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July 1, 1981     Journal Opinion
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ues Fare by JOANNA GILBRIDE Richard N.H., way to celebrate the holiday is with a featuring fine L a number of have made New July Fourth and special auction some featuring sales and others an eclectic of better antiques Withington will early American CLOCK-- This signed WilIard, is one of items to be off by Richard at HHlsboro, d American Indian the estate of of Mar- The auction Withington's Center, the block -- mahogany bonnet top, HEPPLEWHITE,-- This delicately proportioned sewing table used to have a sewing bag attached un- derneath. It will be sold at auction by Richard Withington in Hillsboro, N.H. Friday. Chippendale curly maple chest-on-chest, Hepplewhite mahogany serpentine front sideboard, Indian headdress, Pomo feather basket, Queen Anne candlesticks, brass whale oil lamps and large and small Chippendale mirrors. This represents just a small sampling of the items to be sold which, incidentally, also include a signed Aaron Willard banjo clock. Closer to home, auctioneers George Clement and Archie Steenburgh will be busy on the Fourth selling sterling, a primitive shaving horse, old flasks, several old maps, a rose carved sofa, old sleds, oak furniture, fancy wicker and other odds and ends. The sale will take place at the Jockey Hill Auction Barn in Landaff, N.H. Further south in Cornish, N.H., auctioneer William A. Smith will swing into action on July 5th with a "regular" house sale that happens to include a harpsicord, an antique telescope, horse- drawn sleigh, six-pedal loom, banquet lamps, Victorian furniture and some early items as well as later custom pieces. Other key auctions are scheduled in Burlington, Vt., and Essex Junction, Vt. Church guests visit Newbul?., VISITORS--A group of 143 guests from North Carolina visit Newbury historic church sites. NEWBURY--After six months or more of com- plicated planning the First Congregational Church (United Church of Christ) at Newbury served as host June 23 to 143 guests who were enjoying a Heritage Bus Tour sponsored by The Commission on Church Life and Leader- ship of the Southern Con- ference, U C.C. Last November, Rev. Wayne Gardner, pastor of the Eure Christian Church in Eure, N.C., wrote to the Rev. Charles G. Chamberlain, Executive Minister of the Vermont Conference, U.C.C. in Burlington, asking for in- formation in regard to historical sites in the Vermont U.C.C. area which might be of interest to people coming from the Southern Conference on a Heritage Bus Tour from the Carolinas, through Penn- sylvania, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont and on into Canada. Mr. Chamberlain suggested the Newbury church and the two Atkinson homes now owned by the Conference as having over 200 years of early church history, and which should be enjoyable. As a consequence of this correspondence, three Trailways buses left Hickory, N.C., at 6:30 a.m. June 22nd. The first bus arrived in Newbury at 6 p.m. June 23rd, and the occupants had a chance to go into the church, the second oldest Congregational Church in Vermont with beautiful stained glass windows. The original building burned and the present Colonial house of worship was erected in 1856, and then remodeled in 1893. Catering for the evening meal were members of the Women's Fellowship of the church with a great deal of help from the men. During the dinner waiting period guests who wished to see other in- teresting buildings in town were taken for a ride by ushers and shown the Atkinson Home for the Retired, Atkinson Retreat Center, the Methodist Church, Tenney Memorial Library and the D.A.R. Chapter House. After about a three-hour Newbury visit, the group from the South was on its way to Burlington for the night and then on to Canada. Eclipse Grange by JUNE M. STOWELL THETFORD--On June 9, Eclipse Grange did not have a meeting. Thirteen members attended Chelsea Grange for their Pink Sash night. On June 3, several members attended University Grange Youth Night, and on June 15, six members attended Orange County Pomona meeting at Riverside Grange in W. Topsham. On June 23, Eclipse Grange held an open meeting for the presentation of the grange annual Community Citizens Award. W.M. Jane Stowell was in the chair. After the opening of the Bible and presentation of the Flag, the Worthy Master turned the rest of the program over to Lec- turer Annie Boutwell. Before the program began, the Master presented two distinguished guests, National Grange Lecturer Kermit Richardson and Vermont State Grange Secretary Margaret Richardson. For the opening of the program Donald Fifield played several pialo selec- tions of old time songs. Then Mrs. Helen Paige was asked to tell about the two books that she had recently written. They are "Tales of Thetford" and "Memories of the days of Thetford Academy." She gave a very interesting talk, not realizing that she was to be the recipient of the Citizens Award. This was the ploy that was used to be sure that she was at the meeting. The National Lecturer presented her with the cer- tificate and a marble paperweight. The paper- weight has the grange shield in bronze on the surface and a small plaque on the side with her name and the date. She was very surprised. She had been wondering why so many of her family were present, news ' and then she knew. She has three children, nine grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. They were all there with their spouses. There was a total of 32 members of the Paige family present. In all there was 75 people present. Mr. and Mrs. Stott of Milford, Ct. were there and spoke a few words. Many will remember her as Ruthola Sanborn, who grew up in Thetford. For the remainder of the program, Helen Tilden played a piano solo, and the Country Four, led by Ray Uline played several selections. It was real toe tapping music, and everyone enjoyed it. Robert Grosse made a special cake for the occasion. It was made in the shape of a book, with the grange emblem on one side and the name Eclipse and grange number on the other side. Everyone enjoyed refreshments and a social hour at this time. Grace UMC recommends Mead interesting prepared 5, at 8 Bradford Will open with and exciting Major," by by and pianist. will sing Maurice by Janet will German songs in a Kern, Richard 11 be sung d, ac- IS an ex- been talents Bradford. Interior Design and Decorating C, It BEIT[ BOGHOSIAN i|lll Associate of the Music, with Iki and :tom the At Music in the been Choral of three and Upper with New of Ctive in and ..... ii,( ?00Qii!!!i00iiii00/iiii!!00Zii,0000i iii/ Katrina Munn Margaret Smith set in Bradford the Bel Canto Singers, and has beverages, brownies and appeared many times as other bar cookies. Reser- soloist with the Chorus and in rations for the buffet will be the recent combined concert appreciated. witbthe Randolph Singers. The net proceeds from these The buffet to be held prior to two events will go to the North the concert at 6:30 p.m. will Country Chorus to swell the feature beef stroganoff, home- trip-to-England fund. This baked beans, assorted salads, two-week trip is planned for home-made breads, June of 1982. Margaret Davis earns Master's KINGSTON, R.I.--Margaret Professor Warren D. Smith C. Davis of W. Fairlee Center was the commencement has graduated from the speaker. Last year, 2,428 University of Rhode Island degrees wereawarded. with a Master's Degree in Among theadvanceddegree Library Science. recipients were 49 who The university awarded received doctorates. Masters' 2,446 degrees at its 95th degrees were earned by 493 Commencement May 31. URI persons. Jane Rowe earns double degrees W-ELLS RIVER--Jane H. Music degree in piano from Rowe has received degrees in Music and English from Oberlin College in Ohio. Miss Rowe, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Harry M. Rowe and a 1967 graduate of Blue Mountain Union School, received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the Oberlin College of Arts & Sciences, and a Bachelor of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music at recent com- mencement exercises. Miss Rowe studied with Sedmara Rutstein, associate professor of pianoforte. She was a member of the Oberlin College Choir and was active in the First Church in Oberlin during the five years of the double-degree program. Newbm-y student on Dean's List BRUNSWICK, ME.-- scholastic achievement Bawdoin College has an- during the second semester of nounced Elizabeth R. Thomas the 1980-81 academic year. of Newbury has been named to Dean's List honors are the Dean's List on the basis of awarded to students who, during their last semester at n, received grades o or High Honors in al ly graded courses am a all other courses. Oa.b.Os. ,00TCSeS We P, epa*r ACUTRON. TIMEX. and A;I Makes. NORWICH HONORS NORTHFIELD--Two students from Chelsea, Pamela R. Button and Donald R. Maynard, were named to the Dean's List at Norwich University for the second semester of the 1980-81 year, and a Bradford student, John M. Conti, was promoted to corporal. Bowdoin, received grades of Honors or High Honors in all regularly graded courses and credit in all other courses. HAS. K_ELL JEMIflLERS Ltttleton, NH 03561 ) 444-3-151 ,, ' ,,, Boudreau for ministry by VIRGINIABEDELL James Boudreau for the or- BRADFORD--At a special dainedministry. charge conference at the Bishop Hazen Werner was Grace United Methodist present, gavemeresmtsot.me Church June 22, James voting, anacongrammteoMr. Boudreau was recommended Boudreau. Rev. David Giles for the ordained ministry, then congratulated Mr. A special service was Boudreau and called the planned and written by Doris Boudreau family forward Demick and Pat Pratt Rev including Mrs. Boudreau and David Giles, Districi children, Elizabeth and Superintendent of the Ben-James, and also the clergy nington - Troy District, called wl. were pr.esent: ReVchJOh ..^ _... ,^ ...t. vonneth tknlgm, umtcu bilL, . m - -.,..,s ,,, ,,-,., .....  ...... "^-"-o"a tional e unrlst uuBte , Brown, chairman of th ............ '^-t pastor-parish relations r.a,rOurai oer- committee led the service '---?", .v _-o _ . wit. W es.ley theme. ....... The TRtfrc'e"rated urch. -TheBe0000d00tionwa00s.00000000 _. .y .epa. " -"I Met the combined choirs and then Tne senior choir sang . . .......... everyone olned in the vestry Mv aster ace to race  -. .... with James Boudreau as for a recepuon mr James ano soloist, and "Pardon." Vadia Boudreau. The Pastor - Parish Relations committee was in charge of the service and Soloists Joyce Pierson sang "He Touched Me" and Denni Pratt sang "I Found The Answer." Chimes and organ solos were played by Helena Kin- ney. James Boudreau shared his "Statement of Calling" with all who were present. Members of Grace United Methodist Church voted unanimously to recommend reception which was well attended by members and friends of Grace United Methodist Church. FLEA MARKET E. CORINTH--A flea market will be held at the Old Fairgrounds from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. July 9. July I, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 3 Social , Donna Rothenberg wed in S. Corinth S. CORINTH--Donna Lynn New York, Massachusetts, Rothenberg and Allan George and Washington, D.C. at- Savage of Somerville, Mass., tended. were married June 28 at the The bride tteceived a B.A. in   : home o'f Carol and Richard Political Science from  :  ....  Rothenberg, the bride's Grinnell College, Iowa, and a ' : . .... parents, inS. Corinth. M.Ed. with honors in College .... The groom is the son of Counseling from Northeastern   Hannah Assaraf of Wbeaton, University in Boston. She has Md., and the late Herman been counseling college Savage. students and adults in Quincy Rabbi Solomon Goldberg of and Boston, and will be .....  Rutland officiated at the resident adviser at Grinnell ii , outdoor ceremony. Susan Kay College this fall. Rothenberg of Fort The groom received a B.S. Lauderdale, Fla., sister of the in Biology from the University i bride, was maid of honor, of Maryland. He is a chess i Clifford Knapp of Somerville professional, active as a was best man. Guests from player, teacher andjournalist Florida, Maryland, Illinois, Church services at IV. Fairlee W. FAIRLEE--The first from Vermont, and was a Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Ross evening service of the sum- trustee of Dartmouth College. mer at the W. Falrlee Center Niles' papers have been Debra Bk)dgett Church will be conducted July compiled and organized at 5 at 7:30 p.m. by Rev. Gary Dartmouth's Baker Library Wait, pastor of the churches at by Mr. Wait.  weds Ray Ross Thefford Center and Union Organist will be Mrs. Jean Village. Harrison Jersey, who has Mr. Wait is a native of served in this capacity many Schenectady, N.Y., and times in the past few years. WENTWORTH--Debra Patti and Penni Blodgett of received his early education The church is four miles Blodgett, daughter of Robert Wentworth, and Helen Ross of at the State University of New north of Lake Fairlee on and Terry Blodgett, and Manchester. The brides' York at Albany. He prepared Middlebrook Road. All will be Raymond Ross, son of Con- niece, Nickole Lyon of for the ministry at Boston welcome. stance and Eugene Ross of Rumney, was flower girl, University and was for a time The schedule of services and Plymouth, were married June wearing a long blue and white a member of its faculty. Since visiting ministers for the 27 at the Wentworth eyelet gown. coming to this area, he has month of July : Congregational Church. Rev. Douglas Ross of Plymouth shown great interest in July 5 -- Rev. Gary Wait, David Walters, officiated, served as best man. Ushers Nathaniel Niles, an early Union Village and Thetford The bride, given in were Steven Thomas and resident of W. Fairlee Center, Center. marriage by her father, wore Eugene Ross, Jr., of Plymouth who gathered together for July 12 -- Rev. Harold R. a floor-length gown with a and Richard and Scott worship at his home (the Albert, retired, of Post Mills. Queen Ann neckline and Blodgett of Wentworth. Daniel present Elmwood Farm) the ' July 19 -- Rev. John Knight, chantilly lace bodice Day of Thetford was ring first members of the W. First Congregational Church, decorated with seed pearls bearer. Daine Whiston was Fairlee Center Church. M  Bradford., and a matching finger-tip veil. organist. Niles was one of the first two July 26-=. Stephen and Janet She carried a bouquet of Following a reception for representatives to Congress Nelson, Hanover. daisies and yellow roses. 150 at the Wentworth School, Renee Gardener of Wilton, Mr. and Mrs. Ross left for a Ct., was matron of honor. She week,s trip to Prince Edward wore a floor-length blue gown Island. The couple will make with white lace bodice and their home in Wentworth until long lace sleeves. Similarly fall when they will move to the gowned were the bridesmaids, Keenearea. Ambassador addresses Momm00.m School grads VERSHIRE--Speaker at the W. MacNiven Conard, NOW IN PROGRESS 16th graduation exercises ol Director of Te lnain The Mountain School in School, presented the hand- DRESS Vershire Center, June 6 was written and illustrated the Honorable Donald H. diplomas to the seniors: Petterson, United States Thor0as Pym Cope II, of Ambassador to Somalia and Worcester, MA; Joseph Paul SALE the father of one of the Linehan, of Stratford; Julie graduating seniors. Ann Petterson, of Somalia; He spoke o3 the need for and Christine Rowell, of today's citizens to concern Vershire, Vt. They have been themselves with foreigu policy admitted to the University of *29 issues of the United States, California, Santa Cruz; citing the imperatives of Ceorgetown University School survival and economic of Foreign Service; and two to progress, but also the idealism the University of Vermont. which has motivated Joseph Linehan also received '39 and '49 Americans for the past 200 an ROTC Scholarship, the years. Town of Stratford Scholar- Values to $90 In those years Americans, ship, and the Vermont Scholar despite their failings, have Award from the Vermont [[lwllllllll eptimozed freedom and Student Assistance Cor- ]U[ liberty and the notion that poration. there is a higher good that can guide nations as welles in- LEGION MEETING dividuals, hesaid. BRADFORD--A meeting of Petterson emphasized the American Legion Post No. 20 responsibility of everyone to will be held at7:50 p.m. July 7. be informed and to participate in government, and to express themselves on public issues. "You must bear in mind that an apathetic and unin- formed public is the greatest danger to democracy. Our system prospers or declines depending on the degree of interest and participation of DOWNTOWN MALL, LACONIA - ROUTE 25. WENTWORTH Mo,. hu Sat. 9:30-530 ? Oav aWeek 10 O0 6 O0 Thut$ & fr,. t,II 900 the Americanpeople. Youowe lft off it to your country, you owe it U to yourselves, to involve yourselves--and I would hope with some passion--in the issues of our time," he said. , Vt]  DIAMONDS SHEETS and TOWEL Choo From a I..rgo Selection d Colom and Styles Keepsake...  ,, i S!:l The perfee_t way to " LUXOR TOW"rJ.S sh w your love /[ Slightly Irregular Face .......... 3.00 I. Hand .......... 7.00 4.49 Bath ......... 13.00 6.99 ii uN i H ii iiu [ I I ii i i [ iii i i - i10% 10% Select a Keepsake diamond Blankets and ,ngsgement ring to express ](J B Tablecloths rourlove. Keepsake center tiamonds are.guaranteed in writing, forever, for fine white color, correct modern cut and perfect clarity. BEDSPREADS COMFOIWERS Keepsake. The perfect way to show your RF. SALE REG., SALE love, when it's for keeps. 44.00 19.S9 Twin ....... 38.00 19.99 Full 64.00 29.99 Full ....... 48.00 29.99 74.00 39.99 Qun 55.00 39.99  map King ..... 80.00 J. , F. cAitiff S. M er 1 ACCOUNT 9:00 P.M. OuK IA/II DI |'ART/vII NT TCH[ (603) 747-3462 s, 'Oh"'b"'. Vt . " W,V,,,. N T H r Woodsville, N.H. ues Fare by JOANNA GILBRIDE Richard N.H., way to celebrate the holiday is with a featuring fine L a number of have made New July Fourth and special auction some featuring sales and others an eclectic of better antiques Withington will early American CLOCK-- This signed WilIard, is one of items to be off by Richard at HHlsboro, d American Indian the estate of of Mar- The auction Withington's Center, the block -- mahogany bonnet top, HEPPLEWHITE,-- This delicately proportioned sewing table used to have a sewing bag attached un- derneath. It will be sold at auction by Richard Withington in Hillsboro, N.H. Friday. Chippendale curly maple chest-on-chest, Hepplewhite mahogany serpentine front sideboard, Indian headdress, Pomo feather basket, Queen Anne candlesticks, brass whale oil lamps and large and small Chippendale mirrors. This represents just a small sampling of the items to be sold which, incidentally, also include a signed Aaron Willard banjo clock. Closer to home, auctioneers George Clement and Archie Steenburgh will be busy on the Fourth selling sterling, a primitive shaving horse, old flasks, several old maps, a rose carved sofa, old sleds, oak furniture, fancy wicker and other odds and ends. The sale will take place at the Jockey Hill Auction Barn in Landaff, N.H. Further south in Cornish, N.H., auctioneer William A. Smith will swing into action on July 5th with a "regular" house sale that happens to include a harpsicord, an antique telescope, horse- drawn sleigh, six-pedal loom, banquet lamps, Victorian furniture and some early items as well as later custom pieces. Other key auctions are scheduled in Burlington, Vt., and Essex Junction, Vt. Church guests visit Newbul?., VISITORS--A group of 143 guests from North Carolina visit Newbury historic church sites. NEWBURY--After six months or more of com- plicated planning the First Congregational Church (United Church of Christ) at Newbury served as host June 23 to 143 guests who were enjoying a Heritage Bus Tour sponsored by The Commission on Church Life and Leader- ship of the Southern Con- ference, U C.C. Last November, Rev. Wayne Gardner, pastor of the Eure Christian Church in Eure, N.C., wrote to the Rev. Charles G. Chamberlain, Executive Minister of the Vermont Conference, U.C.C. in Burlington, asking for in- formation in regard to historical sites in the Vermont U.C.C. area which might be of interest to people coming from the Southern Conference on a Heritage Bus Tour from the Carolinas, through Penn- sylvania, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont and on into Canada. Mr. Chamberlain suggested the Newbury church and the two Atkinson homes now owned by the Conference as having over 200 years of early church history, and which should be enjoyable. As a consequence of this correspondence, three Trailways buses left Hickory, N.C., at 6:30 a.m. June 22nd. The first bus arrived in Newbury at 6 p.m. June 23rd, and the occupants had a chance to go into the church, the second oldest Congregational Church in Vermont with beautiful stained glass windows. The original building burned and the present Colonial house of worship was erected in 1856, and then remodeled in 1893. Catering for the evening meal were members of the Women's Fellowship of the church with a great deal of help from the men. During the dinner waiting period guests who wished to see other in- teresting buildings in town were taken for a ride by ushers and shown the Atkinson Home for the Retired, Atkinson Retreat Center, the Methodist Church, Tenney Memorial Library and the D.A.R. Chapter House. After about a three-hour Newbury visit, the group from the South was on its way to Burlington for the night and then on to Canada. Eclipse Grange by JUNE M. STOWELL THETFORD--On June 9, Eclipse Grange did not have a meeting. Thirteen members attended Chelsea Grange for their Pink Sash night. On June 3, several members attended University Grange Youth Night, and on June 15, six members attended Orange County Pomona meeting at Riverside Grange in W. Topsham. On June 23, Eclipse Grange held an open meeting for the presentation of the grange annual Community Citizens Award. W.M. Jane Stowell was in the chair. After the opening of the Bible and presentation of the Flag, the Worthy Master turned the rest of the program over to Lec- turer Annie Boutwell. Before the program began, the Master presented two distinguished guests, National Grange Lecturer Kermit Richardson and Vermont State Grange Secretary Margaret Richardson. For the opening of the program Donald Fifield played several pialo selec- tions of old time songs. Then Mrs. Helen Paige was asked to tell about the two books that she had recently written. They are "Tales of Thetford" and "Memories of the days of Thetford Academy." She gave a very interesting talk, not realizing that she was to be the recipient of the Citizens Award. This was the ploy that was used to be sure that she was at the meeting. The National Lecturer presented her with the cer- tificate and a marble paperweight. The paper- weight has the grange shield in bronze on the surface and a small plaque on the side with her name and the date. She was very surprised. She had been wondering why so many of her family were present, news ' and then she knew. She has three children, nine grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. They were all there with their spouses. There was a total of 32 members of the Paige family present. In all there was 75 people present. Mr. and Mrs. Stott of Milford, Ct. were there and spoke a few words. Many will remember her as Ruthola Sanborn, who grew up in Thetford. For the remainder of the program, Helen Tilden played a piano solo, and the Country Four, led by Ray Uline played several selections. It was real toe tapping music, and everyone enjoyed it. Robert Grosse made a special cake for the occasion. It was made in the shape of a book, with the grange emblem on one side and the name Eclipse and grange number on the other side. Everyone enjoyed refreshments and a social hour at this time. Grace UMC recommends Mead interesting prepared 5, at 8 Bradford Will open with and exciting Major," by by and pianist. will sing Maurice by Janet will German songs in a Kern, Richard 11 be sung d, ac- IS an ex- been talents Bradford. Interior Design and Decorating C, It BEIT[ BOGHOSIAN i|lll Associate of the Music, with Iki and :tom the At Music in the been Choral of three and Upper with New of Ctive in and ..... ii,( ?00Qii!!!i00iiii00/iiii!!00Zii,0000i iii/ Katrina Munn Margaret Smith set in Bradford the Bel Canto Singers, and has beverages, brownies and appeared many times as other bar cookies. Reser- soloist with the Chorus and in rations for the buffet will be the recent combined concert appreciated. witbthe Randolph Singers. The net proceeds from these The buffet to be held prior to two events will go to the North the concert at 6:30 p.m. will Country Chorus to swell the feature beef stroganoff, home- trip-to-England fund. This baked beans, assorted salads, two-week trip is planned for home-made breads, June of 1982. Margaret Davis earns Master's KINGSTON, R.I.--Margaret Professor Warren D. Smith C. Davis of W. Fairlee Center was the commencement has graduated from the speaker. Last year, 2,428 University of Rhode Island degrees wereawarded. with a Master's Degree in Among theadvanceddegree Library Science. recipients were 49 who The university awarded received doctorates. Masters' 2,446 degrees at its 95th degrees were earned by 493 Commencement May 31. URI persons. Jane Rowe earns double degrees W-ELLS RIVER--Jane H. Music degree in piano from Rowe has received degrees in Music and English from Oberlin College in Ohio. Miss Rowe, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Harry M. Rowe and a 1967 graduate of Blue Mountain Union School, received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the Oberlin College of Arts & Sciences, and a Bachelor of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music at recent com- mencement exercises. Miss Rowe studied with Sedmara Rutstein, associate professor of pianoforte. She was a member of the Oberlin College Choir and was active in the First Church in Oberlin during the five years of the double-degree program. Newbm-y student on Dean's List BRUNSWICK, ME.-- scholastic achievement Bawdoin College has an- during the second semester of nounced Elizabeth R. Thomas the 1980-81 academic year. of Newbury has been named to Dean's List honors are the Dean's List on the basis of awarded to students who, during their last semester at n, received grades o or High Honors in al ly graded courses am a all other courses. Oa.b.Os. ,00TCSeS We P, epa*r ACUTRON. TIMEX. and A;I Makes. NORWICH HONORS NORTHFIELD--Two students from Chelsea, Pamela R. Button and Donald R. Maynard, were named to the Dean's List at Norwich University for the second semester of the 1980-81 year, and a Bradford student, John M. Conti, was promoted to corporal. Bowdoin, received grades of Honors or High Honors in all regularly graded courses and credit in all other courses. HAS. K_ELL JEMIflLERS Ltttleton, NH 03561 ) 444-3-151 ,, ' ,,, Boudreau for ministry by VIRGINIABEDELL James Boudreau for the or- BRADFORD--At a special dainedministry. charge conference at the Bishop Hazen Werner was Grace United Methodist present, gavemeresmtsot.me Church June 22, James voting, anacongrammteoMr. Boudreau was recommended Boudreau. Rev. David Giles for the ordained ministry, then congratulated Mr. A special service was Boudreau and called the planned and written by Doris Boudreau family forward Demick and Pat Pratt Rev including Mrs. Boudreau and David Giles, Districi children, Elizabeth and Superintendent of the Ben-James, and also the clergy nington - Troy District, called wl. were pr.esent: ReVchJOh ..^ _... ,^ ...t. vonneth tknlgm, umtcu bilL, . m - -.,..,s ,,, ,,-,., .....  ...... "^-"-o"a tional e unrlst uuBte , Brown, chairman of th ............ '^-t pastor-parish relations r.a,rOurai oer- committee led the service '---?", .v _-o _ . wit. W es.ley theme. ....... The TRtfrc'e"rated urch. -TheBe0000d00tionwa00s.00000000 _. .y .epa. " -"I Met the combined choirs and then Tne senior choir sang . . .......... everyone olned in the vestry Mv aster ace to race  -. .... with James Boudreau as for a recepuon mr James ano soloist, and "Pardon." Vadia Boudreau. The Pastor - Parish Relations committee was in charge of the service and Soloists Joyce Pierson sang "He Touched Me" and Denni Pratt sang "I Found The Answer." Chimes and organ solos were played by Helena Kin- ney. James Boudreau shared his "Statement of Calling" with all who were present. Members of Grace United Methodist Church voted unanimously to recommend reception which was well attended by members and friends of Grace United Methodist Church. FLEA MARKET E. CORINTH--A flea market will be held at the Old Fairgrounds from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. July 9. July I, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 3 Social , Donna Rothenberg wed in S. Corinth S. CORINTH--Donna Lynn New York, Massachusetts, Rothenberg and Allan George and Washington, D.C. at- Savage of Somerville, Mass., tended. were married June 28 at the The bride tteceived a B.A. in   : home o'f Carol and Richard Political Science from  :  ....  Rothenberg, the bride's Grinnell College, Iowa, and a ' : . .... parents, inS. Corinth. M.Ed. with honors in College .... The groom is the son of Counseling from Northeastern   Hannah Assaraf of Wbeaton, University in Boston. She has Md., and the late Herman been counseling college Savage. students and adults in Quincy Rabbi Solomon Goldberg of and Boston, and will be .....  Rutland officiated at the resident adviser at Grinnell ii , outdoor ceremony. Susan Kay College this fall. Rothenberg of Fort The groom received a B.S. Lauderdale, Fla., sister of the in Biology from the University i bride, was maid of honor, of Maryland. He is a chess i Clifford Knapp of Somerville professional, active as a was best man. Guests from player, teacher andjournalist Florida, Maryland, Illinois, Church services at IV. Fairlee W. FAIRLEE--The first from Vermont, and was a Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Ross evening service of the sum- trustee of Dartmouth College. mer at the W. Falrlee Center Niles' papers have been Debra Bk)dgett Church will be conducted July compiled and organized at 5 at 7:30 p.m. by Rev. Gary Dartmouth's Baker Library Wait, pastor of the churches at by Mr. Wait.  weds Ray Ross Thefford Center and Union Organist will be Mrs. Jean Village. Harrison Jersey, who has Mr. Wait is a native of served in this capacity many Schenectady, N.Y., and times in the past few years. WENTWORTH--Debra Patti and Penni Blodgett of received his early education The church is four miles Blodgett, daughter of Robert Wentworth, and Helen Ross of at the State University of New north of Lake Fairlee on and Terry Blodgett, and Manchester. The brides' York at Albany. He prepared Middlebrook Road. All will be Raymond Ross, son of Con- niece, Nickole Lyon of for the ministry at Boston welcome. stance and Eugene Ross of Rumney, was flower girl, University and was for a time The schedule of services and Plymouth, were married June wearing a long blue and white a member of its faculty. Since visiting ministers for the 27 at the Wentworth eyelet gown. coming to this area, he has month of July : Congregational Church. Rev. Douglas Ross of Plymouth shown great interest in July 5 -- Rev. Gary Wait, David Walters, officiated, served as best man. Ushers Nathaniel Niles, an early Union Village and Thetford The bride, given in were Steven Thomas and resident of W. Fairlee Center, Center. marriage by her father, wore Eugene Ross, Jr., of Plymouth who gathered together for July 12 -- Rev. Harold R. a floor-length gown with a and Richard and Scott worship at his home (the Albert, retired, of Post Mills. Queen Ann neckline and Blodgett of Wentworth. Daniel present Elmwood Farm) the ' July 19 -- Rev. John Knight, chantilly lace bodice Day of Thetford was ring first members of the W. First Congregational Church, decorated with seed pearls bearer. Daine Whiston was Fairlee Center Church. M  Bradford., and a matching finger-tip veil. organist. Niles was one of the first two July 26-=. Stephen and Janet She carried a bouquet of Following a reception for representatives to Congress Nelson, Hanover. daisies and yellow roses. 150 at the Wentworth School, Renee Gardener of Wilton, Mr. and Mrs. Ross left for a Ct., was matron of honor. She week,s trip to Prince Edward wore a floor-length blue gown Island. The couple will make with white lace bodice and their home in Wentworth until long lace sleeves. Similarly fall when they will move to the gowned were the bridesmaids, Keenearea. Ambassador addresses Momm00.m School grads VERSHIRE--Speaker at the W. MacNiven Conard, NOW IN PROGRESS 16th graduation exercises ol Director of Te lnain The Mountain School in School, presented the hand- DRESS Vershire Center, June 6 was written and illustrated the Honorable Donald H. diplomas to the seniors: Petterson, United States Thor0as Pym Cope II, of Ambassador to Somalia and Worcester, MA; Joseph Paul SALE the father of one of the Linehan, of Stratford; Julie graduating seniors. Ann Petterson, of Somalia; He spoke o3 the need for and Christine Rowell, of today's citizens to concern Vershire, Vt. They have been themselves with foreigu policy admitted to the University of *29 issues of the United States, California, Santa Cruz; citing the imperatives of Ceorgetown University School survival and economic of Foreign Service; and two to progress, but also the idealism the University of Vermont. which has motivated Joseph Linehan also received '39 and '49 Americans for the past 200 an ROTC Scholarship, the years. Town of Stratford Scholar- Values to $90 In those years Americans, ship, and the Vermont Scholar despite their failings, have Award from the Vermont [[lwllllllll eptimozed freedom and Student Assistance Cor- ]U[ liberty and the notion that poration. there is a higher good that can guide nations as welles in- LEGION MEETING dividuals, hesaid. BRADFORD--A meeting of Petterson emphasized the American Legion Post No. 20 responsibility of everyone to will be held at7:50 p.m. July 7. be informed and to participate in government, and to express themselves on public issues. "You must bear in mind that an apathetic and unin- formed public is the greatest danger to democracy. Our system prospers or declines depending on the degree of interest and participation of DOWNTOWN MALL, LACONIA - ROUTE 25. WENTWORTH Mo,. hu Sat. 9:30-530 ? Oav aWeek 10 O0 6 O0 Thut$ & fr,. t,II 900 the Americanpeople. 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