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Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
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June 16, 1981     Journal Opinion
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TION t Thetford Commission Sales Barn, in East THURSDAY--NIGHT THURSDAY--JUNE 11 STARTING AT 7:30 P.M. 113 Head mostly Holsteins Few Jerseys & Ayrshires Reese Herd of Woodsville, N.H. Con- are cows. : March, 1 springer, 8 milking and bred for of which 4 are Reg. Thorburn Herd of North Tbetford, Vt. : 52 Head of Mostly Holsteins of which 18 )red back, 1 heifer springing, 11 Hol. yearling heifers, 1 Hol. bull Reg., 1 ts an additional 25 Head of Holsteins & and due this fall, plus more open 1. & Blood tested and Checked for pregnancy. or good check C. W. Gray & Sons, Inc. East Thetford, Vt. 7&%4348 or 785-2161 R. & R. Lussier, Lyndonville, Vt. N REAL ESTATE West Newbury, Vt. on the North Road, 5 in South Newbury, follow auction i W]I)NESDAY--NIGHT---JUNE 17 STARTING AT 7 P.M. consists of 1 acre more or less with a of the mountains, septic system, elec- rights, a 10 x 50 mobile home on this a lovely location for a home or qualified buyer HERBERT C. GRAY VT. 785-4348 ERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. 00Toup organization Upper for Han- n]et June 1 to form a On-profit of ASsociate Vermont Retarded and an be the the Physically 100 Baker A constitution was in- troduced for discussion which will be voted on next month. Among those present were Pat Victory, Rep. Wayne Kenyon, representatives from Orange County Mental Health, plus other interested persons from the Upper Valley area. Raymond Meerhergen of Bradford was elected president, Helen Meerhergen vice president, Cherry Hot- chkiss of Chelsea secretary- treasurer, Julie Marsh of Bradford and Berdie Perry of W. Topsham, public relations officers. The nomination committee were Winnie Pinneo of Ryegate, Jeanette Hutchinson of Thetford Center and Berdie Perry of W. Topsham. The aim is to attract as many people as possible from the Upper Valley region who are interested or would want to help in some way. Meetings are held once a month on the first Monday. The next meeting will be July 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the Life Skills Center (old A building behind the Fort Bradford Academy). New For more information, call Pen- Ray Meerbergen, 222-4561, or Mat- Cherry Hotchklss, 685-3165. Bohn, Sam Peter were Meek a, John Hesser forms who and ahlmni group MANCHESTER--Hesser College is currently forming an alumni association. The first project of this association was to complete and publish (O an alumni newsletter. Volume 1 was completed and mailed to Alumni May 15. n of If you are a graduate of of Hesser College and have not yet received your copy of the newsletter, please contact Force Norma Bolduc at the College (668-6660) to be sure that your Good- correct address is on file. Current plans are to publish COUrse several newsletters each year. com. The Alumni Committee is and planning an open hon_se to he of held June 14 from 2-4 p.m. ity This Alumni Open House will provide an opportunity for an Hesser graduates to see the applied new facilities of Hesser Con]. College which is now located he Air at 25-27 Lowell street, and to renew old acquaintances. The of classrooms, labs, and ad- now ministrative offices will be Base, open and light refreshments will be served. PUBLIC NOTICE ARTESIAN WELL n 193o CO. June I0, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 9 HISTORY MADE AT VERNON Friday evening at 6:30, history was made at the Vernon Hydroelectric Station. The first salmon since 1798 swam up the Connecticut River from the Atlantic and went over the dam on its own power. The salmon was locked in the holding area long enough for photographs and for the official recording by the people stationed at the viewing windows to record the shad and salmon migration. The salmon was about 29 inches long and in the 10-plus- Charlene Sherman of Bath is dead SWIFTWATER--Mrs. Church in Lisbon, officiated. Villag e Fire Department, in Charlene (Elsie) Sherman, 86, Interment followed in the Pine care of Dennis Chase, Bath, died at her residence in Bath Grove Cemetery, Woodsville. N.H 03740, or to the Cottage June4 after a brief illness. Memorial contributions Hospital, Woodsville, N.H. Born in Wells River, shehad may be made to the Bath 03785. been a resident of Bath since 1928, where she had helped her Former Bradford publisher dies husband of 57 years, Verna A. Sherman, run the family farm. Mrs. Sherman was a BRADFORD--Stephen M. Record. veteran of World War II, Kelley, veteran Vermont He continued his newspaper receiving WAC of the Week newspaperman and former career as general manager honors from the Women's owner of the Bradford United and editor of the St. Albans Army Corps. She was a Opinion, died June 2 in Sharon Messenger until 1925 when he Vernon HydroeleetricStationFishLadder member of Ross-Wood Post Manor Nursing Home in and Mrs. Kelley moved to No. 20 American Legion, Foxboro, Mass., at the age of Sarasota, Fla., where he was " .- Woodsville. 88. employed as managing editor Th ght Besidesher husband, her Born in New York eity, he of the Sarasota Daily and ou $ on the family includes one daughter, moved to Vermont at a youth- Sunday Times. of Doors Mrs. Foster (Phoebe) Carrof ful age and spent most of his Returning to Vermont, he ms m Bath, and many nieces and life here. was manager, editor and vice nephews. He began his career as a president of the Burlington Funeral services were held newS/nan with the Montpelier Daily News for six years until lilm by @ory W. Moor@ t June 7 at the Ricker Funeral Evening Argus in 1912. Later, he purchased the United /Home, Birch Lane, Wood- he was city editor of the St. ()pinion in Bradford. YARD SALE,--- Three Family sville. Rev. Susan Hoffman, Johnsbur.v Caledonian- employee of the U.S. Senate, Yard Sale, Saturday, June I3, pastor of the United Methodist taking over the managership 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ram or shine. Ralph _,___Lvm of the Vermont office of Sen. West Fairlee Town Hall. Beauford of e dis Ralph Flanders and con-lt---6-10--c tinuing under Sen. Winston L. Julia Austin dies LYME- Ralph E. Beaul'ord, having served in the 87th Prouty. He retired 10 years FOR SALE-- Electrolux after/on  62, of Route lO died June 5 at Mountain Infantry. ago. vacuum cleaner, like new. the Mary Hitchcock Memorial He was commander of the On Oct. 31, 1913, he married Phone 603-298-8103. 2t-- E. HAVERHILL--JUlia M. ttospital in Hanover after a James Young American the former Beatrice Aldrich in I7---e Austin, 70, died June 3 at the brief illness. Legion Post in Lyme. In 1944 Lyndon. Mrs. Kelley died Nov. FOR SALE-- Used sewing Cottage ttospital in Woodsville He was born in Skowhegan, he married Melvina Bearor) 23, 1972. machines and second-band after a long illness. Maine July l, 1919, son of inMaine. Surviving are a daughter, cabinets. Prices start at $40. She was born in Amityviile, William and Blanche He is survived by his wife; Mrs. Katherine Zierak, New location. Singer Lebanon Long Island, N.Y., and had tRoderick; Beauford. He was two daughters, Cheryl Foxboro, Mass.; a daughter- Sewing Center, 28MainSt., W. been a resident of E. Haverhill a Lyme resident for the past 23 Castellani of Denver, Colo., indaw, Mrs. Evelyn Kelley, Lebanon, N.H. near Voice & for lS years, yearsand lived in Hanover for and Susan Pond of Orford; a Sherrill, N.Y., widow of his Vision 603-298-8103. 2t---6- Mrs. Austin had been era- more than five years. sister, Agnes Haggerty of son, Robert A. Kelley; five 17---c ployedasa consultant with the At the time of his death Mr. Portland, Me.; two grand- grandchildren, Stephen FOR SALE--- Floor model New York Telephone Corn- Beauford was employed at the children and several nieces Zierak, Londonderry, N.H.; sewing machines, cabinets, & pany and was a former Dartmouth Medical School as and nephews. Sandra Zierak, Foxboro, vacuum cleaners. Save up to member of the Telephone manager of the shipping and A Mass of Christian Burial Mass.; Mrs. J. Lawrence $200. Singer Lebanon Sewing Pioneers of America. receiving departments. He was celebrated June 6 in the Wolbert, Sykesville, Md.; Ctr., 28 Main St., W. Leb., She was a member of the also worked at James Cam- St. Denis Church in Hanover Stephen Kelley III, Sandwood, NH. near Voice & Vision 603- United Methodist Church of E. pionlnc, inHanover. Hewasa with burial following in the N.J., and Mrs. Carl Cassell, 298-8103. 2t.-.17-- Haverhill and of the veteran of World War II, Highland CemeteryinLyme. pound category. Certainly the jubilation at the dam is warranted as Friday was the day those of us in Vermont and New Hampshire have long been waiting for. The timing of the event was perfect as earlier in the day the dedication ceremonies were held for the new fish ladder at New England Electric's Vernon Hydro Station. The $I0.5 million fish ladder will enable Atlantic salmon and American shad to return to sections of the Connecticut River for the first time in early 200 years. Both salmon and shad live in salt water, but spawn in fresh water. The Connecticut River and its tributaries were native spawning grounds until the construction of dams obstructed the fish runs. The salmon had completely disappeared from the river and the shad were greatly reduced in number. The new Vernon Fish Ladder is part of a coordinated effort to restore the salmon and shad to the Connecticut. The ladder is designed to accommodate an eventual return of 40,000 salmon and 750,000 shad annually. "The Vernon Fish Ladder opens the Connecticut River for 173 miles, from Ing Island Sound to our Bellows Falls Station," said John F. Kaslow, senior vice president, New England Electric System, and president of thsompany's generating subsidiary, New England Power Company. "In 1982, still another step in the restoration process will com- mence with construction of a fish ladder at our Bellows Falls Station in Bellows Falls, Vt." Russell A. Holden, vice president of New England Power Company, hosted the dedication ceremonies and welcomed other participants, including: Brendan H. Whittaker, secretary, Vermont Agency of Environmental Conservation; Charles E. Barry, executive director, New Hampshire Fish and Game Department; Edward F. Kehee, commissioner, Vermont Fish and Game Department; and Howard N. Larsen, regional director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "The return of salmon and shad is good news for sport- smen, who will soon he able to enjoy angling for one of the greatest game fish in the world; for naturalists, who can look forward to an improvement of the entire ecosystem of the river; and for the communities along the river which will see the economic benefits of a new recreational fishing in- dustry," Kaslow said. Constrqion 0f the fish ladder began in May 1979 by O'Connell's SOns, Inc. of HolyoKe, Mass. ane redder auows the fish to go around Vernon Dam, and to ascend 35 feet in the process. The 984-foot-long ladder consists of 51 step-like pools, each higher than the preceding one. The fish swin or jump between the pools. . . The Vernon project also incluaes a public vmwing area with underwater windows, and a fish counting and trapping area. The viewing area will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week, during the salmon and shad run, which is expected to last through June. The events FridaY overshadowed an earlier historical moment which occurred on May 27 at 6:35 p.m. when the first shad swam over the Vernon Dam. The shad was spectacular proof that the money and efforts spent in the past few years to build fish passages will pay off. BASS FISHING OPENS SATURDAY The Vermont bass season opens on Saturday, June 13. This is the daymanY anglers wait for. To many the salmonoids are vastly overrated and the real sport is provided by the black bass. Bass fishermen even have their own national organization and countless big money tournaments around the country to attend. Vermont has some of the best bass fishing in the Northeast with Lake Champlain and the Connecticut River producing lunkers of both the large and small mouth variety. Many lakes and ponds in between such as Morey or Woodbury consistently produce bragging-size bass. pound-for-pound the smallmouth bass puts up as much fight as any fish found in the state. He can be caught on thl from surface plugs to live bait most often in waters any. "rig , a,, Expensive lead core trolling rigs or down unner zv reeC;o for some fine fishing. rig ers_are t neiahbor to the east, New Hampshire, has some uur gre.l .. " , _ m, ou,, h I have never fished for me fine bass fishing msu, =,=, s ies in =_e Granite. State. I have pnNWeWwaemr, r e .!pec ._ .. lion and Educa the chief uf Inform= Fish and Game, that I will go with him this summer. s s nding much of this week guiding a group from a He i pe - -^n" a story on bass fishing in New national magazine " 6 . . Hampshire. I will give you the details on the article when it is finalized. FISH FOR PRIZES ..... r's Upper Connecticut River Valley Fishing _ TInS yrs., ,,ll be held on June 20 and 21. Tournam-, " The Connecticut River between the Wilder Dam and the , iver Bridge will be the site of the action as fishermen Wells R ..... I. he biaaest fish m several categories, In compete to ,c,iz-s fo'the largest fish in each of seven addition m m;uy person will take home a 14 foot canoe. s ies some spec - --ize winner will he determined by a drawing and aiiwreg''r= wine,erut=wfll be at Bughee Landing. in Tou. rnam em '----,,rmont. Complete information and reg)satio Braoru, v 's ru uoo, r, mm orms are available fm Patten SPO "ng form . am ire, 03774. Haverh_ill.,.NeV. H!_itPSimpatiently for the day soon to .come ijhn P, atten s w= v and shad to the ns m Vernon we BelloWS Falls and Wilder. GOBBLER SEASON RESULTS on't know if the Toms are getting smarter than the I d .... the vroblem, but bth New Hampshire and huntersrw!,nlo rech the number of harvested birds Biologists from neither state are complaining as the cessful. Vermont harvested 311 gobblers seasons were SUConl, , to last year s record .of317. New which is seconu _ "f.,md season and took 27 goD.mers wmcJ ..... =hire hela iw x,..,,...--_- -t ,,ear's historic first season. na-,v- ken aunn;, : own is four less than ta] _..,;ta Issued in Vermont was d " The number oI i=, .... "OUS years to a total of 7,503. The bunter m ev skill and luck needed slightly f _ 1 ,=rcent reflects the " succes rate m_. ,y"-- . _ ,^ boa a spring'l'OnL" .... a 25 mds and 48 percent m ,, ,,-e,. . ,a,le r wetgnex, v----%_ The targes.3 g_._',ed20or morepuns"  ....... t.:.., of the adult males wew have a fall season wnen twu u,,=o Vermont will again During his ownership of the Sherrill, N.Y.; 11 great- Bradford daily, which con- grandchildren; a niece, Mrs. tinued to 1935, he also Suzanne Ellingwood, St. operated the Associated Press Johnsbury and a nephew, bureau at the State House in Milton Lang, Norman, Okla. Montpelier, covering several His funeral service was held regular and special sessions of June 6 in the Barber and the Vermont General Lanier Funeral Home, Assembly. Montpelier. Burial was in the He bad also been in charge Lyndon Center Cemetery. of publicity for Norwich University in Northfield and later was publicity director for several years at Vermont College in Montpelier. In 1955, he became an Mooselauke Kitchen Band and of Mooselauke Grange No. 213 of East Haverhill. She is survived by a step- daughter, Elsie Chichester and a sister, Jeanne Garst, both of Bradenton, Fla. TOWN NURSE SCHEDULE PTA looks at future TOPSHAM--Gertrude Hodge nation's-education, political, of Topsham, president, and and economic systems, what John Hazen of W. Hartford, they will be like in the coming vice president, of the Vermont years and how advancements congress of Parents and in technology will affect these Teachers were delegates to the national PTA convention held in Orlando, Fla., last week. The theme of the meeting was "The PTA Moves For- ward . . . Design For The Future." Speakers, workshops and panel discussion all were aimed to take a real look at the A Community Health Services Inc. Town Nurse will check for hypertension and weight June 16 from 9-11 a.m. at the Fairlee Town Hall and from 12-4 p.m. at Bean Hall in W. Fairlee. BITS OF INFORMATION The caterpillar has more than 2,000 muscles. either sex may be taken. The dates are October 24 through November 8. The 27 NW: ,Hampshire birds were taken in nine towns: Walpele 9,. ; hesterfield 2, Westmoreland 2, Langdon 3; ,3, Qd-lestown I, Platiq[, and Lebanon l. Of the total, taken, 16 were year old juveniles which averaged 12V2 pounds. Eleven were adult birds and averaged 18% pounds. The five largests gobblers ranged from 19 to 24 pounds. New Hampshire is certain to soon experience the success with turkeys that Vermont has had once the program gets on its feet. Both states can be proud of what the professional game managers have done to restore a once extinct bird. VERMONT STATE POLICE BLACK POWDER SHOOT The Vermont State Black Powder Championship Shoot will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Otter Creek Fish and Game Club in Bristol. TEDDY ROOSEVELT, ENVIRONMENTALIST "I do not recognize the right to rob by wasteful use, the generations that come after us." The above were the words of Theodore Roosevelt, a leading conservationist and hunter and later president. Thanks to the rapid expansion of the U.S. after the Civil War and the long term effects of market hunting the populations of many species of wildlife were nearing critical levels at the close of the 19th century. Perhaps no man had a bigger hand in stemming the decline and pushing conservation measures than did Teddy Roosevelt, who was himself an avid hunter. Roosevelt seeing the need for conservation in 1887 formed the Boone & Crocket Club. The organization was made up of I00 influential Americans who shared Roosevelt's interest in hunting and in the outdoors. The club was instrumental in its efforts to have the government protect wildlife on federal lands. They realized that without the means to enforce them, game laws were of little use. Thus the government was pushed to use troops to protect the game and enforce the laws. When Roosevelt became president in 1901 the efforts to establish effective wildlife programs on the federal level really took off. He vigorously enforced the Lacey Act of 1900 which bans the interstate shipment of wild game that is taken in violation of the law in the state of origin. This brought an end to large scale market hunting. In 1903 he created the first national wildlife refuge on Pelican Island, Florida. The birds there had been killed in large numbers by persons supplying the plumes for ladies hats. He declared the Kaibab in Arizona a national forest to protect a herd of rocky mountain mule deer. This was 1906. During his administration Roosevelt was responsible for the designation of thousands of acres of land as national parks, refuges and forests. He also encouraged states to set aside land for the protection of game and for the use of the public. NEW ARRIVAL Mr. and Mrs. Paul Turley of Rumney are the parents of a baby daughter, Johanna Lasie. born May 29 at Mary tliichcoek Memorial ilospital. and Vermont Fish & Game TOLL-FREE NUMBERS Bradford 222-4680 Fairlee 333-9414 Wells River 757-2552 systems and influence the education of youth. The keynote speaker was Dr. Christopher J. Dede of the University of Houston at Clear Lake. His speech focused on forthcoming innovations that will allow families to do more educating at home and develop a closer partnership between the home and school. The most outstanding convention feature was an electronic technology exhibit designed to give con- ventioneers hands-on ex- perience with new innovations equi@ment ! affecting education, the family and community life. Participating companies had their equipment there and delegates could work with each of them, listen to presentations, test their knowledge, and in general learn the "how" of future education tools. Thirty workshops were presented covering a range of topics from school finance, stress management and single parent families to legislation and what is right in education. Resolutions were voted on dealing with integration of foreign language studies in school, shoplifting prevention, use of children in TV com- mercials, sales of drug paraphernalia and safety of amusement park rides. August deadline for academies WASHINGTON--Young Vermonters interested in attending a service academy in the school year beginning in July, 1982, should im- mediately contact U.S. Sen. Robert T. Stafford, R-Vt. The deadline is August 15 for application for nomination to the Air Force, Military, Naval and Merchant Marine Academies. "The competition is open to all young men and women who are legal residents of Ver- mont, U.S. citizens, un- married and at least 17 but not yet 22 years of age," Stafford said. Nominees are selected on the basis of merit. Stafford said, with academic achievements and ex- tracurricular activities of each applicant considered along with letters of recom- mendation. SPECIAL MEETING Town of Bradford June 15, 1981 7:30pm at 01d Bradford Academy building To hear and act upon a petition to have the dump site for Town of Bradford remain in Newbury and, if so, to see if the Town will vote to raise an additional $5,200. Selectmen Town of Bradford PAUL MAYETTE, Assaiate 603-747-3372 Hone: T87-.10 List No. 225--Seclusion! Charming cape on 12 acres -- 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, country kitchen with utility room area.. Attic almost finished into extra large bedroom and t2 bath. Beautiful fieldstone hearth for woodstove in L-R. Knotty pine paneling throughout -- even in enclosed porch -- makes this a warm home to nestle in. Full basement, FHW heat-- big garden space, lawn, fruit trees, 1 car detached garage. Walk to stocked pond... 2 miles to towu-- on dead end road. $42,9O0 ........ List No. 235--Landscaped retreatl Towerir pines and green lawns are the setting of this 5 room home. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, glassed in porch. 1 car attached garage, breezeway and workshop. Detached utility shed. Oil hot air heat.., on 3% acres at the edge of small town -- 2 hours from Boston. Offered at $50,000. No. 4351--160 acres, Corinth, $48,000; op and wooded; abandoned farm; good growing lumber; 15 acres or more open fields. [0,Ai-Honse on 20 acres, Ryegate, $45,000; almost dead-end road; wooded acreage; secluded; excellent gambrel-style house almost new. 200 acres, Corinth, $60,000, open and wooded, brook, secluded. Old farmhouse on 47 acres, Newbury, Vt. House needs work, but is liveable; Good location; good investment: owner may finance. $57,OOo. No, 4276--105 acres, Wright's Mt., Bradford, $63,000; one of the most beautifulparcels o land in VT. NO.4292B--10.7 acres, 'ershire, Vt.. near Judgement Ridge, $1,500. Wooded: views, town road. One acre, Newbury $3,000; good secluded building site J2T32 acres, Groton, Vt., $10,900; near Levi Pond and Groton State Forest; improved woodland, good for investment and recreation. Terms from owner. No. 4316---WELL RIVER This beautifully maintained 1839 home has 8 rooms and is located on a very nice lot. There are two baths, 2 zone, hot water baseboard heat and a 2 car garage. It is well insulated, has nice por- ches and a good garden spot. Taxes are approximately $800.00 per year. Price 145.00, No. 4317--NEWBURY, New, custom crafted, white  cedar, log home. Four rooms, expandable to six, with full basement and well insulated Beautiful kitchen with spacious custom-built cabinets, lovely living area with custom-made chandelier. This well-built home. has a wood-gas combination heating system for low heat bill and is situated on 2 beautiful acres. Drive out todayand see this lovely home 1 mile from route 302 on Scotch Hollow Road. Price $49,900.00. No. 4321 10 acres. Newbury. VT.. $4,000; on Class 4 road for t/z mile; same distance from electricity; good growing hardwoods; good for recreation and in- vestment, but at present not good for year-round living; owner will finance. No. 4326--15.5 acres. Plerm0nt. NH -- tS,525; a few ,hundred feet from maintained road; one-third open, two-thirds wooded; good views to west; brook; good terms from owners. TION t Thetford Commission Sales Barn, in East THURSDAY--NIGHT THURSDAY--JUNE 11 STARTING AT 7:30 P.M. 113 Head mostly Holsteins Few Jerseys & Ayrshires Reese Herd of Woodsville, N.H. Con- are cows. : March, 1 springer, 8 milking and bred for of which 4 are Reg. Thorburn Herd of North Tbetford, Vt. : 52 Head of Mostly Holsteins of which 18 )red back, 1 heifer springing, 11 Hol. yearling heifers, 1 Hol. bull Reg., 1 ts an additional 25 Head of Holsteins & and due this fall, plus more open 1. & Blood tested and Checked for pregnancy. or good check C. W. Gray & Sons, Inc. East Thetford, Vt. 7&%4348 or 785-2161 R. & R. Lussier, Lyndonville, Vt. N REAL ESTATE West Newbury, Vt. on the North Road, 5 in South Newbury, follow auction i W]I)NESDAY--NIGHT---JUNE 17 STARTING AT 7 P.M. consists of 1 acre more or less with a of the mountains, septic system, elec- rights, a 10 x 50 mobile home on this a lovely location for a home or qualified buyer HERBERT C. GRAY VT. 785-4348 ERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. 00Toup organization Upper for Han- n]et June 1 to form a On-profit of ASsociate Vermont Retarded and an be the the Physically 100 Baker A constitution was in- troduced for discussion which will be voted on next month. Among those present were Pat Victory, Rep. Wayne Kenyon, representatives from Orange County Mental Health, plus other interested persons from the Upper Valley area. Raymond Meerhergen of Bradford was elected president, Helen Meerhergen vice president, Cherry Hot- chkiss of Chelsea secretary- treasurer, Julie Marsh of Bradford and Berdie Perry of W. Topsham, public relations officers. The nomination committee were Winnie Pinneo of Ryegate, Jeanette Hutchinson of Thetford Center and Berdie Perry of W. Topsham. The aim is to attract as many people as possible from the Upper Valley region who are interested or would want to help in some way. Meetings are held once a month on the first Monday. The next meeting will be July 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the Life Skills Center (old A building behind the Fort Bradford Academy). New For more information, call Pen- Ray Meerbergen, 222-4561, or Mat- Cherry Hotchklss, 685-3165. Bohn, Sam Peter were Meek a, John Hesser forms who and ahlmni group MANCHESTER--Hesser College is currently forming an alumni association. The first project of this association was to complete and publish (O an alumni newsletter. Volume 1 was completed and mailed to Alumni May 15. n of If you are a graduate of of Hesser College and have not yet received your copy of the newsletter, please contact Force Norma Bolduc at the College (668-6660) to be sure that your Good- correct address is on file. Current plans are to publish COUrse several newsletters each year. com. The Alumni Committee is and planning an open hon_se to he of held June 14 from 2-4 p.m. ity This Alumni Open House will provide an opportunity for an Hesser graduates to see the applied new facilities of Hesser Con]. College which is now located he Air at 25-27 Lowell street, and to renew old acquaintances. The of classrooms, labs, and ad- now ministrative offices will be Base, open and light refreshments will be served. PUBLIC NOTICE ARTESIAN WELL n 193o CO. June I0, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 9 HISTORY MADE AT VERNON Friday evening at 6:30, history was made at the Vernon Hydroelectric Station. The first salmon since 1798 swam up the Connecticut River from the Atlantic and went over the dam on its own power. The salmon was locked in the holding area long enough for photographs and for the official recording by the people stationed at the viewing windows to record the shad and salmon migration. The salmon was about 29 inches long and in the 10-plus- Charlene Sherman of Bath is dead SWIFTWATER--Mrs. Church in Lisbon, officiated. Villag e Fire Department, in Charlene (Elsie) Sherman, 86, Interment followed in the Pine care of Dennis Chase, Bath, died at her residence in Bath Grove Cemetery, Woodsville. N.H 03740, or to the Cottage June4 after a brief illness. Memorial contributions Hospital, Woodsville, N.H. Born in Wells River, shehad may be made to the Bath 03785. been a resident of Bath since 1928, where she had helped her Former Bradford publisher dies husband of 57 years, Verna A. Sherman, run the family farm. Mrs. Sherman was a BRADFORD--Stephen M. Record. veteran of World War II, Kelley, veteran Vermont He continued his newspaper receiving WAC of the Week newspaperman and former career as general manager honors from the Women's owner of the Bradford United and editor of the St. Albans Army Corps. She was a Opinion, died June 2 in Sharon Messenger until 1925 when he Vernon HydroeleetricStationFishLadder member of Ross-Wood Post Manor Nursing Home in and Mrs. Kelley moved to No. 20 American Legion, Foxboro, Mass., at the age of Sarasota, Fla., where he was " .- Woodsville. 88. employed as managing editor Th ght Besidesher husband, her Born in New York eity, he of the Sarasota Daily and ou $ on the family includes one daughter, moved to Vermont at a youth- Sunday Times. of Doors Mrs. Foster (Phoebe) Carrof ful age and spent most of his Returning to Vermont, he ms m Bath, and many nieces and life here. was manager, editor and vice nephews. He began his career as a president of the Burlington Funeral services were held newS/nan with the Montpelier Daily News for six years until lilm by @ory W. Moor@ t June 7 at the Ricker Funeral Evening Argus in 1912. Later, he purchased the United /Home, Birch Lane, Wood- he was city editor of the St. ()pinion in Bradford. YARD SALE,--- Three Family sville. Rev. Susan Hoffman, Johnsbur.v Caledonian- employee of the U.S. Senate, Yard Sale, Saturday, June I3, pastor of the United Methodist taking over the managership 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ram or shine. Ralph _,___Lvm of the Vermont office of Sen. West Fairlee Town Hall. Beauford of e dis Ralph Flanders and con-lt---6-10--c tinuing under Sen. Winston L. Julia Austin dies LYME- Ralph E. Beaul'ord, having served in the 87th Prouty. He retired 10 years FOR SALE-- Electrolux after/on  62, of Route lO died June 5 at Mountain Infantry. ago. vacuum cleaner, like new. the Mary Hitchcock Memorial He was commander of the On Oct. 31, 1913, he married Phone 603-298-8103. 2t-- E. HAVERHILL--JUlia M. ttospital in Hanover after a James Young American the former Beatrice Aldrich in I7---e Austin, 70, died June 3 at the brief illness. Legion Post in Lyme. In 1944 Lyndon. Mrs. Kelley died Nov. FOR SALE-- Used sewing Cottage ttospital in Woodsville He was born in Skowhegan, he married Melvina Bearor) 23, 1972. machines and second-band after a long illness. Maine July l, 1919, son of inMaine. Surviving are a daughter, cabinets. Prices start at $40. She was born in Amityviile, William and Blanche He is survived by his wife; Mrs. Katherine Zierak, New location. Singer Lebanon Long Island, N.Y., and had tRoderick; Beauford. He was two daughters, Cheryl Foxboro, Mass.; a daughter- Sewing Center, 28MainSt., W. been a resident of E. Haverhill a Lyme resident for the past 23 Castellani of Denver, Colo., indaw, Mrs. Evelyn Kelley, Lebanon, N.H. near Voice & for lS years, yearsand lived in Hanover for and Susan Pond of Orford; a Sherrill, N.Y., widow of his Vision 603-298-8103. 2t---6- Mrs. Austin had been era- more than five years. sister, Agnes Haggerty of son, Robert A. Kelley; five 17---c ployedasa consultant with the At the time of his death Mr. Portland, Me.; two grand- grandchildren, Stephen FOR SALE--- Floor model New York Telephone Corn- Beauford was employed at the children and several nieces Zierak, Londonderry, N.H.; sewing machines, cabinets, & pany and was a former Dartmouth Medical School as and nephews. Sandra Zierak, Foxboro, vacuum cleaners. Save up to member of the Telephone manager of the shipping and A Mass of Christian Burial Mass.; Mrs. J. Lawrence $200. Singer Lebanon Sewing Pioneers of America. receiving departments. He was celebrated June 6 in the Wolbert, Sykesville, Md.; Ctr., 28 Main St., W. Leb., She was a member of the also worked at James Cam- St. Denis Church in Hanover Stephen Kelley III, Sandwood, NH. near Voice & Vision 603- United Methodist Church of E. pionlnc, inHanover. Hewasa with burial following in the N.J., and Mrs. Carl Cassell, 298-8103. 2t.-.17-- Haverhill and of the veteran of World War II, Highland CemeteryinLyme. pound category. Certainly the jubilation at the dam is warranted as Friday was the day those of us in Vermont and New Hampshire have long been waiting for. The timing of the event was perfect as earlier in the day the dedication ceremonies were held for the new fish ladder at New England Electric's Vernon Hydro Station. The $I0.5 million fish ladder will enable Atlantic salmon and American shad to return to sections of the Connecticut River for the first time in early 200 years. Both salmon and shad live in salt water, but spawn in fresh water. The Connecticut River and its tributaries were native spawning grounds until the construction of dams obstructed the fish runs. The salmon had completely disappeared from the river and the shad were greatly reduced in number. The new Vernon Fish Ladder is part of a coordinated effort to restore the salmon and shad to the Connecticut. The ladder is designed to accommodate an eventual return of 40,000 salmon and 750,000 shad annually. "The Vernon Fish Ladder opens the Connecticut River for 173 miles, from Ing Island Sound to our Bellows Falls Station," said John F. Kaslow, senior vice president, New England Electric System, and president of thsompany's generating subsidiary, New England Power Company. "In 1982, still another step in the restoration process will com- mence with construction of a fish ladder at our Bellows Falls Station in Bellows Falls, Vt." Russell A. Holden, vice president of New England Power Company, hosted the dedication ceremonies and welcomed other participants, including: Brendan H. Whittaker, secretary, Vermont Agency of Environmental Conservation; Charles E. Barry, executive director, New Hampshire Fish and Game Department; Edward F. Kehee, commissioner, Vermont Fish and Game Department; and Howard N. Larsen, regional director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "The return of salmon and shad is good news for sport- smen, who will soon he able to enjoy angling for one of the greatest game fish in the world; for naturalists, who can look forward to an improvement of the entire ecosystem of the river; and for the communities along the river which will see the economic benefits of a new recreational fishing in- dustry," Kaslow said. Constrqion 0f the fish ladder began in May 1979 by O'Connell's SOns, Inc. of HolyoKe, Mass. ane redder auows the fish to go around Vernon Dam, and to ascend 35 feet in the process. The 984-foot-long ladder consists of 51 step-like pools, each higher than the preceding one. The fish swin or jump between the pools. . . The Vernon project also incluaes a public vmwing area with underwater windows, and a fish counting and trapping area. The viewing area will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week, during the salmon and shad run, which is expected to last through June. The events FridaY overshadowed an earlier historical moment which occurred on May 27 at 6:35 p.m. when the first shad swam over the Vernon Dam. The shad was spectacular proof that the money and efforts spent in the past few years to build fish passages will pay off. BASS FISHING OPENS SATURDAY The Vermont bass season opens on Saturday, June 13. This is the daymanY anglers wait for. To many the salmonoids are vastly overrated and the real sport is provided by the black bass. Bass fishermen even have their own national organization and countless big money tournaments around the country to attend. Vermont has some of the best bass fishing in the Northeast with Lake Champlain and the Connecticut River producing lunkers of both the large and small mouth variety. Many lakes and ponds in between such as Morey or Woodbury consistently produce bragging-size bass. pound-for-pound the smallmouth bass puts up as much fight as any fish found in the state. He can be caught on thl from surface plugs to live bait most often in waters any. "rig , a,, Expensive lead core trolling rigs or down unner zv reeC;o for some fine fishing. rig ers_are t neiahbor to the east, New Hampshire, has some uur gre.l .. " , _ m, ou,, h I have never fished for me fine bass fishing msu, =,=, s ies in =_e Granite. State. I have pnNWeWwaemr, r e .!pec ._ .. lion and Educa the chief uf Inform= Fish and Game, that I will go with him this summer. s s nding much of this week guiding a group from a He i pe - -^n" a story on bass fishing in New national magazine " 6 . . Hampshire. I will give you the details on the article when it is finalized. FISH FOR PRIZES ..... r's Upper Connecticut River Valley Fishing _ TInS yrs., ,,ll be held on June 20 and 21. Tournam-, " The Connecticut River between the Wilder Dam and the , iver Bridge will be the site of the action as fishermen Wells R ..... I. he biaaest fish m several categories, In compete to ,c,iz-s fo'the largest fish in each of seven addition m m;uy person will take home a 14 foot canoe. s ies some spec - --ize winner will he determined by a drawing and aiiwreg''r= wine,erut=wfll be at Bughee Landing. in Tou. rnam em '----,,rmont. Complete information and reg)satio Braoru, v 's ru uoo, r, mm orms are available fm Patten SPO "ng form . am ire, 03774. Haverh_ill.,.NeV. H!_itPSimpatiently for the day soon to .come ijhn P, atten s w= v and shad to the ns m Vernon we BelloWS Falls and Wilder. GOBBLER SEASON RESULTS on't know if the Toms are getting smarter than the I d .... the vroblem, but bth New Hampshire and huntersrw!,nlo rech the number of harvested birds Biologists from neither state are complaining as the cessful. Vermont harvested 311 gobblers seasons were SUConl, , to last year s record .of317. New which is seconu _ "f.,md season and took 27 goD.mers wmcJ ..... =hire hela iw x,..,,...--_- -t ,,ear's historic first season. na-,v- ken aunn;, : own is four less than ta] _..,;ta Issued in Vermont was d " The number oI i=, .... "OUS years to a total of 7,503. The bunter m ev skill and luck needed slightly f _ 1 ,=rcent reflects the " succes rate m_. ,y"-- . _ ,^ boa a spring'l'OnL" .... a 25 mds and 48 percent m ,, ,,-e,. . ,a,le r wetgnex, v----%_ The targes.3 g_._',ed20or morepuns"  ....... t.:.., of the adult males wew have a fall season wnen twu u,,=o Vermont will again During his ownership of the Sherrill, N.Y.; 11 great- Bradford daily, which con- grandchildren; a niece, Mrs. tinued to 1935, he also Suzanne Ellingwood, St. operated the Associated Press Johnsbury and a nephew, bureau at the State House in Milton Lang, Norman, Okla. Montpelier, covering several His funeral service was held regular and special sessions of June 6 in the Barber and the Vermont General Lanier Funeral Home, Assembly. Montpelier. Burial was in the He bad also been in charge Lyndon Center Cemetery. of publicity for Norwich University in Northfield and later was publicity director for several years at Vermont College in Montpelier. In 1955, he became an Mooselauke Kitchen Band and of Mooselauke Grange No. 213 of East Haverhill. She is survived by a step- daughter, Elsie Chichester and a sister, Jeanne Garst, both of Bradenton, Fla. TOWN NURSE SCHEDULE PTA looks at future TOPSHAM--Gertrude Hodge nation's-education, political, of Topsham, president, and and economic systems, what John Hazen of W. Hartford, they will be like in the coming vice president, of the Vermont years and how advancements congress of Parents and in technology will affect these Teachers were delegates to the national PTA convention held in Orlando, Fla., last week. The theme of the meeting was "The PTA Moves For- ward . . . Design For The Future." Speakers, workshops and panel discussion all were aimed to take a real look at the A Community Health Services Inc. Town Nurse will check for hypertension and weight June 16 from 9-11 a.m. at the Fairlee Town Hall and from 12-4 p.m. at Bean Hall in W. Fairlee. BITS OF INFORMATION The caterpillar has more than 2,000 muscles. either sex may be taken. The dates are October 24 through November 8. The 27 NW: ,Hampshire birds were taken in nine towns: Walpele 9,. ; hesterfield 2, Westmoreland 2, Langdon 3; ,3, Qd-lestown I, Platiq[, and Lebanon l. Of the total, taken, 16 were year old juveniles which averaged 12V2 pounds. Eleven were adult birds and averaged 18% pounds. The five largests gobblers ranged from 19 to 24 pounds. New Hampshire is certain to soon experience the success with turkeys that Vermont has had once the program gets on its feet. Both states can be proud of what the professional game managers have done to restore a once extinct bird. VERMONT STATE POLICE BLACK POWDER SHOOT The Vermont State Black Powder Championship Shoot will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Otter Creek Fish and Game Club in Bristol. TEDDY ROOSEVELT, ENVIRONMENTALIST "I do not recognize the right to rob by wasteful use, the generations that come after us." The above were the words of Theodore Roosevelt, a leading conservationist and hunter and later president. Thanks to the rapid expansion of the U.S. after the Civil War and the long term effects of market hunting the populations of many species of wildlife were nearing critical levels at the close of the 19th century. Perhaps no man had a bigger hand in stemming the decline and pushing conservation measures than did Teddy Roosevelt, who was himself an avid hunter. Roosevelt seeing the need for conservation in 1887 formed the Boone & Crocket Club. The organization was made up of I00 influential Americans who shared Roosevelt's interest in hunting and in the outdoors. The club was instrumental in its efforts to have the government protect wildlife on federal lands. They realized that without the means to enforce them, game laws were of little use. Thus the government was pushed to use troops to protect the game and enforce the laws. When Roosevelt became president in 1901 the efforts to establish effective wildlife programs on the federal level really took off. He vigorously enforced the Lacey Act of 1900 which bans the interstate shipment of wild game that is taken in violation of the law in the state of origin. This brought an end to large scale market hunting. In 1903 he created the first national wildlife refuge on Pelican Island, Florida. The birds there had been killed in large numbers by persons supplying the plumes for ladies hats. He declared the Kaibab in Arizona a national forest to protect a herd of rocky mountain mule deer. This was 1906. During his administration Roosevelt was responsible for the designation of thousands of acres of land as national parks, refuges and forests. He also encouraged states to set aside land for the protection of game and for the use of the public. NEW ARRIVAL Mr. and Mrs. Paul Turley of Rumney are the parents of a baby daughter, Johanna Lasie. born May 29 at Mary tliichcoek Memorial ilospital. and Vermont Fish & Game TOLL-FREE NUMBERS Bradford 222-4680 Fairlee 333-9414 Wells River 757-2552 systems and influence the education of youth. The keynote speaker was Dr. Christopher J. Dede of the University of Houston at Clear Lake. His speech focused on forthcoming innovations that will allow families to do more educating at home and develop a closer partnership between the home and school. The most outstanding convention feature was an electronic technology exhibit designed to give con- ventioneers hands-on ex- perience with new innovations equi@ment ! affecting education, the family and community life. Participating companies had their equipment there and delegates could work with each of them, listen to presentations, test their knowledge, and in general learn the "how" of future education tools. Thirty workshops were presented covering a range of topics from school finance, stress management and single parent families to legislation and what is right in education. Resolutions were voted on dealing with integration of foreign language studies in school, shoplifting prevention, use of children in TV com- mercials, sales of drug paraphernalia and safety of amusement park rides. August deadline for academies WASHINGTON--Young Vermonters interested in attending a service academy in the school year beginning in July, 1982, should im- mediately contact U.S. Sen. Robert T. Stafford, R-Vt. The deadline is August 15 for application for nomination to the Air Force, Military, Naval and Merchant Marine Academies. "The competition is open to all young men and women who are legal residents of Ver- mont, U.S. citizens, un- married and at least 17 but not yet 22 years of age," Stafford said. Nominees are selected on the basis of merit. Stafford said, with academic achievements and ex- tracurricular activities of each applicant considered along with letters of recom- mendation. SPECIAL MEETING Town of Bradford June 15, 1981 7:30pm at 01d Bradford Academy building To hear and act upon a petition to have the dump site for Town of Bradford remain in Newbury and, if so, to see if the Town will vote to raise an additional $5,200. Selectmen Town of Bradford PAUL MAYETTE, Assaiate 603-747-3372 Hone: T87-.10 List No. 225--Seclusion! Charming cape on 12 acres -- 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, country kitchen with utility room area.. Attic almost finished into extra large bedroom and t2 bath. Beautiful fieldstone hearth for woodstove in L-R. Knotty pine paneling throughout -- even in enclosed porch -- makes this a warm home to nestle in. Full basement, FHW heat-- big garden space, lawn, fruit trees, 1 car detached garage. Walk to stocked pond... 2 miles to towu-- on dead end road. $42,9O0 ........ List No. 235--Landscaped retreatl Towerir pines and green lawns are the setting of this 5 room home. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, glassed in porch. 1 car attached garage, breezeway and workshop. Detached utility shed. Oil hot air heat.., on 3% acres at the edge of small town -- 2 hours from Boston. Offered at $50,000. No. 4351--160 acres, Corinth, $48,000; op and wooded; abandoned farm; good growing lumber; 15 acres or more open fields. [0,Ai-Honse on 20 acres, Ryegate, $45,000; almost dead-end road; wooded acreage; secluded; excellent gambrel-style house almost new. 200 acres, Corinth, $60,000, open and wooded, brook, secluded. Old farmhouse on 47 acres, Newbury, Vt. House needs work, but is liveable; Good location; good investment: owner may finance. $57,OOo. No, 4276--105 acres, Wright's Mt., Bradford, $63,000; one of the most beautifulparcels o land in VT. NO.4292B--10.7 acres, 'ershire, Vt.. near Judgement Ridge, $1,500. Wooded: views, town road. One acre, Newbury $3,000; good secluded building site J2T32 acres, Groton, Vt., $10,900; near Levi Pond and Groton State Forest; improved woodland, good for investment and recreation. Terms from owner. No. 4316---WELL RIVER This beautifully maintained 1839 home has 8 rooms and is located on a very nice lot. There are two baths, 2 zone, hot water baseboard heat and a 2 car garage. It is well insulated, has nice por- ches and a good garden spot. Taxes are approximately $800.00 per year. Price 145.00, No. 4317--NEWBURY, New, custom crafted, white  cedar, log home. Four rooms, expandable to six, with full basement and well insulated Beautiful kitchen with spacious custom-built cabinets, lovely living area with custom-made chandelier. This well-built home. has a wood-gas combination heating system for low heat bill and is situated on 2 beautiful acres. Drive out todayand see this lovely home 1 mile from route 302 on Scotch Hollow Road. Price $49,900.00. No. 4321 10 acres. Newbury. VT.. $4,000; on Class 4 road for t/z mile; same distance from electricity; good growing hardwoods; good for recreation and in- vestment, but at present not good for year-round living; owner will finance. No. 4326--15.5 acres. Plerm0nt. NH -- tS,525; a few ,hundred feet from maintained road; one-third open, two-thirds wooded; good views to west; brook; good terms from owners.