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June 16, 1981     Journal Opinion
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June 10, 1981.The Journal Opinion-Page 5 3asins C a ,ecticut ,r s lanagem, variety d] river" am'ely o! Bicentennial and Century.Farms in Bradford and Corinth 1771 know, the farm in Peters' Bradford, officially Bicentennial ral of the Peters ra4ford can he he 1771 flood, John Peters had on his property low next to the RiVer (near the ion). The house next built -- a house It is owned ; early built the first Thetford, Bradford he was da, his son was farm for has a Joseph the Allen, Haskins' says: the Ethan was and was parade of was stood up an old the sale of Morgan an for began to were West, and replaced But horseback riding has regained popularity, and many of the large Morgan horse farms trace their horses directly back to the strain developed by the Peters family. The Peters farm was also noted for its Registered Merino sheep, imported from England. They kept a flock of about 100. After 1900, the Peters farm went out of sheep and horses and increased their herd of dairy cattle. Years ago the Peters farm was the site of large agricultural fairs. Frank has had to go out of farming because of his health, but he still has a few sheep to remind him of the old days. Taplin-Hutchinson farm, 1777 Grace Hutchinson is still living on the farm which goes back through her husband's family to Col John Taplin, the founder of Corinth. He was granted land in the town in the original charter in 1763- so perhaps the Hutchinson farm is on land that was in the Taplin family at that early date The earliest land transactions are not in the public records, so it would be hard to find out. At any rate, Col. Taplin moved to Corinth around 1777, so he can he considered as a resident there at that time. The site of Col. John's original buildings is on land nearby, and was in the Taplin family until about 30 years ago. Mrs. Hutchinson's present house was built in 1866 by William Taplin. Previous to that there was a smaller house nearby, with a deep well in its cellar. When they laid water pipes for the new house, they had to go through the old cellar wall of huge stone slabs. Leo Hutchinson raised his own workhorses and never had a tractor. He did a lot of sugaring, and the old sugarhause can still be seen up next to the road. The farm has been deeded to the Hutchinson's daughter Celia Perge and husband Alex of Silver Springs, Maryland, who eventually will have it as a retirement home Armstrong.Martin-Brainerd farm, 1869 Harry and Joanne Brainerd's farm on Taplin Hill in East Corinth has been in the family since 1869, when Harry's great-grandfather, James Armstrong, left his native Ireland because of the potato famine. When James settled on the farm he raised sheep and worked as a butcher, most of his trade being with workers at the nearby copper mines. In 1890 he sold the farm to his son-in-law, Charles Martin, who tapped about 1500 maple trees and kept a small herd of Holstein cattle. All their milk was used for making butter, with the skim milk going to the hogs and calves. They churned twice a week, and it was an all-day chore. Besides the farmwork, Charles served as postmaster for Bradford for 26 years The Martins' daughter, Florence, married Leon Brainerd, and they continued with the farm and the butter business, Leon switching from Holsteins to Jerseys. About 1940 he changed from making butter to shipping whole milk, and remodeled the barn, in- stalling one of the first cement stable floors in the area. Around that time there was a lot of trouble with Bang's Disease (Brucellosis) and the Brainerds twice lost their herd because of it. The government would test the cattle for the disease, then come and brand the reactors and take them away, paying $20 indemnity for each cow -- a terrible loss, but necessary for eradicating the disease. In 1958 the Brainerds' son Harry took over the farm. Since then he has switched back to Holsteins and assembled a herd numbering 65. His wife Jeanne does a generous share of the farm- work, besides working fulltime in Bradford as a teacher's aide. Their three daughters are grown and gone, but Harry's mother, Florence, still lives with them in their 200-year-old far. mhonse originally built by Major John Taplin, Jr. (Note: More Corinth Century farms coming later.) CUSTOMER--This homing or racing pigeon with an identification band has been hanging around down- town Bradford for several weeks, cadging meals in local stores. Silver ID band says AU 80-13SAN. It also has a blue band with nothing on it. Local residents report that the bird is very friendly. . Sixth Fleet {continued from pag e 1 } McCormick {DDG 8}, which supported U.S. Combat operations in Southeast Asia. Prior to commanding USS Columbus (CG 12) in August 1973, he was. assigned to the Surface Missile Systems Project in the Naval Ordnance Systems Command and the. Anti-Ship Missile Defense Project in the Naval Material command. Upon being relieved of command of Columbus in August 1974, he reported as Deputy Director, Surface Weapons Systems Division {OP-35) in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and became Director, Combat Direction Systems Division (0P-34) in March, 1975. In June 1976, he became Director, Surface Combat Systems Division (0P-35). He assumed command of CRUDESGRU THREE on 23 July 1977 and was relieved on 11 May 1979. He became Assistant Deputy C'hief of Naval Operations (Surface Warfare) on June 18, 1979 On Sept. 1, 1980 he assumed the duties of "Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (OP-03). Scott Carson, Newbury wins Ayershire award NEWBURY--A registered Ayrshire owned by Scott D. Carson of Newbury was recently awarded distinguished Junior All American honors by the National Ayrshire Breeders' Association, Brandon, Ver- mont. The Junior All-American Awards can only be earned by individuals who have won high honors in state, regional and national dairy cattle shows and milking age females must he on a production testing program. This is the 21st year that the Aryshire Dairy Breed Association has sponsored the Junior All American Awards program with 69 Ayrshires entered and 48 nominations made from 17 states The panel of 16 nationally known judges gave the ned to nine of the tan-bark cham- pions for the elite Junior All- American rating. Ayrshires receiving Junior All-American ratings are highly regarded in the dairy industry and are valuable as breeding stock. The Carson Ayrshire nominated for the competition was a two-year-old cow, Hark- dale Hi O'Gracious Cindy, who received High Honorable Mention. WINNER--WIth form like that a name like Harkdale HI O'Graclous Cindy, it's no: wonder this two-year-old cow raised by Scott Carson of Newbury won Junior All American Honors from the National Ayrshire Breeders' Association. Clinic offers workshop on breathing HANOVER--The Hitchcock designed for persons with The workshop will be Clinic will conduct a "Better emphysema, asthma and-or limited to 20 participants. Breathing Workshop" for chronic bronchitis, diseases Total cost of the six sessions is adults with breathing dif- which lead to shortness of $20. Some financial aid is ficulties June 15-July 1. breath, available. Family members The workshop, a six-session Sessions will be held are encouraged to participate educational program, is Mondays and Wednesdays free of charge. If there is from 1-3 p.m. at the Hitchcock sufficient interest, future i::  Clinic. programs may be planned for The workshop will be ledby evenings as well as af-  Nancy Walsh-Robart, RN, ternoons i nurse practitioner, and will Interested persons are provide educational in- asked to call the Hitchcock formation and learning skills Clinic Office of Health to help participants un- Education, (603) 643-4000, derstand and manage extension 2280, to register or breathing problems, to obtain further information. Mr and Mrs. Richard Welch and Mr and Mrs. Dean Page of Groton attended the graduation. GROTON--Alan S. Fifield, son of Mr. and Mrs Dale A. Fifield of Groton, has been promoted in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of senior airman. Fifield is a ground equip- ment mechanic at Plattsburgh Miehad Welch is graduated S RYEGATE--Michael A( Welch of town graduated May :, 9 at the University of Orono, ! i Maine, with a degree in public management and has been selected as town manager of Bradley, Maine. Groton airnmn Welch succeeds John is Eldridge who resigned after lromole two years. The selection of Welch by the town Board of Selectmen took place in April. Welch has begun to familiarize himself with town affairs with particular em- phasis on the new budget and the town meeting in June Welch graduated from Blue Mountain Union School and is Air Force Base, N.Y., with the the son of Richard and Gloria 3BOth Field Maintenance OFF WE GO. ,, Friendly visiting pigeon flies o!! Worn hamh o! Peter Nutting, '/eich of town Squadron. The arman is a 1978 graduate of Blue owner of T0$.rket in Bradstolrd' : HIS wife, Deaun, has ac- Mountain Union High School, ' ..... " ' , ....... ............. *' ''*  " " ' cepted a position in a doctor's Wells River, Vt. office. * Nit. special election {continued from page 1) the district year-round, not residents to move away, just attend the 90-day Rowden holds the following personal decorations and t the Edit o or Medal, * Return to the cave dwe///ng era service medals, Bronze Star Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Com- mendation Medal, China Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with three engagement stars, Korean Presidential Unit Citation, United Nationals Service Medal, and Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is married to the former Sarah Sumner of Rockford, Ill. They have three children: Jane, Tom and John. at executed $700 million. This one plant may have to import nuclear fear of will eliminate the need for at plants from abroad. least 50 trips by ocean going Many, poor benighted souls oil tankerseachyear, would like to return to the Each modern nuclear cave dwelling era. The cave electric plant saves the dweller had few worries. His burning of 10 million barrels of life span was less than 30 agine the few a never Years; in are and many After a strictly would lives would are of 1-million this of a the ng near a less then a {U.S. plants to is no war, the mid- oversized strait, to slaves oil plants: plant N.H. oil over oil or its coal equivalent, of 3- million tons. Let us not forget the acid rain problems due to the burning of oil and coal. Even wood burning gives off radioactive carbon. I recently spoke to a chemist from southern New Hampshire. He told me the beans in his garden last summer were damaged by acid rain. He had tested the rain for its acidity. The U S. Navy has been operating nuclear submarines for more than 25 years The crew, eats, works and sleep within 150 feet of the nuclear reactor which powers the ship. So far, there have been no reports of horns or tails growing on any of the crew members Now, regarding the problem of highly radioactive nuclear waste. It can be processed safely. The highly radioactive waste from a modern nuclear plant for one year, can be contained in five or six barrels. The ash from the same size coal plant would fill 40,000 trucks {6 tons per load}. France, not as large in area as our state of Texas and with five times the population has been reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from six coun- tries for several years. The U. s. plant lies idle. France expects to make billions of francs from this reprocessing and is b{ooked solid thru 1990. In the U.S. reprocessing is a political football and is op- posed by people ignorant of the facts. ,__France and Germany are ||aing and selling nuclear electric plants throughout, the world. They had sold four to oil rich Iran before the war with Iraq. The American manufacturers of nuclear plants are almost out of business and have lost thousands of jobs to overseas companies. One person remarked, the U.S. the bir- thplace of the nuclear age years. M. Nevins Etowah, N.C. 28729 arts program after budget cuts To the Editor: An open letter from me board of the New Hampshire uommission on the ArtS to protest the New Hampshire Senate Finance recommended budget for the agency. Honorable Robert Monler, Senate President and Members of the NH Senate We the undersigned Com- missioners to the NH Com- mission on the Arts, working closely with our staff, have spent a major amount of our time and effort to plan for a reasonable future for the arts in this state with the budget proposed by the House. Although we would be seriously constrained at the level of $138,000, we .un derstand the state an national budget problemS.  foresee a possibillt.Y:_ aPividing at least sutuc- and assistance for the artS to maintain the demonstrated advantages to the state of the present arts programS. We would not be forced to cw out such popular and eful programs as those currently well underway in EducatiOn, Touring, Folk Arts, etc It will take t ho.ughL care l ad- ditional hard work on thepart of the staff and com- missioners, already heavily committed, but we can promise that these will be forthcoming. We consider the $35,.,0_ allotment vroposed by tn. Senate Filance Co.mm/ e sWOUld mean the death o[ tale arts effort. The Com- missioners do not have sup . Tax h/ke00 tcontinued from page 1 } $6,065,896, more than $1 million above the 1981 total of $4,957,748, and includes a 27.1 per cent increase in the amount to be raised by taxes totaling $2,997,986. The largest increase in the proposen budget is $382,973 to a total of $2,279,677 for the county nursing home. The hearing on th budget will begin at 7 p.m. at the Graflon County Courthouse June 15. ficient time or capability to administer any programs without a paid staff. A staff shrunken to a half-time Director and a secretary would scarcely he prepared to be properly accountable for any federal funds. We con- sider the only alternatives that could be proposed under such a minimal budget would be so pitiful and absurd there would be no arts program worthy" of the name any longer. We trust this possibility will be reconsidered as any such minimum is not acceptable and we append a list of the categories currently ad- ministered under the Com- mission which would probably be self-eliminated or virtually destroyed. programs Cut by Senate Finance Artists-in-theSchls small Grants Assistance p tblic information Program T chnicai Assistance Grants l dividuai Artists Awards p ,ster Design Program, F ik Arts Program V real Arts Program causing the area to lose its most productive citizens. Officials should concentrate on attracting smaller in- dustries that would employ 50 to 100 persons, rather than going after one or two big plants, he said, and the state should also make a con- centrated effort to attract nearby Canadian tourists. On energy; Cryans said he favored letting the Seabrook Nuclear Power Station go on line, but that its construction should not be subsidized by the state or by electricity con- sumers. Investors who back such projects should be prepared to take some of the risk of high costs, he added. Cryans said the political legislative sessions and special sessions. "Your job is not done when those 90 days are up," said Cryans. The term for which he is running expires Jan. 4, 1983. On another issue, Cryans said he favors completion of Interstate 93 through Fran- conia Notch, but "I don't want to see the Notch destroyed." He said the area he seeks to represent in the Senate is a "complex district," with differing problems in different areas such as Cenway, Lit- tleton, Woedsville and other towns. Some have problems of rapid growth with  many second home owners, while others need more growth and industry. campaign was somewhat Cryans said he opposes a difficult because it is coming sales or income tax as a at a time when, if elected, he remedy for the state's would be entering office at the financial problems. tailend of the regular "I intend to bring my legislative session, and economic experience into the because Mrs Poulsen has not Senate along with the spoken out on many issues, strongest possible "I would be coming in (to representative voice for the Senate) at a time to make taxpayers of New Hamp- decisions. It would be a dif- shire's North Country," he ficult task, but I don't think it's something I can't handle," Cryans said. He said he believed a state senator's job is to represent -NH Touring Program Reference Library Governor's Awards Annual Conferences Barbara J. Dunfrey, Chairperson North Hampton. NH 03862 i.ael Wertenbaker. Com- missioner Nelson, NH 03455 Patricia Bass, Commissioner Concord, NH 0"3301 Grace Casey, Commissioner Gilmanton Iron Works, NH 03837 Calvin Libby, Commissioner Nashua. NH 03063 James W. Tebbetts, Com- missioner Laconia, Nil 03246 Pauline Spanos, missioner Lincoln, Nil 03251 said. "As a banker, I have bad to keep in close touch with the small businesses of our District, as well as with the homeowner who has been threatened with higher and higher property taxes," he added. "What I have seen in both the business community and from the homeowner is fear that state government may sacrifice local communities in order to balance the budget. We cannot allow that to happen, nor can we shy away from a well planned offensive to attract more industry for our citizens," Cryans said. "The next three to five years may well indicate what the future of the North Country will be. That is why I want to be an active State Senator, an involved representative for small business and homeowners alike," he said. LYME FLEA MARKET LYME- A Tailgate Craft and Flea Market will be held on Corn- the Lyme common June 20 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for the You'll be in great shape with the weekly pair! Kenneth P. Spritz, missioner ilanover, Nh 03755 benefit of the Congregational Church. Spaces are available Corn- at $5 each. For further in- formation, call 353-9082 or 795- 2634. You can't beat our Journal Opinion and Second Opinion. People like different things and we offer something for everyone in the family.., for the housewife to start her day off right, for the working man to relax with after a hectic day at the office. For the convenience of home delivery subscribe tO the Journal Opinion and get the Second Opinion as a bonus. 00J.O0 in Vermont and New Hampshire *ll.00 Out 01 State '7.00 Senior Citizen rates JOurnal IIJ Opinion P. 0. BOX 378 BRADFORD, VERMONT 05033 June 10, 1981.The Journal Opinion-Page 5 3asins C a ,ecticut ,r s lanagem, variety d] river" am'ely o! Bicentennial and Century.Farms in Bradford and Corinth 1771 know, the farm in Peters' Bradford, officially Bicentennial ral of the Peters ra4ford can he he 1771 flood, John Peters had on his property low next to the RiVer (near the ion). The house next built -- a house It is owned ; early built the first Thetford, Bradford he was da, his son was farm for has a Joseph the Allen, Haskins' says: the Ethan was and was parade of was stood up an old the sale of Morgan an for began to were West, and replaced But horseback riding has regained popularity, and many of the large Morgan horse farms trace their horses directly back to the strain developed by the Peters family. The Peters farm was also noted for its Registered Merino sheep, imported from England. They kept a flock of about 100. After 1900, the Peters farm went out of sheep and horses and increased their herd of dairy cattle. Years ago the Peters farm was the site of large agricultural fairs. Frank has had to go out of farming because of his health, but he still has a few sheep to remind him of the old days. Taplin-Hutchinson farm, 1777 Grace Hutchinson is still living on the farm which goes back through her husband's family to Col John Taplin, the founder of Corinth. He was granted land in the town in the original charter in 1763- so perhaps the Hutchinson farm is on land that was in the Taplin family at that early date The earliest land transactions are not in the public records, so it would be hard to find out. At any rate, Col. Taplin moved to Corinth around 1777, so he can he considered as a resident there at that time. The site of Col. John's original buildings is on land nearby, and was in the Taplin family until about 30 years ago. Mrs. Hutchinson's present house was built in 1866 by William Taplin. Previous to that there was a smaller house nearby, with a deep well in its cellar. When they laid water pipes for the new house, they had to go through the old cellar wall of huge stone slabs. Leo Hutchinson raised his own workhorses and never had a tractor. He did a lot of sugaring, and the old sugarhause can still be seen up next to the road. The farm has been deeded to the Hutchinson's daughter Celia Perge and husband Alex of Silver Springs, Maryland, who eventually will have it as a retirement home Armstrong.Martin-Brainerd farm, 1869 Harry and Joanne Brainerd's farm on Taplin Hill in East Corinth has been in the family since 1869, when Harry's great-grandfather, James Armstrong, left his native Ireland because of the potato famine. When James settled on the farm he raised sheep and worked as a butcher, most of his trade being with workers at the nearby copper mines. In 1890 he sold the farm to his son-in-law, Charles Martin, who tapped about 1500 maple trees and kept a small herd of Holstein cattle. All their milk was used for making butter, with the skim milk going to the hogs and calves. They churned twice a week, and it was an all-day chore. Besides the farmwork, Charles served as postmaster for Bradford for 26 years The Martins' daughter, Florence, married Leon Brainerd, and they continued with the farm and the butter business, Leon switching from Holsteins to Jerseys. About 1940 he changed from making butter to shipping whole milk, and remodeled the barn, in- stalling one of the first cement stable floors in the area. Around that time there was a lot of trouble with Bang's Disease (Brucellosis) and the Brainerds twice lost their herd because of it. The government would test the cattle for the disease, then come and brand the reactors and take them away, paying $20 indemnity for each cow -- a terrible loss, but necessary for eradicating the disease. In 1958 the Brainerds' son Harry took over the farm. Since then he has switched back to Holsteins and assembled a herd numbering 65. His wife Jeanne does a generous share of the farm- work, besides working fulltime in Bradford as a teacher's aide. Their three daughters are grown and gone, but Harry's mother, Florence, still lives with them in their 200-year-old far. mhonse originally built by Major John Taplin, Jr. (Note: More Corinth Century farms coming later.) CUSTOMER--This homing or racing pigeon with an identification band has been hanging around down- town Bradford for several weeks, cadging meals in local stores. Silver ID band says AU 80-13SAN. It also has a blue band with nothing on it. Local residents report that the bird is very friendly. . Sixth Fleet {continued from pag e 1 } McCormick {DDG 8}, which supported U.S. Combat operations in Southeast Asia. Prior to commanding USS Columbus (CG 12) in August 1973, he was. assigned to the Surface Missile Systems Project in the Naval Ordnance Systems Command and the. Anti-Ship Missile Defense Project in the Naval Material command. Upon being relieved of command of Columbus in August 1974, he reported as Deputy Director, Surface Weapons Systems Division {OP-35) in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and became Director, Combat Direction Systems Division (0P-34) in March, 1975. In June 1976, he became Director, Surface Combat Systems Division (0P-35). He assumed command of CRUDESGRU THREE on 23 July 1977 and was relieved on 11 May 1979. He became Assistant Deputy C'hief of Naval Operations (Surface Warfare) on June 18, 1979 On Sept. 1, 1980 he assumed the duties of "Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (OP-03). Scott Carson, Newbury wins Ayershire award NEWBURY--A registered Ayrshire owned by Scott D. Carson of Newbury was recently awarded distinguished Junior All American honors by the National Ayrshire Breeders' Association, Brandon, Ver- mont. The Junior All-American Awards can only be earned by individuals who have won high honors in state, regional and national dairy cattle shows and milking age females must he on a production testing program. This is the 21st year that the Aryshire Dairy Breed Association has sponsored the Junior All American Awards program with 69 Ayrshires entered and 48 nominations made from 17 states The panel of 16 nationally known judges gave the ned to nine of the tan-bark cham- pions for the elite Junior All- American rating. Ayrshires receiving Junior All-American ratings are highly regarded in the dairy industry and are valuable as breeding stock. The Carson Ayrshire nominated for the competition was a two-year-old cow, Hark- dale Hi O'Gracious Cindy, who received High Honorable Mention. WINNER--WIth form like that a name like Harkdale HI O'Graclous Cindy, it's no: wonder this two-year-old cow raised by Scott Carson of Newbury won Junior All American Honors from the National Ayrshire Breeders' Association. Clinic offers workshop on breathing HANOVER--The Hitchcock designed for persons with The workshop will be Clinic will conduct a "Better emphysema, asthma and-or limited to 20 participants. Breathing Workshop" for chronic bronchitis, diseases Total cost of the six sessions is adults with breathing dif- which lead to shortness of $20. Some financial aid is ficulties June 15-July 1. breath, available. Family members The workshop, a six-session Sessions will be held are encouraged to participate educational program, is Mondays and Wednesdays free of charge. If there is from 1-3 p.m. at the Hitchcock sufficient interest, future i::  Clinic. programs may be planned for The workshop will be ledby evenings as well as af-  Nancy Walsh-Robart, RN, ternoons i nurse practitioner, and will Interested persons are provide educational in- asked to call the Hitchcock formation and learning skills Clinic Office of Health to help participants un- Education, (603) 643-4000, derstand and manage extension 2280, to register or breathing problems, to obtain further information. Mr and Mrs. Richard Welch and Mr and Mrs. Dean Page of Groton attended the graduation. GROTON--Alan S. Fifield, son of Mr. and Mrs Dale A. Fifield of Groton, has been promoted in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of senior airman. Fifield is a ground equip- ment mechanic at Plattsburgh Miehad Welch is graduated S RYEGATE--Michael A( Welch of town graduated May :, 9 at the University of Orono, ! i Maine, with a degree in public management and has been selected as town manager of Bradley, Maine. Groton airnmn Welch succeeds John is Eldridge who resigned after lromole two years. The selection of Welch by the town Board of Selectmen took place in April. Welch has begun to familiarize himself with town affairs with particular em- phasis on the new budget and the town meeting in June Welch graduated from Blue Mountain Union School and is Air Force Base, N.Y., with the the son of Richard and Gloria 3BOth Field Maintenance OFF WE GO. ,, Friendly visiting pigeon flies o!! Worn hamh o! Peter Nutting, '/eich of town Squadron. The arman is a 1978 graduate of Blue owner of T0$.rket in Bradstolrd' : HIS wife, Deaun, has ac- Mountain Union High School, ' ..... " ' , ....... ............. *' ''*  " " ' cepted a position in a doctor's Wells River, Vt. office. * Nit. special election {continued from page 1) the district year-round, not residents to move away, just attend the 90-day Rowden holds the following personal decorations and t the Edit o or Medal, * Return to the cave dwe///ng era service medals, Bronze Star Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Com- mendation Medal, China Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with three engagement stars, Korean Presidential Unit Citation, United Nationals Service Medal, and Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is married to the former Sarah Sumner of Rockford, Ill. They have three children: Jane, Tom and John. at executed $700 million. This one plant may have to import nuclear fear of will eliminate the need for at plants from abroad. least 50 trips by ocean going Many, poor benighted souls oil tankerseachyear, would like to return to the Each modern nuclear cave dwelling era. The cave electric plant saves the dweller had few worries. His burning of 10 million barrels of life span was less than 30 agine the few a never Years; in are and many After a strictly would lives would are of 1-million this of a the ng near a less then a {U.S. plants to is no war, the mid- oversized strait, to slaves oil plants: plant N.H. oil over oil or its coal equivalent, of 3- million tons. Let us not forget the acid rain problems due to the burning of oil and coal. Even wood burning gives off radioactive carbon. I recently spoke to a chemist from southern New Hampshire. He told me the beans in his garden last summer were damaged by acid rain. He had tested the rain for its acidity. The U S. Navy has been operating nuclear submarines for more than 25 years The crew, eats, works and sleep within 150 feet of the nuclear reactor which powers the ship. So far, there have been no reports of horns or tails growing on any of the crew members Now, regarding the problem of highly radioactive nuclear waste. It can be processed safely. The highly radioactive waste from a modern nuclear plant for one year, can be contained in five or six barrels. The ash from the same size coal plant would fill 40,000 trucks {6 tons per load}. France, not as large in area as our state of Texas and with five times the population has been reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from six coun- tries for several years. The U. s. plant lies idle. France expects to make billions of francs from this reprocessing and is b{ooked solid thru 1990. In the U.S. reprocessing is a political football and is op- posed by people ignorant of the facts. ,__France and Germany are ||aing and selling nuclear electric plants throughout, the world. They had sold four to oil rich Iran before the war with Iraq. The American manufacturers of nuclear plants are almost out of business and have lost thousands of jobs to overseas companies. One person remarked, the U.S. the bir- thplace of the nuclear age years. M. Nevins Etowah, N.C. 28729 arts program after budget cuts To the Editor: An open letter from me board of the New Hampshire uommission on the ArtS to protest the New Hampshire Senate Finance recommended budget for the agency. Honorable Robert Monler, Senate President and Members of the NH Senate We the undersigned Com- missioners to the NH Com- mission on the Arts, working closely with our staff, have spent a major amount of our time and effort to plan for a reasonable future for the arts in this state with the budget proposed by the House. Although we would be seriously constrained at the level of $138,000, we .un derstand the state an national budget problemS.  foresee a possibillt.Y:_ aPividing at least sutuc- and assistance for the artS to maintain the demonstrated advantages to the state of the present arts programS. We would not be forced to cw out such popular and eful programs as those currently well underway in EducatiOn, Touring, Folk Arts, etc It will take t ho.ughL care l ad- ditional hard work on thepart of the staff and com- missioners, already heavily committed, but we can promise that these will be forthcoming. We consider the $35,.,0_ allotment vroposed by tn. Senate Filance Co.mm/ e sWOUld mean the death o[ tale arts effort. The Com- missioners do not have sup . Tax h/ke00 tcontinued from page 1 } $6,065,896, more than $1 million above the 1981 total of $4,957,748, and includes a 27.1 per cent increase in the amount to be raised by taxes totaling $2,997,986. The largest increase in the proposen budget is $382,973 to a total of $2,279,677 for the county nursing home. The hearing on th budget will begin at 7 p.m. at the Graflon County Courthouse June 15. ficient time or capability to administer any programs without a paid staff. A staff shrunken to a half-time Director and a secretary would scarcely he prepared to be properly accountable for any federal funds. We con- sider the only alternatives that could be proposed under such a minimal budget would be so pitiful and absurd there would be no arts program worthy" of the name any longer. We trust this possibility will be reconsidered as any such minimum is not acceptable and we append a list of the categories currently ad- ministered under the Com- mission which would probably be self-eliminated or virtually destroyed. programs Cut by Senate Finance Artists-in-theSchls small Grants Assistance p tblic information Program T chnicai Assistance Grants l dividuai Artists Awards p ,ster Design Program, F ik Arts Program V real Arts Program causing the area to lose its most productive citizens. Officials should concentrate on attracting smaller in- dustries that would employ 50 to 100 persons, rather than going after one or two big plants, he said, and the state should also make a con- centrated effort to attract nearby Canadian tourists. On energy; Cryans said he favored letting the Seabrook Nuclear Power Station go on line, but that its construction should not be subsidized by the state or by electricity con- sumers. Investors who back such projects should be prepared to take some of the risk of high costs, he added. Cryans said the political legislative sessions and special sessions. "Your job is not done when those 90 days are up," said Cryans. The term for which he is running expires Jan. 4, 1983. On another issue, Cryans said he favors completion of Interstate 93 through Fran- conia Notch, but "I don't want to see the Notch destroyed." He said the area he seeks to represent in the Senate is a "complex district," with differing problems in different areas such as Cenway, Lit- tleton, Woedsville and other towns. Some have problems of rapid growth with  many second home owners, while others need more growth and industry. campaign was somewhat Cryans said he opposes a difficult because it is coming sales or income tax as a at a time when, if elected, he remedy for the state's would be entering office at the financial problems. tailend of the regular "I intend to bring my legislative session, and economic experience into the because Mrs Poulsen has not Senate along with the spoken out on many issues, strongest possible "I would be coming in (to representative voice for the Senate) at a time to make taxpayers of New Hamp- decisions. It would be a dif- shire's North Country," he ficult task, but I don't think it's something I can't handle," Cryans said. He said he believed a state senator's job is to represent -NH Touring Program Reference Library Governor's Awards Annual Conferences Barbara J. Dunfrey, Chairperson North Hampton. NH 03862 i.ael Wertenbaker. Com- missioner Nelson, NH 03455 Patricia Bass, Commissioner Concord, NH 0"3301 Grace Casey, Commissioner Gilmanton Iron Works, NH 03837 Calvin Libby, Commissioner Nashua. NH 03063 James W. Tebbetts, Com- missioner Laconia, Nil 03246 Pauline Spanos, missioner Lincoln, Nil 03251 said. "As a banker, I have bad to keep in close touch with the small businesses of our District, as well as with the homeowner who has been threatened with higher and higher property taxes," he added. "What I have seen in both the business community and from the homeowner is fear that state government may sacrifice local communities in order to balance the budget. We cannot allow that to happen, nor can we shy away from a well planned offensive to attract more industry for our citizens," Cryans said. "The next three to five years may well indicate what the future of the North Country will be. That is why I want to be an active State Senator, an involved representative for small business and homeowners alike," he said. LYME FLEA MARKET LYME- A Tailgate Craft and Flea Market will be held on Corn- the Lyme common June 20 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for the You'll be in great shape with the weekly pair! Kenneth P. Spritz, missioner ilanover, Nh 03755 benefit of the Congregational Church. Spaces are available Corn- at $5 each. For further in- formation, call 353-9082 or 795- 2634. You can't beat our Journal Opinion and Second Opinion. People like different things and we offer something for everyone in the family.., for the housewife to start her day off right, for the working man to relax with after a hectic day at the office. For the convenience of home delivery subscribe tO the Journal Opinion and get the Second Opinion as a bonus. 00J.O0 in Vermont and New Hampshire *ll.00 Out 01 State '7.00 Senior Citizen rates JOurnal IIJ Opinion P. 0. BOX 378 BRADFORD, VERMONT 05033