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June 16, 1981     Journal Opinion
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June 16, 1981
 

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Smithsonian News Service Photo by Jeff Ploskonke &apos;: :i  C i!i ]iii!!i!!i ' i )I iiiii!!  T t" " " r A better way.,. refining the household objects that directly affect our day-to- day convenience and comfort. Meet one of them--Peter I)anko of Alexandria, Va., the 32-year-old designer of an innovative plywood chair molded from a single sheet of laminated wood under 16 tons of pressure. Designed in 1976, the museum-quality chair is simplicity itself, the product of this craftsman's inquiring mind, an inspired moment and a dash of luck. "l wanted to design a chair that was ultra-functional, good-looking and also inex- pensive," Danko said recently at his studio. "'But I had no idea what I was doing; I was never aware of the history of furniture design." The creator of limited- By David M. Maxfield Smithsonian News Service Chances are you're reading this in a favorite easy chair. Or maybe you're sitting on a new modular unit, heirloom rocker, old Windsor, wingback or director's chair. ttave you thought much about that chair--who "in- vented" it, what sort of history it has? And what about your other furniture? How did that sofa-bed, highchair, chaise lounge and tilt-top table "arrive" at your house? Though many people probably reserve their ad- miration and curiosity for the inventors of such gadgetry as electronic calculators and video equipment, there are also creative individuals quietly at work devising and Innovative furniture is as traditionally American as apple pie. Working on a new creation in his Alexandria, Va., studio, designer Peter Danko examines a piece of plywood just molded under intense pressure. This same technique was used in the design and fabrication of the chair at top left, molded from a single piece of plywood--an innovation that won a place in New York City's Museum of Modern Art and a spot in a new Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service show. The chair's bentwood technique and clean design make it a direct descendant of the one pictured immediately below it--173 years older. Because of their special materials, the rustic rocking chair (center) fabricated from green willow branches and the horn chair were all the rage in the late 1800s. edition sculptural furniture, furniture design and Danko felt that both his own production during the 19th and work and the production 20th centuries in terms of process he observed at fac- materials, comfort, por- tortes was too time- tability, multiple use and consuming, a result of fabrication techniques laborious assemblage steps. Danko's chair, as it turns out, "Why should it take so long?" is the descendant of a pioneer he thought, bentwood model so modern in One evening, Danko sat at a appearance that the two h)k neighborhood bar downing a like contemporaries. beer and toying aroundwith a Many of the innovative 3-by-5 menu card, bending it furniture pieces in the show, back and forth. "The which first appeared at the idea--the single piece Cooper-Hewitt Museum, the chair--just came to me," he Smithsonian's national recalled, museum of design in New tte approached several York City, are registered with manufacturers, but they were the U.S. Patent Office in skeptical, convinced that keeping with the long-held wood would split as the American tradition molding pressure was applied, recognized by the Constitution I)anko turned to the Museum that citizens should be of Modern Art in New York rewarded and protected for City. The museum quickly new ideas and ways of doing accepted the chair for its things. design study collection, then Though patents have been put him in contact with a awarded over theyears for all receptive manufacturer, who sorts of things, including a is putting the chair into mass 19th-century sofa-bathtub production, advertised as the "common Along with dozens of other sense invention of the age," household objects, many of innovation seems to occur in them chairs that revolve, chairs more often than in rock, fold up, stack and in- other forms of furniture, the flate, Danko's work also has exhibit's curator, David found its way into a Hanks, says "The chair," he Smithsonian Institution explains, "always has been a Traveling Exhibition Service challenge for designers, show entitled "Innovative though it is something Furniture in America." everyone uses." Peter Danko The exhibit focuses on the agrees: "They are the hardest technological changes in (pleaseturntopage 5A IlIPtNlll 111110ST .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June 10,1981 i to project. ::) ;It I / ! ! Start doghouse by assem- bling the platform (parts 1 and 2) with waterproof glue and galvanized 8d box nails. Next, cut the front and the back. The total height of the front from peak to bottom is 28"; the back is 29/:," high. Form the opening in the front with either a saber saw or a keyhole saw. Be sure to thoroughly sand the sawed edges. Attach the back with glue and 6d nails. The bottom edge of the back lines up with the bottom surface of the deck piece. Cut the two sides to length (36") and then determine correct height by checking the parts on what you have assembled so far. The top edge of the sides is cut to match the angle of the roof line. Cut the two runners (part 6) and assemble them to the sides with glue and 4d nails. (please turn to page 5A) i 1 21 1 x 3 x 60 lumber (tn.lted) 2 1 pc. K x"30 x 60 exterior Pvo<x= 3 1 Pc.  x 29 x 30 mtor ,I pc= Pvood  x 28 x 30 exterior 5 PlYWood 2pc=.  x 24 x 36 exterior ek,._ . so it can be -'-,'o and trimmed on b. 7 Pcs. . x 2 x 30 lumber 2 2pcs"  x 2.2 x36 exterk)r 1 Pc. 1 x 3 x 36 lumber 1 Pc.  x 30 x 30 exterior P,Ood 0.. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 PHOTOGRAPHY by GARY QUACKENBUSH 6O3-353-9833 NALIZED pROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY pERSO of your Wedding Capturing the Sl.iritncDtSO8 BOOKED IN JUNE oFF AD. e Guard00smen modern Green Mountain Bo s BURLINGTON--For nearly 35 years, the Vermont Air National Guard has been on duty during times of war and peace to provide the Air Force with a combat-ready air defense unit when the need arises. Some 800 airman and officers are on comtant call, ready to don their uniforms on a short notice. The first Vermont "Guardsmen" were the Green Mountain Boys, the farmers and merchants who served so valiantly in the military during the Revolutionary War. Today, Air Guard members hold civilian jobs such as mail carriers, teachers, bankers, and housewives. But, one weekend a month and 15 days every year they become citizen. airmen to support the natiora defense effort. The Vermont Air Guard was organized at what was then Burlington Municipal Airport on July 1, 1946 and was given federal recognition as the 134th Fighter Squadron. It was the first air unit in Vermont and one of the first Air National Guard units in the country organized after the end of World War Two. During the war the forerunner of the Vermont Air Guard, the 530th Fighter Squadron, 211th Fighter Group, was credited with battle participation in the India-Burma campaign and the China Offensive cam- paign. ON GUARD--One of Vermont Air National Guard B- 57s that will fly in formation along with many other Mustang was widely used in both the European and Asiatic theaters of World War Two. By the end of 1950, the unit reached its full assigned strength of 300 members. The Korean War was an important milestone for the unit. On January 9, 1951, tim Vermont ANG was alerted and entered active military service on February 1. The Fighter squadron was assigned to the Eastern Air Defense Commander for the 21 months of its activation and several members of the unit served in Korea and other parts of the world. On October 3!, 1952 the squadron was ............. released from active duty and returned to state control. The F94's were replaced by the twin engine F89D Scor- pions. A year later, the Chief . of the National Guard Bureau presented the unit with the Flying Safety Award for it's excellent safety record. mont Air National Guard is " .............. marking its 35th anniversary, which officials describe as "the biggest and best" F-89 Scorpion celebration in its history. The Vermont ANG became "It has become an in- part of the Air Defense ternational celebration with Runway Alert program in many of our Canadian Forces January 1960, and was friends joining us," said Maj. reorganized as the 158th James W. McCabe, public Fighter Group under the affairs officer. Dozens of U.S. USAF Air Defense command, and Canadian aircraft from Vermont Air Guard marks biggest, best anniversary BURLINGTON--The Ver- available at very reasonable prices," McCabe said. After the flying activities are over June 10 at 8 p.m., there will be a B-57 Farewell Dinner and Awards Ceremony at the Air National Guard NCO Club facilities on the Air National Guard side of the Airport. Special guests will include Keith Ferris, the of- ficial Air Force Artist and Robert "Bob" Mikesh, B-57 author of "B57 in '*" In April 1954 the Vermont P..47Thunderbelt ANG began an important transition to its first jet air- The first aircraft in the craft--the F94 Starfire. The VTANG inventory were the 134th was reorganized asa jet C47 Gooney Birds and two all-weather fighter in- types of trainers, the L5 and terceptor squadron. The AT6. The trainers helped pave squadron was rated as a the way for the unit's first Category "A" combat-ready tactical aircraft, the P47 unit in July 1957 with special Thunderbolt. commendations. F-S1 Mustang The F51 Mustangs replaced the P47's in July 1950. The Nineteen-fifty-eight brought mother change in aircraft. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 Alert hangars, previously used by the regular Air Force personnel, now were manned by the jet-age minuteman of the Vermont Air Guard. The unit went into a full-time, 24- hour seven day-a-week alert status. In October 1962, the group received the Operational Readiness Award by the National Guard Bureau for having the highest degree of readiness of any F89 unit in the country. The Vermont ANG is engaged in other task apart from its primary mission. In October 1964, the unit assisted authorities in a security search, prior to the visit by (please turn to page 2A) antiques to experimental models are on display. Activities kicked off June 8 with a reception and banquet honoring the Vermont National Guard. An Air Show will be held June 9 - l0 on the commercial side of the Burlington Inter- national Airport. Entrance will be through the Army Guards Building 890 Road off Willislon Road just East of the Airport entrance. Gates will be open from 2 - 9 p.m. and flying activities will be from 3 - 8p.m. "We think that you and your familios will enjoy the celebration. It's going to be an exciting time and it's all free. Refreshments will be Pilot and Combat." Activities each day June 9- l0 include Open House at 2 p.m. ; Super Chipmunk Acrobatics Show 3 p.m.; B-57 Formation Flying 4 p.m.; Pitts Special Acrobatics Show 5 p.m.; 2015 A-10 Demon- stration, F-15 Demonstration and Canadian F-5 Flying Exhibition at 6:30 p.m. BRADFORD SOUTH END MARKET lyre( eld. Sn (yo contoner) ...... $14.S0 d. ttn  ............. $,S$ Ik. Fresh Produce NATURAL FOOOS |1-STOI aerial demonstrations during Guard's 35th an. nlversary flying show in Burlington today and tomorrow. Smithsonian News Service Photo by Jeff Ploskonke ': :i  C i!i ]iii!!i!!i ' i )I iiiii!!  T t" " " r A better way.,. refining the household objects that directly affect our day-to- day convenience and comfort. Meet one of them--Peter I)anko of Alexandria, Va., the 32-year-old designer of an innovative plywood chair molded from a single sheet of laminated wood under 16 tons of pressure. Designed in 1976, the museum-quality chair is simplicity itself, the product of this craftsman's inquiring mind, an inspired moment and a dash of luck. "l wanted to design a chair that was ultra-functional, good-looking and also inex- pensive," Danko said recently at his studio. "'But I had no idea what I was doing; I was never aware of the history of furniture design." The creator of limited- By David M. Maxfield Smithsonian News Service Chances are you're reading this in a favorite easy chair. Or maybe you're sitting on a new modular unit, heirloom rocker, old Windsor, wingback or director's chair. ttave you thought much about that chair--who "in- vented" it, what sort of history it has? And what about your other furniture? How did that sofa-bed, highchair, chaise lounge and tilt-top table "arrive" at your house? Though many people probably reserve their ad- miration and curiosity for the inventors of such gadgetry as electronic calculators and video equipment, there are also creative individuals quietly at work devising and Innovative furniture is as traditionally American as apple pie. Working on a new creation in his Alexandria, Va., studio, designer Peter Danko examines a piece of plywood just molded under intense pressure. This same technique was used in the design and fabrication of the chair at top left, molded from a single piece of plywood--an innovation that won a place in New York City's Museum of Modern Art and a spot in a new Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service show. The chair's bentwood technique and clean design make it a direct descendant of the one pictured immediately below it--173 years older. Because of their special materials, the rustic rocking chair (center) fabricated from green willow branches and the horn chair were all the rage in the late 1800s. edition sculptural furniture, furniture design and Danko felt that both his own production during the 19th and work and the production 20th centuries in terms of process he observed at fac- materials, comfort, por- tortes was too time- tability, multiple use and consuming, a result of fabrication techniques laborious assemblage steps. Danko's chair, as it turns out, "Why should it take so long?" is the descendant of a pioneer he thought, bentwood model so modern in One evening, Danko sat at a appearance that the two h)k neighborhood bar downing a like contemporaries. beer and toying aroundwith a Many of the innovative 3-by-5 menu card, bending it furniture pieces in the show, back and forth. "The which first appeared at the idea--the single piece Cooper-Hewitt Museum, the chair--just came to me," he Smithsonian's national recalled, museum of design in New tte approached several York City, are registered with manufacturers, but they were the U.S. Patent Office in skeptical, convinced that keeping with the long-held wood would split as the American tradition molding pressure was applied, recognized by the Constitution I)anko turned to the Museum that citizens should be of Modern Art in New York rewarded and protected for City. The museum quickly new ideas and ways of doing accepted the chair for its things. design study collection, then Though patents have been put him in contact with a awarded over theyears for all receptive manufacturer, who sorts of things, including a is putting the chair into mass 19th-century sofa-bathtub production, advertised as the "common Along with dozens of other sense invention of the age," household objects, many of innovation seems to occur in them chairs that revolve, chairs more often than in rock, fold up, stack and in- other forms of furniture, the flate, Danko's work also has exhibit's curator, David found its way into a Hanks, says "The chair," he Smithsonian Institution explains, "always has been a Traveling Exhibition Service challenge for designers, show entitled "Innovative though it is something Furniture in America." everyone uses." Peter Danko The exhibit focuses on the agrees: "They are the hardest technological changes in (pleaseturntopage 5A IlIPtNlll 111110ST .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont June 10,1981 i to project. ::) ;It I / ! ! Start doghouse by assem- bling the platform (parts 1 and 2) with waterproof glue and galvanized 8d box nails. Next, cut the front and the back. The total height of the front from peak to bottom is 28"; the back is 29/:," high. Form the opening in the front with either a saber saw or a keyhole saw. Be sure to thoroughly sand the sawed edges. Attach the back with glue and 6d nails. The bottom edge of the back lines up with the bottom surface of the deck piece. Cut the two sides to length (36") and then determine correct height by checking the parts on what you have assembled so far. The top edge of the sides is cut to match the angle of the roof line. Cut the two runners (part 6) and assemble them to the sides with glue and 4d nails. (please turn to page 5A) i 1 21 1 x 3 x 60 lumber (tn.lted) 2 1 pc. K x"30 x 60 exterior Pvo<x= 3 1 Pc.  x 29 x 30 mtor ,I pc= Pvood  x 28 x 30 exterior 5 PlYWood 2pc=.  x 24 x 36 exterior ek,._ . so it can be -'-,'o and trimmed on b. 7 Pcs. . x 2 x 30 lumber 2 2pcs"  x 2.2 x36 exterk)r 1 Pc. 1 x 3 x 36 lumber 1 Pc.  x 30 x 30 exterior P,Ood 0.. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 PHOTOGRAPHY by GARY QUACKENBUSH 6O3-353-9833 NALIZED pROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY pERSO of your Wedding Capturing the Sl.iritncDtSO8 BOOKED IN JUNE oFF AD. e Guard00smen modern Green Mountain Bo s BURLINGTON--For nearly 35 years, the Vermont Air National Guard has been on duty during times of war and peace to provide the Air Force with a combat-ready air defense unit when the need arises. Some 800 airman and officers are on comtant call, ready to don their uniforms on a short notice. The first Vermont "Guardsmen" were the Green Mountain Boys, the farmers and merchants who served so valiantly in the military during the Revolutionary War. Today, Air Guard members hold civilian jobs such as mail carriers, teachers, bankers, and housewives. But, one weekend a month and 15 days every year they become citizen. airmen to support the natiora defense effort. The Vermont Air Guard was organized at what was then Burlington Municipal Airport on July 1, 1946 and was given federal recognition as the 134th Fighter Squadron. It was the first air unit in Vermont and one of the first Air National Guard units in the country organized after the end of World War Two. During the war the forerunner of the Vermont Air Guard, the 530th Fighter Squadron, 211th Fighter Group, was credited with battle participation in the India-Burma campaign and the China Offensive cam- paign. ON GUARD--One of Vermont Air National Guard B- 57s that will fly in formation along with many other Mustang was widely used in both the European and Asiatic theaters of World War Two. By the end of 1950, the unit reached its full assigned strength of 300 members. The Korean War was an important milestone for the unit. On January 9, 1951, tim Vermont ANG was alerted and entered active military service on February 1. The Fighter squadron was assigned to the Eastern Air Defense Commander for the 21 months of its activation and several members of the unit served in Korea and other parts of the world. On October 3!, 1952 the squadron was ............. released from active duty and returned to state control. The F94's were replaced by the twin engine F89D Scor- pions. A year later, the Chief . of the National Guard Bureau presented the unit with the Flying Safety Award for it's excellent safety record. mont Air National Guard is " .............. marking its 35th anniversary, which officials describe as "the biggest and best" F-89 Scorpion celebration in its history. The Vermont ANG became "It has become an in- part of the Air Defense ternational celebration with Runway Alert program in many of our Canadian Forces January 1960, and was friends joining us," said Maj. reorganized as the 158th James W. McCabe, public Fighter Group under the affairs officer. Dozens of U.S. USAF Air Defense command, and Canadian aircraft from Vermont Air Guard marks biggest, best anniversary BURLINGTON--The Ver- available at very reasonable prices," McCabe said. After the flying activities are over June 10 at 8 p.m., there will be a B-57 Farewell Dinner and Awards Ceremony at the Air National Guard NCO Club facilities on the Air National Guard side of the Airport. Special guests will include Keith Ferris, the of- ficial Air Force Artist and Robert "Bob" Mikesh, B-57 author of "B57 in '*" In April 1954 the Vermont P..47Thunderbelt ANG began an important transition to its first jet air- The first aircraft in the craft--the F94 Starfire. The VTANG inventory were the 134th was reorganized asa jet C47 Gooney Birds and two all-weather fighter in- types of trainers, the L5 and terceptor squadron. The AT6. The trainers helped pave squadron was rated as a the way for the unit's first Category "A" combat-ready tactical aircraft, the P47 unit in July 1957 with special Thunderbolt. commendations. F-S1 Mustang The F51 Mustangs replaced the P47's in July 1950. The Nineteen-fifty-eight brought mother change in aircraft. Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 Alert hangars, previously used by the regular Air Force personnel, now were manned by the jet-age minuteman of the Vermont Air Guard. The unit went into a full-time, 24- hour seven day-a-week alert status. In October 1962, the group received the Operational Readiness Award by the National Guard Bureau for having the highest degree of readiness of any F89 unit in the country. The Vermont ANG is engaged in other task apart from its primary mission. In October 1964, the unit assisted authorities in a security search, prior to the visit by (please turn to page 2A) antiques to experimental models are on display. Activities kicked off June 8 with a reception and banquet honoring the Vermont National Guard. An Air Show will be held June 9 - l0 on the commercial side of the Burlington Inter- national Airport. Entrance will be through the Army Guards Building 890 Road off Willislon Road just East of the Airport entrance. Gates will be open from 2 - 9 p.m. and flying activities will be from 3 - 8p.m. "We think that you and your familios will enjoy the celebration. It's going to be an exciting time and it's all free. Refreshments will be Pilot and Combat." Activities each day June 9- l0 include Open House at 2 p.m. ; Super Chipmunk Acrobatics Show 3 p.m.; B-57 Formation Flying 4 p.m.; Pitts Special Acrobatics Show 5 p.m.; 2015 A-10 Demon- stration, F-15 Demonstration and Canadian F-5 Flying Exhibition at 6:30 p.m. BRADFORD SOUTH END MARKET lyre( eld. Sn (yo contoner) ...... $14.S0 d. ttn  ............. $,S$ Ik. Fresh Produce NATURAL FOOOS |1-STOI aerial demonstrations during Guard's 35th an. nlversary flying show in Burlington today and tomorrow.