"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
June 16, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 18     (18 of 18 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 18     (18 of 18 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 16, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 8A-The Second Opinion-June I0, 1981 QUANTITIES LIMITED "The Weeder with the Wiggle" now the remains of an ancient civilization by Doug Routley University of New llampshire New' visitors to New England are amazed tosee the miles of stone walls and empty cellar holes. It's rather like looking at the remains of an ancient civilization. Where did all the people go? They were farmers, of course, and they left for several reasons. The main goal of many of them was better living conditions. A major problem in New England is poor soil. Too heavy, too light, shallow, stony, and low in fertility and organic matter, it provided early farmers with a sub- sistence living at best. Farm labor requirements were enormous. Who could blame farm folk for moving west where the deep, rich organic soils held considerably more promise? Recently, there has been much concern over the loss of organic matter even in the grassland soils of the Mid- west. It has always been a problem in New England and anyone who clears a piece of ground for farm or garden soon realizes it. Without organic matter, soil is difficult to manage and is often un- productive. Organic matter improves soil tilth, aeration and moisture retention. It reduces erosion, stimulates bacterial activity and improves root growth. As a result of im- proved plant nutrition, yields go up. Many sources of organic matter exist. As the price of chemical fertilizers increase and far- mers and gardeners have realized the importance of soil-building, manure has taken on greater importance. It, too, is often expensive, decompose. In one ex- periment, mature crops of millet and rye when plowed under released none of their nitrogen to the successive three crops. The nitrogen was all tied up in bacteria or it remained undecayed at the ph)w layer. Winter cover crops such as rye, ryegrass or oats are good for preventing soil erosion and they may absorb some of the soluable soil nitrogen, preventitg its loss from fall and spring rains. However, there is little evidence that they provide long-term benefit to soil organic content and may actually reduce yields of following crops unless nitrogen fertilizer is added. Grass sods can have the same effect, although their ex- tensive root systems may have a beneficial, although temporary, effect on soil structure. Although the value of grass and cereal crops for soil improvement may be questioned, there is no doubt that nitrogen-fixing legumes are highly beneficial. Perennial and biennial legumes such as clovers and alfalfa do increase crop yields, usually in direct proportion to the amount turned under. In a t0-year experiment at Cornell University, the yield of small grains was increased three times when grown on plowed-under alfalfa sod. Several clovers were almost as good but annual legumes such as vetch, soybeans, peas and field beans gave only slight increases. Annuals leave little residue in the soil because they have small root systems and, in these, tests, the tops were not in- corporated. lxst soil-building crops but soil test is a good investment alfalfa sedd is quite expensive before anything else is done. for this purpose. Red clover is Soil organic matter is a cheaper to establish and is precious substance, quick to also more tolerant of acid disappear and hard to replace. soils. Nevertheless, no legume It can be put back into the soil will grow well in acid soil and in several ways but no method the addition of lime or wood is easy or cheap. Never- ashes is usually necessary theless, adding organic In New England, alfalfa and where land is brought under matter through a well-planned red clover are considered the cultivation for the first time. A program of crop rotation is IIIIMIIHIMMIIIMlUMIIIIIHUlIIIIIIIIlUllIIIIIIIIIIMMII NOTICE TO THE CUSTOMERS ! OF WELLS RIVER SAVINGS BANK AND THE NATIONAL BANK OF NEWBURY == == Due to the purchase of the National Bank of Newbury by the Wells River Savings Bank, which will take place on June 12, 1981, both banks  will close at 6 p.m. Friday, June 12, and will remain closed Saturday, i June 13. | The Wells River Savings Bank will be open as usual Monday morning, June 15, to serve all your banking needs, m= NATIONAL BANK OF NEWBURY (802) 757-2741 Better hurry! Take advantage of these super values, and save! essential for long-term productivity of our farms and gardens. When you think of namebrand quality at reasonable prices where you can use your charge account. think of Use Your Charge Account .ou. , A.,, . o ,.^, ,, ,, ,.,o., St Johnsbury. Vt - WoocIsville, N.H Main Street Bradford, Vt. 222.5527 III I III II I C. Commode/Rec. Cab... 15 x 21 x 25-H D. Dry Sink/End Table " 15 x 21 x 25-H c GIANT INVENTORY REDUCTION WITH INCREDIBLE VALUES I Each table a fine example of cabinetmakers art. Hand-rubbed and finished in choice of li or dark antique. End Tables save crafted of S01id r ., , .o New England Pine i IIII II Ill I I II II Ill I II I "l Ill I Ill I I I I I I I I I I lll I • " d for your conic m an see tilt mBIB m DELIVER! V- -v v _--' ' SERVICE. ROUTE 302, LISBON ROAD 603-444-2033 LITTLETON, N.H. Hours: Weekdays 9 a.m. to 5:34) p.m. • Friday Nilih! 'ill 9 p.m. • Saturday 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m MOORGARD LATEX HOUSE PAINT Low lustre finish, lasting durability. REGULAR RETAIL GALLON PRICE i i i i i i MOORE'S HOUSE PAINT High gloss, protective finish for years of beauty. , !! , ,, ,, II PAINTS especially if it must be hauled any distance. Quality varies ,  widely. Excessive amounts of tie "  :}7 " -" i .3dl bedding such as sawdust or IP 'j,, j., I='..   " shavings can tie up con- a[O ,-- .  ,l i j [ " "" siderable Compost nitrogen has longinbeen the soil.used    cX (' " ;i r by wise gardeners as an  ,z   ,t While important soil amendment. Supplies Composting need not be done lUp-  ! ii .... Ill UP [.85' in a pile because leaves and  I ) m other raw organic matter will Weeder/Cultivator in the soil but the materials must be in- Use motion instead of muscle to weed a garden, around a corporated to prevent blowing patio, along a walkway. Unique hula action works below' and to foster decomposition. "" 2 ' •' !if' tt   !'- " the surface to cut weeds forward and backward--without It is important to remember disturbing top soil. Also cultivates, aerates, mulches. Self- that in order to decompose leaves, stalks, sawdust and other debris, microorganisms fromrequire additional nitrogen.or Unlau it manure.the tSsoiladdedatit theWillaSexpensebefertlJizer takenof  1 "i; "f i:, ,i[i ;  ,:. any crop growing there. There is also ample  "i " " d 'he I  "! evidence that green manure .,.  or soil-building crops can also rob the soil of nitrogen as they i • • , '! savings are unbeHeveabl˘,- Page 8A-The Second Opinion-June I0, 1981 QUANTITIES LIMITED "The Weeder with the Wiggle" now the remains of an ancient civilization by Doug Routley University of New llampshire New' visitors to New England are amazed tosee the miles of stone walls and empty cellar holes. It's rather like looking at the remains of an ancient civilization. Where did all the people go? They were farmers, of course, and they left for several reasons. The main goal of many of them was better living conditions. A major problem in New England is poor soil. Too heavy, too light, shallow, stony, and low in fertility and organic matter, it provided early farmers with a sub- sistence living at best. Farm labor requirements were enormous. Who could blame farm folk for moving west where the deep, rich organic soils held considerably more promise? Recently, there has been much concern over the loss of organic matter even in the grassland soils of the Mid- west. It has always been a problem in New England and anyone who clears a piece of ground for farm or garden soon realizes it. Without organic matter, soil is difficult to manage and is often un- productive. Organic matter improves soil tilth, aeration and moisture retention. It reduces erosion, stimulates bacterial activity and improves root growth. As a result of im- proved plant nutrition, yields go up. Many sources of organic matter exist. As the price of chemical fertilizers increase and far- mers and gardeners have realized the importance of soil-building, manure has taken on greater importance. It, too, is often expensive, decompose. In one ex- periment, mature crops of millet and rye when plowed under released none of their nitrogen to the successive three crops. The nitrogen was all tied up in bacteria or it remained undecayed at the ph)w layer. Winter cover crops such as rye, ryegrass or oats are good for preventing soil erosion and they may absorb some of the soluable soil nitrogen, preventitg its loss from fall and spring rains. However, there is little evidence that they provide long-term benefit to soil organic content and may actually reduce yields of following crops unless nitrogen fertilizer is added. Grass sods can have the same effect, although their ex- tensive root systems may have a beneficial, although temporary, effect on soil structure. Although the value of grass and cereal crops for soil improvement may be questioned, there is no doubt that nitrogen-fixing legumes are highly beneficial. Perennial and biennial legumes such as clovers and alfalfa do increase crop yields, usually in direct proportion to the amount turned under. In a t0-year experiment at Cornell University, the yield of small grains was increased three times when grown on plowed-under alfalfa sod. Several clovers were almost as good but annual legumes such as vetch, soybeans, peas and field beans gave only slight increases. Annuals leave little residue in the soil because they have small root systems and, in these, tests, the tops were not in- corporated. lxst soil-building crops but soil test is a good investment alfalfa sedd is quite expensive before anything else is done. for this purpose. Red clover is Soil organic matter is a cheaper to establish and is precious substance, quick to also more tolerant of acid disappear and hard to replace. soils. Nevertheless, no legume It can be put back into the soil will grow well in acid soil and in several ways but no method the addition of lime or wood is easy or cheap. Never- ashes is usually necessary theless, adding organic In New England, alfalfa and where land is brought under matter through a well-planned red clover are considered the cultivation for the first time. A program of crop rotation is IIImlIMIIMMIIIMlUMIIIIIHUlIIIIIIIIlUllIIIIIIIIIIMMII NOTICE TO THE CUSTOMERS ! OF WELLS RIVER SAVINGS BANK AND THE NATIONAL BANK OF NEWBURY == == Due to the purchase of the National Bank of Newbury by the Wells River Savings Bank, which will take place on June 12, 1981, both banks  will close at 6 p.m. Friday, June 12, and will remain closed Saturday, i June 13. | The Wells River Savings Bank will be open as usual Monday morning, June 15, to serve all your banking needs, m= NATIONAL BANK OF NEWBURY (802) 757-2741 Better hurry! Take advantage of these super values, and save! essential for long-term productivity of our farms and gardens. When you think of namebrand quality at reasonable prices where you can use your charge account. think of Use Your Charge Account .ou. , A.,, . o ,.^, ,, ,, ,.,o., St Johnsbury. Vt - WoocIsville, N.H Main Street Bradford, Vt. 222.5527 III I III II I C. Commode/Rec. Cab... 15 x 21 x 25-H D. Dry Sink/End Table " 15 x 21 x 25-H c GIANT INVENTORY REDUCTION WITH INCREDIBLE VALUES I Each table a fine example of cabinetmakers art. Hand-rubbed and finished in choice of li or dark antique. End Tables save crafted of S01id r ., , .o New England Pine i IIII II Ill I I II II Ill I II I "l Ill I Ill I I I I I I I I I I lll I • " d for your conic m an see tilt mBIB m DELIVER! V- -v v _--' ' SERVICE. ROUTE 302, LISBON ROAD 603-444-2033 LITTLETON, N.H. Hours: Weekdays 9 a.m. to 5:34) p.m. • Friday Nilih! 'ill 9 p.m. • Saturday 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m MOORGARD LATEX HOUSE PAINT Low lustre finish, lasting durability. REGULAR RETAIL GALLON PRICE i i i i i i MOORE'S HOUSE PAINT High gloss, protective finish for years of beauty. , !! , ,, ,, II PAINTS especially if it must be hauled any distance. Quality varies ,  widely. Excessive amounts of tie "  :}7 " -" i .3dl bedding such as sawdust or IP 'j,, j., I='..   " shavings can tie up con- a[O ,-- .  ,l i j [ " "" siderable Compost nitrogen has longinbeen the soil.used    cX (' " ;i r by wise gardeners as an  ,z   ,t While important soil amendment. Supplies Composting need not be done lUp-  ! ii .... Ill UP [.85' in a pile because leaves and  I ) m other raw organic matter will Weeder/Cultivator in the soil but the materials must be in- Use motion instead of muscle to weed a garden, around a corporated to prevent blowing patio, along a walkway. Unique hula action works below' and to foster decomposition. "" 2 ' •' !if' tt   !'- " the surface to cut weeds forward and backward--without It is important to remember disturbing top soil. Also cultivates, aerates, mulches. Self- that in order to decompose leaves, stalks, sawdust and other debris, microorganisms fromrequire additional nitrogen.or Unlau it manure.the tSsoiladdedatit theWillaSexpensebefertlJizer takenof  1 "i; "f i:, ,i[i ;  ,:. any crop growing there. There is also ample  "i " " d 'he I  "! evidence that green manure .,.  or soil-building crops can also rob the soil of nitrogen as they i • • , '! savings are unbeHeveabl˘,-