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Bradford , Vermont
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July 7, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-July 7, 1982 i iii - ii iii lira i i iii ii THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. . Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly mmslml imbhlmi in Iredferd, Vemamt. S,triptlem reteo. Vorm, n earl Not Nempdd*. $t.0O I",, ve; $t.00 for ,il ma0ko; nt ef state $1|.N per yNr end $L00 for six mNths; Se,r tiffin diKu,,t $2.N. Secend class pesp peld e! hHel, Vemeat 0S05|. Publidmd by Nectlmes! Publltbiq Compu, Inc.. P.O. Sex ]78. |mcneil. Robert F. Huminsld President &amp; Publisher Bradford /  Woodsville t;02-222-528 i  .i 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper q ii ii i, i ii i ii i,i, ,i ,J i , ' ' i" " , 'I' Editorial Tax stabilization in Bradford Tax stabilization has been the major issue at regular and special Town Meetings this year and a lesser issue at last week's Annual School Meeting in the Town of Bradford. At issue is a graduated tax break originally adopted in Bradford as an emergency favor for property owners in the town whose taxed property had been damaged by flood or fire. In more recent times, beginning about 20 years ago, tax stabilization has been used in the town as an incentive device to spur industrial growth. A five year tax stabilization plan can give a business opening up a "50 percent tax break during its first year, 30 t the second year, 20 percent the third year, ten percent the fourth year, and equal property assessment on the fifth year. Many opposing the idea of tax stabilization for new businesses point to the fact that residential property owners are never offered individual tax breaks as an incentive or for anything else by the town or school district. Many of these same people are finding themselves wondering if in- creasing industry actually decreases taxes or solves any of the town's problems in the long run. More in- dustry means more jobs, but it often signals an increase in costly school enrollments and additional services tO be provided for by the town. It is this subject of growth that is the single most important issue facing Bradford today. But, there is undoubtably a great need for jobs in the Bradford area. Philisophical questions over whether or not to use tax stabilization or tax incentives to recruit industry probably mean very little to the unemployed. In the mid-1960's voters in Bradford gave the town's selectmen the authority to grant tax stabilization on their own. Because of mixed sen- timent over the issue, the selectmen have developed a policy whereby all tax stabilization requests are granted by the voters, not by themselves, at Town Meetings. This policy has been criticized by some who have become tired of the debate or are concerned that the policy might not have been fair. Four requests for the tax break were defeated at Bradford's regular Town Meeting in March; three weeks ago voters decided to grant tax stabilization at a special Town Meeting held specifically to act upon the request of a computer company seeking to locate in the town. Another request for tax stabilization has just been made by a Canadian firm planning to purchase the Channel Mills clothing factory. We believe the selectmen's policy has been fair and has worked on a justifiable basis considering the merits and differences of each request. Any decision formed by a consensus of town voters is more democratic than the decision of three town of- ficials at a selectmen's meeting. But it is time for the voters to address the whole issue and put the question of tax stabilization to a vote, perhaps even with established criteria set for" eligibility for requests. Voting on each request has worked well up to now, but it is time to either define tax stabilization policy in greater detail or to finally abolish the tax break altogether. Keep writing those letters Freedom of the press is the most important right of an individual in the United States. It enables one to speak out on issues and provides the right to say what is on your mind without the fear of reprisal or censorship. This is why we print all submitted letters to the editor -- provided their authen- ticity is not in question and that they are in no way slanderous. We respect the individual beliefs of those who use our forum, even if the beliefs represented in those letters are not always shared by us. And, it is a rare occasion, indeed, when we exercise our option to reply to the views stated in a letter. However, Mr. Frank L. Cutler, of Bridport, Vt., has presented his views on this page often enough so that some comment on his most recent correspondence (printed in this issue) seems fair. This week, Mr. Cutler supplies the accusation that thousands of concerned citizens, among them many area residents, demonstrating against the nuclear arms race are doing so only because they have been duped by a communist conspiracy. This kind of inane stance on the issue of nuclear arms control demonstrates an inability to accept the very real concerns of people acting on a hugely complicated and threatening issue. By attributing concern and action to a communist conspiracy, Mr. Cutler often seems to opt for the easy way nut. However, we urge him to con- tinue exercising his freedom of speech in this newspaper and others. For his stated philosophies do much to strengthen the resolve of many who share his views -- and just as many whodonot. Letters to the Edi From Bradford to "Barford" To the Editor: In the June 30th edition of the Journal Opinion I read an article which really appalled me. There it was indicated that there was a possibility that by Fail Bradford might have five places open for the sale of liquor and seven later on. It is had enough to have our State trying to finance itself by the sale of liquors while at the same time trying to hold shout out down the number of deaths this insane due to D.W.I. drinking Now we seem to want to turn go on like this, we our good town into a drinking change the joint. We spend a lot of money from Bradford and talk about protecting our Let's wake up country from Communism needs to be done regardless of the fact that the good town as free greatest danger is from within. It is time for the Churches W. and all concerned citizens to Communist inspired : TotheEditor: (WILPF), in addition to Marti Sawing logs at Newman Lumber Company it ' .,," t, f' .... , I\\; . ,..:t. , _ ., ?.' /t/jl,A ;t ., .. .... . ............... ..  ,- .... :., ...:, ..:- <-..:.,  ";:': ,, ,.  ...... .:,. .... , ":/." , The Newman Lumber Company The Newman Lumber pany. The owner, Murdnck Mrs. Hobbs says that after company in Woodsville has two parts to its history, as it has operated in two separate locations, each of which has its own previous sawmill history. Whitcher-Stone-Acer millsite The location where Newman Lumber had its planer mill (until the fire in 1978) was first used for a sawmill by the Woodsville. Lumber Company, which was owned and operated by Ira Whitcher in partnership with Lewis C. Puttee. Mr. Whitcher had previously carried on a lumber business for more than 30 years in Benton, then moved to Woodsville in 1870 to take advantage of the railroad facilities here. He and Mr. Puttee built a steam sawmill in Woodsville in 1872 and did a lucrative business. Their mill burned in 1879; but they im- mediately rebuilt on the same site, and by 1886 were producing a million and a half feet of rough and dressed lumber a y, besides lath and clapboards,  and were employing I0 to 12 men. In 1891, Mr. Whitcher sold out his half-interest to Mr. Pattee, whose son Fred continued the business under the name of the Woodsville Lumber Works until the mill was again burned around 1902. A third mill was built on this site around 1909 by Dwight S. Stone, who sold out in 1921 to the Acer Lumber Company, which manufac- tured hardwood flouring until it went bankrupt during the Depression, closing out with an auction in 1930. The property went into the hands of the Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank and was vacant for quite a number of years. Later owners and operators have been the Alden K Hay Lumber Company (1943), City Lumber Company (1944) and Newman Lumber Company (1953). Sources: Whitcher's History of Haverhill; Child's Grafton County Gazetteer registered deeds. Trotting park site The present location of Newman Lurhber Company on Routes 10 and 302 was for many years a trotting park, Deeds show that the land had been purchased in 1869 from the Russell King family by Harry Holton for use as a trotting park, and continued as such through ownership by a partnership of Chester Abbott, E. B. Mann and Ira Whitcher (1889), then Dennis R. Rouhan (1916), the Woodsville Park Association (1917), then H. B. Knight and Dennis Rouhan (1943). At one time the 4and was used for a miniature golf course. In 1945 the Johnson Lumber Company bought the land and erected a sawmill here. In 1950 it was sold to Harold Taylor Sr., then in 1956 to Newman Lumber Corn- Newman, died in 1974, and the mill has since been operated by Walter Young, president of the company. Recollections Ruth Wilmot of Wood- sviUe remembers when the present mill site was a trotting park and fairground, later a miniature golf course. Back in the Twenties, Ruth Hobbs of Woodsville (Mrs. Arthur Hobbs) worked as bookkeeper and stenographer for Acer Lumber Company, starting when she was only 17 years old. Being so young, and a girl, they were dubious about whether she could handle the work -- but she stayed there about five years, as long as the company was in business. She later worked for Newman Lumber. Mrs. Hobbs says that when she started working for Acer, their office was in the bottom floor of the present home of Eugene Burt on Terrace Street. The next floor the mill went bankrupt during the Depression, it was put into the hands of a trustee, E. C. Hirst. He had the mill workers dry and saw what lumber was already on the premises, and sold it out as he could, then sold the property at auction in 1930. Mrs. Murdock Newman says that she and her husband first moved to the North Country in 1951, when they leased a mill in Lisbon, then came to Woodsville in 1953. At that time they bought their original mill site (across from Grafton Motors) where there was an old planer mill that had been deserted for several years. One day they went out for a Sunday drive through Sugar Hill and happened to encounter S. Gerard Paine, who gave them a tour of his buildings and his paintings -- one of which was an award- winning watercolor of the old mill the Newmans had just bought. Mr. Young now has the painting in his office. S  for single .... mit]nd the top floor ' was occupied by the cook, sawmill on the old trotting National The Western Goals Foun- dation of Alexandria, Va., in their new study entitled: "The War Called Peace: The Soviet Peace Offensive" states that the demonstration held in New York on June 12th was led and organized by representatives of CPUSA (Communist Party, U.S.A.) fronts, the U.S. af- filiates of international Soviet fronts, and of groups that have close ties with Soviet fronts. These include the U.S. Peace Council (USPC), Christian Peace Conference (CPC), Clergy and Laity Concerned (CALC), American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), War Resisters League (WRL), and Women's International League for Peace and Freedom CPUSA-controlled and in- Fron fluenced union groups. The The large Mobilization For Survival from Catholic (MFS), a key part of the rally, ders, Protestant may soon be supplanted by a and q new group called Federation demonstrated for Progress (FP). the Left has Religious and church inroads in the groups, New England regional mainstream delegations and children were munities. The insulated in the march from smiling faces the large number of Marxist- U.S. disarmament Leninist parties and support seem to realize groups for Soviet-sponsored were being terrorists, such as the hate to see Palestine Liberation because once Organization (PLO), Irish was suckered. I Republican Army (IRA), for President South West Africa People's Roosevelt, the Organization (SWAPO), sibleformykidl African National Congress being blown (ANC) of South Africa, the him at New People's Army in the Philippines, and Farabundo Mrs. Harvey Hardy, and her husband. Later the office was in Dwight Stone's former office building, in front of the present Grafton Motors building (where Route 302 runs now), and an addition was built onto the building. Later, when Route 302 was rebuilt, Newman Lumber set the office building back to make room for the road. After the planing mill burned, in 1978, the entire office building was moved up to its present location on the mill property. Mrs. Hobbs says that the company was named Acer because the name means maple -- and the company worked mostly with maple lumber, along with birch and beech. Acer bought rough- sawn. partially dried hard- wood lumber, then kiln-dried it and manufactured it into high quality hardwood flooring. Some of it was extra thick, for bowling alleys, so that it not onty was firm, but could be sanded repeatedly without removing the mat- ching. Mrs. Hobbs remembers the rough lumber being stacked onto little carts, which were pushed into the kilns. It was always very steamy in the kilns, from the moisture of the lumber. The kilns were kept heated around-the-clock, seven days a week, and were fueled with scrap wood, sawdust and shavings. The lumber was dried until moisture.meters said it was exactly right. Then, after sawing and planing, the finished flooring was fastened into bundles with metal strapping and was moved by conveyor, either directly into railroad cars. or across the track into a big storehouse. The track ran right through the millyard, between the buildings. Sober reflections arms control by GARY SCHMITT Mr. Schmitt is a U.S. Senate staffer. Wednesday, JulY 7 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 8 BRADFORD: Selectmen, 4:00 p.m. CORINTH: Unified District 36 School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Friday, July 9 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.m. Monday, July 12 WOODSVII J.R: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. CORINTH: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. BRADFORD: Trustees, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 14 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. President Reagan's announcement that the United States and the Soviet Union will soon begin strategic arms control negotiations has " been met with widespread enthusiasm. The general view seems to be that arms agreements make the world a safer place to live in -- that they lessen significantly the probability of war. As with most political opinions there is an element of truth to this one. However, as is also the case with most such opinions, it is an exaggeration, which does not  simply corresd to the facts.  .Recent ers..iii. _ of American uroOCK rewman bUIlt a history inmcates mat even arms accorus that actually reduce the number of arms do not necessarily ensure peace. Perhaps the most salient example of this point is provided by the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. In this accord Japan, Great Britain and the United States agreed, among other things, to reduce the number of battleships they held by roughly half and to build no new battleships for a decade. It was reasoned that since bat- tleships were essential for controlling the world's sea lanes, a reduction in their number would guarantee peace by deterring nations from attempting to seize what they could not hold. The 1922 treaty, however, failed to halt the construction of new ships; and, in- directly, it fueled the building of even more sophisticated weapons systems. Truly, no sooner had the ink dried on the accord than Japan -- remaining within the letter of the treaty -- began building a powerful new kind of ship, the 10,000 ton cruiser. And, in an dfort to regain what the battleship had once provided, the aircraft carrier soon was developed-- and used at Pearl Harbor. Arms agreements, then, can reduce the number of weapons but they cannot reduce the ambitions and interests of nations or the individuals who lead them. On the other hand, the absence of an park site and continued using the old planer mill -- until January 1, 1978, when the planer mill burned to the ground. Since then the entire operation has been moved to the trotting park lot, and has been continually enlarged and modernized. There was another fire, in the lumber storage yard, on April 16, 1977, but the action of nine fire departments kept it from spreading farther. Mr. Newman built in 1964 the double sawmill, which can handle up to 200,000 feet of lumber a week, and Mr. Young presently has plans for further enlargements of the sawing facilities to a capacity of 250,000 feet per week. The sawmill is quite different from those of the old days, as it is operated entirely from a small enclosure equipped with buttons and levers. NeWman Lumber's output is entirely wholesale, and 98 percent of it is planed lumber, mostly pine for industrial use or for siding, in a great variety of patterns. Mr. Young says that the scrap wood is chipped and sent to James River in Berlin or to Boise Cascade, for making paper. Shavings are tightly compressed in bags by two huge baling machines, and total a trailerload each day, about 1200 bags. They are shipped mostly to Maryland for horse bedding. The hark goes for fuel at the paper mill in Gilman, Vermont. In the near future the mill will begin fueling its own kilns with wood waste, bark, and then sawdust, using boilers that will have to comply with anti- pollution standards. The mill has its own machine shop for equipment repair and for grinding knives for the chipper and planer -- a great variety of knives being needed to produce the many kinds of siding patterns of- fered. While visiting the mill on an extremely cold day, we inquired about the lubrication of machinery under such a great range of temperatures, and Mr. Young said that they use synthetic oils that can function from 70 degrees below zero up to 200 degrees. That should cover almost any weather we are likely to have. Through the years the number in the work force has reached up to 54. However, as agreement can actually Before and during the War, for instance, there was limit on the production of biological weapons. (There was, the Geneva Protocol of prohibited their use; but was not then a signatory.) there was clandestine stock effective and lethal chemical Germany a new family of nerve I and readied for use. But they used. Why? The reason is simple enough. Axis nor the Allied Powers their enemies' strength biological weaponry. In contrast, agreements, the United known to its potential location and number of its most weapon, the land-based ICBM. this circumstance allow  even e -- the leaders of the Soviet speculate about the first strike? Is the United States! that fact? Is the world These that arms agreements can never 1817 the Rush-Bagot the United States and Great cessfully eliminated the naval taking place on the years after the two nations engaged in war with each other. this accord's effectiveness real and long-term confluence and a realization that more in common culturally than any other nations on the earth. In other words, the that led to this agreement's exceptional and not the norm. In-sum, the Reagan conducting the Soviets, should keep in agreement reached is panacea. And the administration prudent to remind the this fact as arms talks g New state police (continued from page 1 ) violations during the month of June as compared with a total number of 826 violations handled by area Vermont State Police during the previous month of May. Other violations reported for June included: four DWl violations, eight incidents of driving with a suspended license, three incidents of carless and negligent driving, 16 violations of the laws of the road, 13 truck violations, one uninspected vehicle, four driving without a license violations, six driving without a registration violations, and 15 non-specified motor vehicle violations. Combined motor vehicle violations add up to a total number of 505 for the month of June. There were 897 total violations reported in May. Motor Vehicle Accidents Police say there were 50 motor vehicle accidents reported in our area last month. Nineteen parsons were injured as a result of these accidents and one person was killed. in most mills, business here at the present time is the slowest Note: Remember the since the Depression, but by antique car rally, antique handling small orders they show and sale, and railroad hope to remain in operation, exhibit in Haverhill on Sun- day, July I 1. Property damage attributed Motor vehicle to accidents in June ran up an May were up estimated total of $139,990, April and up according to police, the same May vs. April The According to police figures, vehicle criminal investigations in during the month Northeastern Vermont were up one-half of one up 29 percent in May over April but rose April and up seven percent over the over the same period last reported during year. period last year. CALEn OF EVEn Wednesday, July 7 WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens Luncheon Church of Christ vestry serving at noon. For call 757-2206. Thursday, July 8 GROTON: Sen, Stafford's office from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. E. CORINTH: The fabulous 13th Annual E. Market at the E. Friday, July 9 BRADFORD: Senior Citizens Luncheon at Vocational Center serving at 11:45 a.m. Fox 2224782. Tuesday, July 13 . FAIRLEE: Historical Society Meeting at the starting at 7:30 p.m. THETFORD: Eclipse Grange Award Hall starting at 7:30 p.m. Town Clerk honored. Wednesday, July 14 THETFORD: A Community Health Nurse will be at the Thetford Hill Church p.m. WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens LuncheOn Church of Christ serving at noon. For 2206. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-July 7, 1982 i iii - ii iii lira i i iii ii THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. . Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly mmslml imbhlmi in Iredferd, Vemamt. S,triptlem reteo. Vorm, n earl Not Nempdd*. $t.0O I",, ve; $t.00 for ,il ma0ko; nt ef state $1|.N per yNr end $L00 for six mNths; Se,r tiffin diKu,,t $2.N. Secend class pesp peld e! hHel, Vemeat 0S05|. Publidmd by Nectlmes! Publltbiq Compu, Inc.. P.O. Sex ]78. |mcneil. Robert F. Huminsld President & Publisher Bradford /  Woodsville t;02-222-528 i  .i 603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper q ii ii i, i ii i ii i,i, ,i ,J i , ' ' i" " , 'I' Editorial Tax stabilization in Bradford Tax stabilization has been the major issue at regular and special Town Meetings this year and a lesser issue at last week's Annual School Meeting in the Town of Bradford. At issue is a graduated tax break originally adopted in Bradford as an emergency favor for property owners in the town whose taxed property had been damaged by flood or fire. In more recent times, beginning about 20 years ago, tax stabilization has been used in the town as an incentive device to spur industrial growth. A five year tax stabilization plan can give a business opening up a "50 percent tax break during its first year, 30 t the second year, 20 percent the third year, ten percent the fourth year, and equal property assessment on the fifth year. Many opposing the idea of tax stabilization for new businesses point to the fact that residential property owners are never offered individual tax breaks as an incentive or for anything else by the town or school district. Many of these same people are finding themselves wondering if in- creasing industry actually decreases taxes or solves any of the town's problems in the long run. More in- dustry means more jobs, but it often signals an increase in costly school enrollments and additional services tO be provided for by the town. It is this subject of growth that is the single most important issue facing Bradford today. But, there is undoubtably a great need for jobs in the Bradford area. Philisophical questions over whether or not to use tax stabilization or tax incentives to recruit industry probably mean very little to the unemployed. In the mid-1960's voters in Bradford gave the town's selectmen the authority to grant tax stabilization on their own. Because of mixed sen- timent over the issue, the selectmen have developed a policy whereby all tax stabilization requests are granted by the voters, not by themselves, at Town Meetings. This policy has been criticized by some who have become tired of the debate or are concerned that the policy might not have been fair. Four requests for the tax break were defeated at Bradford's regular Town Meeting in March; three weeks ago voters decided to grant tax stabilization at a special Town Meeting held specifically to act upon the request of a computer company seeking to locate in the town. Another request for tax stabilization has just been made by a Canadian firm planning to purchase the Channel Mills clothing factory. We believe the selectmen's policy has been fair and has worked on a justifiable basis considering the merits and differences of each request. Any decision formed by a consensus of town voters is more democratic than the decision of three town of- ficials at a selectmen's meeting. But it is time for the voters to address the whole issue and put the question of tax stabilization to a vote, perhaps even with established criteria set for" eligibility for requests. Voting on each request has worked well up to now, but it is time to either define tax stabilization policy in greater detail or to finally abolish the tax break altogether. Keep writing those letters Freedom of the press is the most important right of an individual in the United States. It enables one to speak out on issues and provides the right to say what is on your mind without the fear of reprisal or censorship. This is why we print all submitted letters to the editor -- provided their authen- ticity is not in question and that they are in no way slanderous. We respect the individual beliefs of those who use our forum, even if the beliefs represented in those letters are not always shared by us. And, it is a rare occasion, indeed, when we exercise our option to reply to the views stated in a letter. However, Mr. Frank L. Cutler, of Bridport, Vt., has presented his views on this page often enough so that some comment on his most recent correspondence (printed in this issue) seems fair. This week, Mr. Cutler supplies the accusation that thousands of concerned citizens, among them many area residents, demonstrating against the nuclear arms race are doing so only because they have been duped by a communist conspiracy. This kind of inane stance on the issue of nuclear arms control demonstrates an inability to accept the very real concerns of people acting on a hugely complicated and threatening issue. By attributing concern and action to a communist conspiracy, Mr. Cutler often seems to opt for the easy way nut. However, we urge him to con- tinue exercising his freedom of speech in this newspaper and others. For his stated philosophies do much to strengthen the resolve of many who share his views -- and just as many whodonot. Letters to the Edi From Bradford to "Barford" To the Editor: In the June 30th edition of the Journal Opinion I read an article which really appalled me. There it was indicated that there was a possibility that by Fail Bradford might have five places open for the sale of liquor and seven later on. It is had enough to have our State trying to finance itself by the sale of liquors while at the same time trying to hold shout out down the number of deaths this insane due to D.W.I. drinking Now we seem to want to turn go on like this, we our good town into a drinking change the joint. We spend a lot of money from Bradford and talk about protecting our Let's wake up country from Communism needs to be done regardless of the fact that the good town as free greatest danger is from within. It is time for the Churches W. and all concerned citizens to Communist inspired : TotheEditor: (WILPF), in addition to Marti Sawing logs at Newman Lumber Company it ' .,," t, f' .... , I\\; . ,..:t. , _ ., ?.' /t/jl,A ;t ., .. .... . ............... ..  ,- .... :., ...:, ..:- <-..:.,  ";:': ,, ,.  ...... .:,. .... , ":/." , The Newman Lumber Company The Newman Lumber pany. The owner, Murdnck Mrs. Hobbs says that after company in Woodsville has two parts to its history, as it has operated in two separate locations, each of which has its own previous sawmill history. Whitcher-Stone-Acer millsite The location where Newman Lumber had its planer mill (until the fire in 1978) was first used for a sawmill by the Woodsville. Lumber Company, which was owned and operated by Ira Whitcher in partnership with Lewis C. Puttee. Mr. Whitcher had previously carried on a lumber business for more than 30 years in Benton, then moved to Woodsville in 1870 to take advantage of the railroad facilities here. He and Mr. Puttee built a steam sawmill in Woodsville in 1872 and did a lucrative business. Their mill burned in 1879; but they im- mediately rebuilt on the same site, and by 1886 were producing a million and a half feet of rough and dressed lumber a y, besides lath and clapboards,  and were employing I0 to 12 men. In 1891, Mr. Whitcher sold out his half-interest to Mr. Pattee, whose son Fred continued the business under the name of the Woodsville Lumber Works until the mill was again burned around 1902. A third mill was built on this site around 1909 by Dwight S. Stone, who sold out in 1921 to the Acer Lumber Company, which manufac- tured hardwood flouring until it went bankrupt during the Depression, closing out with an auction in 1930. The property went into the hands of the Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank and was vacant for quite a number of years. Later owners and operators have been the Alden K Hay Lumber Company (1943), City Lumber Company (1944) and Newman Lumber Company (1953). Sources: Whitcher's History of Haverhill; Child's Grafton County Gazetteer registered deeds. Trotting park site The present location of Newman Lurhber Company on Routes 10 and 302 was for many years a trotting park, Deeds show that the land had been purchased in 1869 from the Russell King family by Harry Holton for use as a trotting park, and continued as such through ownership by a partnership of Chester Abbott, E. B. Mann and Ira Whitcher (1889), then Dennis R. Rouhan (1916), the Woodsville Park Association (1917), then H. B. Knight and Dennis Rouhan (1943). At one time the 4and was used for a miniature golf course. In 1945 the Johnson Lumber Company bought the land and erected a sawmill here. In 1950 it was sold to Harold Taylor Sr., then in 1956 to Newman Lumber Corn- Newman, died in 1974, and the mill has since been operated by Walter Young, president of the company. Recollections Ruth Wilmot of Wood- sviUe remembers when the present mill site was a trotting park and fairground, later a miniature golf course. Back in the Twenties, Ruth Hobbs of Woodsville (Mrs. Arthur Hobbs) worked as bookkeeper and stenographer for Acer Lumber Company, starting when she was only 17 years old. Being so young, and a girl, they were dubious about whether she could handle the work -- but she stayed there about five years, as long as the company was in business. She later worked for Newman Lumber. Mrs. Hobbs says that when she started working for Acer, their office was in the bottom floor of the present home of Eugene Burt on Terrace Street. The next floor the mill went bankrupt during the Depression, it was put into the hands of a trustee, E. C. Hirst. He had the mill workers dry and saw what lumber was already on the premises, and sold it out as he could, then sold the property at auction in 1930. Mrs. Murdock Newman says that she and her husband first moved to the North Country in 1951, when they leased a mill in Lisbon, then came to Woodsville in 1953. At that time they bought their original mill site (across from Grafton Motors) where there was an old planer mill that had been deserted for several years. One day they went out for a Sunday drive through Sugar Hill and happened to encounter S. Gerard Paine, who gave them a tour of his buildings and his paintings -- one of which was an award- winning watercolor of the old mill the Newmans had just bought. Mr. Young now has the painting in his office. S  for single .... mit]nd the top floor ' was occupied by the cook, sawmill on the old trotting National The Western Goals Foun- dation of Alexandria, Va., in their new study entitled: "The War Called Peace: The Soviet Peace Offensive" states that the demonstration held in New York on June 12th was led and organized by representatives of CPUSA (Communist Party, U.S.A.) fronts, the U.S. af- filiates of international Soviet fronts, and of groups that have close ties with Soviet fronts. These include the U.S. Peace Council (USPC), Christian Peace Conference (CPC), Clergy and Laity Concerned (CALC), American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), War Resisters League (WRL), and Women's International League for Peace and Freedom CPUSA-controlled and in- Fron fluenced union groups. The The large Mobilization For Survival from Catholic (MFS), a key part of the rally, ders, Protestant may soon be supplanted by a and q new group called Federation demonstrated for Progress (FP). the Left has Religious and church inroads in the groups, New England regional mainstream delegations and children were munities. The insulated in the march from smiling faces the large number of Marxist- U.S. disarmament Leninist parties and support seem to realize groups for Soviet-sponsored were being terrorists, such as the hate to see Palestine Liberation because once Organization (PLO), Irish was suckered. I Republican Army (IRA), for President South West Africa People's Roosevelt, the Organization (SWAPO), sibleformykidl African National Congress being blown (ANC) of South Africa, the him at New People's Army in the Philippines, and Farabundo Mrs. Harvey Hardy, and her husband. Later the office was in Dwight Stone's former office building, in front of the present Grafton Motors building (where Route 302 runs now), and an addition was built onto the building. Later, when Route 302 was rebuilt, Newman Lumber set the office building back to make room for the road. After the planing mill burned, in 1978, the entire office building was moved up to its present location on the mill property. Mrs. Hobbs says that the company was named Acer because the name means maple -- and the company worked mostly with maple lumber, along with birch and beech. Acer bought rough- sawn. partially dried hard- wood lumber, then kiln-dried it and manufactured it into high quality hardwood flooring. Some of it was extra thick, for bowling alleys, so that it not onty was firm, but could be sanded repeatedly without removing the mat- ching. Mrs. Hobbs remembers the rough lumber being stacked onto little carts, which were pushed into the kilns. It was always very steamy in the kilns, from the moisture of the lumber. The kilns were kept heated around-the-clock, seven days a week, and were fueled with scrap wood, sawdust and shavings. The lumber was dried until moisture.meters said it was exactly right. Then, after sawing and planing, the finished flooring was fastened into bundles with metal strapping and was moved by conveyor, either directly into railroad cars. or across the track into a big storehouse. The track ran right through the millyard, between the buildings. Sober reflections arms control by GARY SCHMITT Mr. Schmitt is a U.S. Senate staffer. Wednesday, JulY 7 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 8 BRADFORD: Selectmen, 4:00 p.m. CORINTH: Unified District 36 School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Friday, July 9 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p.m. Monday, July 12 WOODSVII J.R: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. CORINTH: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. BRADFORD: Trustees, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 14 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. President Reagan's announcement that the United States and the Soviet Union will soon begin strategic arms control negotiations has " been met with widespread enthusiasm. The general view seems to be that arms agreements make the world a safer place to live in -- that they lessen significantly the probability of war. As with most political opinions there is an element of truth to this one. However, as is also the case with most such opinions, it is an exaggeration, which does not  simply corresd to the facts.  .Recent ers..iii. _ of American uroOCK rewman bUIlt a history inmcates mat even arms accorus that actually reduce the number of arms do not necessarily ensure peace. Perhaps the most salient example of this point is provided by the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. In this accord Japan, Great Britain and the United States agreed, among other things, to reduce the number of battleships they held by roughly half and to build no new battleships for a decade. It was reasoned that since bat- tleships were essential for controlling the world's sea lanes, a reduction in their number would guarantee peace by deterring nations from attempting to seize what they could not hold. The 1922 treaty, however, failed to halt the construction of new ships; and, in- directly, it fueled the building of even more sophisticated weapons systems. Truly, no sooner had the ink dried on the accord than Japan -- remaining within the letter of the treaty -- began building a powerful new kind of ship, the 10,000 ton cruiser. And, in an dfort to regain what the battleship had once provided, the aircraft carrier soon was developed-- and used at Pearl Harbor. Arms agreements, then, can reduce the number of weapons but they cannot reduce the ambitions and interests of nations or the individuals who lead them. On the other hand, the absence of an park site and continued using the old planer mill -- until January 1, 1978, when the planer mill burned to the ground. Since then the entire operation has been moved to the trotting park lot, and has been continually enlarged and modernized. There was another fire, in the lumber storage yard, on April 16, 1977, but the action of nine fire departments kept it from spreading farther. Mr. Newman built in 1964 the double sawmill, which can handle up to 200,000 feet of lumber a week, and Mr. Young presently has plans for further enlargements of the sawing facilities to a capacity of 250,000 feet per week. The sawmill is quite different from those of the old days, as it is operated entirely from a small enclosure equipped with buttons and levers. NeWman Lumber's output is entirely wholesale, and 98 percent of it is planed lumber, mostly pine for industrial use or for siding, in a great variety of patterns. Mr. Young says that the scrap wood is chipped and sent to James River in Berlin or to Boise Cascade, for making paper. Shavings are tightly compressed in bags by two huge baling machines, and total a trailerload each day, about 1200 bags. They are shipped mostly to Maryland for horse bedding. The hark goes for fuel at the paper mill in Gilman, Vermont. In the near future the mill will begin fueling its own kilns with wood waste, bark, and then sawdust, using boilers that will have to comply with anti- pollution standards. The mill has its own machine shop for equipment repair and for grinding knives for the chipper and planer -- a great variety of knives being needed to produce the many kinds of siding patterns of- fered. While visiting the mill on an extremely cold day, we inquired about the lubrication of machinery under such a great range of temperatures, and Mr. Young said that they use synthetic oils that can function from 70 degrees below zero up to 200 degrees. That should cover almost any weather we are likely to have. Through the years the number in the work force has reached up to 54. However, as agreement can actually Before and during the War, for instance, there was limit on the production of biological weapons. (There was, the Geneva Protocol of prohibited their use; but was not then a signatory.) there was clandestine stock effective and lethal chemical Germany a new family of nerve I and readied for use. But they used. Why? The reason is simple enough. Axis nor the Allied Powers their enemies' strength biological weaponry. In contrast, agreements, the United known to its potential location and number of its most weapon, the land-based ICBM. this circumstance allow  even e -- the leaders of the Soviet speculate about the first strike? Is the United States! that fact? Is the world These that arms agreements can never 1817 the Rush-Bagot the United States and Great cessfully eliminated the naval taking place on the years after the two nations engaged in war with each other. this accord's effectiveness real and long-term confluence and a realization that more in common culturally than any other nations on the earth. In other words, the that led to this agreement's exceptional and not the norm. In-sum, the Reagan conducting the Soviets, should keep in agreement reached is panacea. And the administration prudent to remind the this fact as arms talks g New state police (continued from page 1 ) violations during the month of June as compared with a total number of 826 violations handled by area Vermont State Police during the previous month of May. Other violations reported for June included: four DWl violations, eight incidents of driving with a suspended license, three incidents of carless and negligent driving, 16 violations of the laws of the road, 13 truck violations, one uninspected vehicle, four driving without a license violations, six driving without a registration violations, and 15 non-specified motor vehicle violations. Combined motor vehicle violations add up to a total number of 505 for the month of June. There were 897 total violations reported in May. Motor Vehicle Accidents Police say there were 50 motor vehicle accidents reported in our area last month. Nineteen parsons were injured as a result of these accidents and one person was killed. in most mills, business here at the present time is the slowest Note: Remember the since the Depression, but by antique car rally, antique handling small orders they show and sale, and railroad hope to remain in operation, exhibit in Haverhill on Sun- day, July I 1. Property damage attributed Motor vehicle to accidents in June ran up an May were up estimated total of $139,990, April and up according to police, the same May vs. April The According to police figures, vehicle criminal investigations in during the month Northeastern Vermont were up one-half of one up 29 percent in May over April but rose April and up seven percent over the over the same period last reported during year. period last year. CALEn OF EVEn Wednesday, July 7 WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens Luncheon Church of Christ vestry serving at noon. For call 757-2206. Thursday, July 8 GROTON: Sen, Stafford's office from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. E. CORINTH: The fabulous 13th Annual E. Market at the E. Friday, July 9 BRADFORD: Senior Citizens Luncheon at Vocational Center serving at 11:45 a.m. Fox 2224782. Tuesday, July 13 . FAIRLEE: Historical Society Meeting at the starting at 7:30 p.m. THETFORD: Eclipse Grange Award Hall starting at 7:30 p.m. Town Clerk honored. Wednesday, July 14 THETFORD: A Community Health Nurse will be at the Thetford Hill Church p.m. WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens LuncheOn Church of Christ serving at noon. For 2206.