"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
June 9, 1982     Journal Opinion
PAGE 11     (11 of 18 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 11     (11 of 18 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 9, 1982
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Girls', was painted in 1951 by Raphael Soyer at the age of Sz. Older artists create an 'ageless' beauty by MARGERY BYERS Smithsonian News Service Gilbert Stuart painted a portrait of John Adams in 1826 when he was 71, Benjamin West was 81 in 1819 when he executed a self-portrait, Benjamin Franklin invented the bifocal lens when he was in his 70s and Verdi composed "Otello" when he was 73. "You're only as old as you feel" and "age is a state of mind" may be hackneyed expressions, but they also are true. Some people are old at 21, others young at 80, or as Oliver Wendell Holmes put it, "To be 70. years young is sometimes more hopeful than to be 40 years old." . The image of grandpa and grandma doing little but telling stories, rocking and knitting sweaters is less valid now than ever before. For generations, many members of the "graying" population have rightly rebelled against these stereotypes, and many more-- in large part, because there really are many more of them-- are doing so today. Indeed, older Americans are the fastest growing segment of our population. One of every seven Americans is 60 years old or over, and that figure is expected to increase. Older Americans have become a powerful political force as well; organized into nationwide groups, they have tirelessly lobbied Congress to revise or abolish mandatory retirement ages, seeking to prove that age is no barrier to creativity and inspiration. The careers of older artists who continued to work well into their later years is a testament to the older Americans' cause. Thomas Hart Benton died at 85 in 1975, a few hours after working on a mural in his studio. He had maintained for years that each mural would be his last-- "I'm just too old to do all that climbing of ladders." Maria Martinez, the San Ildefonso pueblo potter, created her world-renowned black pottery until she was in her 90s. Grandma Moses, who died at 101, began to paint at 76 when her arthritic fingers could no longer embroider. Henri Matisse, confined to his bed, cut out brightly colored paper patterns which were acclaimed when they went on exhibit 24 years after his death at 84 in 1954. Artist John Brabach avoided admitting his age but, when he died in 1981, his World War I draft card revealed that he was 101. He never stopped producing paintings. In a tribute to the dedication and vision of older artists such as these, the paintings of older Americans have been highlighted in a 1982 wall calendar published to com- memorate the White House Conference on Aging. The calendar contains 12 paintings from the collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American Art; almost all the works, in- cluding paintings by George Inness, Georgia O'Keeffe, Gilbert Stuart, Alma Thomas and Benjamin West, were created by artists after the age of 60. "Just as a painting is far more than the pigment that adds the color of the wood that makes the stretchers so, too, creative genius is more than technique or even vision," Dr. Robert N. Butler, Director of the National Institute on Aging, wrote in an in- troduction to the calendar. ".. By viewing the paintings of these artists, we see that beauty and genius are ageless and that creative imagination is not limited by time." Time has certainly been no obstacle to Georgia O'Keeffe, now 94. As famous as she has been indomitable, O'Keeffe has long refused to let poor vision stop her from painting. Laurie Lisle, in Portrait of An Artist, A Biography of Georgia O'Keeffe, writes of this instinct for artistic sur- vival despite shadowy vision: "She even courageously and proudly remarked that her new way of seeing light, shadow, color and line was 'interesting' and that it gave her new painting ideas . . . O'Keeffe learned to take tubes of paint to her housekeeper, ask her to read out loud the names of the colors on the labels and then, with the in- formation memorized, she would return to her studio." New York City sculptor Seymour Lipton, still ex- traordinarily vigorous at 78, has said he feels like a man of 40. "He's lean and tough and in top shape," Harry Rand, curator of 20th-century painting and sculpture at the National Museum of American Art, says. "He gets up at 6 and, by 8, he's wrestling his sculpture together." With his strong right hand, partially developed by years of tournament tennis, Lipton manipulates huge cutting shears. "I'm still exploring," Lipton explains. "To me, sculpture is a great ad- venture, unending and always fresh. There is no such thing as maturity--that is just a word. The creative person who loses the sponteneity and naivete of his childhood becomes an academician. What you gain with ex- perience is a sense of control but my next piece is as ex- citing as the drawings I made in public school." It usually takes many years fo? artists to attain recognition and, despite illness, a sense of humor can feed their creativity long after many of their contemporaries have retired to rocking chairs. Peggy Bacon, now 86 and living in Maine, is known for incisive and penetrating caricatures as well as illustrations for ap- proximately 60 books. Over the decades, she lost little of the freshness and frankness of her youth, and her wit has delighted everyone. She was suffering from a joint disease when she turned 80, but her humor surfaced even then. "My bones were grinding together--you could hear them," she said at the time. "They made reports like a pistol." She was given a false hip of steel and plastic, spent two months in the hospital and pKomised to use a cane which sfiefcalled "a peculiar and dreadful looking thing with treads on it." When complimented on her remarkable recovery, she retorted: "The surgeons perform these miracles and they get old battered relics back on their feet again. My face looks as if it'd been ploughed. I'm not really very vain but I don't like to look dilapidated." Although partially blind, she continued to apint in her Maine home--with a magnifying glass mounted to her drawing board. Alma Thomas, who lived in Washington, D.C., did not begin to paint seriously until she was in her 60s, following many years as a demanding junior high school teacher who expected her students to excel. Well-educated and a member of a middle-class black family, she had a strong personality and a flair for the dramatic, and she was totally dedicated to her art and her students. She found young people stimulating, enjoyed being Surrounded by her proteges and provided scholarships to promising students. Energetic and en- thusiastic, she continually (please turn to page 8A) Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June 9, 1982 was Older Americans Month the ear-old Nina by her front sound of lend, to take her to Nursing Older American Volunteers respond to needs around nation Miss Hedge Piano for the volunteer agency. Throughout Thursday the country, more than 300,000 Miss men and women 60 years of age one, age or older are RSVP of the most volunteers m approximately that's ever 930 communities. Their volunteer colleagues in ACTION's other Older the Retired American Volunteer Programs include 18,000 by Foster Grandparents assigned national to children with special or ., Stockade, Round & Split Rail Build your own or we install. FROG GARDEN CENTER VT. (802) 222-5595 don't need foster homes.., kids do." MARY DI OF SOCIAL SERVICES AND SELF-EMPLOYED having trouble finding com- prices, top Quality Medical ? 'Stop at our office below. L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY 802-333-9224 ,,.u=, b Wuly. 12 noe to 430 PM PERSONN. AND PY BIRTHDAY CHARLIEVE-00ER is BEttER" PPY BIRTHDAY DY DOCKHAM ON YOUR GR'ADUATION! ] Happy Birthday !JAMIE SAMPSON Older American Volunteers provide assistance throughout the nation. In Pennsylvania, senior companion Eleanor Creslski, 67, helps her client shopping. exceptional needs and 5,000 Program relies upon the in- - Senior Companions who dividualized loving care of provide caring attention to the low-income seniors who frail elderly, respond to the problems of Since May was Older juvenile offenders, runaway Americans Month, it's a good youth, children with learning r time to take a look at how disabilities, drug abusers, the many elderly are making mentally retarded or abused their lives richer and more and neglectedyoungsters. rewarding asvolunteers. In Rutland, Vt., 63 Foster From Vermont to Grandparents are sponsored California, ACTION volun- by the Vermont State teers serve through the local Department of Mental Health. sponsorship of non-profit One of the newest stations - private or public utilizing the life-long ex- organizations and agencies in perience of these volunteers is approximately 1,000 corn- the Rutland Community munities throughout the Correctional Center, which United States. houses 95 young men. Foster Grandparents and Last year, project director Senior Companions receive a Virginia Heck placed two stipend of $2.00 an hour for 20 Foster Grandparents in the hours Of weekly service, facility. "First, you have to RSVP volunteers are non- prove yourself to the boys," stipended and serve an she says. "They don't trust average of four hours each easily. Now ! see kids laugh week. and tell stories. I see them Foster Grandparents touch the grandparents." and Young People-- Claude Melanson, acting A Great Combination superintendent of the center, The Foster Grandparent says, "The grandparents are CARPETING/'3.99 yd. & up ! yds. to cho00 from BARRE HOME SUPPLY e00.14 vt, WALLPAPERhs' 50,000 rolls to choose from. OPEN BARRE HOME SUPPLY IODAY$ Rt. 14 Bl're, Vt. A WEEK very comfortable with the boys and the boys are very comfortable with them. There was a void in the backgrounds of many of these young men and that attracts them to the grandparents." Stella Dailey, 77, is, indeed, comfortable as she sits at a round table in the center's library where she puts to use 34 years as a teacher by tutoring the boys. "I love it. All the residents are like my grandsons. I had one boy this morning who got two math problems wrong out of 40," she says proudly. Greg Baker, an instructor at the center, praises the grandparents' "extreme effectiveness, their flexibility, maturity and interpersonal skills." Senior Companions-- A Life-line for the Elderly In Pittsburgh, Senior Companions at the Western Restoration Center, a tran- sitional care home for seniors with mental and-or emotional problems, illustrate how volunteers free paid staff to attend to other professional duties. According to assistant social services director Fred Fiske, "Because of the. Senior Companions, we now have more time." The center's mission is to equip the residents with survival skills so that they may leave the center and live in supervised settings within the community. For Senior Companion Rachel Harris, 66, the reward of her efforts is "watching them grow, seeing them come out of that shell. The fact that I can help them touches me." The Senior Companions have designed a changing poster display that includes such ordinary subjects as pets. "it's something theyall can relate to because they've all had pets," explains volunteer Hortense Caldwell, 74. "For people who don't even open their eyes or speak, who've forgotten what dif- ferent textures feel like- well, when someone like that responds, I feel great satisfaction." Mrs. Harris and Mrs. Caldwell met during the program's 40-hour pre-service orientation. "Horteuse and I jelled like peas in a pod," Mrs. Harris smiles. "A spark flies and we call each other on the phone at night and talk about a new technique we've thought of to use at the center the next day," Friendship is also the key ingredient between client and volunteer. Carrie Nevin, 93, not only looks forward to Eleanor Ackerman's visits, she very much needs her Senior Companion's help. Every second Wednesday, the cardiac division of a Pitt- sburgh hospital calls at precisely 10 a.m. to monitor Mrs. Nevin's pacemaker with the help of Mrs. Ackerman. The first pacemaker failed. "I was dead once but I guess I wasn't fit for heaven yet," Mrs. Nevin observes drily. Mrs. Ackerman helps the older woman pay bills, does the grovery shopping and takes her client home with her on holidays. "Eleanor is about my only friend. Oh, we get along real nice," Mrs. Nevin says fondly. The program is sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging. "The difference our Senior Companions make in their clients' lives is invaluable," maintains project director David Majornick. "They give of themselves in countless ways." (piease turn to page 2A) l I l l HOME REMEDIES F POISON IVY Home treatments for poison ivy and oak seem as plentiful and varied as the stars. Readers of THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS frequently write in to offer their own "best" remedies for summer's "thorn in the flesh". These fellow sufferers all swear by their favorite potions and solutions, so maybe at least one of them will work for you. John Haille of Florence, S.C. recommends a solution of 1 oz. prepared phenol--car- bolic acid--and 15 oz. water (Phenol-containing Octagon soap, he says, works almost as well.) Washing with this mixture as soon as possible after exposure, John claims, will eliminate an itching attack. The same preparation can also be used for treatment: The solution stops itching, keeps the area clean, and lets it heal itself. Jewelweed seems to be an especially popular home remedy, Mark Wilson of Tewks- bury Mass. says to crush this member of the balsam family (Impatiens biflora in your hand and apply it directly on the rash several times a day until it clears He sug- gests that a convenient way to store this healer is to boil down a quantity of the herb and make ice cubes of the juice. Then you can apply a cube any time the itchy plant strikes you. Lemon juice is a favorite with Stefni Dawn of Beloit, Wis. She suggests washing the exposed area, patting it dry with a soft towel,.and then spreading on as much lemon juice as the skin will absorb. She says one treatment is sometimes enough to neutral- ize the poison.., but if itching and swelling return, just apply more juice to the area Stefni claims her therapy will clear up even a severe case within a few hours. Steve Morgan of Branson, Mo:--vho says he's "gone through years of playing the hermit" because of poison ivy, even though he's tried all the medications on the market--has finally found his sure-fire remedy for the pesky plague: Salt. That's right .. wet the affected areas and sprinkle on a little bit of good old table salt! Steve warns that this treatment does burn and smart a bit, but for him it makes those itch- ing, weeping bumps go away. Along the same line as the lemon juice therapy, vinegar (apple cider vinegar gets lots of votes) is recommended by many. Nancy Kerson of Willow Creek. Calif. says. "Both my husband and I are very allergic to poison ivy and have found that vinegar is most effective if we use it when the very first signs of inflammation appear. Even if we wait until the rash is well developed, the vinegar still stops the itching better than any of the creams and lotions from the drug store." Well, all of these formulas sound good in theory--and if applied immediately after contact many of them may well work to prevent the poison rash--but according to a local pharmacist we know, no acid formula is going to clear up the blisters once they've appeared. The poison ivy chemical that causes an allergic reaction in some 75% of the U.S. population--urushiol--does have an alkaline base. But once the poisonous substance gets into the blood and causes redness and swelling, it can be counteracted only by medicines taken internally. Many of the folk remedies can relieve only the symptoms of your allergy..These potions, as well as commercial products designed for external use, the pharmacist says, merely soothe the itching and keep you from scratching and infecting the sores. If you know you've been exposed to the poisonous plants and can quickly wash the areas with a strong soap, you may be able to remove the oils before they penetrate the underlayers of the skin. (By the way. poison ivy cannot be caught and spread by touching the rash unless some of these oils still remain on the skin.) For FREE additional information on hon remedies and on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine, senO your name and address and ask for Rdprint NO. 548: "Kitchen Medicine". Mail to Doing MORE ,. With LESS!, P.O. Box 70. Hendersonville. N.C. 28791, or in care of this paper. Copyright 1982 THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS, Inc ii I I i INVESTMENTS CLINT SWIFT HANOVER ROAD Nil WAYS (800) 542-5,171 WEST LEBANON, NH 03784 VT WATI (Q00) 259717 RED SOX TICKETS Jim Walker 41 King St. Woodsville, N.H. 03785 Tel. (603) 747-3389 or 747.3639 Make A Memorable Occas=0n _/_,/IEven moreso.., with a gift that lasts forevez  --GOLD & SILVER JEWE-LRY   -- INDIAN JEWELRY .. ,'>---,. StJNSHINE BOUTIOUE " ^ "- A EFFANBEE'S "DOLLS THAT TOUCH YOUR HEART" Have arrived at THE SLEEPING CAT 31 CrMTRAL $1". WOOOSVILLE, N,H. 603,747-3551 MON.-SAT. -- 9:30- 5, VI.T IL--_ 9,30-8. M, A511E O6 FOR SALE TOP SOIL/LOAM GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER _ (  RADFORD, VT. (SeZ) =ti Girls', was painted in 1951 by Raphael Soyer at the age of Sz. Older artists create an 'ageless' beauty by MARGERY BYERS Smithsonian News Service Gilbert Stuart painted a portrait of John Adams in 1826 when he was 71, Benjamin West was 81 in 1819 when he executed a self-portrait, Benjamin Franklin invented the bifocal lens when he was in his 70s and Verdi composed "Otello" when he was 73. "You're only as old as you feel" and "age is a state of mind" may be hackneyed expressions, but they also are true. Some people are old at 21, others young at 80, or as Oliver Wendell Holmes put it, "To be 70. years young is sometimes more hopeful than to be 40 years old." . The image of grandpa and grandma doing little but telling stories, rocking and knitting sweaters is less valid now than ever before. For generations, many members of the "graying" population have rightly rebelled against these stereotypes, and many more-- in large part, because there really are many more of them-- are doing so today. Indeed, older Americans are the fastest growing segment of our population. One of every seven Americans is 60 years old or over, and that figure is expected to increase. Older Americans have become a powerful political force as well; organized into nationwide groups, they have tirelessly lobbied Congress to revise or abolish mandatory retirement ages, seeking to prove that age is no barrier to creativity and inspiration. The careers of older artists who continued to work well into their later years is a testament to the older Americans' cause. Thomas Hart Benton died at 85 in 1975, a few hours after working on a mural in his studio. He had maintained for years that each mural would be his last-- "I'm just too old to do all that climbing of ladders." Maria Martinez, the San Ildefonso pueblo potter, created her world-renowned black pottery until she was in her 90s. Grandma Moses, who died at 101, began to paint at 76 when her arthritic fingers could no longer embroider. Henri Matisse, confined to his bed, cut out brightly colored paper patterns which were acclaimed when they went on exhibit 24 years after his death at 84 in 1954. Artist John Brabach avoided admitting his age but, when he died in 1981, his World War I draft card revealed that he was 101. He never stopped producing paintings. In a tribute to the dedication and vision of older artists such as these, the paintings of older Americans have been highlighted in a 1982 wall calendar published to com- memorate the White House Conference on Aging. The calendar contains 12 paintings from the collection of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American Art; almost all the works, in- cluding paintings by George Inness, Georgia O'Keeffe, Gilbert Stuart, Alma Thomas and Benjamin West, were created by artists after the age of 60. "Just as a painting is far more than the pigment that adds the color of the wood that makes the stretchers so, too, creative genius is more than technique or even vision," Dr. Robert N. Butler, Director of the National Institute on Aging, wrote in an in- troduction to the calendar. ".. By viewing the paintings of these artists, we see that beauty and genius are ageless and that creative imagination is not limited by time." Time has certainly been no obstacle to Georgia O'Keeffe, now 94. As famous as she has been indomitable, O'Keeffe has long refused to let poor vision stop her from painting. Laurie Lisle, in Portrait of An Artist, A Biography of Georgia O'Keeffe, writes of this instinct for artistic sur- vival despite shadowy vision: "She even courageously and proudly remarked that her new way of seeing light, shadow, color and line was 'interesting' and that it gave her new painting ideas . . . O'Keeffe learned to take tubes of paint to her housekeeper, ask her to read out loud the names of the colors on the labels and then, with the in- formation memorized, she would return to her studio." New York City sculptor Seymour Lipton, still ex- traordinarily vigorous at 78, has said he feels like a man of 40. "He's lean and tough and in top shape," Harry Rand, curator of 20th-century painting and sculpture at the National Museum of American Art, says. "He gets up at 6 and, by 8, he's wrestling his sculpture together." With his strong right hand, partially developed by years of tournament tennis, Lipton manipulates huge cutting shears. "I'm still exploring," Lipton explains. "To me, sculpture is a great ad- venture, unending and always fresh. There is no such thing as maturity--that is just a word. The creative person who loses the sponteneity and naivete of his childhood becomes an academician. What you gain with ex- perience is a sense of control but my next piece is as ex- citing as the drawings I made in public school." It usually takes many years fo? artists to attain recognition and, despite illness, a sense of humor can feed their creativity long after many of their contemporaries have retired to rocking chairs. Peggy Bacon, now 86 and living in Maine, is known for incisive and penetrating caricatures as well as illustrations for ap- proximately 60 books. Over the decades, she lost little of the freshness and frankness of her youth, and her wit has delighted everyone. She was suffering from a joint disease when she turned 80, but her humor surfaced even then. "My bones were grinding together--you could hear them," she said at the time. "They made reports like a pistol." She was given a false hip of steel and plastic, spent two months in the hospital and pKomised to use a cane which sfiefcalled "a peculiar and dreadful looking thing with treads on it." When complimented on her remarkable recovery, she retorted: "The surgeons perform these miracles and they get old battered relics back on their feet again. My face looks as if it'd been ploughed. I'm not really very vain but I don't like to look dilapidated." Although partially blind, she continued to apint in her Maine home--with a magnifying glass mounted to her drawing board. Alma Thomas, who lived in Washington, D.C., did not begin to paint seriously until she was in her 60s, following many years as a demanding junior high school teacher who expected her students to excel. Well-educated and a member of a middle-class black family, she had a strong personality and a flair for the dramatic, and she was totally dedicated to her art and her students. She found young people stimulating, enjoyed being Surrounded by her proteges and provided scholarships to promising students. Energetic and en- thusiastic, she continually (please turn to page 8A) Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June 9, 1982 was Older Americans Month the ear-old Nina by her front sound of lend, to take her to Nursing Older American Volunteers respond to needs around nation Miss Hedge Piano for the volunteer agency. Throughout Thursday the country, more than 300,000 Miss men and women 60 years of age one, age or older are RSVP of the most volunteers m approximately that's ever 930 communities. Their volunteer colleagues in ACTION's other Older the Retired American Volunteer Programs include 18,000 by Foster Grandparents assigned national to children with special or ., Stockade, Round & Split Rail Build your own or we install. FROG GARDEN CENTER VT. (802) 222-5595 don't need foster homes.., kids do." MARY DI OF SOCIAL SERVICES AND SELF-EMPLOYED having trouble finding com- prices, top Quality Medical ? 'Stop at our office below. L. BOURBEAU INSURANCE AGENCY 802-333-9224 ,,.u=, b Wuly. 12 noe to 430 PM PERSONN. AND PY BIRTHDAY CHARLIEVE-00ER is BEttER" PPY BIRTHDAY DY DOCKHAM ON YOUR GR'ADUATION! ] Happy Birthday !JAMIE SAMPSON Older American Volunteers provide assistance throughout the nation. In Pennsylvania, senior companion Eleanor Creslski, 67, helps her client shopping. exceptional needs and 5,000 Program relies upon the in- - Senior Companions who dividualized loving care of provide caring attention to the low-income seniors who frail elderly, respond to the problems of Since May was Older juvenile offenders, runaway Americans Month, it's a good youth, children with learning r time to take a look at how disabilities, drug abusers, the many elderly are making mentally retarded or abused their lives richer and more and neglectedyoungsters. rewarding asvolunteers. In Rutland, Vt., 63 Foster From Vermont to Grandparents are sponsored California, ACTION volun- by the Vermont State teers serve through the local Department of Mental Health. sponsorship of non-profit One of the newest stations - private or public utilizing the life-long ex- organizations and agencies in perience of these volunteers is approximately 1,000 corn- the Rutland Community munities throughout the Correctional Center, which United States. houses 95 young men. Foster Grandparents and Last year, project director Senior Companions receive a Virginia Heck placed two stipend of $2.00 an hour for 20 Foster Grandparents in the hours Of weekly service, facility. "First, you have to RSVP volunteers are non- prove yourself to the boys," stipended and serve an she says. "They don't trust average of four hours each easily. Now ! see kids laugh week. and tell stories. I see them Foster Grandparents touch the grandparents." and Young People-- Claude Melanson, acting A Great Combination superintendent of the center, The Foster Grandparent says, "The grandparents are CARPETING/'3.99 yd. & up ! yds. to cho00 from BARRE HOME SUPPLY e00.14 vt, WALLPAPERhs' 50,000 rolls to choose from. OPEN BARRE HOME SUPPLY IODAY$ Rt. 14 Bl're, Vt. A WEEK very comfortable with the boys and the boys are very comfortable with them. There was a void in the backgrounds of many of these young men and that attracts them to the grandparents." Stella Dailey, 77, is, indeed, comfortable as she sits at a round table in the center's library where she puts to use 34 years as a teacher by tutoring the boys. "I love it. All the residents are like my grandsons. I had one boy this morning who got two math problems wrong out of 40," she says proudly. Greg Baker, an instructor at the center, praises the grandparents' "extreme effectiveness, their flexibility, maturity and interpersonal skills." Senior Companions-- A Life-line for the Elderly In Pittsburgh, Senior Companions at the Western Restoration Center, a tran- sitional care home for seniors with mental and-or emotional problems, illustrate how volunteers free paid staff to attend to other professional duties. According to assistant social services director Fred Fiske, "Because of the. Senior Companions, we now have more time." The center's mission is to equip the residents with survival skills so that they may leave the center and live in supervised settings within the community. For Senior Companion Rachel Harris, 66, the reward of her efforts is "watching them grow, seeing them come out of that shell. The fact that I can help them touches me." The Senior Companions have designed a changing poster display that includes such ordinary subjects as pets. "it's something theyall can relate to because they've all had pets," explains volunteer Hortense Caldwell, 74. "For people who don't even open their eyes or speak, who've forgotten what dif- ferent textures feel like- well, when someone like that responds, I feel great satisfaction." Mrs. Harris and Mrs. Caldwell met during the program's 40-hour pre-service orientation. "Horteuse and I jelled like peas in a pod," Mrs. Harris smiles. "A spark flies and we call each other on the phone at night and talk about a new technique we've thought of to use at the center the next day," Friendship is also the key ingredient between client and volunteer. Carrie Nevin, 93, not only looks forward to Eleanor Ackerman's visits, she very much needs her Senior Companion's help. Every second Wednesday, the cardiac division of a Pitt- sburgh hospital calls at precisely 10 a.m. to monitor Mrs. Nevin's pacemaker with the help of Mrs. Ackerman. The first pacemaker failed. "I was dead once but I guess I wasn't fit for heaven yet," Mrs. Nevin observes drily. Mrs. Ackerman helps the older woman pay bills, does the grovery shopping and takes her client home with her on holidays. "Eleanor is about my only friend. Oh, we get along real nice," Mrs. Nevin says fondly. The program is sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging. "The difference our Senior Companions make in their clients' lives is invaluable," maintains project director David Majornick. "They give of themselves in countless ways." (piease turn to page 2A) l I l l HOME REMEDIES F POISON IVY Home treatments for poison ivy and oak seem as plentiful and varied as the stars. Readers of THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS frequently write in to offer their own "best" remedies for summer's "thorn in the flesh". These fellow sufferers all swear by their favorite potions and solutions, so maybe at least one of them will work for you. John Haille of Florence, S.C. recommends a solution of 1 oz. prepared phenol--car- bolic acid--and 15 oz. water (Phenol-containing Octagon soap, he says, works almost as well.) Washing with this mixture as soon as possible after exposure, John claims, will eliminate an itching attack. The same preparation can also be used for treatment: The solution stops itching, keeps the area clean, and lets it heal itself. Jewelweed seems to be an especially popular home remedy, Mark Wilson of Tewks- bury Mass. says to crush this member of the balsam family (Impatiens biflora in your hand and apply it directly on the rash several times a day until it clears He sug- gests that a convenient way to store this healer is to boil down a quantity of the herb and make ice cubes of the juice. Then you can apply a cube any time the itchy plant strikes you. Lemon juice is a favorite with Stefni Dawn of Beloit, Wis. She suggests washing the exposed area, patting it dry with a soft towel,.and then spreading on as much lemon juice as the skin will absorb. She says one treatment is sometimes enough to neutral- ize the poison.., but if itching and swelling return, just apply more juice to the area Stefni claims her therapy will clear up even a severe case within a few hours. Steve Morgan of Branson, Mo:--vho says he's "gone through years of playing the hermit" because of poison ivy, even though he's tried all the medications on the market--has finally found his sure-fire remedy for the pesky plague: Salt. That's right .. wet the affected areas and sprinkle on a little bit of good old table salt! Steve warns that this treatment does burn and smart a bit, but for him it makes those itch- ing, weeping bumps go away. Along the same line as the lemon juice therapy, vinegar (apple cider vinegar gets lots of votes) is recommended by many. Nancy Kerson of Willow Creek. Calif. says. "Both my husband and I are very allergic to poison ivy and have found that vinegar is most effective if we use it when the very first signs of inflammation appear. Even if we wait until the rash is well developed, the vinegar still stops the itching better than any of the creams and lotions from the drug store." Well, all of these formulas sound good in theory--and if applied immediately after contact many of them may well work to prevent the poison rash--but according to a local pharmacist we know, no acid formula is going to clear up the blisters once they've appeared. The poison ivy chemical that causes an allergic reaction in some 75% of the U.S. population--urushiol--does have an alkaline base. But once the poisonous substance gets into the blood and causes redness and swelling, it can be counteracted only by medicines taken internally. Many of the folk remedies can relieve only the symptoms of your allergy..These potions, as well as commercial products designed for external use, the pharmacist says, merely soothe the itching and keep you from scratching and infecting the sores. If you know you've been exposed to the poisonous plants and can quickly wash the areas with a strong soap, you may be able to remove the oils before they penetrate the underlayers of the skin. (By the way. poison ivy cannot be caught and spread by touching the rash unless some of these oils still remain on the skin.) For FREE additional information on hon remedies and on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine, senO your name and address and ask for Rdprint NO. 548: "Kitchen Medicine". Mail to Doing MORE ,. With LESS!, P.O. Box 70. Hendersonville. N.C. 28791, or in care of this paper. Copyright 1982 THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS, Inc ii I I i INVESTMENTS CLINT SWIFT HANOVER ROAD Nil WAYS (800) 542-5,171 WEST LEBANON, NH 03784 VT WATI (Q00) 259717 RED SOX TICKETS Jim Walker 41 King St. Woodsville, N.H. 03785 Tel. (603) 747-3389 or 747.3639 Make A Memorable Occas=0n _/_,/IEven moreso.., with a gift that lasts forevez  --GOLD & SILVER JEWE-LRY   -- INDIAN JEWELRY .. ,'>---,. StJNSHINE BOUTIOUE " ^ "- A EFFANBEE'S "DOLLS THAT TOUCH YOUR HEART" Have arrived at THE SLEEPING CAT 31 CrMTRAL $1". WOOOSVILLE, N,H. 603,747-3551 MON.-SAT. -- 9:30- 5, VI.T IL--_ 9,30-8. M, A511E O6 FOR SALE TOP SOIL/LOAM GREEN FROG GARDEN CENTER _ (  RADFORD, VT. (SeZ) =ti