ih by clouds, I still enjoy the scenery as we w brook and the way the view opens up as we g , from the bridge onto the meadow, v  I Looking around us we find that pestiferous li I iy over-the-field. It s bright purple blossoms are v r[ about the time it usurps large sections of la differently.  No, those beautiful yellow blossoms are n  Sl The plant is iron weed, and watch out for the st': juice in the stems. See blossoms i  the elderberry { there are the trilliums and jack-in-the-pul W Hopefully they'll increase now. 't  14 t There's a honeysucke or beauty bush. I d t ,l seeing one here before. This is great; I've near the house, a days ago e rl It seems only few these ostrich f ... fiddlehead stage and see them now. Later  through here will have lots of jewel weed. :'e plaot, don't you, with it's yellow and orange blossoms. When the stems are crushed, their J : clearing up poison ivy when applied to the ra.i an Indian legend about the Great Spirit pl.t'tk tl, near the poison. We tried it, and sure enough dried down. ."  In a while, this damp place on the left will i  forget.me-nots, and on the right, that plant u-- through in such numbers is nettles, t See that log in the set-back on the left? We.,..ews the summer as there are sometimes turtle w%; the sun. These mares and their colts belong toO  These underpasses take us beneath the tra'..i and railway and make great places for Clw" periment with voices and echoes. These cows also belong to the neighbors. See what I mean by the view opening the mountains, Haverhill Village and That's Dream and Do Farm and we keep on their fields as we work on ours. The few elms you see here are t that once stretched toward the river. up elm branches Arthur and I saw the lady bugs on them that we'd ever seen, the branches appeared red when we first pick them up. I don't know about you, but this wind is for me. Let's head back. There's a king l swallows swooping to catch their food. for them. You should be here when we're ping grass. They're really busy then. small hawks sitting on the wire fence ducks, kingfmhers, occasionally sea gulls hobo41nks, red-winged blackbirds, sometimes bugsards. Hear that horn? That's the signal that I' the house, but even as we hurry grapevines, meadow rue, woodbine, cucumbers . . . oh, if .I could only grow cousins with such successl i  i: Thanks for keeping me company; come and see the change.