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July 1, 1981     Journal Opinion
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lle, Number 26 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont I kc, Pl 7/9831O July 1, 1981 authorized Publishing The National International Representative Board's from Rindge, N.H., who has has authorized been working with the labor practice Organizing Committee, the cgains t Equity of Orford in the dismissal It said there evidence to involving a employee of a settlement before action. that practice justified in- H. Trunzo, fired for aion organizing Boston office find sufficient a similar Joaquin a native of visa expired remain in his legal action Equity is he was his editorial that was in- his work at was told there was for him as a change in by former Gov. publishes in several Rico and American Guild, an has been organizing it was Leo the Guild's basic issues are wages and job security. Ducharme contended that production workers at Equity are paid between $100 and $175 a week less than similar workers in union shops. Another member of the employee organizing com- mittee, Larry Yonaitis, said, "Management at Equity is currently in total control and few people are allowed to work their way up the ranks or pay scale." Trunzo, who is an attorney admitted to the New Hamp- shire bar, was fired without advance notice on April 2,1981 by Thomson, the Guild of. ficials said. They quoted a letter handed to Trunzo by the former governor when he was fired, as saying: "Your attendance to personal legal practice matters during office hours have convinced us that the building of a law practice is more important to you than developing a career as a law editor with Equity." Trunzo claims that Robb Thomson, the Vice President of Equity in charge of editorial affairs, had agreed at the time of hiring that Trunzo could practice law as long as any work that was missed was made up. Two weeks before being dismissed, Trunzo said he received an unsolicited ap- pointment by the Court to represent indigent minors. "I felt it was my duty as an at- torney and as a member of the community to answer the call of the court," said Trunzo. He missed about three hours of work tO go tO court and made up the missed time by coming to work early, he said. "Meldrim then called me in -(please turn to page 5)- Remembrance L. Martin dies; longtmle area police officer BRADFORD--Remembrance L. Martin, long-time police chief of Bradford and Pier- mont, was buried yesterday. He died suddenly last Friday at the age of 71 in the Veterans Administration Hospital in White River Junction. "It's going to he a tough job to fill his boots," commented K. Donald Welch, a Bradford Village trustee who had known Martin since he was a teenager going to school in Newbury. "If I could find a cop his equal 10 years ago, I would think I was in heaven," Welch added. Martin, born in Bradford March 16, 1910, had been in ill health in recent years and his police duties in Bradford had been reduced. "There is hardly an older family in town who he hadn't helped in some small way as police officer," Welch said, adding that Martin tried to steer younger people away from serious trouble. "If ever a man gave people a break, be did." Returning to the Upper A young Bradford resident THE CHIEF--'Ilte late Remembrance L. Martin, for many years police chief in Valley area after the war, Martin became active in echoed Welch's comments, both Bradford and Piermont, is shown in a recent photo taken in his Bradford construction in Bradford and saying "He always wanted to help the kids. He wouldn't turn office, nearby areas. the kids in. He would just talk to them and say, 'Don't you think it's time to straighten out?'... He talked me out of running away from home." Martin was police chief in Piermont for 34 years and police chief in Bradford for 16 years, holding both posts in the area over the years. simultaneously in latter "There are very few years. He lived in Piermont in buildings in the Bradford recent years. Square that he didn't have Before that, he had been an ' something to do with the independent contractor, structure or repair," Welch working on numerous projects told the Journal Opinion. "There probably wasn't a better man to frame a building than he was." Martin also earned a reputation for taking down old buildings, including the old Bradford Inn where the Bradford National Bank now stands. "He had a very unique way of taking buildings down. No great amount of mess was ever created during the operation of taking it down," Welch said. Martin also had built many bridges and sidewalks in the area. Martin's construction skills were put to use by the Army during World War II when be served with the Headquarters Company of the 1060th Engineer Port Construction Repair Group as a foreman directing the work of driving piles into the ground as foundations for docks and bridges. He also did heavy construction work during his Army service from Nov. 27, 1943, to Jan. 18, 1946. He was discharged as a Master Sargeant. "Other than being a very good policeman in the town and a very good chief of police until he became sickly, he did a lot of other things for the village. He redid the sidewalks in Bradford. He was, (please turn to page 9) Haverhill board okays three school hirings N. HAVERHILL--The for a second contract for Haverhill School Beard has related work to be done on the voted to hire an agriculture schoors drainage system. instructor, a custodian and a Hood's low bid for that work bookkeeper for the school was $6,752. A total of four bids district. The board at its June 24 meeting also accepted the resignations of teachers John McAlron of Woodsville High School and Paul Hogan of Haverhill Academy , Junior High. Joan Sirlin's request for maternity leave from Nov. 1, 1981-June, 1982 was approved. The board also accepted a $13,984 low bid from James Hood of N. Haverhill for replacing the septic system of the James Morrill Elemen- tary School. Hood's was the lowest bid. The board also said it will re negotiate with Hood was received on each project. Also approved was a $16,200 contract for the drivers' education program, in which participating students will pay $50 which will go back into school district funds, ac- cording to Superintendent Norman Mullin. Woedsville High Principal Donald Evans said between 75 and 80 students take drivers education classes. Action on a proposed high school greenhouse project was delayed for further con- sideration. The next board meeting is scheduled July 8. Newbu00. 's school budget is cut NEWBURY--School district voters had already approved voters at their annual meeting the Oxbow High School budget June 22 cut some $10,000 from the school board's proposed $265,435 general budget for Newbury Elementary School. The cut by the 83 voters reduced the total increase over last year's budget from 14 per cent as proposed by the School Board to 12 per cent and put the tax rate at $2.34. "There are retired farmers living near me who are trying to make it on $200 a month from Social Security," said Karl Schwenke, who proposed the motion to cut the budget. But former School Board Chairman Mary Burnham said "I feel our little elementary School is taking it in the neck" because the and a $295,000 bond issue to repair Oxbow's roof. Newbury School District voters, although cutting the general budget, added $5,000 for attic insulation and pur- chase of a more efficient oil burner. Voters reelected the three incumbent. School Board members, Delores Drugach, president, /or a three-year term; Russell Carson for two years; and Gerry Brooks for one year. Also elected were Joseph Rinaldi, principal of Newbury's Christian School, as representative to the Oxbow School Board; Thomas Burnham, as school auditor; and Patricia Rhoads as annual meeting came after treasurer. Oxbow policy is set on extra.curriculars -hiring renewal policy. "The Oxbow School Board believes that extra-curricular activities ar'e teaching- learning activities conducted in non-academic formats and they are 'different-but-equal' to academic classes in their educational value to BRADFORD--The Oxbow School Beard has adopted an extra-curricular activities and Erosion conwol NEWBURY--A combined meeting of the Northern Vermont and George D. Aiken Resource Conservation and Development Areas will be held July 16 at 11:30 a.m. at Warners Gallery in Newbury. Following a dutch lunch, participants will tour the Connecticut River Stream- bank Erosion Control Demonstration Project in Haverhill. Completed two years ago by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the project was designed to demonstrate a number of erosion control methods. The purpose of the project Vermont is preferred for Canada power line RUTLAND--"The member companies of the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL) have agreed that Vermont is the preferred site for construction of the 450 KV- DC Transmission line which Elementary second graders (from left) Becky Cush- Adam Nasse and Mike Tomlinson received awards f'ts in MS Read-a-thon. pupils raise MS fund W"' Hydro-Que with . New Enand," according S. John Zuckernick, presiaem ates pledged a specified amount caus and cures of the 55 for each book read. disease. The remaining 60 Multiple Sclerosis is a percent stays in the Southern in disease which cripples young Vermont Chapter area to par- adults. Forty percent of the provide free information, money donated goes to the counseling and referral National Multiple Sclerosis services, and equipment for had Society for research into the patients and their families in the counties of Addison, Opinion adds of Vermont Electric Power Company (VELCO). According to Zuckernick, NEPOOL will provide VELCO with $2.5 million for engineering feasibility and environmental studies leading to an application for con- struction to the State Public Service Board. "All of which should take approximately two years, during which time we plan to give Vermonters ample op- portunity to exvress . their,, interest in the hne, Zuckernick said. The proposed line will he a 450 kilovolt direct current transmission line running from Des Cantons in Canada to a point near Comerford, N.H. It is designed to carry 600 megawatts of electricity in the first stage, with eventual expansion to 2,000 megawatts. "With this agreement," said Zuckernick, ,'Vermonters will realize a substantial boost in their efforts to reduce dependence on expensive imported oil. Furthermore," BIG he said, "since Vermont's this Bennington, Orange, Rutland, Windham and Windsor. The participants in the Read-a-thon read a total of 794 books during the month of April. Billie Jo Trojanowski .features of the newspaper, received a bookbag for having The nationally syndicated read the most books of any entertainment series an- participant. A knapsack was nounced today will join such awarded to Mike Tomlinson" other popular columns by local writers as "Over the River and Through the Years" by Katharine Blaladell, "Money Sense" by William Rose, "Antiques Fare" by Joanna Gilbride, "Life on the for raising the most money. Some prizes were also awarded to participants on a random basis. A stuffed dog representing the MS mascot, Mystery Sleuth, was presented to Becky Cushman. byFarm" Fran Hyde, "Kid's Each of thefollowing children Korner-by L.F. Barnes, and received a flexible frisbee: the "Our River" series. Adam Nasse, Matt Cutler, You can read them all every Heather Hood, Karen week in the Journal Opinion. O'Donnell, Rachel Walsh and Keith Re,anger. studonts,"thepolieysays. urricular activities. When it curricular prqgram," the "Therefore, the Board is appropriate in the judgment poliey statement said. for new fire station believes that in order to of the Beard, qualified Oxbow "All prospective extra- maintain the continuity of the staff will be given preference curricular supervisors will be iYEGATE---Selectmen have The building will he under a total educational program, it for extra-curricular activity provided with a job signed a $14,889 contract with must make every reasonable assignments," it said. description of the position for Agway Corp. to construct the ' town's new firehouse next to effort to hire qualified, "When an extra-curricular which they are applying," it the town garage in Ryegate supervisors of extra- supervisory position becomes said. available, the Oxbow staff will "Renewal Activity Corner. be notified and given suf- Agreements for supervisors of The 40-by-64-foot building is tour is planned ficient time to apply for the position," it added. ' was to experiment with new "When new staff members and innovative techniques for are hired, every effort will be streambank protection, made to secure people who are Techniques which were the not only qualified in their least expensive to iustall were specific teaching area, but used because it is hoped that also have some expertise the results will be helpful to which might be used to landowners using their own strengthen the extra- resources to maintain their streambanks. Erosion cited at The RC&D program strives to provide leadership and direction in the area of WOODSVILLE--A federal resource management. This official has told the town of tour will help participants Woodsville it should correct make more knowledgeable three areas of erosion, in- decisions about streambank cluding "immediate at- tention" at the airport. stabilization. W.M. Dannehy, district conservations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said in a letter read at the June 22 selectmen's meeting that erosion on cropland at the airport is in excess of seven tons per acre on much of the share of the output of the line acreage. ( please turn-to page S) Spring activities will be issued expected to be completed by as soon as practical following Aug. 1, and the town will pay the completion of the Spring for it in three installments. season. All other renewals of The town is responsible for Activity Agreements for site preparation, finish extra-curricular supervisors grading, some painting, and of the teaching staff will be digging of post holes. A total of issued at the same time as $20,000 has been allotted for regular teaching contracts," the project. it added. The contract was signed . with Agway representatives Larry Doughty, Karl Woolever and Diane Miller. He - also cited erosion problems on the Everett Keith farm and the Alan Page farm .on Briar Hill and said, "In each case, we felt the town could re-direct the flow of water to help prevent erosion construction of a public boat problems on cropland." ramp at Bedeli Park in Haverhill, He also said "The lan- downers need to help the situation by utilizing con- servation practices to help prevent erosion with resulting sedimentation in road ditches and culverts. "As Executive Councilor for District One, I would like to ask for your assistance and support in obtaining the necessary permit and funding for a public boat launch at the five-year warranty, plus a longer warrhnty on specific parts. In other business, selectmen agreed to accept the recommendation of the Board of Civil Authority that the tax appraisal on the Guilbault property on Bible Hill be lowered by $1,500; reviewed plans for the proposed water pollution control facility in S. Ryegate; and reviewed a letter from District Tran- sportation Administrator Hugh Elder which stated an $8,697 increase in gas tax allocations for Ryegate. Boat ramp asked.for Bedell Park HAVERHILL--New Ham- Bedell State Park in the Town pshire Executive Councillor of Haverhill," Burton said in a Ray Burton has asked Gov. letter to Gallen. Hugh Gallen to help in the "It is my understanding that local citizens and organizations are willing to contribute one half the cost of a reasonably priced public boat launch," the letter added. "Would you be willing to assist and support this request?" Burton asked Gallen. BAD MAiNF_,--IS Sm0kg rubber and framebeg, contestant in eei Drive Pull benefit for Muscular :i:  Dystrophy in Fal June  couldn't move the "pull" the requ distance despite the great effort. (See Sports Page for results). lle, Number 26 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont I kc, Pl 7/9831O July 1, 1981 authorized Publishing The National International Representative Board's from Rindge, N.H., who has has authorized been working with the labor practice Organizing Committee, the cgains t Equity of Orford in the dismissal It said there evidence to involving a employee of a settlement before action. that practice justified in- H. Trunzo, fired for aion organizing Boston office find sufficient a similar Joaquin a native of visa expired remain in his legal action Equity is he was his editorial that was in- his work at was told there was for him as a change in by former Gov. publishes in several Rico and American Guild, an has been organizing it was Leo the Guild's basic issues are wages and job security. Ducharme contended that production workers at Equity are paid between $100 and $175 a week less than similar workers in union shops. Another member of the employee organizing com- mittee, Larry Yonaitis, said, "Management at Equity is currently in total control and few people are allowed to work their way up the ranks or pay scale." Trunzo, who is an attorney admitted to the New Hamp- shire bar, was fired without advance notice on April 2,1981 by Thomson, the Guild of. ficials said. They quoted a letter handed to Trunzo by the former governor when he was fired, as saying: "Your attendance to personal legal practice matters during office hours have convinced us that the building of a law practice is more important to you than developing a career as a law editor with Equity." Trunzo claims that Robb Thomson, the Vice President of Equity in charge of editorial affairs, had agreed at the time of hiring that Trunzo could practice law as long as any work that was missed was made up. Two weeks before being dismissed, Trunzo said he received an unsolicited ap- pointment by the Court to represent indigent minors. "I felt it was my duty as an at- torney and as a member of the community to answer the call of the court," said Trunzo. He missed about three hours of work tO go tO court and made up the missed time by coming to work early, he said. "Meldrim then called me in -(please turn to page 5)- Remembrance L. Martin dies; longtmle area police officer BRADFORD--Remembrance L. Martin, long-time police chief of Bradford and Pier- mont, was buried yesterday. He died suddenly last Friday at the age of 71 in the Veterans Administration Hospital in White River Junction. "It's going to he a tough job to fill his boots," commented K. Donald Welch, a Bradford Village trustee who had known Martin since he was a teenager going to school in Newbury. "If I could find a cop his equal 10 years ago, I would think I was in heaven," Welch added. Martin, born in Bradford March 16, 1910, had been in ill health in recent years and his police duties in Bradford had been reduced. "There is hardly an older family in town who he hadn't helped in some small way as police officer," Welch said, adding that Martin tried to steer younger people away from serious trouble. "If ever a man gave people a break, be did." Returning to the Upper A young Bradford resident THE CHIEF--'Ilte late Remembrance L. Martin, for many years police chief in Valley area after the war, Martin became active in echoed Welch's comments, both Bradford and Piermont, is shown in a recent photo taken in his Bradford construction in Bradford and saying "He always wanted to help the kids. He wouldn't turn office, nearby areas. the kids in. He would just talk to them and say, 'Don't you think it's time to straighten out?'... He talked me out of running away from home." Martin was police chief in Piermont for 34 years and police chief in Bradford for 16 years, holding both posts in the area over the years. simultaneously in latter "There are very few years. He lived in Piermont in buildings in the Bradford recent years. Square that he didn't have Before that, he had been an ' something to do with the independent contractor, structure or repair," Welch working on numerous projects told the Journal Opinion. "There probably wasn't a better man to frame a building than he was." Martin also earned a reputation for taking down old buildings, including the old Bradford Inn where the Bradford National Bank now stands. "He had a very unique way of taking buildings down. No great amount of mess was ever created during the operation of taking it down," Welch said. Martin also had built many bridges and sidewalks in the area. Martin's construction skills were put to use by the Army during World War II when be served with the Headquarters Company of the 1060th Engineer Port Construction Repair Group as a foreman directing the work of driving piles into the ground as foundations for docks and bridges. He also did heavy construction work during his Army service from Nov. 27, 1943, to Jan. 18, 1946. He was discharged as a Master Sargeant. "Other than being a very good policeman in the town and a very good chief of police until he became sickly, he did a lot of other things for the village. He redid the sidewalks in Bradford. He was, (please turn to page 9) Haverhill board okays three school hirings N. HAVERHILL--The for a second contract for Haverhill School Beard has related work to be done on the voted to hire an agriculture schoors drainage system. instructor, a custodian and a Hood's low bid for that work bookkeeper for the school was $6,752. A total of four bids district. The board at its June 24 meeting also accepted the resignations of teachers John McAlron of Woodsville High School and Paul Hogan of Haverhill Academy , Junior High. Joan Sirlin's request for maternity leave from Nov. 1, 1981-June, 1982 was approved. The board also accepted a $13,984 low bid from James Hood of N. Haverhill for replacing the septic system of the James Morrill Elemen- tary School. Hood's was the lowest bid. The board also said it will re negotiate with Hood was received on each project. Also approved was a $16,200 contract for the drivers' education program, in which participating students will pay $50 which will go back into school district funds, ac- cording to Superintendent Norman Mullin. Woedsville High Principal Donald Evans said between 75 and 80 students take drivers education classes. Action on a proposed high school greenhouse project was delayed for further con- sideration. The next board meeting is scheduled July 8. Newbu00. 's school budget is cut NEWBURY--School district voters had already approved voters at their annual meeting the Oxbow High School budget June 22 cut some $10,000 from the school board's proposed $265,435 general budget for Newbury Elementary School. The cut by the 83 voters reduced the total increase over last year's budget from 14 per cent as proposed by the School Board to 12 per cent and put the tax rate at $2.34. "There are retired farmers living near me who are trying to make it on $200 a month from Social Security," said Karl Schwenke, who proposed the motion to cut the budget. But former School Board Chairman Mary Burnham said "I feel our little elementary School is taking it in the neck" because the and a $295,000 bond issue to repair Oxbow's roof. Newbury School District voters, although cutting the general budget, added $5,000 for attic insulation and pur- chase of a more efficient oil burner. Voters reelected the three incumbent. School Board members, Delores Drugach, president, /or a three-year term; Russell Carson for two years; and Gerry Brooks for one year. Also elected were Joseph Rinaldi, principal of Newbury's Christian School, as representative to the Oxbow School Board; Thomas Burnham, as school auditor; and Patricia Rhoads as annual meeting came after treasurer. Oxbow policy is set on extra.curriculars -hiring renewal policy. "The Oxbow School Board believes that extra-curricular activities ar'e teaching- learning activities conducted in non-academic formats and they are 'different-but-equal' to academic classes in their educational value to BRADFORD--The Oxbow School Beard has adopted an extra-curricular activities and Erosion conwol NEWBURY--A combined meeting of the Northern Vermont and George D. Aiken Resource Conservation and Development Areas will be held July 16 at 11:30 a.m. at Warners Gallery in Newbury. Following a dutch lunch, participants will tour the Connecticut River Stream- bank Erosion Control Demonstration Project in Haverhill. Completed two years ago by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the project was designed to demonstrate a number of erosion control methods. The purpose of the project Vermont is preferred for Canada power line RUTLAND--"The member companies of the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL) have agreed that Vermont is the preferred site for construction of the 450 KV- DC Transmission line which Elementary second graders (from left) Becky Cush- Adam Nasse and Mike Tomlinson received awards f'ts in MS Read-a-thon. pupils raise MS fund W"' Hydro-Que with . New Enand," according S. John Zuckernick, presiaem ates pledged a specified amount caus and cures of the 55 for each book read. disease. The remaining 60 Multiple Sclerosis is a percent stays in the Southern in disease which cripples young Vermont Chapter area to par- adults. Forty percent of the provide free information, money donated goes to the counseling and referral National Multiple Sclerosis services, and equipment for had Society for research into the patients and their families in the counties of Addison, Opinion adds of Vermont Electric Power Company (VELCO). According to Zuckernick, NEPOOL will provide VELCO with $2.5 million for engineering feasibility and environmental studies leading to an application for con- struction to the State Public Service Board. "All of which should take approximately two years, during which time we plan to give Vermonters ample op- portunity to exvress . their,, interest in the hne, Zuckernick said. The proposed line will he a 450 kilovolt direct current transmission line running from Des Cantons in Canada to a point near Comerford, N.H. It is designed to carry 600 megawatts of electricity in the first stage, with eventual expansion to 2,000 megawatts. "With this agreement," said Zuckernick, ,'Vermonters will realize a substantial boost in their efforts to reduce dependence on expensive imported oil. Furthermore," BIG he said, "since Vermont's this Bennington, Orange, Rutland, Windham and Windsor. The participants in the Read-a-thon read a total of 794 books during the month of April. Billie Jo Trojanowski .features of the newspaper, received a bookbag for having The nationally syndicated read the most books of any entertainment series an- participant. A knapsack was nounced today will join such awarded to Mike Tomlinson" other popular columns by local writers as "Over the River and Through the Years" by Katharine Blaladell, "Money Sense" by William Rose, "Antiques Fare" by Joanna Gilbride, "Life on the for raising the most money. Some prizes were also awarded to participants on a random basis. A stuffed dog representing the MS mascot, Mystery Sleuth, was presented to Becky Cushman. byFarm" Fran Hyde, "Kid's Each of thefollowing children Korner-by L.F. Barnes, and received a flexible frisbee: the "Our River" series. Adam Nasse, Matt Cutler, You can read them all every Heather Hood, Karen week in the Journal Opinion. O'Donnell, Rachel Walsh and Keith Re,anger. studonts,"thepolieysays. urricular activities. When it curricular prqgram," the "Therefore, the Board is appropriate in the judgment poliey statement said. for new fire station believes that in order to of the Beard, qualified Oxbow "All prospective extra- maintain the continuity of the staff will be given preference curricular supervisors will be iYEGATE---Selectmen have The building will he under a total educational program, it for extra-curricular activity provided with a job signed a $14,889 contract with must make every reasonable assignments," it said. description of the position for Agway Corp. to construct the ' town's new firehouse next to effort to hire qualified, "When an extra-curricular which they are applying," it the town garage in Ryegate supervisors of extra- supervisory position becomes said. available, the Oxbow staff will "Renewal Activity Corner. be notified and given suf- Agreements for supervisors of The 40-by-64-foot building is tour is planned ficient time to apply for the position," it added. ' was to experiment with new "When new staff members and innovative techniques for are hired, every effort will be streambank protection, made to secure people who are Techniques which were the not only qualified in their least expensive to iustall were specific teaching area, but used because it is hoped that also have some expertise the results will be helpful to which might be used to landowners using their own strengthen the extra- resources to maintain their streambanks. Erosion cited at The RC&D program strives to provide leadership and direction in the area of WOODSVILLE--A federal resource management. This official has told the town of tour will help participants Woodsville it should correct make more knowledgeable three areas of erosion, in- decisions about streambank cluding "immediate at- tention" at the airport. stabilization. W.M. Dannehy, district conservations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said in a letter read at the June 22 selectmen's meeting that erosion on cropland at the airport is in excess of seven tons per acre on much of the share of the output of the line acreage. ( please turn-to page S) Spring activities will be issued expected to be completed by as soon as practical following Aug. 1, and the town will pay the completion of the Spring for it in three installments. season. All other renewals of The town is responsible for Activity Agreements for site preparation, finish extra-curricular supervisors grading, some painting, and of the teaching staff will be digging of post holes. A total of issued at the same time as $20,000 has been allotted for regular teaching contracts," the project. it added. The contract was signed . with Agway representatives Larry Doughty, Karl Woolever and Diane Miller. He - also cited erosion problems on the Everett Keith farm and the Alan Page farm .on Briar Hill and said, "In each case, we felt the town could re-direct the flow of water to help prevent erosion construction of a public boat problems on cropland." ramp at Bedeli Park in Haverhill, He also said "The lan- downers need to help the situation by utilizing con- servation practices to help prevent erosion with resulting sedimentation in road ditches and culverts. "As Executive Councilor for District One, I would like to ask for your assistance and support in obtaining the necessary permit and funding for a public boat launch at the five-year warranty, plus a longer warrhnty on specific parts. In other business, selectmen agreed to accept the recommendation of the Board of Civil Authority that the tax appraisal on the Guilbault property on Bible Hill be lowered by $1,500; reviewed plans for the proposed water pollution control facility in S. Ryegate; and reviewed a letter from District Tran- sportation Administrator Hugh Elder which stated an $8,697 increase in gas tax allocations for Ryegate. Boat ramp asked.for Bedell Park HAVERHILL--New Ham- Bedell State Park in the Town pshire Executive Councillor of Haverhill," Burton said in a Ray Burton has asked Gov. letter to Gallen. Hugh Gallen to help in the "It is my understanding that local citizens and organizations are willing to contribute one half the cost of a reasonably priced public boat launch," the letter added. "Would you be willing to assist and support this request?" Burton asked Gallen. BAD MAiNF_,--IS Sm0kg rubber and framebeg, contestant in eei Drive Pull benefit for Muscular :i:  Dystrophy in Fal June  couldn't move the "pull" the requ distance despite the great effort. (See Sports Page for results).