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July 1, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-July 1, 1981 EAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Robert F. Hum|nski President & Publisher Bradford i "  Woodsville 802-Z22-5Zgl o. ; 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper .... Editorial I iii ' Mem' In this week's column, I want to sum- marize the low flying jet fighter plane fuss that we have heard so much about during the spring months. As you know, I took an out-front role with this based on my feeling that there is another place where fighter jets can do their training other than our White Mountains during the tourist season at 100 feet fron--dhe ground. The decision is now in the hands of the Federal Aviation Administration. If they base their decision on what the people in this area of New Hampshire have said they should decide against this request by the U.S. Air Force. Frankly, the best place for these training flights to take place is at Camp Drum, N.Y• which is already equipped to handle these type of flights from a very large air base. Reasonable people agreed throughout the meetings that the military should have a place to conduct their training, but not the mountains of New " Hampshire at 300 miles an hour and 100 above the ground. You may have noted that after many of us "locals" raised our objections, others, Sen. Rudman, and Governor Gallen have joined in suggesting that there are other places for these training missions to take place• I have forwarded copies of letters, a petition signed by many people in Sand- wich, and other documents to Governor Gailen, Senators Rudman and Humphrey, and Congressmen D'Amours and Gregg and the Federal Aviation Administration• If any readers of this column would like to make their thoughts known they should write to: Robert Wittington, Director, When they buried Remembrance L. Martin in Bradford yesterday, they buried a Vermont tradition and a Bradford-Piermont institution. Martin, like his father before him, was a police officer, serving many years as police chid in Bradford and Piermont and as an Orange County deputy sheriff. But Martin was much more than a policeman. The mark of his hand will remain for many years on numerous buildings, bridges and public works projects on which he worked as a private contractor for decades. "Mere" Martin was a Vermonter through and through. Even the first name, Remembrance, rings with Vermont history and tradition when parents named their children after was young and .he did farm chores nights and mornings so he could go to school. He served his country for three years during World War II, using his considerable construction skills to build docks and bridges, a vital wartime service. Martin's health was obviously failing in recent years but he didn't say much about it and he kept going at his police duties in Bradford and Piermont, although his Bradford duties were reduced. "He was stubborn," says Welch. Those who did not know Martin well, or who moved to the Upper Valley in more recent years, probably are not aware of his many con- tributions in public service and as a builder. Martin himself wasn't one to Sign .your letters Federal Aviation Administration, New England Region, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, Mass. 01803. Phone (617) 273-7244. I spoke with Mr. Wittington on June 25, 1981. He tells me that it will he another 4 to 5 weeks before the entire package will be on his desk and then his job will only he to decide on the safety of the air space. I believe there is a time and place for everything. The place and time for these low level training missions is at Camp Drum or at a regular military operations base and not in our mountains 100 feet above the ground during our tourist season. This week I want to pay special tribute to Mildred Beech of Wolfeboro who received the first award of the Mildred Beech Tourism of the Year award. This is a New Hampshire citizen who has done much to promote and foster good tourism here in our state and New England area. A few dates and events coming up that I will he participating in are July 4th, Parade in Woodsville 11 a.m.; parade in Lancaster 2 p.m.; barheque for New Hampshire Music Festival in Center Harbor at 5 p.m.; July 8th Annual Meeting of the North Country Council in Bretton Woods; July 9th Annual Meeting of the New Hampshire Environmental Law Council; July llth is the Annual here at my place in Bath at 6 p.m.; July 15th Governer and Council Meeting 10 a.m., State House; July 20th Tour unincorporated Towns in Coos County. EDITORS' NOTE: The Journal Opinion recently received a letter commenting on events at Bear Ridge Speedway and signed "Sick and Tired." It is the policy of this newspaper that only letters signed with a name and address, and a phone number if possible, will be published. This policy is based on a sense of fairness both to those who might be mentioned in a letter, and to the letter writer. If a letter is worth writing, it is worth putting your name to it. The Journal Opinion also reserves the right to edit or decline publication of letters that might he in bad taste, or contain libelous material. Under certain mitigating circumstances, a letter may he published with the writer's name withheld on request, but the editors must know the letter writer's identity. E. Bertram Pike Edwin's son Bertram from the city and took over as head salesman of the corn- the virtues--Patience, Charity, talk much about his ac- pany. He is credited with grew with the business, and by comllishments Imilding the company into the the time his father died in . r----- .........  , X r as lread the .................................... ......... ....  ) ..... .  ......  . Y ...... :: good01d' t "He .mt .  ..... s' pres| , ten different technique of knowing what could man, he had a job to do, " said Welch. Alonzo died in1891, Edwin was companies, including Pike cause problems, because of his ex- "It's sad that the last year*of his life his naturalsuccessor. Manufacturing, and was a As the business grew, the man of wide interests and should be marked with so much tragedy." " But there will be many who will remember Martin's major cow tributions to the area over seven dacades since his birth in Bradford in 1910. "He had deteriorated in recent years, but so are you and I going to deteriorate," Welch commented. Martin and his work will stand on their own merits as a tradition of Vermont and the Upper Valley--hard work, service to others, and com- passion, along with stubborn pride. Or as Don Welch put it: -- 'Tll tell you, ho was quite a guy." perience," said K. Donald Welch, Bradford trustee and former water commissioner who was associated with Martin for many years. As a policeman, some thought Martin too lenient with young people. Instead of turning them in for violations, he more often scolded them and let them goso they wouldn't bear a police record for the rest of their lives. As one young person in Bradford said, "Thank God he was here." Perhaps Martin's leniency was a legacy of his own none too soft life as a youngster, His mother died when he Fama00 va/00e, and whmtones village of Pike developed around the nucleus of a new factory, offices, store, boardinghouses, and railroad station. As the dynamic head of the company and new patriarch of the Pike family, Edwin quickly developed a reputation as a tyrant dominating the entire com- munity. Patrolling the village on his horse, Rex, Edwin would pound on the doors of the homes and make sure that everything was in order inside -- any deficiency prompting the delivery of a lengthy moral lecture. He would always sniff for the telltale odor of kerosene, which the residents might have used for starting fires in their stoves-- Edwin was death against it because of the hazard to the whole village. As the crowning touch, Edwin decreed that every house in the village must be painted yellow and white, symbolizing sunshine and purity. Edwin's position in the village wa clearly stated when he said, "I am the man and I am the boss." Exer- cising his omnipotence, he would fire a man in the morning and rehire him in the afternoon. However, there was another side to his paternalistic position, as reflected by his generosity on Fourth of July celebrations. He directed his carpenters to build scats on lumber wagons, enough to accommodate 100 people, then took all the children in Pike to the Fourth of July celebration in Newbury. In addition to this free outing, he gave each of them 50 cents spending money. influence. During his reign, Pike Manufacturing reached its peak in assets, income, and employees, although Ber- tram's time, attention, and money were often distracted and diverted by other en- terprises, such as the White Mountain Forest, the establishment of the tuber- culosis sanitarium at Glen- cliff, and the development of the Lake Tarleton Club. Bertram Pike is remembered by many people for private acts of generosity. Reminiscences Fred Page of Haverhill says that when he worked as secretary for Bertram Pike, there were so many different enterprises being handled that it was quite a proposition just • making sure a letter went onto the right letterhead, whether it was for Pike Manufac- turing, the Moosilauke Lumber and Bobbin Mill, the Pike and Lavoie Bobbin Mill in Glenc]iff, the Lake Tarleton Club, or any of a dozen others. Pike Manufacturing had worldwide markets, especially in .Germany, and their old catalogs are printed in a variety of languages. They also had farflung sources of whetstone material, such as a quarry in Brownington, Vermont and others in Arkansas, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Nova Scotia, England, Germany, Belgium, Scotland, and Turkey. Marguerite Eichorn, Fred Page, Ellis Hall, Louis Pike (a third cousin of Bertram Pike) and others have many recollections of the old days in (please turn to page 9) WedneMlay, July 1 WELLS RIVER: Blue Mountain Union School Board, 7:30 E "m" WBURY: Village trustees, 7:30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Friday, July 3 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2 p.m• Monday, July 6 HAVERHILL: Selectmen, 7 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen, 7 p.m. BATH: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 7 GROTON: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 8 FAIRLEE: Planning meeting 7: 30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: WoodsvUle Improvement Corp., 7:30 p.m• HAVERHILL: Haverhill Cooperative School Board, 7:30 p.m. People in the village of One of Mr. Pike's first him a great many suits• After Pike remember when it was a mills was on the Oliverian putting him to much trouble, busy place, thriving on the Brook, about a mile northwest he turned to the clerk and prosperity of the Pike of the present village of Pike. said: 'You have seen my Manufacturing Company, It was behind the present money, and I have seen your which was at one time the summer home of RohertBord clothes; good-day.' The suit world's largest manufacturer of Hartford, Connecticut, and was bought at another store," of natural whetstones. The across the road from Robert Although Mr. Pike's Pike name came from the Foote'sbouse. finances occasionally reached family who developed the Isaac Pike was a man of a tangled condition, healways industry and the village, many enterprises, engaging paid his debts, and was noted In 1821, Person Noyes of also in farming, lumbering, for his generosity in many East Haverhill, while wood andstorekeeping, lnthecarly enterprises, including chopping nearby in Piermont, days he rafted large quantities donating the ground on which picked up a piece of stone with of logs and lumber down the the East Haverhill church was which he attempted to whet Connecticut River to Hart- built. his axe. The stone gave such ford, later sending his AlouzoPike good results that he gathered whetstones downriver the Isaac's son Alonzo, an several pieces from a nearby same way• Child's Gruftou enterprising young man, ledge, broke them into rough County Gazetteer tells about bought out his father's store in sythestone shape, and sold an incident on one of his trips Haverhill at the age of 18, and some of them to neighboring downcountry: carried on the business farmers• "After selling his lumber himself. When his father died in Hartford, he went to a three years later in 1860, the Isaac Pike clothing store to refit himself family persuaded Alonzo to Six years later Mr. Noyes with a new suit of clothes. His abandon his plans for a big- died and his widow married appearance was net very city business career and to Isaac Pike.AmongMr. Noyes' assuring, as he had lost bis take over the family's belongings, Mr. Pike found hat, and his clothes were whetstone business and put it one of these sharpening rather the worse for wear, and on a more secure basis. stones, inquired its origin, the clerk who was in charge of Through his efforts it bought the mining rights to a the store was not disposed to developed greatly and was large area of mica schist sell him a suRofciothesuntil incorporated as the Pike where the stone had been he was satisfied that he had Manufacturing Company. found, and went into business the money to pay for it. Mr. Edwin Pike making "Indian Pond, Pike drew out his money, and At the request of Alonzo, Sythestones". then allowed the clerk to show brother Edwin came home Proposed dump in Bradford t Letters to the Ed Turn the land00dl question down have tried to keep it respec- table on our premises. We have luckily kept our taxes paid and have had some scarry days and nights because of the Waits River going over its hanks, but this was an act of God which he saw us through• But for a human being to he so deliberate to hurt and upset people is not reasonable. I was feeling real good and happy that so many people were concerned over the dump situation. Everyone says, "I thought it was all settled." So did I. Now after the meeting and voting Mr. Limlaw still puts a bid in for a landfill across the road. Why does he want it here in a residential spot? What's wrong with putting one in his own town? There is plenty of open space in Waits River where he lives. So, why doesn't he put it there on some of his families property. I'll bet they don't want to put up with the smell and rats and mess either. Also, just think of the traffic situation. It's a regular race track through here now. With traffic through to Barre plus local, now add trucks from Bradford plus Waits River, To the Editor: I feel that I must voice my welcome their business close opinion, to home. It seems as if no one is really Visualize a roadway that aware of what Limiaw intends has towns drawing beth ways to do to our small community, to a dump, (even though it is If we all just sit back and wait the law to cover trucks, it is for someone else to do not always done)garbage is something, it will be too late strewn the entire length of the and once installed, a dump route and is blown all over the can never be "undone", not at place. Is this what you want? least in our lifetime. Please, everyone that un- Ours is a very modest little center, everyone working hard and trying the best way we can to meet expenses, not the least of them being taxes. In the back of our minds is the comforting thought that at least we are accruing equity in our homes and taxes become bearable. If this dump gets TotheEditor: East Corinth and the Top- contend I don't know if I can put into shams' it won't be safe as it is fishing words that will let anyone  new. a large know just how 1 feel, but I am We walk alot and we have to into it from going to try! Milton and I he very careful. And I have where three bought our home in 1951. We been told by more than three empty into real estate dealers that I'm sure, property values will lower, drainage will Not just ours but alot of others with our wells. ', on this road. So, if this landfill to the is allowed in this residential turn area, who knows what some of the rest of you may have to derstands our concern, or has any interest in our problem, come with us to the meeting on July 9 at the Old Bradford Academy building and help us put a final end to this ridiculous proposal. If we don't stand together now, we are all going to be picking up garbage alone. Our 00Rlver What00 being You will recall that in ioo--king at the issued by the N.H. Office of State Planning that portion dealing with flooding and had the problems of preserving natural unforseen results of the National Flood New Hampshire also used the A-95 projec to discourage inappropriate development in is a federally required review of volving public financing by the Regional (in northern N.H. the North Country State Planning. Note though the "discourage". This is the limit of A-95. A "Reach" the comment that in-as-much as the N.H. Board has nominal authority over owned dams, it supplements the Corps spection program and where necessary to owners. The owner in turn .two years in which to comply. While this reasonable from a financial standpoint, there! feel that a lot can happen in two years. Until recently flood studies, indeed all floodi overlooked the effects of ice jamming. of the most serious.trouble in recent years. just completed a report entitled "Historic Ice in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont". communities in the upper basin to remains trouble spots can be dealt with. Since specific a general policy may not prove probability individual communities will couraged to develop their own solutions. As an approach to keeping natural floodplains in general clear General Court passed an agricultural lands by means of which development rights to lands are bought by the state while the private hands• This is most the o attractive approach to the problem, but have begun, continued funding In addition to the he made so attractive that such land use ""highest and best" use in the classic ok'd--you bet our homes will decrease in valtte!l Who in their right mind would want to own property very near a dump that will accommodate several towns? Not me and not you. It seems ironic that within Unborn child To the Editor: "Hello, who are you?" the last few months our asked the Angel of Light to the community has been child. reassessed for taxes, making "Who am I? I don't know," our taxes higher, had a new said the child. "Who do you section of highway con- think I am?" structed, making the road by "You are your mother and our homes a "mini dragstrip" father's conscience," said the and now it is adding insult to Angel. injury to even consider "Where are my mother and adopting a dirty dumpsite to father?" asked the child• our midst• "They are on Planet Earth I'm sure that Limlaw has at their wit's end. They are so many acres of land better busy talking and being suited for a dump in his own liberated that they can't take town of Waits River, and if time to reason," said the money is the most important Angel. factor to him, as I'm sure it is, "Do I have any brothers and he and his family should (ptease turn to page 5) , Jessie Gilman Planning Offices of both New Bradford, Vt.  agreed tothe ' '  the Valley• Involved in the process are both Agriculture, both states, the regional community. At issue will be land economic potential, production levels, employment levels and eventually of alternatives to the mono-culture farming in favor of something more in nutritional needs of the area. The "Reach" naturally regarded the hazardous waste management as critical disposal iqvariably impacts water shire drafted a Solid Waste ManagemenZ public meetings during this past spring throughout the state, it identified 14 impoundmant sites" in threats to local water quality. In addition the Governor's Hazardous has developed a variety of of hazardous waste management, including ' plan. It remains to he seen how much of With in Concord, I dispair of seeing management in my lifetime. To go on, the Status report responds .... mendations by listing the conclusions Policy Commission. These are in a sense dress all the usual problems sensibly Commission could not do was to fund doubt that the Legislature will water related programs than its In a like vein the UNH Water Resource has come through with an program--six major categories supply, resources and ecology, dissemination and technology transfer. Concord has in mind for the University, The Report concludes with a couple Water Resources Board on three management of state owned dams on them. determine the best programs of best satisfy the recreational, eaergy and the people downstream. The Corps a "Predictive Model For Low Water pshire". Low flow is in a sense the represents "all we're going to we want". The study should help tc and cannot expect of our available water. At the beginning of this commentary I Status Report contained information • . , 9 remarkable, encouraging and disturbing can see why I used these particular remarkable because until I real idea of hew much work had thoroughly. It is encouraging because agency staff who know their jobs and They are on top of the But it is nevertheless disturbing on thing, most of the foregoing is on paper, ! Much of it will probably remain there. available or will be withheld. many elected officials; it flies in the conventional wisdom, it often economic or political disapproval, in areas little understood by stitutionally simpler to respond for them. I find itdisturbing leadership we lack the will to decisions that turn plan into :address the future where the floods lakes and unsafe waters hide. Yet this leave our children. Perhaps it was best summed up specialist who said "by the time we do, it will he too late to do anything." (The foregoing has been a synopsis "Basin Status Report" produced Ofllee o state Planning, at the River Basin Program. No other state such a response. Several Vermont statements on that state's pesltlou in notes were made. MONEY SENSE Credit Unions There is a growing star on the financial horizon. It's been with us a good many years but with the advent of high in- terest rates on loans and the escalating service charges on other bank services, this form of financial institution is coming into its own to serve the less capital-intensive needs of the consumer. This organization is called a credit union. An institution that, until a few years ago, would not have caused banks any great concern, is now making many a banker look over his shoulder at some of the inroads the credit union is making into traditional banking services. The commercial banking industry fought long and loud when savings banks introduced the Negotiable Order of With- drawal (NOW accounts), but have been relatively quiet since credit unions began issuing share drafts, which is nothing more than a checking account. It is possible the banks have not joined in battle at this time because the greater threat, involving larger sums of deposit money, is not coming from the share draft of credit unions but from the intense com- petition being provided by the major money market funds. It has always been surprising to me that more credit unions have not been formed. Under state law, "Credit union organization shall be limited to groups having a common bond .... ". To me, the "Common bond" provision has always been the most fascinating because it provides such a great potential for each community, regardless of its size, to have at least one credit union; thus assuring the citizens of that community the opportunity to participate in a program of lower cost personal loans. The "common BOND" provision provides for the for- mation of a credit union, "... to groups within a well-defined neighborhood, community or rural district . . ." This provision covers a great amount of territory. In the state of Vermont, for example, the Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, under certain provisions, will make available on request a form of Articles of Association and a form of model by-laws. The organization of a credit union, its operation and the simplicity of the laws that govern its day- to-day functions are relatively uncomplicated in respect to today's cluttered regulations governing other types of financial institutions. Deposits are protected, as insurance for savings in most credit unions is provided by the National Credit Union Administration. The credit union can not and was never intended to replace conventional sources of financing such as commercial or savings banks. But for many people they are a viable alternative and are worth exploring. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-July 1, 1981 EAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of * Journal | Opinion dllum# $1.M. Robert F. Hum|nski President & Publisher Bradford i "  Woodsville 802-222-5281 Jo. " 603-747-2016 s.£p An Independent Newspaper .... Editorial I iii ' Mem' In this week's column, I want to sum- marize the low flying jet fighter plane fuss that we have heard so much about during the spring months. As you know, I took an out-front role with this based on my feeling that there is another place where fighter jets can do their training other than our White Mountains during the tourist season at 100 feet frormthe ground. The decision is now in the hands of the Federal Aviation Administration. If they base their decision on what the people in this area of New Hampshire have said they should decide against this request by the U.S. Air Force. Frankly, the best place for these training flights to take place is at Camp Drum, N.Y• which is already equipped to handle these type of flights from a very large air base. Reasonable people agreed throughout the meetings that the military should have a place to conduct their training, but not the mountains of New " Hampshire at 300 miles an hour and 100 above the ground. You may have noted that after many of us "locals" raised our objections, others, Sen. Rudman, and Governor Gallen have joined in suggesting that there are other places for these training missions to take place• I have forwarded copies of letters, a petition signed by many people in Sand- wich, and other documents to Governor Gailen, Senators Rudman and Humphrey, and Congressmen D'Amours and Gregg and the Federal Aviation Administration• If any readers of this column would like to make their thoughts known they should write to: Robert Wittington, Director, When they buried Remembrance L. Martin in Bradford yesterday, they buried a Vermont tradition and a Bradford-Piermont institution. Martin, like his father before him, was a police officer, serving many years as police chief in Bradford and Piermont and as an Orange County deputy sheriff. But Martin was much more than a policeman. The mark of his hand will remain for many years on numerous buildings, bridges and public works projects on which he worked as a private contractor for decades. "Mere" Martin was a Vermonter through and through. Even the first name, Remembrance, rings with Vermont history and tradition when parents named their children after was young and .he did farm chores nights and mornings so he could go to school. He served his country for three years during World War II, using his considerable construction skills to build docks and bridges, a vital wartime service. Martin's health was obviously failing in recent years but he didn't say much about it and he kept going at his police duties in Bradford and Piermont, although his Bradford duties were reduced. "He was stubborn," says Welch. Those who did not know Martin well, or who moved to the Upper Valley in more recent years, probably are not aware of his many con- tributions in public service and as a builder. Martin himself wasn't one to Sign .your letters Federal Aviation Administration, New England Region, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, Mass. 01803. Phone (617) 273-7244. I spoke with Mr. Wittington on June 25, 1981. He tells me that it will he another 4 to 5 weeks before the entire package will be on his desk and then his job will only he to decide on the safety of the air space. I believe there is a time and place for everything. The place and time for these low level training missions is at Camp Drum or at a regular military operations base and not in our mountains 100 feet above the ground during our tourist season. This week I want to pay special tribute to Mildred Beech of Wolfeboro who received the first award of the Mildred Beech Tourism of the Year award. This is a New Hampshire citizen who has done much to promote and foster good tourism here in our state and New England area. A few dates and events coming up that I will he participating in are July 4th, Parade in Woodsville 11 a.m.; parade in Lancaster 2 p.m.; barheque for New Hampshire Music Festival in Center Harbor at 5 p.m.; July 8th Annual Meeting of the North Country Council in Bretton Woods; July 9th Annual Meeting of the New Hampshire Environmental Law Council; July llth is the Annual here at my place in Bath at 6 p.m.; July 15th Governer and Council Meeting 10 a.m., State House; July 20th Tour unincorporated Towns in Coos County. EDITORS' NOTE: The Journal Opinion recently received a letter commenting on events at Bear Ridge Speedway and signed "Sick and Tired." It is the policy of this newspaper that only letters signed with a name and address, and a phone number if possible, will be published. This policy is based on a sense of fairness both to those who might be mentioned in a letter, and to the letter writer. If a letter is worth writing, it is worth putting your name to it. The Journal Opinion also reserves the right to edit or decline publication of letters that might he in bad taste, or contain libelous material. Under certain mitigating circumstances, a letter may he published with the writer's name withheld on request, but the editors must know the letter writer's identity. E. Bertram Pike Edwin's son Bertram from the city and took over as head salesman of the corn- the virtues--Patience, Charity, talk much about his ac- pany. He is credited with grew with the business, and by comllishments building the company into the the time his father died in . r--- .........  , X r as lread the .................................... ......... ....  ) ..... .  ......  . Y ...... : goodtOld' t '*He ,li*t ,  ..... s pres| , ten 'different technique of knowing what could man, he had a job to do, " said Welch. Alonzo died in lS9i, Edwin was companies, including Pike cause problems, because of his ex- "It's sad that the last year*of his life his naturalsuccessor. Manufacturing, and was a As the business grew, the man of wide interests and should be marked with so much tragedy." " But there will be many who will remember Martin's major cow tributions to the area over seven dacades since his birth in Bradford in 1910. "He had deteriorated in recent years, but so are you and I going to deteriorate," Welch commented. Martin and his work will stand on their own merits as a tradition of Vermont and the Upper Valley--hard work, service to others, and com- passion, along with stubborn pride. Or as Don Welch put it: -- 'Tll tell you, ho was quite a guy." perience," said K. Donald Welch, Bradford trustee and former water commissioner who was associated with Martin for many years. As a policeman, some thought Martin too lenient with young people. Instead of turning them in for violations, he more often scolded them and let them goso they wouldn't bear a police record for the rest of their lives. As one young person in Bradford said, "Thank God he was here." Perhaps Martin's leniency was a legacy of his own none too soft life as a youngster, His mother died when he Fam/(00 and whet, topes village of Pike developed around the nucleus of a new factory, offices, store, boardinghouses, and railroad station. As the dynamic head of the company and new patriarch of the Pike family, Edwin quickly developed a reputation as a tyrant dominating the entire com- munity. Patrolling the village on his horse, Rex, Edwin would pound on the doors of the homes and make sure that everything was in order inside -- any deficiency prompting the delivery of a lengthy moral lecture. He would always sniff for the telltale odor of kerosene, which the residents might have used for starting fires in their stoves-- Edwin was death against it because of the hazard to the whole village. As the crowning touch, Edwin decreed that every house in the village must be painted yellow and white, symbolizing sunshine and purity. Edwin's position in the village wa clearly stated when he said, "I am the man and I am the boss." Exer- cising his omnipotence, he would fire a man in the morning and rehire him in the afternoon. However, there was another side to his paternalistic position, as reflected by his generosity on Fourth of July celebrations. He directed his carpenters to build scats on lumber wagons, enough to accommodate 100 people, then took all the children in Pike to the Fourth of July celebration in Newbury. In addition to this free outing, he gave each of them 50 cents spending money. influence. During his reign, Pike Manufacturing reached its peak in assets, income, and employees, although Ber- tram's time, attention, and money were often distracted and diverted by other en- terprises, such as the White Mountain Forest, the establishment of the tuber- culosis sanitarium at Glen- cliff, and the development of the Lake Tarleton Club. Bertram Pike is remembered by many people for private acts of generosity. Reminiscences Fred Page of Haverhill says that when he worked as secretary for Bertram Pike, there were so many different enterprises being handled that it was quite a proposition just • making sure a letter went onto the right letterhead, whether it was for Pike Manufac- turing, the Moosilauke Lumber and Bobbin Mill, the Pike and Lavoie Bobbin Mill in Glenc]iff, the Lake Tarleton Club, or any of a dozen others. Pike Manufacturing had worldwide markets, especially in .Germany, and their old catalogs are printed in a variety of languages. They also had farflung sources of whetstone material, such as a quarry in Brownington, Vermont and others in Arkansas, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Nova Scotia, England, Germany, Belgium, Scotland, and Turkey. Marguerite Eichorn, Fred Page, Ellis Hall, Louis Pike (a third cousin of Bertram Pike) and others have many recollections of the old days in (please turn to page 9) Wednesday, July 1 WELLS RIVER: Blue Mountain Union School Board, 7:30 E "m" WBURY: Village trustees, 7:30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Friday, July 3 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2 p.m. Monday, July 6 HAVERHILL: Selectmen, 7 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8 p.m. THETFORD: Selectmen, 7 p.m. BATH: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 7 GROTON: Selectmen, 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 8 FAIRLEE: Planning meeting 7: 30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: WoodsvUle Improvement Corp., 7:30 p.m• HAVERHILL: Haverhill Cooperative School Board, 7:30 p.m. People in the village of One of Mr. Pike's first him a great many suits• After Pike remember when it was a mills was on the Oliverian putting him to much trouble, busy place, thriving on the Brook, about a mile northwest he turned to the clerk and prosperity of the Pike of the present village of Pike. said: 'You have seen my Manufacturing Company, It was behind the present money, and 1 have seen your which was at one time the summer home of RobertBord clothes; good-day.' The suit world's largest manufacturer of Hartford, Connecticut, and was bought at another store," of natural whetstones. The across the road from Robert Although Mr. Pike's Pike name came from the Foote'shouse. finances occasionally reached family who developed the Isaac Pike was a man of a tangled condition, healways industry and the village, many enterprises, engaging paid his debts, and was noted In 1821, Person Noyes of also in farming, lumbering, for his generosity in many East Haverhill, while wood andstorekeeping, lnthecarly enterprises, including chopping nearby in Piermont, days he rafted large quantities donating the ground on which picked up a piece of stone with of logs and lumber down the the East Haverhill church was which he attempted to whet Connecticut River to Hart- built. his axe. The stone gave such ford, later sending his AlouaoPike good results that he gathered whetstones downriver the Isaac's son Alonzo, an several pieces from a nearby same way• Child's Gruftou enterprising young man, ledge, broke them into rough County Gazetteer tells about bought out his father's store in sythestone shape, and sold an incident on one of his trips Haverhill at the age of 18, and some of them to neighboring downcountry: carried on the business farmers• "After selling his lumber himself. When his father died in Hartford, he went to a three years later in 1860, the Isaac Pike clothing store to refit himself family persuaded Alonzo to Six years later Mr. Noyes with a new suit of clothes. His abandon his plans for a big- died and his widow married appearance was not very city business career and to isaac Pike.AmongMr. Noyes' assuring, as he had lost bis take over the family's belongings, Mr. Pike found hat, and his clothes were whetstone business and put it one of these sharpening rather the worse for wear, and on a more secure basis. stones, inquired its origin, the clerk who was in charge of Through his efforts it bought the mining rights to a the store was not disposed to developed greatly and was large area of mica schist sell him a sult of clothes until incorporated as the Pike where the stone had been he was satisfied that he had Manufacturing Company. found, and went into business the money to pay for it. Mr. Edwin Pike making "Indian Pond. Pike drew out his money, and At the request of Alonzo, Sythestones". then allowed the clerk to show brother Edwin came home Proposed dump in Bradford t Letters to the Ed Turn the landflU question down have tried to keep it respec- table on our premises. We have luckily kept our taxes paid and have had some scarry days and nights because of the Waits River going over its hanks, but this was an act of God which he saw us through• But for a human being to he so deliberate to hurt and upset people is not reasonable. I was feeling real good and happy that so many people were concerned over the dump situation. Everyone says, "I thought it was all settled." So did I. Now after the meeting and voting Mr. Limlaw still puts a bid in for a landfill across the road. Why does he want it here in a residential spot? What's wrong with putting one in his own town? There is plenty of open space in Waits River where he lives. So, why doesn't he put it there on some of his families property• I'll bet they don't want to put up with the smell and rats and mess either. Also, just think of the traffic situation. It's a regular race track through here now. With traffic through to Barre plus local, now add trucks from Bradford plus Waits River, To the Editor: I feel that I must voice my welcome their business close opinion, to home. It seems as if no one is really Visualize a roadway that aware of what Limiaw intends has towns drawing beth ways to do to our small community, to a dump, (even though it is If we all just sit back and wait the law to cover trucks, it is for someone else to do not always done)garbage is something, it will be too late strewn the entire length of the and once installed, a dump route and is blown all over the can never be "undone", not at place. Is this what you want? least in our lifetime. Please, everyone that un- Ours is a very modest little center, everyone working hard and trying the best way we can to meet expenses, not the least of them being taxes. In the back of our minds is the comforting thought that at least we are accruing equity in our homes and taxes become bearable. If this dump gets TotheEditor: East Corinth and the Top- contend I don't know if I can put into shams' it won't be safe as it is fishing words that will let anyone  now. a large know just how 1 feel, but I am We walk alot and we have to into it from going to try! Milton and I he very careful. And I have where three bought our home in 1951. We been told by more than three empty into real estate dealers that I'm sure, property values will lower, drainage will Not just ours but alot of others with our wells. ', on this road. So, if this landfill to the is allowed in this residential turn area, who knows what some of the rest of you may have to derstands our concera, or has any interest in our problem, come with us to the meeting on July 9 at the Old Bradford Academy building and help us put a final end to this ridiculous proposal. If we don't stand together now, we are all going to be picking up garbage alone. Our 00Rlver What00 being You will recall that in ioo--king at the issued by the N.H. Office of State Planning that portion dealing with flooding and had the problems of preserving natural unforseen results of the National Flood New Hampshire also used the A-95 projec to discourage inappropriate development in is a federally required review of volving public financing by the Regional (in northern N.H. the North Country State Planning. Note though the "discourage". This is the limit of A-95. A "Reach" the comment that in-as-much as the N.H. Board has nominal authority over owned dams, it supplements the Corps spection program and where necessary to owners. The owner in turn two years in which to comply. While this reasonable from a financial standpoint, there! feel that a lot can happen in two years. Until recently flood studies, indeed all floodi overlooked the effects of ice jamming. of the most serious,trouble in recent years. just completed a report entitled "Historic Ice in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont". communities in the upper basin to remains trouble spots can be dealt with. Since specific a general policy may not prove probability individual communities will couraged to develop their own solutions. As an approach to keeping natural floodplains in general clear General Court passed an agricultural lands by means of which development rights to lands are bought by the state while the private hands• This is most the on attractive approach to the problem, but have begun, continued funding In addition to the he made so attractive that such land use ""highest and best" use in the classic ok'd--you bet our homes will decrease in valtte!l Who in their right mind would want to own property very near a dump that will accommodate several towns? Not me and not you• It seems ironic that within Unborn child To the Editor: "Hello, who are you?" the last few months our asked the Angel of Light to the community has been child. reassessed for taxes, making "Who am I? I don't know," our taxes higher, had a new said the child. "Who do you section of highway con- think I am?" structed, making the road by "You are your mother and our homes a "mini dragstrip" father's conscience," said the and now it is adding insult to Angel. injury to even consider "Where are my mother and adopting a dirty dumpsite to father?" asked the child• our midst• "They are on Planet Earth I'm sure that Limlaw has at their wit's end. They are so many acres of land better busy talking and being suited for a dump in his own liberated that they can't take town of Waits River, and if time to reason," said the money is the most important Angel. factor to him, as I'm sure it is, "Do I have any brothers and he and his family should (ptease turn to page 5) , Jessie Gilman Planning Offices of both New Bradford, Vt.  agreed tothe ' "  the Valley• Involved in the precess are both Agriculture, both states, the regional community. At issue will be land economic potential, production levels, employment levels and eventually of alternatives to the mono-culture farming in favor of something more in nutritional needs of the area. The "Reach" naturally regarded the hazardous waste management as critical disposal iqvariably impacts water shire drafted a Solid Waste ManagemenZ public meetings during this past spring throughout the state, it identified 14 impoundmant sites" in threats to locaiwater quality. In addition the Governor's Hazardous has developed a variety of of hazardous waste management, including ' plan. It remains to he seen how much of With in Concord, I dispair of seeing management in my lifetime. To go on, the Status report responds .... mendations by listing the conclusions Policy Commission. These are in a sense dress all the usual problems sensibly Commission could not do was to fund doubt that the Legislature will water related programs than its In a like vein the UNH Water Resource has come through with an program--six major categories supply, resources and ecology, dissemination and technology transfer. Concord has in mind for the University, The Report concludes with a couple Water Resources Board on three management of state owned dams on then. determine the best programs of best satisfy the recreational, eaergy and the people downstream. The Corps a "Predictive Model For Low Water pshire". Low flow is in a sense the represents "all we're going to we want". The study should help tc and cannot expect of our available water. At the beginning of this commentary I Status Report contained information • . , 9 remarkable, encouraging and disturbing can see why I used these particular remarkable because until I real idea of hew much work had thoroughly. It is encouraging because agency staff who know their jobs and They are on top of the But it is nevertheless disturbing on thing, most of the foregoing is on paper, ! Much of R will probably remain there. available or will be withheld. many elected officials; it flies in the conventional wisdom, it often economic or political disapproval, in areas little understood by stitutionally simpler to respond for them. I find itdisturbing leadersh/p we lack the will to decisions that turn plan into : addrees the future where the floods lakes and unsafe waters hide. Yet thiS leave our children. Perhaps it was best summed up specialist who said "by the time we do, it will he too late to do anything." (The foregoing has been a synopsis "Basin Status Report" produced Omee o State Planning, at the River Basin Program. No ohor state such a response. Several Vermont statements on that state's peslliou in notes were made. MONEY SENSE Credit Unions There is a growing star on the financial horizon. It's been with us a good many years but with the advent of high in- terest rates on loans and the escalating service charges on other bank services, this form of financial institution is coming into its own to serve the less capital-intensive needs of the consumer. This organization is called a credit union. An institution that, until a few years ago, would not have caused banks any great concern, is now making many a banker look over his shoulder at some of the inroads the credit union is making into traditional banking services. The commercial banking industry fought long and loud when savings banks introduced the Negotiable Order of With- drawal (NOW accounts), but have been relatively quiet since credit unions began issuing share drafts, which is nothing more than a checking account. It is possible the banks have not joined in battle at this time because the greater threat, involving larger sums of deposit money, is not coming from the share draft of credit unions but from the intense com- petition being provided by the major money market funds. It has always been surprising to me that more credit unions have not been formed. Under state law, "Credit union organization shall be limited to groups having a common bond .... ". To me, the "Common bond" provision has always been the most fascinating because it provides such a great potential for each community, regardless of its size, to have at least one credit union; thus assuring the citizens of that community the opportunity to participate in a program of lower cost personal loans. The "common BOND" provision provides for the for- mation of a credit union, "... to groups within a well-defined neighborhood, community or rural district . . ." This provision covers a great amount of territory. In the state of Vermont, for example, the Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, under certain provisions, will make available on request a form of Articles of Association and a form of model by-laws. The organization of a credit union, its operation and the simplicity of the laws that govern its day- to-day functions are relatively uncomplicated in respect to today's cluttered regulations governing other types of financial institutions. Deposits are protected, as insurance for savings in most credit unions is provided by the National Credit Union Administration. The credit union can not and was never intended to replace conventional sources of financing such as commercial or savings banks. But for many people they are a viable alternative and are worth exploring.