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June 16, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-June 10, 1981 II I .ii i ii i iiii ii IIII I III NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. t Publisher of Robert F. Huminsld President & Publisher Bradford / .   Woodsville 802-222-5281 " .  2 603-747-20 ! 6 An Independent Newspaper I EditOrial Highway robbery The Vermont legislature, in the face of the state's troubled economy, appears determined to chase away even more business or at least make it as expensive as possible to do business here. First it was shutting down virtually all the supermarkets in the state on Sundays on threat of arrest of store managers under the revised "Blue Law." Now it's substantially increased taxes on out-of-state trucks which has stirred outraged cries of "highway robbery" and "border war" from other states. On June 15, truckers from other states, including neighboring New Hampshire, will have to pay $15 every time they cross the border into Vermont, plus a $40 highway use permit. The legislature doubled the Vermonters for goods delivered here from out of state. No doubt truckers will avoid Ver- mont altogether when possible, killing the considerable business they do in fuel and other purchases in Vermont. New Hampshire, in apparent retaliation, has announced it will impose identical $40 highway permit fees and $15 border-crossing fees on Vermont trucks starting next month, meaning higher costs for Vermont businesses that sell their goods in other states hnd deliver them by truck. "It's definitely going to hurt the consumer because the trucking operators are going to add the in- creased cost of operation to their freight rates," said one trucking firm spokesman in Lebanon. I Some do care/n the US. Letters to the Editor J To the Editor: aggressive marketing Mr. Babb. I wonder how many people techniques such as ad- world's ' noticed the moral statement vertising, distributing free the whole use tax from the former $20, in- :sed   g fee from $I0, and killed the reciprocal exemptions that formerly applied to trucks from 13 other states including New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Angry trucking firms say the fees, apparently the highest in the nation, will be passed along to consumers, which will mean, in many cases, to Racing fans have a right to know To the Editor: rules and I never have been. I legal. enjoy racing very rfiuch and my car has never been found illegal. When I came to the track on Friday night no one said a word about the problem. The only time it was questioned again was when we were about to start the engines for the Feature Race. At that time, Mr. Elms used a piece of plywood pushed against the rear tire and said it stuck out too far. I was told I could go to the pits and put on another tire and they would give me two laps. I explained that the ear is legal and I could prove it. I also pointed out that the spare tire that I carry has the same offset and this change of tires wouldn't prove anything. I also said that if Mr. Elms didn't approve I still had one week left to fix the problem--although I sure don't know what I could do different, because the car is MONEY SENSE Investing your money If you have $10,000 or more in cash you are able to deposit in a so-called "Money Market Certificate", then you are a potential member of this country's growing roster of "Study the Financial Page Club". With your $I0,000 or more, on the date this column was written, you can command one of the highest savings rates paid in the history of this country! Without having your money tied up for a long period of time. Without the risk of market fluctuations for the six months your money is on deposit. Without the risk of loss, because your money is insured by the FDIC (or some other agency) up to $I00,000. You can even get a check each month for your interest income. While we're at it, let's not forget Money Market Mutual Funds, Investor's Funds and a host of other funds that will accept amounts as small as $I,000 for a minimum of I0 days and a maximum of 89 days and pay you 15 per cent or more on your money. (Incident]y, these "Funds" are NOT insured savings.) Sound like Utopia? For a privilegedfew it can he. Meanwhile, lost in the backwash of this gigantic struggle for the big buck, are the millions of people whose eavings seldom rise above a $1,000 dollars and if they do, are usually ear-marked for some immediate need such as taxes or in- surance. What are the legislators and regulators doing for the "little guy"? Very little. If you pick the right hank, you can receive as much as 51/2 per cent on your savings account. As you can see, there is quite a bit of difference between that rate and the 15 per cent or so paid on Money Market accounts. Don't bear down too hard on your local bank. The real culprit responsible for this mess is a thing called "Regulation Q". Under this regulation, savings ba are forbidden to pay more than 5% per cent on regular savings accounts and commercial hank are limited to 5V4 per cent. Fortunately, "Regulation Q" is being phased out, offering some hope for the small saver to realize a greater return on his account. It does take time however to phase out a regulation, especially one that will bring all hanks into more intense competition for the savings dollar. In the meantime, let's compare interest income between (A) A person who can invest $10,000. in a money market certificate and tB) a person with $10,000. in a regular savings account as of June 1,1981: (a) $10,000. at 15.925 per cent for 180 days equals $785.34 (B) $10,000. at 5.5 per cent for 180 days equals $271.08 The difference: $514.26 As you can see, this is a considerable amount of money. Because hanks are receiving an increasing number of so- called money market deposits their interest expense is in- creasing proportionately. What are hanks doing to offset this increase cost? Next week we'll take s look at some o( the ways hanks can operate to p rot,,.t their earnings against the 'rising cost of money. After all, Ive never heard a bank being called a charitable organization! I am writing this letter because I feel the racing fans have a right to know what happened to Car No. 98 at the races last Friday night. We were in first place in points and the car has been working really well all year. I was told by the officials on May 29th that my right nerf bar stuck out too far. It has been this way since the middle of the last year of racing, but no one ever questioned it before. The reason it was out was because a special built offset wheel was ruined during a race last year and ! didn't have another wheel like it so I put on a standard offset wheel, The rule book says you have 2 weeks to fix a problem, but I fixed the nerf bar in question between the May 29th race and Friday's race. I used a straight edge to determine that the nerf bar no longer stuck out by the tire, I am not interested in breaking the Vermont's greatness To the Editor: Vermonters love to glorify their state but we wonder how many really make its beauties an important part of their lives. It would take a book to cover the subject of Vermont's greatness, and this has been done in the past by many talented writers and artists. We would simply like to point out some aspects of our pleasures in the state which many people are missing. And you don't have to retire to have the fun we as. We soon discovered on arriving here in the fail of 1971, that the winter was a beautiful and thrilling time of year. This just happened, unplanned. We were not skiers: we happen to like activity and the outdoors. We now ski almost daily during the course of the five winter months and cover several hundred miles in this area alone Breath-taking sights greet us at every turn, but very rarely do we meet any other skiers, or even see any ski tracks. It seems a pity. The coming of spring is just /Admittedly, Vermont is having as exciting as winter, but in pi'oblems ,,diff..ce WY&-:O ..the *" earhest chaes s tl iival of different speczes of birds whether this is the best way to do it. from those which been guests And how do. state officials plan to at our feeders all winter. The monitor the numerous trucks entering the state from all points of the com- pass? More State Policemen? That sounds expensive, too, and the police have enough to do already. for education commissioner red-wing blackbirds come first. This year we were honored by the arrival of a male and fernale cardinal who decided to stay after a careful inspection of the premises. So now we are feeding the honeymooners who shovld soon become parents. A male cardinal had stopped by briefly in past years hut never persuaded a To the Editor: The Vermont Board of Education is in the process of searching for a new education commissioner. Before we begin to consider applicants, we would like to hear froq educators and the public about the kinds of qualities that Vermonters believe the new commissioner should possess. We have set aside the second half of our June board meeting to hear individually from representatives of professional asociatious and individuals. We will also receive letters of comment and suggestions. These wantin]g to meet with the state board may arrange an interview for June 16 in Montpelier by calling Sally Bouffard. Department of Education, 828-3135, Those who want to send letters may write to: Allen Martin, Chairman Vermont Board of Education, Suite One, 100 Dorset Street, South Burlington, Vermont 05401. Allen Martin, Chairman Vermont Board of Education I then confronted the flagman who said Mr. Elms told him to Black Flag me if I started the race. I asked the flagman to please look at the bar in question, but he said it wouldn't do any good, Mr. Elms was the boss. When I got to the pits I checked the car again, in front of 30 or 40 people and found it legal, as I knew it was. I then went to Robert Nutting tassociate owner of the track) and had him check it--be said it was legal. I had Crawford Emery, the pit steward, look at it and he agreed it was OK. I had both members of the Driver Grevience Committee, Pete Dunn and Jr. Coffin, look at it and they both agreed it was legal. Before the evening was over many people had looked at the problem and agreed there was nothing wrong. Mr. Elms, in my opinion, stood alone in his decision. As a result of this, I was moved out of first place and down the ladder again. There were 20-25 Little League ball players from female to join him Also this Chelsea waiting to see me year for the first time a race, as well as all the regular mocking bird arrived and fans. I must say it was some left again -- on May tO. Bird heart-breaking and era- feeders can be an endless source of interest and amusement, but for the greatest pleasure they should be visible from some spot used for rest and recreation, such as the breakfast nook. During the past ten years we have recorded 82 different species of birds seen from our kitchen window Our final note for this report concerns spring wild flowers which are for most part, small and sparse and quickly past. Of course, the more a person knows about a subject the more interesting j! becomes, but at least one of us arrived in Vermont knowing very few spring wild flowers being a city type and having vacations in the summer. However. this year in May alone we iden- tified and recorded about 70 different kinds of wild flowers. These observations were made almost incidentally to our life in the garden, with only a few excursions to neighboring woodlands. We had a lot of fun. We won't dk$cdssthe joys of summer an [t, ince these are well kn0v/n to one and all. Even flatlanders. Peg Watt Jim Watt Ely, Vt. P.S.: Since this letter was composed, bright-eyes in the family spotted rand identified later with bookl ten additional flowers along the road by just driving to town for a newspaper. This was on May 31. You see: it's easy as well as fun. harassing to have to take a legal car out of the race. Now fans, I appeal to you--How Does One Compete This Way? You follow the rules and still erid up sitting in the pits. Could someone tell me why they waited until the feature race to bring the problem up again. I stood around the pits all evening with nothing to do and no one said anything. We have always, in the past, been given 2 weeks to fix a problem. I was given 2 laps. If a car has a problem during the evening and can't run, the track likes to be given warning ahead of time. I wasn't given any warning at all! Tell me racing fans, was this fair and proper? I await your replays. Frank Keene Owner & Driver of Car No. 98 Chelsea, Vt. that two senior officials of the Reagan Administration recently made and the sacrifice entailed in this statement. After "lengthy discussions" AID Administrator M. Peter McPherson said that Dr. Stephen Joseph and Eugene N. Babb, officials of the Agency for International Development intend to submit their resignations after the United States casts it's vote against the International code at the World Health Assembly May 21st in Geneva. McPherson said the resignations will be accepted immediately. Joseph and Babb are protesting the ad- ministration's decision on the infant formula code. The United States is expected to be the only government among the 157 countries participating in the World Health Assembly to vote against the code. Basically this code is designed to diminish com- mercial efforts to convince women in the Third World and underdeveloped nations to switch from breast feeding their babies to using formula. Many of these countries have contaminated water supplies and poor sanitation. Mothers simply cannot prepare a safe clean formula under these conditions. Approximately 10 million infants and young children annually suffer from sometimes fatal malnutrition and other diseases associated with inadequate breast feeding and the use of milk substitutes. Many health and religious groups in the United States support this code, but "big business" along with its ob- vious financial clout appears to he heard more clearly by the current administration. The "immoral culprits" are three large formula manufacturers and the Grocery Manufacturers of America." Apparently the credit side of the ledger is more important than the lives of babies we never see, or the respect of the world. The code seeks to forbid Sportsmanship and team spirit To the Editor : with good team spirit. The This iS my first ever "Letter East Corinth Ma[or  League to the Editor". I have been coaches, Copeland and sorely tempted may times but never stirred up enough to actually do it. I have just returned from a Little League Baseball game between the Bradford Green Hornets and the East Corinth major league team. I always thought the purpose of Little League was to teach the children 1) the game of baseball 2) sportsmanship and 3) to work together as a team Wentworth police chief resigns To the Editor: An open letter to the citizens of the Town of Wentworth It is with deep regret that I must write this letter of resignation as Chief of Police of the Town of Wentworth, New Hampshire. effective June 9, 1981. As you are all aware, the present state of the economy, and rapid rise of the rate of inflation, have made it next to impossible for individuals and families to make ends meet. Unfortunately, I am in the same position. The office of Chief of Police in Wentworth is not a full- time, full-paying job; and I cannot, by any stretch of the imagination, survive on a part-time job. I have accepted an ap- pointment as a full-time police officer on the Waterville Valley Department of Public Safety. Because of. the distance which separates these two communities, and because I find that for the sake of fuel economy, I must move closer to my full-time em- ployment, I feel that I can not serve you effectively as your Chief of Police. I am certain that your selectmen will appoint someone who will serve you as you deserve to be served until Return to the cave dwelling era associate, display the poorest sportsmanship of any of the coaches I've seen in four years of Little League games. And, the worst of it is, it shows in their team's attitude, too. I don't feel there is any room in Little League for adult coaches who rax 11-and 12- year-old opposing pitchers and players. Their job is to teach their team hew to play a good game, net how to walk slowly to the plate to delay the samples or sending nurses or isn't totally "non nurses" dressed in white that some into maternity wards and about our villages in the Third World to in promote baby formula. Jacc I commend Dr. Joseph and 00Our by In 1976 the New England River Basins pleted a three year study of the Connecticutl a 292 page report entitled "The unified program for flood plain necticut River Basin" it outlined, recommendations focused on quote better job of getting along the overall responsibility pretty agencies. Like all such efforts, its general spotty. In many cases key strategies pensive or politically, economically or to be contemplated. In other cases some, seemed too small in scale to he worth preaching such issues, River's Reach did not emphasis on the "cumulative impact" and conditions and in effect did not identify! suspected time bombs ticking in the enough for another column and we'll look time. The New Hampshire Office of State issued a "Basin Status Report" to the Citizen's Advisory Group. It is a rather date on just how this state has followed recommendations found in River's recommendations addressed every conc riverine activity and condition the types pages and the information it remarkable, encouraging and disturbing, i order. In this situation it is difficult to avoid a did you know" kind of approach but we'll thing to a minimum. Those of us who watch the PBS channels classic "Is there a Water Crisis" last been unfortunately reassured by hearing has traditionally been a well watered fortunate is the couple of dry years are down, some wells have become swings are downright unreliable and if ( quality is a mounting concern. In the river itself water quality has proving since 1972. Some may ago we were told not to eat the fish and drink might prove terminal. Things are the In the New Hampshire-Vermont section from here on the term "river" will mean the Canadian border to the otherwise noted--there are 26 facilities with 24 more planned. built since the Reagan administra most water related projects and most of rot.fit tbo budgets of the towns involved. .... Ville: plantwill be finished and go future. There is still some 309 miles of that do not meet mandated quality degradation is a mix of municipal Water quality includes that of we tend to think of streams geology permits no such distinctions. ground water, they feed streams and separated. The N.H. Water Supply commission has prepared draft activity that could Seventy two percent of of the people generally rely on ground use. While the Rivers Reach made no Psychiatrist Robert L. Dupont says the nuclear phobia is psychological. Let us be truthful and not forget, the Three Mile Island incident was grossly blown out of proportion by an ignorant media and the opponents of nuclear power. No one: I repeat, not one person was injured in the vicinity of 3 Mile Island. Dr. Arthur M. Bueche, last year's winner of the American Institute of Chemistry's gold medal, sees a parallel bet- ween today's nuclear phobia (please turn to page 5) To the Editor: Re: Nuclear electric and the ignorant and misguided op- position to it. I am not a nuclear physicist but I have worked for almost 40 years in coal, oil, and finally in nuclear electric plants. As far as I am con- cerned, the nuclear plant is the cleanest, safest, most efficient and the cheapest. Dr. Edward Teller, noted nuclear physicist has said, "Nuclear power is the cleanest, safest and cheapest method of generating large amounts of electricity. your next election. In the for the support you have ex- meantime, again, let me tended to me, not only at the express my regret that I must polls on election day, but leave. Perhaps, sometime in throughout each of the four the future, it will he my years of our association. pleasure to serve you again. Tom Smith, I would also like to take this (Ex)-Chief of Police opportunity to thank all of you Wentworth, N.H. game, so they won't have to play the last inning ! Probably they will say, I am just mad because we lost. Not so -- we have lost many this year and last, but, ! have not come away from a loss feeling this way since last year when we played East Corinth. Gall R. Hathaway Bradford Vermont Secretary of State .. James H. Douglas ,.. A new era in rulemaking On July 1, Vermont enters a new era in rulemaking. On that day the new Administrative Procedure Act (A.P.A.) reform law takes effect, and agencies of state government will experience fir- stband the new climate for rulemaking in Vermont. At a time when Washington is feeling the first effects of a concerted movement toward deregulation, Vermont's unique version of the A.P.A.--first adopted here in 1968--is about to change course toward greater accountability and legislative oversight on rulemaking. Rules properly adopted by the A.P.A. process have the force and effect of law. They are promulgated (a fancy word for 'put into effect') by state agencies and reviewed by a legislative committee that meets throughout the year for that purpose alone. The committee is made up of members of the Vermont Senate and House of Representatives. Before July 1, if the committee found that a particular rule was arbitrary, contrary to the intent of the Legislature or beyond the authority granted the agency by law, the committee could do one of two things. It could recommend to the agency that the rule be changed or repealed. Or, if the agency refused, the committee could attempt to have the rule repealed by a bill or joint resolution of the General Assembly. The fundamental change in rulemaking after July 1is the addition of a new remedy for the committee, if it is disenchanted with a particular rule. Now the committee, , by majority vote of.the entire committee, can file a written complaint with the rule that will make defending the rule in court more difficult for the agency. This isn't quite as potent a sanction as a "legislative veto," a concept currently being discussed in some states that would allow a committee to repeal a rule on its own, without full legislative action. But the formal complaint letter approach--unique to Vermont among the states--will cer- tainly have a chilling effect on too vigorous rulemaking activity by state agencies. In addition to these changes, the new procedures will also give Vermont citizens more access to the rulemaking process. The new law provides for more extensive publicizing of proposed rules, more time and greater notice for public hearings and new channels of communication between citizens and state agencies. Agencies will now be required by law to fully explain new rules to people who ask about them. The new rulemaking process even requires agencies to write out and keep on file any procedures of the agency that are used by an agency in the discharge of its powers that affect even one citizen not an employee of the agency, if a single person requests it. The temper of the times condemns excessive governmental interference in our lives Rules. historically, have been the worst culprits, allowing government to poke its finger in places even legislatures have been careful not to invade. Vermont's new approach to rulemaking represents the first strong winds of change in this area in recent years. The weather is clearing, the burden of government is slowly lifting, and Vermonters.ought to appreciate just how c0mmitted Vermont / State government really is in 1981 to these ends. mendations for hydro power in New such installations in the basin. Lake created to regulate the flow on the hydro facility if a permit applied for Resources Board and the N.E. Power Several such applications have been section -- the Bradford-Waits river dam is Wells River another. When it considered recreation, River': Connecticut River National Recreation involved a total of 56,000 acres Charlestown to the Conn. Lakes. The enthusiasm in either Vermont or the towns within its borders. but the gas has been disconnected. However, a plan to designate a tributary better luck. The plan and investigated those rivers and standing wild, scenic and recreational result is the "River Conservation Act" session of the General Court. for the protection and In addition both Fish and Game and acquisition of additional public access River. We'll ee. The "Reach" also looked at mended that some 600 archeolc aside. Heritage Act" introduced into the 1981 followed by a seek to preserve such identified sites. dition to the archeological environmental impact studies. vation of a number of Flood control Reservoir Sites. Since publication, rethinking of this program and it sites on the Sugar River in Anadromous fish restoration, primarily  and Atlantic Shad, is an old idea more, These fish, which breed develop in salt were wiped out in by dams on the lower river which cut spawning grounds Ul story on the salmon a few weeks hack. River's Reach recommended Falls, Vernon, Bellow's Falls and series begun earlier down river. Bellow's Falls is "in the works" and later this decade. I visited Turner's why they, fish ladders, run to each. The mere size and obvious enormous, and the power New Hampshire, Vermont compact to manage these fisheries. Massachusetts are delaying that agreement, without which the success. We've run outof EDITOR'S NOTE-- The three authors' like to hear from you. If you ha/e Connecticut River issues you would here, please let us know.,We want to and he responsive to yoar interests. Journal Opinion, Box 378, Bradford, Vt. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-June 10, 1981 II I .ii i ii i iiii ii IIII I III NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. t Publisher of Robert F. Huminsld President & Publisher Bradford / .   Woodsville 802-222-5281 " .  2 603-747-20 ! 6 An Independent Newspaper I EditOrial Highway robbery The Vermont legislature, in the face of the state's troubled economy, appears determined to chase away even more business or at least make it as expensive as possible to do business here. First it was shutting down virtually all the supermarkets in the state on Sundays on threat of arrest of store managers under the revised "Blue Law." Now it's substantially increased taxes on out-of-state trucks which has stirred outraged cries of "highway robbery" and "border war" from other states. On June 15, truckers from other states, including neighboring New Hampshire, will have to pay $15 every time they cross the border into Vermont, plus a $40 highway use permit. The legislature doubled the Vermonters for goods delivered here from out of state. No doubt truckers will avoid Ver- mont altogether when possible, killing the considerable business they do in fuel and other purchases in Vermont. New Hampshire, in apparent retaliation, has announced it will impose identical $40 highway permit fees and $15 border-crossing fees on Vermont trucks starting next month, meaning higher costs for Vermont businesses that sell their goods in other states hnd deliver them by truck. "It's definitely going to hurt the consumer because the trucking operators are going to add the in- creased cost of operation to their freight rates," said one trucking firm spokesman in Lebanon. I Some do care/n the US. Letters to the Editor J To the Editor: aggressive marketing Mr. Babb. I wonder how many people techniques such as ad- world's ' noticed the moral statement vertising, distributing free the whole use tax from the former $20, in- :sed   g fee from $I0, and killed the reciprocal exemptions that formerly applied to trucks from 13 other states including New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Angry trucking firms say the fees, apparently the highest in the nation, will be passed along to consumers, which will mean, in many cases, to Racing fans have a right to know To the Editor: rules and I never have been. I legal. enjoy racing very rfiuch and my car has never been found illegal. When I came to the track on Friday night no one said a word about the problem. The only time it was questioned again was when we were about to start the engines for the Feature Race. At that time, Mr. Elms used a piece of plywood pushed against the rear tire and said it stuck out too far. I was told I could go to the pits and put on another tire and they would give me two laps. I explained that the ear is legal and I could prove it. I also pointed out that the spare tire that I carry has the same offset and this change of tires wouldn't prove anything. I also said that if Mr. Elms didn't approve I still had one week left to fix the problem--although I sure don't know what I could do different, because the car is MONEY SENSE Investing your money If you have $10,000 or more in cash you are able to deposit in a so-called "Money Market Certificate", then you are a potential member of this country's growing roster of "Study the Financial Page Club". With your $I0,000 or more, on the date this column was written, you can command one of the highest savings rates paid in the history of this country! Without having your money tied up for a long period of time. Without the risk of market fluctuations for the six months your money is on deposit. Without the risk of loss, because your money is insured by the FDIC (or some other agency) up to $I00,000. You can even get a check each month for your interest income. While we're at it, let's not forget Money Market Mutual Funds, Investor's Funds and a host of other funds that will accept amounts as small as $I,000 for a minimum of I0 days and a maximum of 89 days and pay you 15 per cent or more on your money. (Incident]y, these "Funds" are NOT insured savings.) Sound like Utopia? For a privilegedfew it can he. Meanwhile, lost in the backwash of this gigantic struggle for the big buck, are the millions of people whose eavings seldom rise above a $1,000 dollars and if they do, are usually ear-marked for some immediate need such as taxes or in- surance. What are the legislators and regulators doing for the "little guy"? Very little. If you pick the right hank, you can receive as much as 51/2 per cent on your savings account. As you can see, there is quite a bit of difference between that rate and the 15 per cent or so paid on Money Market accounts. Don't bear down too hard on your local bank. The real culprit responsible for this mess is a thing called "Regulation Q". Under this regulation, savings ba are forbidden to pay more than 5% per cent on regular savings accounts and commercial hank are limited to 5V4 per cent. Fortunately, "Regulation Q" is being phased out, offering some hope for the small saver to realize a greater return on his account. It does take time however to phase out a regulation, especially one that will bring all hanks into more intense competition for the savings dollar. In the meantime, let's compare interest income between (A) A person who can invest $10,000. in a money market certificate and tB) a person with $10,000. in a regular savings account as of June 1,1981: (a) $10,000. at 15.925 per cent for 180 days equals $785.34 (B) $10,000. at 5.5 per cent for 180 days equals $271.08 The difference: $514.26 As you can see, this is a considerable amount of money. Because hanks are receiving an increasing number of so- called money market deposits their interest expense is in- creasing proportionately. What are hanks doing to offset this increase cost? Next week we'll take s look at some o( the ways hanks can operate to p rot,,.t their earnings against the 'rising cost of money. After all, Ive never heard a bank being called a charitable organization! I am writing this letter because I feel the racing fans have a right to know what happened to Car No. 98 at the races last Friday night. We were in first place in points and the car has been working really well all year. I was told by the officials on May 29th that my right nerf bar stuck out too far. It has been this way since the middle of the last year of racing, but no one ever questioned it before. The reason it was out was because a special built offset wheel was ruined during a race last year and ! didn't have another wheel like it so I put on a standard offset wheel, The rule book says you have 2 weeks to fix a problem, but I fixed the nerf bar in question between the May 29th race and Friday's race. I used a straight edge to determine that the nerf bar no longer stuck out by the tire, I am not interested in breaking the Vermont's greatness To the Editor: Vermonters love to glorify their state but we wonder how many really make its beauties an important part of their lives. It would take a book to cover the subject of Vermont's greatness, and this has been done in the past by many talented writers and artists. We would simply like to point out some aspects of our pleasures in the state which many people are missing. And you don't have to retire to have the fun we as. We soon discovered on arriving here in the fail of 1971, that the winter was a beautiful and thrilling time of year. This just happened, unplanned. We were not skiers: we happen to like activity and the outdoors. We now ski almost daily during the course of the five winter months and cover several hundred miles in this area alone Breath-taking sights greet us at every turn, but very rarely do we meet any other skiers, or even see any ski tracks. It seems a pity. The coming of spring is just /Admittedly, Vermont is having as exciting as winter, but in pi'oblems ,,diff..ce WY&-:O ..the *" earhest chaes s tl iival of different speczes of birds whether this is the best way to do it. from those which been guests And how do. state officials plan to at our feeders all winter. The monitor the numerous trucks entering the state from all points of the com- pass? More State Policemen? That sounds expensive, too, and the police have enough to do already. for education commissioner red-wing blackbirds come first. This year we were honored by the arrival of a male and fernale cardinal who decided to stay after a careful inspection of the premises. So now we are feeding the honeymooners who shovld soon become parents. A male cardinal had stopped by briefly in past years hut never persuaded a To the Editor: The Vermont Board of Education is in the process of searching for a new education commissioner. Before we begin to consider applicants, we would like to hear froq educators and the public about the kinds of qualities that Vermonters believe the new commissioner should possess. We have set aside the second half of our June board meeting to hear individually from representatives of professional asociatious and individuals. We will also receive letters of comment and suggestions. These wantin]g to meet with the state board may arrange an interview for June 16 in Montpelier by calling Sally Bouffard. Department of Education, 828-3135, Those who want to send letters may write to: Allen Martin, Chairman Vermont Board of Education, Suite One, 100 Dorset Street, South Burlington, Vermont 05401. Allen Martin, Chairman Vermont Board of Education I then confronted the flagman who said Mr. Elms told him to Black Flag me if I started the race. I asked the flagman to please look at the bar in question, but he said it wouldn't do any good, Mr. Elms was the boss. When I got to the pits I checked the car again, in front of 30 or 40 people and found it legal, as I knew it was. I then went to Robert Nutting tassociate owner of the track) and had him check it--be said it was legal. I had Crawford Emery, the pit steward, look at it and he agreed it was OK. I had both members of the Driver Grevience Committee, Pete Dunn and Jr. Coffin, look at it and they both agreed it was legal. Before the evening was over many people had looked at the problem and agreed there was nothing wrong. Mr. Elms, in my opinion, stood alone in his decision. As a result of this, I was moved out of first place and down the ladder again. There were 20-25 Little League ball players from female to join him Also this Chelsea waiting to see me year for the first time a race, as well as all the regular mocking bird arrived and fans. I must say it was some left again -- on May tO. Bird heart-breaking and era- feeders can be an endless source of interest and amusement, but for the greatest pleasure they should be visible from some spot used for rest and recreation, such as the breakfast nook. During the past ten years we have recorded 82 different species of birds seen from our kitchen window Our final note for this report concerns spring wild flowers which are for most part, small and sparse and quickly past. Of course, the more a person knows about a subject the more interesting j! becomes, but at least one of us arrived in Vermont knowing very few spring wild flowers being a city type and having vacations in the summer. However. this year in May alone we iden- tified and recorded about 70 different kinds of wild flowers. These observations were made almost incidentally to our life in the garden, with only a few excursions to neighboring woodlands. We had a lot of fun. We won't dk$cdssthe joys of summer an [t, ince these are well kn0v/n to one and all. Even flatlanders. Peg Watt Jim Watt Ely, Vt. P.S.: Since this letter was composed, bright-eyes in the family spotted rand identified later with bookl ten additional flowers along the road by just driving to town for a newspaper. This was on May 31. You see: it's easy as well as fun. harassing to have to take a legal car out of the race. Now fans, I appeal to you--How Does One Compete This Way? You follow the rules and still erid up sitting in the pits. Could someone tell me why they waited until the feature race to bring the problem up again. I stood around the pits all evening with nothing to do and no one said anything. We have always, in the past, been given 2 weeks to fix a problem. I was given 2 laps. If a car has a problem during the evening and can't run, the track likes to be given warning ahead of time. I wasn't given any warning at all! Tell me racing fans, was this fair and proper? I await your replays. Frank Keene Owner & Driver of Car No. 98 Chelsea, Vt. that two senior officials of the Reagan Administration recently made and the sacrifice entailed in this statement. After "lengthy discussions" AID Administrator M. Peter McPherson said that Dr. Stephen Joseph and Eugene N. Babb, officials of the Agency for International Development intend to submit their resignations after the United States casts it's vote against the International code at the World Health Assembly May 21st in Geneva. McPherson said the resignations will be accepted immediately. Joseph and Babb are protesting the ad- ministration's decision on the infant formula code. The United States is expected to be the only government among the 157 countries participating in the World Health Assembly to vote against the code. Basically this code is designed to diminish com- mercial efforts to convince women in the Third World and underdeveloped nations to switch from breast feeding their babies to using formula. Many of these countries have contaminated water supplies and poor sanitation. Mothers simply cannot prepare a safe clean formula under these conditions. Approximately 10 million infants and young children annually suffer from sometimes fatal malnutrition and other diseases associated with inadequate breast feeding and the use of milk substitutes. Many health and religious groups in the United States support this code, but "big business" along with its ob- vious financial clout appears to he heard more clearly by the current administration. The "immoral culprits" are three large formula manufacturers and the Grocery Manufacturers of America." Apparently the credit side of the ledger is more important than the lives of babies we never see, or the respect of the world. The code seeks to forbid Sportsmanship and team spirit To the Editor : with good team spirit. The This iS my first ever "Letter East Corinth Ma[or  League to the Editor". I have been coaches, Copeland and sorely tempted may times but never stirred up enough to actually do it. I have just returned from a Little League Baseball game between the Bradford Green Hornets and the East Corinth major league team. I always thought the purpose of Little League was to teach the children 1) the game of baseball 2) sportsmanship and 3) to work together as a team Wentworth police chief resigns To the Editor: An open letter to the citizens of the Town of Wentworth It is with deep regret that I must write this letter of resignation as Chief of Police of the Town of Wentworth, New Hampshire. effective June 9, 1981. As you are all aware, the present state of the economy, and rapid rise of the rate of inflation, have made it next to impossible for individuals and families to make ends meet. Unfortunately, I am in the same position. The office of Chief of Police in Wentworth is not a full- time, full-paying job; and I cannot, by any stretch of the imagination, survive on a part-time job. I have accepted an ap- pointment as a full-time police officer on the Waterville Valley Department of Public Safety. Because of. the distance which separates these two communities, and because I find that for the sake of fuel economy, I must move closer to my full-time em- ployment, I feel that I can not serve you effectively as your Chief of Police. I am certain that your selectmen will appoint someone who will serve you as you deserve to be served until Return to the cave dwelling era associate, display the poorest sportsmanship of any of the coaches I've seen in four years of Little League games. And, the worst of it is, it shows in their team's attitude, too. I don't feel there is any room in Little League for adult coaches who rax 11-and 12- year-old opposing pitchers and players. Their job is to teach their team hew to play a good game, net how to walk slowly to the plate to delay the samples or sending nurses or isn't totally "non nurses" dressed in white that some into maternity wards and about our villages in the Third World to in promote baby formula. Jacc I commend Dr. Joseph and 00Our by In 1976 the New England River Basins pleted a three year study of the Connecticutl a 292 page report entitled "The unified program for flood plain necticut River Basin" it outlined, recommendations focused on quote better job of getting along the overall responsibility pretty agencies. Like all such efforts, its general spotty. In many cases key strategies pensive or politically, economically or to be contemplated. In other cases some, seemed too small in scale to he worth preaching such issues, River's Reach did not emphasis on the "cumulative impact" and conditions and in effect did not identify! suspected time bombs ticking in the enough for another column and we'll look time. The New Hampshire Office of State issued a "Basin Status Report" to the Citizen's Advisory Group. It is a rather date on just how this state has followed recommendations found in River's recommendations addressed every conc riverine activity and condition the types pages and the information it remarkable, encouraging and disturbing, i order. In this situation it is difficult to avoid a did you know" kind of approach but we'll thing to a minimum. Those of us who watch the PBS channels classic "Is there a Water Crisis" last been unfortunately reassured by hearing has traditionally been a well watered fortunate is the couple of dry years are down, some wells have become swings are downright unreliable and if ( quality is a mounting concern. In the river itself water quality has proving since 1972. Some may ago we were told not to eat the fish and drink might prove terminal. Things are the In the New Hampshire-Vermont section from here on the term "river" will mean the Canadian border to the otherwise noted--there are 26 facilities with 24 more planned. built since the Reagan administra most water related projects and most of rot.fit tbo budgets of the towns involved. .... Ville: plantwill be finished and go future. There is still some 309 miles of that do not meet mandated quality degradation is a mix of municipal Water quality includes that of we tend to think of streams geology permits no such distinctions. ground water, they feed streams and separated. The N.H. Water Supply commission has prepared draft activity that could Seventy two percent of of the people generally rely on ground use. While the Rivers Reach made no Psychiatrist Robert L. Dupont says the nuclear phobia is psychological. Let us be truthful and not forget, the Three Mile Island incident was grossly blown out of proportion by an ignorant media and the opponents of nuclear power. No one: I repeat, not one person was injured in the vicinity of 3 Mile Island. Dr. Arthur M. Bueche, last year's winner of the American Institute of Chemistry's gold medal, sees a parallel bet- ween today's nuclear phobia (please turn to page 5) To the Editor: Re: Nuclear electric and the ignorant and misguided op- position to it. I am not a nuclear physicist but I have worked for almost 40 years in coal, oil, and finally in nuclear electric plants. As far as I am con- cerned, the nuclear plant is the cleanest, safest, most efficient and the cheapest. Dr. Edward Teller, noted nuclear physicist has said, "Nuclear power is the cleanest, safest and cheapest method of generating large amounts of electricity. your next election. In the for the support you have ex- meantime, again, let me tended to me, not only at the express my regret that I must polls on election day, but leave. Perhaps, sometime in throughout each of the four the future, it will he my years of our association. pleasure to serve you again. Tom Smith, I would also like to take this (Ex)-Chief of Police opportunity to thank all of you Wentworth, N.H. game, so they won't have to play the last inning ! Probably they will say, I am just mad because we lost. Not so -- we have lost many this year and last, but, ! have not come away from a loss feeling this way since last year when we played East Corinth. Gall R. Hathaway Bradford Vermont Secretary of State .. James H. Douglas ,.. A new era in rulemaking On July 1, Vermont enters a new era in rulemaking. On that day the new Administrative Procedure Act (A.P.A.) reform law takes effect, and agencies of state government will experience fir- stband the new climate for rulemaking in Vermont. At a time when Washington is feeling the first effects of a concerted movement toward deregulation, Vermont's unique version of the A.P.A.--first adopted here in 1968--is about to change course toward greater accountability and legislative oversight on rulemaking. Rules properly adopted by the A.P.A. process have the force and effect of law. They are promulgated (a fancy word for 'put into effect') by state agencies and reviewed by a legislative committee that meets throughout the year for that purpose alone. The committee is made up of members of the Vermont Senate and House of Representatives. Before July 1, if the committee found that a particular rule was arbitrary, contrary to the intent of the Legislature or beyond the authority granted the agency by law, the committee could do one of two things. It could recommend to the agency that the rule be changed or repealed. Or, if the agency refused, the committee could attempt to have the rule repealed by a bill or joint resolution of the General Assembly. The fundamental change in rulemaking after July 1is the addition of a new remedy for the committee, if it is disenchanted with a particular rule. Now the committee, , by majority vote of.the entire committee, can file a written complaint with the rule that will make defending the rule in court more difficult for the agency. This isn't quite as potent a sanction as a "legislative veto," a concept currently being discussed in some states that would allow a committee to repeal a rule on its own, without full legislative action. But the formal complaint letter approach--unique to Vermont among the states--will cer- tainly have a chilling effect on too vigorous rulemaking activity by state agencies. In addition to these changes, the new procedures will also give Vermont citizens more access to the rulemaking process. The new law provides for more extensive publicizing of proposed rules, more time and greater notice for public hearings and new channels of communication between citizens and state agencies. Agencies will now be required by law to fully explain new rules to people who ask about them. The new rulemaking process even requires agencies to write out and keep on file any procedures of the agency that are used by an agency in the discharge of its powers that affect even one citizen not an employee of the agency, if a single person requests it. The temper of the times condemns excessive governmental interference in our lives Rules. historically, have been the worst culprits, allowing government to poke its finger in places even legislatures have been careful not to invade. Vermont's new approach to rulemaking represents the first strong winds of change in this area in recent years. The weather is clearing, the burden of government is slowly lifting, and Vermonters.ought to appreciate just how c0mmitted Vermont / State government really is in 1981 to these ends. mendations for hydro power in New such installations in the basin. Lake created to regulate the flow on the hydro facility if a permit applied for Resources Board and the N.E. Power Several such applications have been section -- the Bradford-Waits river dam is Wells River another. When it considered recreation, River': Connecticut River National Recreation involved a total of 56,000 acres Charlestown to the Conn. Lakes. The enthusiasm in either Vermont or the towns within its borders. but the gas has been disconnected. However, a plan to designate a tributary better luck. The plan and investigated those rivers and standing wild, scenic and recreational result is the "River Conservation Act" session of the General Court. for the protection and In addition both Fish and Game and acquisition of additional public access River. We'll ee. The "Reach" also looked at mended that some 600 archeolc aside. Heritage Act" introduced into the 1981 followed by a seek to preserve such identified sites. dition to the archeological environmental impact studies. vation of a number of Flood control Reservoir Sites. Since publication, rethinking of this program and it sites on the Sugar River in Anadromous fish restoration, primarily  and Atlantic Shad, is an old idea more, These fish, which breed develop in salt were wiped out in by dams on the lower river which cut spawning grounds Ul story on the salmon a few weeks hack. River's Reach recommended Falls, Vernon, Bellow's Falls and series begun earlier down river. Bellow's Falls is "in the works" and later this decade. I visited Turner's why they, fish ladders, run to each. The mere size and obvious enormous, and the power New Hampshire, Vermont compact to manage these fisheries. Massachusetts are delaying that agreement, without which the success. We've run outof EDITOR'S NOTE-- The three authors' like to hear from you. If you ha/e Connecticut River issues you would here, please let us know.,We want to and he responsive to yoar interests. Journal Opinion, Box 378, Bradford, Vt.