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Bradford , Vermont
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July 2, 2014     Journal Opinion
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Page 8m JOURNAL OPINION--July 2, 2014 0BITU00RIES COURT REPORT Harlan Keniston 1930 - 2014 NORTH HAVERHILL--Harlan"Bud" Keniston, 83, of North Haverhill, died June 24, 2014, at Cottage Hospital, Woodsville. He was born in Haverhill, July 13, 1930, a son of Nathan and Mildred, (Greenley) Keniston. For several years, he worked at the former Northeast Square and Dowel in North Haverhill. He married Marion C. (LaVoice) Rockwood on Aug. 6, 1966 and she predeceased him on Aug. 16, 2009. He was also predeceased by a sister, Evelyn Thayer, on March 7, 2013. He is survived by and a brother with whom he made his home, Russell Keniston of North Haverhill; two stepsons, Dale Rockwood of Byfield, MA and David Rockwood of Alton, NH; along with several nieces, nephews and cousins. A graveside service was held June 28 in the Pine Grove Cemetery, SwiRwater Road, Woodsville. The Rev. David Moore officiated. Ricker Funeral Home and Crema- tion Care of Woodsville was in charge of arrangements. For more information or to sign an online condolence, visit www.rickerth.com. Peter Pierson 1938 - 2014 EAST CORINTH--Peter R. Pierson of East Corinth passed away June 26, 2014 at his home following a long illness. He was 75 years old. Born on Sept. 24, 1938 in Haverhill, he was the son of John A. and Mable Luella (Sweet) Pierson. Peter was a lifelong resident of East Corinth. He attended Corinth grammar school and was a graduate of Bradford Academy. He served several years in the Vermont Army National Guard. Over the years, he was employed at various jobs including school bus driver for East Corinth schools, he worked on various local farms, Tofani Motors and Pierson's Garage. In later years, he was self employed as a small engine mechanic, owning and operating Pierson's and Sons Small Engine Repair Shop in East Corinth. Peter was an avid New England sports fan of the Boston Red Sox and Celtics. He also was a race car driver at Bear Ridge for many years Besides his parents he is prede- ceased by his brother, John Pierson; and an infant brother, Melvin Pierson. He is survived by four sons Kurt Pierson and wife Wendy of Burro, Troy Pierson and Chad Pierson both of Groton, and Ryan Pierson and wife Liza of East Corinth; eight grandchildren, Cole and Jackson Pierson, Sierra Eastman, Courtney, Page, Cooper Pierson, and Gracie and Harper Pierson; a great granddaughter, Brynn Carter; two brothers, Gone Pierson and his wife Deanna of East Corinth and Bruce Pierson of Kansas; a sister, Jonalee Dow and husband Charles of Colorado; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. A private family gathering will be held at the family home at a later date. There are no calling hours. Arrangements are by Hale Funeral Homes and Cremation Care of Bradford and Thetford. And online guestbook is at www.halefuneralhomes.com. CHILD FOOD SAFETY NORTH HAVERHILLn July 8 from 6 to 8 p.m., a free professional development opportunity for early childcare administrators, educators, foodservice staff and volunteers in the Grafton County Extension office. There is no charge for this workshop, but registration in advance is appreciated. To register, call (603)787-6944 or write to deborah.maes@unh.edu. ORANGE COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT-CRIMINAL DIVISION CHELSEA--The following cases were heard before Judge William J. Donahue of the Orange County Superior Court-Criminal Division in Chelsea on June 25. All defendants were released on conditions unless otherwise noted. Arraignments On June 19, Charles M. Camp, 45, of Randolph Center pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to violation of abuse prevention order on June 18. The arresting agency was Vermont State Police in Royalton. On June 20, Camp again pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to violation of abuse prevention order, as well as violation of conditions of release, both on June 19. The arresting agency was the Orange County Sheriff's Department; he was released on $1,500 bail under conditions including orders not to harass or have contact with his victim, enter upon certain premises on Route 113 or Will's Store in Chelsea; and to abide by a 24-hour curfew. On June 23, Carol Wheatley, 48, of Braintree pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to violation of abuse prevention order on June 15. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. She was ordered not to harass or have contact with her victims or enter upon certain premises in Braintree. On June 24, Crystal E. Walker, 29, of Tunbridge pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to a felony of unlawful trespass on an occupied residence and resisting arrest on May 21. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. She was released on $1,500 bail under conditions including orders not to harass or have contact with her victim or enter upon certain premises in Braintree. James L. Thomas, 46, of Randolph pleaded innocent to vehicle operation with suspended license on May 24. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. *** Bradley Giroux, 33, of South Burlington pleaded innocent to careless or negligent vehicle operation (subsequent offense) on May 20. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. Mark Mattiace, 36, of East Corinth pleaded innocent to vehicle operation with suspended license on May 1. The arresting agency was VSP in Bradford. He was released on $1,000 bail. *** Raymond Chandler Jr., 57, of Lebanon pleaded innocent to a felony of lewd and lascivious conduct with a child and engaging in a prohibited act on Sept. 1,2013. The arresting agency was the Orange County Sheriff's Dept. He was ordered not to harass or have contact with his alleged victim, have unsupervised contact with minors, nor enter on certain premises in Braintree. Clinton L. Bell Jr., 32, of Burro pleaded innocent to vehicle operation with suspended license on May 13. The arresting agency was VSP in Bradford. Bell was released on $1,000 bail. Chad G. Spencer, 32, of Orange pleaded innocent to a felony of unlawful mischiefgreaer than $1000 on May 8. The arresting agency was VSP in Middlesex; Spencer was released on $1,500 bail *** Thomas E. Densmore, 56, of Tunbrilge pleaded innocent to "knowingly permitting his cattle, horses, sheep, goats, swine, or domestic fowls to go upon the lands or premises of another, after the latter has given the owner notice thereof' on April 20. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. *** Blake A. Manning, 23, of Thetford Center pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to: felony driving under the influence, third or subsequent offense; vehicle operation with suspended license; vehicle operation with reckless or gross negligence; resisting arrest; and simple assault of a law enforcement officer, all on June 17. The arresting agency was VSP in Bradford. Manning was held at Northeast State Correctional Facility in St. Johnsbury on $25,000 bail. Conditions of release include orders not to harass or have contact with three individuals. On June 26, Joshua Porter-Govea, 18, of South Royalton pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to a felony burglary, unlawful trespass on building and unlawful mischief ($250 or less) on June 26. The arresting agency was the Randolph Police Department. He was held on $1000 bail at the Chelsea Lockup; conditions of release include 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew and orders not to enter upon the premises of the Randolph Recreational Fields. *** On June 26, Anton Porter-Govea, 18, of South Royalton pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to a felony burglary, unlawful trespass on building and unlawful mischief(S250 or less) on June 26. The arresting agency was the Randolph Police Department. He was held on $1000 bail at the Chelsea Lockup; conditions of release include 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew and orders not to enter upon the premises of the Randolph Recreational Fields. On June 26, Sarah P. Blake, 17, of Louisburg, NC failed to appear for an arraignment for felony embezzlement (,.more than $100) on May 1. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. *** On June 27, Kevin T. Gallagher, 24, of Peabody, MA pleaded innocent before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. to DUI on Dec. 24. The arresting agency was VSP in Bradford. Gallagher was released on $1,000 bail. Senteneings Travis Woodbury, 22, of Windsor admitted violation o fprobation before Judge Robert P. Gerety Jr. as filed on April 3, 2012. The probation stemmed from convictions for: vehicle operation with reckless or gross negligence; attempting to elude a law enforcement officer; and violation of conditions of release, all on Oct. 29, 2011. Woodbury's sentence was all suspended except 66 days. His modified probation warrant expires on June 25, 2015 and includes orders for mental health counseling and curfew. Woodbury was held at Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield. *** Brandin Durkee, 26, of White River Junction pleaded guilty to vehicle operation with suspended license, fourth offense, on June 5. The arresting agency was VSP in Royalton. Durkee was sentenced to serve 18 to 19 days up to eight hours a day in a Furlough Community Restitution Program to start on July 1, with credit for time served. *** Scott M. Knowles, 50, of Brookfield pleaded guilty to petit larceny, $900 or less, on May 6. The arresting agency was the Randolph Police Department. He was sentenced to serve nine to 10 days up to eight hours each day in a Furlough Community Restitution Program to start on July 8. Kathryn Kingsbury, 25, of St. Johnsbury pleaded guilty to vehicle operation with suspended license on May 16 The .... arresting agency was VSP in Bradford. She was ordered to pay $427 in frees and surcharges. Bear Ridge (continued from page 1) who lives on Kidder Road said that it sounds like during practice nights there are multiple vehicles on the track despite indications made by Elms in January that only one car at a time would be out on the track during the practices. Phil Bowman, who said he lives on Old Post Road, urged the selectboard to put an article on a town meeting warrant if there were going to be additional nights of use at the track. "It's punishing to people who live in West Bradford," he said. Bob Riley, who said he works at the track when he stays in the area during the summer, said the practice sessions are invaluable in providing training to young drivers. "They're racing safer and they're working on their cars better," he said. "It's not making [Elms] any money. It's just an opportunity for a young kid to learn." Elms said that one possible reason for any additional noise may be that they cut some timber at the track earlier this year to accomodate additional parking. And under questioning by Unkles, Elms said all the cars at the track are equipped with functioning mufflers. Zoning administrator Bob Wing asked whether the town would be wise to conduct a decibel study of the noise generated at the track. He offered to conduct the study himself with equipment possessed by the town's police department. "At least we would have something to hang our hat on," Wing said. But the selectmen were unwilling to take any action with two members absent from the session. "I can assure you folks we heard your concerns," Unkles said. "But we are uncomfortable making any decision until the return of other two board members." Vermonster In other motorsports venue permitting news, the selectboard asked Bradford Police Chief Jeff Stiegler to draft a conditional permit that would limit camping on the Bradford Fairgrounds during the semiannual Vermonster 4x4 event. Vermonster show runner Randy Oakley said that area camping sites are already full during his event, which he said attracted approximately 7,000 people during its May run. Oakley said there are about two dozen to 30 recreational vehicles that spend the weekend at the Fairgrounds during the three-day event held in May and September each year. Some of those camping at the fairground are vendors while others are drivers and participants. "To eliminate camping down there would shoot us in the foot," Oakley said. "Guys come from Maine and from Florida. Being able to stay on site is pretty critical to our program." Stiegler said during the last event, he had some concerns about the proximity of several RVs to open fires and there were some additional public safety issues, although he did not elaborate on those during last week's meeting. Selectboard vice chair Carole Taylor said she wanted absent selectboard members Randy Moore and Lisa Sharp present before taking any action on a conditional permit. Alex Nuti-de Biasi can be reached at editor@jonews.com. HUNTER ED COURSE BATH-A hunter education course will be held at the Ammonoosuc Valley Fish and Game Club on July 24, from 5:30 to 8 p.m., July 26 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on July 27 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To be certified, a participant must attend all three classes and be age 12 or older. For information, call David Falkenham at (603)728-8958. q-hank you to all friends and family for supporting us through this difficult time. Also a big thank you to Melissa and Bryan Gould for the beautiful service. From the Palmer Family 00ODY m1:m=lvatmmm=l['.-  Cadlllac I'EI 00.t.00l'il www.codychevrolet.com MONTPELIER 802-223-6337 Offering home insurance policies to fit your budget and your home. M.K.RICHARDSON AGENCY, IN(.',. }bu,. Locallnsu,'a.ce Agency, " Chelsea: 685-3885 Barre: 479-2556 HALE Funeral Homes of Bradford & Thefford, VT Locally Owned and Operated Serving the Upper Valley Since 1900 Funeral & Cremation Services Arranged Licensed Directors Available 24 Hours A Day 7 Days a Week Gregory Hodge Glenn Ward 187 Upper Plain Route 113 Bradford, VT (802) 222-5758 Thefford, VT (802) 785-4667 Senior scene i NORTH HAVERHILL--The Horse Meadow Senior Center will be closed for the July 4 holiday. There will be no regular cribbage games at Horse Meadow Senior Center for the months of June, July and August. ,, On Wednesdays in July, there will be a computer"boot camp. On July 9, the program will be about computer viruses and virus p.rotection. On July 16, the program is an Intro to the Internet. Brochures are available at HMSC. Classes are $5 each or $20 for all five. Celebrate hat day on July 24. Prizes will be given during lunch fo[,the most creative, funniest, most glamorous, sportiest and most' Horse Meadow hats. There are a number of regular weekday activities at the Horse Meadow Senior Center. On Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays, Bone Builders meet at 9:30 a.m. On Tuesdays, the breakfast coffee shop is open from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. and the Nifty Needlers group meets from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The writers = group meets at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesdays and there is a Bingo game at 1 p.m. On Thursdays, Barb has an art class at 9 a.m. Every week day at 11 : 15 a.m., live music will be played. On Saturday mornings, Zumba classes are held at HMSC. Almost every day at HMSC, a vegetable, salad and dessert are served along with the other menu items. On July 3, pot roast is featured; the senior center is closed for July 4; on July 7, liver, onions and bacon is on the menu. On July 8, chicken salad over tomatoes will be served. On July 9, spaghetti with meat sauce is on the menu. For more information, call (603)787-2539. ### BRADFORD---The Orange East Senior Center will be closed for the July 4 holiday. The next Texas Hold'em Tournament will be held on July 19. There is a $50 entry fee. The doors open at 5 p.m. and the tournament starts at 6 p.m. This event is a fundraiser for the benefit of Meals on Wheels. The senior center's trip to Cape Cod and the islands will take place from Sept. 8 to 12. For information, call Vicky at (802)222-4782. All are welcome to come. On Mondays at 12:45 p.m., Pam Wilcox leads a knitting club. On Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m. at the senior center, there is a Weight Watchers meeting. A computer class for users with any level of knowledge meets on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon. Easy Tai Chi classes are held on Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. The East Corinth Cribbage Club will be meeting at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays at the senior center. The cost to play is $2 per night and any level player is welcome. A raffle drawing will be held on the last Wednesday of every month. Call Sally Osgood at (802)222-5756 for more information. On July 3, the lunch menu includes meatball subs with peppers and onions and potato chips; the senior center is closed for the July 4 holiday. On July 7, there will be quiche, four'bean salad and corn; on July 8, there will be a lunch buffet; on July 9, there will be veggie and bacon subs and potato salad. For more information on any of the above, call (802)222-4782. WMNF: Bear activity up this year CAMPTON, NH--Human encounters with black bears in the White Mountain National Forest usually begin in late June. This year, a number of bear incidents have been reported in campgrounds and backcountry areas. One report described a bear that was attempting to get into a tent. Another was about a bear searching the bed of a pick-up truck looking for food. Bears can quickly become habituated to human food. According to forest officials, improperly stored food attracts bears to people who are currently camping at a site and let8 the bear know that it can find food at that campsite in the future. The bear might return to the site again. The WMNF is urging campers to keep a clean campsite to ensure bears and other animals do not forage for human foods. Bears that get too used to people may have to be trapped and relocated or even killed. Group to provide free children's books BRADFORDn July 11 at 10 a.m., Duncan McDougall from the Children's Literacy Foundation will be visiting the Bradford Public Library. McDougall will read aloud from books and share his love of words, reading and writing. Each child who participates in the program can choose two books to keep from a selection orand-new children's books. The Bradford Elementary School was one of eight elementary schools in Vermont and New Hampshire that was selected to receive a 2014-15 Year of the Book sponsorship by CLiF. Each school will receive free books and literacy programs worth approximately $25,000 in value over the course of a school year. BPL Co-Librarian Gail Lavaude, who also serves as librarian at BES, is encouraging members of the public to attend the event. FOOD ASSISTANCE BERLIN,3SquaresVT, formerly known as. the food stamp program, assists Vermonters with buying food. A family of four earning up to $3,554 a month may be able to get benefits. Resources such as savings accounts do not prevent qualifying for the program. Receiving 3 Squares VT also qualifies families for other benefits such as the school lunch program and telephone payment assistance. For information or to apply online, visit the Vermont Food Help website or call (800)479-615 I. JOSHUA AND THE LEADERSHIP TR )N Read Deuteronomy 31:1-29 The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you. Deuteronomy 31.'8 Joshua had been part of the story all along. He had been a slave liberated in the Exodus. He had been partway up Mount Sinai. He had spied out the land and supported Moses in numerous crises. He had led the Israelites into battle. He had wandered in the wilderness with the rest of the nation. He had lived the history and the covenant and been mentored by the greatest leader in Israel's history. In today's reading Joshua assumed a new role by taking Moses' place as the leader &Israel. Three public events marked this leadership transition. First, there was apublic transfer of authority (w. 1-8). This part of the transition was done by Moses. The people needed to know that the leadership baton was being passed on in an orderly, responsible manner. They needed to be reminded again of the sin that was preventing Moses from entering the Promised Land and to see his faith in submitting to God' s judgment. The Lord would lead them to victory, no matter which human leader was in charge. Second, there were to be public readings of the Law every seventh year, during the Festival of Tabernacles (vv. 9-13). To this end, Moses entrusted a written copy of the Law to the priests and Eevites, who placed it in the Ark, at the symbolic center of the nation's spiritual life. God' s covenant mattered more tfian the gifts or abilities of any one leader. One leadership transition was less important than passing on a godly heritage to the next generation. QUAIL HOLLOW SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY in West Lebanon/ Hanover has 3. and 2 bedroom apartments available. Rent includes all utilities. OPEN HOUSE TOUR EVERY WEDNESDAY at 12:30 PM 603-653-3001 Third, therewas apublic commission- ing service (vv. 14-29). This part of the leadership transition was done by God Himself. On this occasion, He taught Moses a song that warned of Israel's future rebellion and faithlessness. Even so, He Himself would keep His promises and remain faithful and loving to His people. ### APPLY THEWORD--"Be strong and courageous" (vv. 6-7) is a theme that extends into Joshua chapter 1. This is an excellent theme for any transitibn, whether it's a leadership transition in a church or ministry or the transitions that come our way throughout our lives. No matter what the circumstances are around us, we can be strong and courageous when we know that ultimately God is in charge. ### This devotion was taken with permis- sion from the June 2014 issue of Today in the Word. Today in the Word is published by Moody Bible Institute, Chicago, 1L, 1-800-DL-MOOD Y, www. todayintheword.com. * Business Auto Recreation