"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
July 15, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 1     (1 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
July 15, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Number 28 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont j ,, , July 15, 1981 The sun shines brightly on Bradford's Summerf est ght sun- smiled on Bradford's annual summer Summerfest '81, booths lined down- Main Street, clowns out balloons to the and Bruce Stevens out old time tunes on affair July 9- an auction of old and new, special sales, a bar- jam session night street musnc by Bob area residents tourists stopped to the music or the festivities. also in- Farm Day Farm on Rte. 5, or so up the road the Main "-Street lee milk. ice cheese and yogurt out to visitors at o erfest '81 was by local businesses PIANO ROLL BLUES--Bruce Stevens tinkles out old-time tunes while bystanders join in singing during Bradford's Summerfest '81. 111 CROONER--Band leader Bob Hanley eraons a 195h tune during street dance in Bradford attended by more than 1,000. 4 NGDiane of Littleton a craft booth at Summerfest "81 as a clown. the cow TOURIST ATTRACTION---Summerfest '81 attracted many out-of.starers including the Jack Kerr family from Dunellen, N.J. who were visiting the Joseph Sorrentino family in Bradford. Pictured (l-r, top row) Jeff Kerr, Jack Kerr, and Joseph Sorrentino. (i-r, middle row) Christine Derby, David Sorrentino, Georgi Kerr, and Joan Sorrentino. (i-r, front row) Mike Sorrentino and Joe Sorrentino, Jr. Burgess Farm participate in *Open Day at Burgess Farm in Bradford. Farm enthusiast as far away as Denmark signed in the guest book. DISCUSSION--RIchard Vaughan of Newbury discussed dairy fagming with visitors. More pictures inside BROADCASTING--Gene Puffer and Gerry Brooks of WYKR at Open Dairy Farm Day in Bradford. Blood donors show up in spite of heat wave WOODSVILLE--In spite of 90 degree temperatures, 120 donors turned out for the Haverhill Chapter Red Cross Blood Drawing at the National Guard Armory in Woodsy,lie July 8. Both Margaret Taylor and Karen Aldrich, co-chairmen of the Blood Program, were surprised that the Armory was a comfortable 72 degrees. It made it much more pleasant for the volunteer workers as well as the donors. Volunteers who participated in the drawing included: Dr. Donald Kollisch and Dr. Patricia Glowa, physicians on call; Sheila Pollock, Duane Gray and Judy Spencer, registration; Shirley McAllister, baby sitter; Sgt. Wright and Victor Brooks of the National Guard, loading and unloading; Barbara Jones, Dianne Noyes, Elsie Savoy, Dot Willis, Elsie Johnson and Marie Bertrand of the Methodist Girls' Club, canteen; Doris Allen, E.M.T., Margaret Taylor, Martha White, R.N. and Shirley Cobb, canteen table; Harold Taylor, preparation of bags; Rosemary Hall, R.N., Davie Eames, R.N., Pauline Noble, L.PN., Susan Aldrich, L.P. N. Josephine Kluk, L.P.N., Marion Young, L.P.N., Jan Kinder, L.P.N., Sylvia Brill, N.A., Nancy Overton, E.M.T., Mary Hobbs, L.P.N:, Ann Joy, E.M.T. and Bea. Smith, E.M.T., donor room. Donors including t0 first- time donors, were :. Haverhilh Bruce Bishop, Barbara . Bishop, , Gm'Y' Scnon, .howy , Edith Celley, Cheryl Laver- diere, John Mitchell, Irene Lewis, Clifford Batchelder, Earl Aremburg. N. Haverhill: Alison Pollock Shauna Kimball, John Page, Marie Tetreault, Philip Tucker, Edith Henson, Evelyn Elms, Douglas White, Rosamond Bailey, Elizabeth Lack,e, Janet Kinder, John e Demers, Don Hammond, Robert Clifford, John Far- nham, Lydia Hatch, Deborah Blay, Sara White, Kevin Bruno, William Hall. Woodsvllle: Lois Paye, Evalona Bedard, Bruce Labs, Kathleen Labs, Armond McGennis,-Charles P. Butson, Roger Fournier, Charles L. Butson, Barbara Lamont, June Pudvah, Judith Spencer, Shirley Cobb, Kareff Whalen, Harold Noyes, John Noble, Pauline Noble, Martin Noble, Betty Maynes, Richard Roy, Virginia Bradley, Julius Tueckhardt, Edward Loranger, Frank O'Malley, Clarice Murray, John Cobb, Peter Thompson, Josephine Kink, Harold O. Taylor, Ron Fournier, Conrad Fournier, Roland Moore, Karl Lunz, Thomas Wozney, Edward Cook, Jean Roy, Victor Roy, Jessie Kendall, Susie Smith, Rose Cox. Mary B. Lavasseur, Karen Hudson. Bath: Rosalie Aldrich, Thomas Lenkowski, Donald Killisch, M.D. Others from New Hamp- shire: Barbara Farr, Donna Mitton, Earl Ramsay, Sandra Ingerson, Warren Wetherbee, Barbara Willis, Emily Brooks, Duane Gray, Timothy Corey Nelda Coulter, Jackuelyn Sawin, Robert Elder, Jim Moore. Newbury- Greg Perkins, Amanda Bowen, Florence Welch, Edith Thurston, Susan Spooner. Wells River: ,'Donald Staplefeld, Marie McLure, Dorothy Butsou, Kenneth Sabin, Doris Allen, Robert Longmore, Shellie Warner, Stanley Whitman, David The Ryegates: Jeanne Wyman, Stephen Elliot, Bertha Stevens, Stevon Blood, Kenneth Nelson, Jane Grimes, Nancy Perkins. Others from Vermont: Debra Morrison, Kenneth Vittum, Genevieve Perryman, Betty Morse, Steven Longmore, Sandra Sapounas. The next Haverhill Chapter drawing will be in February. Missing boy is found after three days lost HAVERHIA 12-year-old uncommunicative. The austistic boy from weather was warm and wet in Massachusetts has been found the area during the e0 hours unharmed on Black Mountain Kevin was exposed to the where he was lost for three weather. days. The boy and his father, The boy, Kevin Barker of Robert Barker, were flown by Haverhill, Mass., had only a National Guard helicopter few scratches to show for his from the mountain to Cottage ordeal when he was located in Hospital, where Kevin was dense undergrowth at the released after examination. A 2,200-foot level of the yn- hospital spokesman described tain he was trying to dim . him as "tired and hungry but Kevin had disappeared from otherwise okay." a gathering of family and ,,- friends at Lime Kiln Camp- ground July 4 after telling his parents he wanted to climb the mountain and being told they would do it the next day. The youngster was first located June 7 by John Brignoli of Marshfield, Mass., who himself is the father of an autistic child. Brignoli heard radio reports of the missing boy and drove to New Ham- pshire to help.search. Austism ts a learning disorder that makes a child Coupon Clipper starts today Another new feature, "The Coupon Clipper," starts this week in the Jourmll Opinion. Jane Fuller, a consumer expert who is author of "The Coupon Clipper," will tell you how to save and even earn money through coupon and refund offers. She notes that manufac- turers of national brand supermarket products offered nearly 7,000 refund offers last year and with information in this new column "readers can turn virtually every box top and label in their kitchens into cash." Theoral to.f00 elemental, roof THETFORD--The Thotford School Beard has hired a consulting firm to'cheok the leaking elementary school roof and will warn a special town meeting for Sept. 3 to vote funds for replacement of the roof. Pantel-Thrall Associates, an engineering consulting firm, will check the roof for needed repairs and for safety at a cost of $2,500. The firm was low bidder for the work. If approved by voters at the special meeting, bidding on construction and start of construction is expected to begin in late September. HOME DESTROYED--The Orford home of the Tim Giesing family was destroyed by fire caused by lightning. Fire destroys Orford home ORFORD--Fire started by relatives in Connecticut when Piermont, Lyme and Thetford lightning destroyed the Tim the fire occurred, fire departments responded to Giesing house on Rte. 25 Fire Marshal Bud Lewis the blaze. during arecentthunderstorm, said lightning hittheentrance Only a few tools in the The Giesings and their five box and shot through the basement were saved from children were visiting television. Oxford, Fairlee. thefire. Newbury .society traces history NEWBURY--The Newbury Dartmouth College in New Hamlshire Grants. now Historical Society held its Hanover in 1770. known as Vermont, were busy second meeting of the season at the Bailgy Club in Newbury July 8. The new President, Alexander Urquhart, presided over a business meeting at which a life membership and a memorial roll entry were announced. The next meeting is calkl for Aug. 12 in the Fellowship Hall in W. Newbury where William Lighffoot will speak on "The Development of the Radio". Gerry Brooks read a paper that had been delivered at the The upper Connecticut River was composed of small frontier settlements. When Wheelock arrived in Hanover there were 100 persons in 20 families. At the beginning of the revolution a government was set up in New Hampshire giving only tree representative to all the town in Grafton county which then extended to Hanover. Support from England through the Royal Governor was no longer available to Dartmouth. preventing New York from ha,ing control and. at a convention in Windsor in 1777. established a separate state west of the Connecticut River. Wheelnck decided to ignore New Hampshire and petitioned the Vermont legislature to accept 16 towns on the east ,side of the Con- hectic,at into the State of Vermont. The Arlington Junta opposed it in fear that the political balance of power would shift to the east side of Wheelock persuaded the the Green Mountains. Popular Uermont Historical Society's twm of Graiton unt), to vote in 177 reversed the annual m three yrl  no de!egat to the assembly's rejection and ago. It told of tlie area ect both sbom'dId. : ]gter created the first East Union. sides of the river, beginning Government by way of Now Wheeleek could apply to with the influence of Eleazer protest, Meanwhile the land Vermont for aid to the college. Wheelock who established speculators in the west of the New Hampshire protested . vtgorously to Vermont and Ethan Allen reported from the Contiental congress that the AWARD.--Rural Carrier James Barber receives 25. year Postal Service Award from Haverhill Post- master Bertha Aremburg. James Barber gets post office award HAVERHILL--Rural Carrier boxes. He delivers, mail from James Barber has received Haverhill, Piermont and Pike his 25-year Postal Service Post Offices. The trip takes Award from Haverhill him into parts of 6 different Postmaster Bertha Arem- towns. burg. This is for 22 years Postal and 3 years Military Service. At the same time, Barber received a 22 year Safe Planning-zoning Driving Award and a letter of manuals available appreciation. When he started delivering MONTPELIER--The Ver- mail in 1959 he went about 30 mont Department of Housing miles per day and had 162 and Community Affairs is boxes. Now he travelsabout95 distributing manuals to help miles per day and has 331 local officials with their planning and zoning ' responsibilities. Grafton hunches fuel saving plan Planning commissioners, administrative officers, HAVERHILL--The Grafton Fairlee and energy analyst members of twon boards of County Executive Committee has begun a $29,285 program to conserve energy at the courthouse building, nursing home and steam plant. The committe at a meeting July 8 agreed to launch the program by committing $17,000 left over from last year's fuel oil budget. Chris Herb to save $25,000 in fuel costs the first year and ultimately savings of $60,482 when the project is completed. The energy consultants will meet with the county com- missions to initiate the program within the next month and a county employee will be trained to operate an energy management program. adjustment and others can use the Home Study Manuals to learn about duties and responsibilities under the Vermont Planning and Development Act. Study questions are included as well as pertinent sections of the law. Copies have been mailed to Vermont Town Clerks, and to each Regional Planning Commission. Read "The Coupon Clipper" The program was estimated this week and every week in by consultants Roger Aubin of the Journal Opinion. Dynamic Integrations Corp, of power of the confederacy would be used to annihilate Vermont and vandieate New Hampshire. The Vermont assembly voted to exclude the towns east of the river. The 27 towns along both sides of the upper river voted to secede  from Vermont and call a convention to form a new state along the river. Wheelock's next maneuver was to petition the Exeter government to take all of the old New Hampshire Grants, which would center New Hampshire on tbe Con- necticut. New Hampshire agreed providing the Con- tinental Congress approved. At this point Wheelock became poor in health, dying at the age of 68. The upper river towns were again ac- cepted into Vermont and later were again rejected and fnally the towns east of the river sent a representative to New Hampshire and we were, as we are today, separated into Vermont and New Hampshire by the Connecticut River. Block grant explained by. Gregg WASHINGTON--The U.S. House of Representatives' recent approval of the Gramm-Latta Reconciliation package now makes it possible to achieve the federal budget cuts essential to bringing inflat)on under control, says Rep. Judd Gregg, R-N.H. Last week's House budget vote marked the most sub- stantial reduction and revision in federal government spending this nation has witnessed, he said. "The House approved an estimated $38.2 billion spending reduction for Fiscal Year t962 and at least $15 billion over the next three years. This will result in the trimming down of more than 250 domestic programs," Gregg said. "It has been a very painful and confusing process across the board, Nonetheless, through it all, Congress has emerged with spending reductions and please turn to pa.e : Number 28 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont j ,, , July 15, 1981 The sun shines brightly on Bradford's Summerf est ght sun- smiled on Bradford's annual summer Summerfest '81, booths lined down- Main Street, clowns out balloons to the and Bruce Stevens out old time tunes on affair July 9- an auction of old and new, special sales, a bar- jam session night street musnc by Bob area residents tourists stopped to the music or the festivities. also in- Farm Day Farm on Rte. 5, or so up the road the Main "-Street lee milk. ice cheese and yogurt out to visitors at o erfest '81 was by local businesses PIANO ROLL BLUES--Bruce Stevens tinkles out old-time tunes while bystanders join in singing during Bradford's Summerfest '81. 111 CROONER--Band leader Bob Hanley eraons a 195h tune during street dance in Bradford attended by more than 1,000. 4 NGDiane of Littleton a craft booth at Summerfest "81 as a clown. the cow TOURIST ATTRACTION---Summerfest '81 attracted many out-of.starers including the Jack Kerr family from Dunellen, N.J. who were visiting the Joseph Sorrentino family in Bradford. Pictured (l-r, top row) Jeff Kerr, Jack Kerr, and Joseph Sorrentino. (i-r, middle row) Christine Derby, David Sorrentino, Georgi Kerr, and Joan Sorrentino. (i-r, front row) Mike Sorrentino and Joe Sorrentino, Jr. Burgess Farm participate in *Open Day at Burgess Farm in Bradford. Farm enthusiast as far away as Denmark signed in the guest book. DISCUSSION--RIchard Vaughan of Newbury discussed dairy fagming with visitors. More pictures inside BROADCASTING--Gene Puffer and Gerry Brooks of WYKR at Open Dairy Farm Day in Bradford. Blood donors show up in spite of heat wave WOODSVILLE--In spite of 90 degree temperatures, 120 donors turned out for the Haverhill Chapter Red Cross Blood Drawing at the National Guard Armory in Woodsy,lie July 8. Both Margaret Taylor and Karen Aldrich, co-chairmen of the Blood Program, were surprised that the Armory was a comfortable 72 degrees. It made it much more pleasant for the volunteer workers as well as the donors. Volunteers who participated in the drawing included: Dr. Donald Kollisch and Dr. Patricia Glowa, physicians on call; Sheila Pollock, Duane Gray and Judy Spencer, registration; Shirley McAllister, baby sitter; Sgt. Wright and Victor Brooks of the National Guard, loading and unloading; Barbara Jones, Dianne Noyes, Elsie Savoy, Dot Willis, Elsie Johnson and Marie Bertrand of the Methodist Girls' Club, canteen; Doris Allen, E.M.T., Margaret Taylor, Martha White, R.N. and Shirley Cobb, canteen table; Harold Taylor, preparation of bags; Rosemary Hall, R.N., Davie Eames, R.N., Pauline Noble, L.PN., Susan Aldrich, L.P. N. Josephine Kluk, L.P.N., Marion Young, L.P.N., Jan Kinder, L.P.N., Sylvia Brill, N.A., Nancy Overton, E.M.T., Mary Hobbs, L.P.N:, Ann Joy, E.M.T. and Bea. Smith, E.M.T., donor room. Donors including t0 first- time donors, were :. Haverhilh Bruce Bishop, Barbara . Bishop, , Gm'Y' Scnon, .howy , Edith Celley, Cheryl Laver- diere, John Mitchell, Irene Lewis, Clifford Batchelder, Earl Aremburg. N. Haverhill: Alison Pollock Shauna Kimball, John Page, Marie Tetreault, Philip Tucker, Edith Henson, Evelyn Elms, Douglas White, Rosamond Bailey, Elizabeth Lack,e, Janet Kinder, John e Demers, Don Hammond, Robert Clifford, John Far- nham, Lydia Hatch, Deborah Blay, Sara White, Kevin Bruno, William Hall. Woodsvllle: Lois Paye, Evalona Bedard, Bruce Labs, Kathleen Labs, Armond McGennis,-Charles P. Butson, Roger Fournier, Charles L. Butson, Barbara Lamont, June Pudvah, Judith Spencer, Shirley Cobb, Kareff Whalen, Harold Noyes, John Noble, Pauline Noble, Martin Noble, Betty Maynes, Richard Roy, Virginia Bradley, Julius Tueckhardt, Edward Loranger, Frank O'Malley, Clarice Murray, John Cobb, Peter Thompson, Josephine Kink, Harold O. Taylor, Ron Fournier, Conrad Fournier, Roland Moore, Karl Lunz, Thomas Wozney, Edward Cook, Jean Roy, Victor Roy, Jessie Kendall, Susie Smith, Rose Cox. Mary B. Lavasseur, Karen Hudson. Bath: Rosalie Aldrich, Thomas Lenkowski, Donald Killisch, M.D. Others from New Hamp- shire: Barbara Farr, Donna Mitton, Earl Ramsay, Sandra Ingerson, Warren Wetherbee, Barbara Willis, Emily Brooks, Duane Gray, Timothy Corey Nelda Coulter, Jackuelyn Sawin, Robert Elder, Jim Moore. Newbury- Greg Perkins, Amanda Bowen, Florence Welch, Edith Thurston, Susan Spooner. Wells River: ,'Donald Staplefeld, Marie McLure, Dorothy Butsou, Kenneth Sabin, Doris Allen, Robert Longmore, Shellie Warner, Stanley Whitman, David The Ryegates: Jeanne Wyman, Stephen Elliot, Bertha Stevens, Stevon Blood, Kenneth Nelson, Jane Grimes, Nancy Perkins. Others from Vermont: Debra Morrison, Kenneth Vittum, Genevieve Perryman, Betty Morse, Steven Longmore, Sandra Sapounas. The next Haverhill Chapter drawing will be in February. Missing boy is found after three days lost HAVERHIA 12-year-old uncommunicative. The austistic boy from weather was warm and wet in Massachusetts has been found the area during the e0 hours unharmed on Black Mountain Kevin was exposed to the where he was lost for three weather. days. The boy and his father, The boy, Kevin Barker of Robert Barker, were flown by Haverhill, Mass., had only a National Guard helicopter few scratches to show for his from the mountain to Cottage ordeal when he was located in Hospital, where Kevin was dense undergrowth at the released after examination. A 2,200-foot level of the yn- hospital spokesman described tain he was trying to dim . him as "tired and hungry but Kevin had disappeared from otherwise okay." a gathering of family and ,,- friends at Lime Kiln Camp- ground July 4 after telling his parents he wanted to climb the mountain and being told they would do it the next day. The youngster was first located June 7 by John Brignoli of Marshfield, Mass., who himself is the father of an autistic child. Brignoli heard radio reports of the missing boy and drove to New Ham- pshire to help.search. Austism ts a learning disorder that makes a child Coupon Clipper starts today Another new feature, "The Coupon Clipper," starts this week in the Jourmll Opinion. Jane Fuller, a consumer expert who is author of "The Coupon Clipper," will tell you how to save and even earn money through coupon and refund offers. She notes that manufac- turers of national brand supermarket products offered nearly 7,000 refund offers last year and with information in this new column "readers can turn virtually every box top and label in their kitchens into cash." Theoral to.f00 elemental, roof THETFORD--The Thotford School Beard has hired a consulting firm to'cheok the leaking elementary school roof and will warn a special town meeting for Sept. 3 to vote funds for replacement of the roof. Pantel-Thrall Associates, an engineering consulting firm, will check the roof for needed repairs and for safety at a cost of $2,500. The firm was low bidder for the work. If approved by voters at the special meeting, bidding on construction and start of construction is expected to begin in late September. HOME DESTROYED--The Orford home of the Tim Giesing family was destroyed by fire caused by lightning. Fire destroys Orford home ORFORD--Fire started by relatives in Connecticut when Piermont, Lyme and Thetford lightning destroyed the Tim the fire occurred, fire departments responded to Giesing house on Rte. 25 Fire Marshal Bud Lewis the blaze. during arecentthunderstorm, said lightning hittheentrance Only a few tools in the The Giesings and their five box and shot through the basement were saved from children were visiting television. Oxford, Fairlee. thefire. Newbury .society traces history NEWBURY--The Newbury Dartmouth College in New Hamlshire Grants. now Historical Society held its Hanover in 1770. known as Vermont, were busy second meeting of the season at the Bailgy Club in Newbury July 8. The new President, Alexander Urquhart, presided over a business meeting at which a life membership and a memorial roll entry were announced. The next meeting is calkl for Aug. 12 in the Fellowship Hall in W. Newbury where William Lighffoot will speak on "The Development of the Radio". Gerry Brooks read a paper that had been delivered at the The upper Connecticut River was composed of small frontier settlements. When Wheelock arrived in Hanover there were 100 persons in 20 families. At the beginning of the revolution a government was set up in New Hampshire giving only tree representative to all the town in Grafton county which then extended to Hanover. Support from England through the Royal Governor was no longer available to Dartmouth. preventing New York from ha,ing control and. at a convention in Windsor in 1777. established a separate state west of the Connecticut River. Wheelnck decided to ignore New Hampshire and petitioned the Vermont legislature to accept 16 towns on the east ,side of the Con- hectic,at into the State of Vermont. The Arlington Junta opposed it in fear that the political balance of power would shift to the east side of Wheelock persuaded the the Green Mountains. Popular Uermont Historical Society's twm of Graiton unt), to vote in 177 reversed the annual m three yrl  no de!egat to the assembly's rejection and ago. It told of tlie area ect both sbom'dId. : ]gter created the first East Union. sides of the river, beginning Government by way of Now Wheeleek could apply to with the influence of Eleazer protest, Meanwhile the land Vermont for aid to the college. Wheelock who established speculators in the west of the New Hampshire protested . vtgorously to Vermont and Ethan Allen reported from the Contiental congress that the AWARD.--Rural Carrier James Barber receives 25. year Postal Service Award from Haverhill Post- master Bertha Aremburg. James Barber gets post office award HAVERHILL--Rural Carrier boxes. He delivers, mail from James Barber has received Haverhill, Piermont and Pike his 25-year Postal Service Post Offices. The trip takes Award from Haverhill him into parts of 6 different Postmaster Bertha Arem- towns. burg. This is for 22 years Postal and 3 years Military Service. At the same time, Barber received a 22 year Safe Planning-zoning Driving Award and a letter of manuals available appreciation. When he started delivering MONTPELIER--The Ver- mail in 1959 he went about 30 mont Department of Housing miles per day and had 162 and Community Affairs is boxes. Now he travelsabout95 distributing manuals to help miles per day and has 331 local officials with their planning and zoning ' responsibilities. Grafton hunches fuel saving plan Planning commissioners, administrative officers, HAVERHILL--The Grafton Fairlee and energy analyst members of twon boards of County Executive Committee has begun a $29,285 program to conserve energy at the courthouse building, nursing home and steam plant. The committe at a meeting July 8 agreed to launch the program by committing $17,000 left over from last year's fuel oil budget. Chris Herb to save $25,000 in fuel costs the first year and ultimately savings of $60,482 when the project is completed. The energy consultants will meet with the county com- missions to initiate the program within the next month and a county employee will be trained to operate an energy management program. adjustment and others can use the Home Study Manuals to learn about duties and responsibilities under the Vermont Planning and Development Act. Study questions are included as well as pertinent sections of the law. Copies have been mailed to Vermont Town Clerks, and to each Regional Planning Commission. Read "The Coupon Clipper" The program was estimated this week and every week in by consultants Roger Aubin of the Journal Opinion. Dynamic Integrations Corp, of power of the confederacy would be used to annihilate Vermont and vandieate New Hampshire. The Vermont assembly voted to exclude the towns east of the river. The 27 towns along both sides of the upper river voted to secede  from Vermont and call a convention to form a new state along the river. Wheelock's next maneuver was to petition the Exeter government to take all of the old New Hampshire Grants, which would center New Hampshire on tbe Con- necticut. New Hampshire agreed providing the Con- tinental Congress approved. At this point Wheelock became poor in health, dying at the age of 68. The upper river towns were again ac- cepted into Vermont and later were again rejected and fnally the towns east of the river sent a representative to New Hampshire and we were, as we are today, separated into Vermont and New Hampshire by the Connecticut River. Block grant explained by. Gregg WASHINGTON--The U.S. House of Representatives' recent approval of the Gramm-Latta Reconciliation package now makes it possible to achieve the federal budget cuts essential to bringing inflat)on under control, says Rep. Judd Gregg, R-N.H. Last week's House budget vote marked the most sub- stantial reduction and revision in federal government spending this nation has witnessed, he said. "The House approved an estimated $38.2 billion spending reduction for Fiscal Year t962 and at least $15 billion over the next three years. This will result in the trimming down of more than 250 domestic programs," Gregg said. "It has been a very painful and confusing process across the board, Nonetheless, through it all, Congress has emerged with spending reductions and please turn to pa.e :