"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
July 15, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
July 15, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 4-The Journal Opinion-July 15, 1981 tTHEAST PUBLISHI NG COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly Hwpaper peMbked in Ikmltd, Vermut. Sebscrllptien rates. Verment end New Hampshire- St.O0 per yoM; $6,0{)fer six memlhs; t of iote $||.OS pot ylr  $F,OS fr six moaflls; Sol |x dtscent $2.00. Second ckm; peerage pew st SnMiferd, Vemelot sse3$. Pvblisked by Nrtkeett Puldlsktq Cempeny, Inc,, P,O, |ez 3711, Smdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford /  , ; Woodsville 802.222-5281  ,  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper I Editorial 00,,Lette s to the Edito ) Q--00on00 00l00,'shearlt00( r r , abo., " Limlaw dump Fireworks are expensive Volunteer The first meeting with the To the Editor: Road and watched the display help needed the proposed Limlaw Dump, As I sit here figuring up the without contributing a dime. was well attended, by beth WHEN IS A TAX CUT  who expenses on our 'ourth What does this mean? It To the Editor : sides of the issue. Another f - NOT A TAX CUT? means that we cannot con- tinue to put on this annual display every year. In closing, just let me say that those of who shoot them off are in constant danger of one blowing up in the tube and injuring or even killing one of us. Our thanks to all who contributed towards the display and thanks to all who helped in any way this year. E. Ryegate Recreation Program Russ Buliard, Treas. E. Ryegate, Vt. Annual Fireworks Display, which I consider to be one gf the best in the area, I can t help but wonder what the public thinks. Do they think that the fireworks company gives us the fireworks. Well, they don't! There is a lot of time and effort that goes into these displays. Th'i-s year we lost $328 on our display. Why? Because many people refused to give a donation and many many more lined Route 5, the Interstate and the Monroe A e .for our time To the Editor: The following reading was read by Mrs. Eleanor Bragg at our UMW Church meeting. Some of us felt we would like to share it with everyone. .................... ARE THI KIIREALLYTO BLAME? ...... " --" We read in the papers and hear on the air. The dump and the voters Some of Bradford's current problems in deciding on a permanent town dump might have been avoided if selectmen bad taken a public reading through the ballot box in advance. Selectmen first decided to quit the Colbeth dump in Newbury because of an increase in the cost there from some $11,000 a year to $15,600, an understandable effort to save the taxpayers money. But the choice of the Powers dump in Wells River as a temporary site stirred an outcry because of the distance involved, and negotiations with the proposed new Limlaw dump raised further hackles among residents in that area who don't want to live near a dump. It took a 5ome 100 approval of the legal voters of the town." A lot of the t0-do could have been avoided if the voters had been con- suited in the first place. Even though the law authorizes selectmen to make certain decisions on town business without a public vote, there are some issues too important to be decided without such a vote and the dump issue is one of them. The dump issue is still up in the air despite the one-year renewal agreeznent with Colbeth and the pending application of Limlaw's dump for which Bradford has authorized a $1,000 deposit, refun- dable if the town decides not to use it. While the issue is fresh in the public mind, it may well be time for Brad- ford to consider creating it's own on a one-year renewable contract at the higher price, while negotiations apparently still continue with Limlaw. Fortunately, the selectmen saw the message in the 100-signature petition and agreed not to make any further decision on a dump site "without the Such an alternative, which hasn't been widely considered to date, would certainly be better than jumping from bed to bed to find a suitable dump at reasonable cost for the town's citizens. After all, it is the citizens who pay for it through their taxes. Walter Record's fire Generous neighbors Rebuilding and restocking seemed impossible, but neigh- bors and friends immediately organized fund-raising drives for the Records. Nearby dairy farmer Everett "Shine" King offered Walter "the pick of his herd" and urged other far- mers to do the same. Many responded with either animals or money, which, with Waiter's 38 heifers, gave his new herd a good start. The building fund With the help of a lot of people, the barn was finally rebuilt and restocked. Walter now has 165 Holsteins and 40 sheep. He still has a mor- tgage, but least he :has the animals to earn money to help pay it off. and has shelter for them. Concerned children Besides the adults, the children of the community showed great concern and sympathy after the fire. Everything was going fine for Walter Record of Lyme. He had spent 15 or 20 years developing a high-producing herd of Registered Holsteins, and at the beginning of April, 1977, he was looking forward to a good year of selling breeding stock and paying off some of the mortgage. His 40 ewes were ready to lamb in two weeks He had lots of feed left at the end of winter, plenty of corn and hay, and the bills were almost caught up. All of this changed on the night of April 2. when Walter and his mother, Ada Record, were awakened by pounding on their door and by shouts that their barn was on fire. Within minutes it was all ablaze and spreading to the silo and milkhouse, fanned by benefited from a great variety Walter and Ada had always of community activities: a welcomed neighborhood benefit auction of donated children at the farm. as well goods totaling $6500, a sale of garden plants earning $1500, benefit foodsales by school children, a barbecue and a supper, each with en- tertainment, also a sale of high winds. Five fire depar-coffee and doughnuts at tments came. but about all Canaan Fair by the4-H club, a they could do was maintain a benefit cocktail party, and screen of water to protect the raffling of two handmade Records' 200-year.old house, afghans and a "barnyard Only three of their 119 cattle escaped from the barn, and two of them were so badly burned that they had to be destroyed Waiter figured that at least his sheep were safe. because they could run into an outside yard where they were ued to being fed -- but the sh, ,ured the barn as a refugt ,:,d saved inside, to suffocate and burn Walter also lost some of his collection of exotic birds --his peacocks, Diamond doves, and Japanese silky bantams. His three pigs were burned, but were not as school classes on field trips, and would answer their questions and make them feel at home. After the fire they received a donation of ten cents from a record grade child, and the following letter: "'I am sorry your barn burned down. I hope you can get enough money to build another barn. So wegan come out and visit you again..." Other children wrote: "I am verry verry sorry your seap and pigs and cow are dead,.." "I am sory that your baron got brned down. I want to giv you something, but al I have is a rabit and chicens../' "I am sorry your farm was a fire. The cows are sad. Me to..." "I hope you can build your cattle up again because you worked so hard. I hope you are all right . . . Good luck and I hope my letter will chier you up." design" quilt made by 34 friends. These activities plus generous cash contributions swelled the building fund to more than $20.000. Ada Record made sure that each and every contributor was thanked individually. Of killing and stealing and crime everywhere. We sigh and say, as we notice the trend, "This young generation.., where will it end?" But can we be sure that it's their fault alone, That maybe a part of it isn't our own? Are we less guilty, who place in their way too many things that lead them astray? Too much money, too much idle time; Too many mcies of passion and crime; Too many books not fit to be read; Too much evil in what they hear said; Too many children encouraged to roam; Too many parents who don't stay at home. Kids don't make the movies, they don't write the books, They don't paint gay pictures of gangsters and crooks; They don't make the liquor, they don't run the bars; They don't make the laws and they'don't sell the cars; They don't peddle the drugs that addle the brain, That's all done by older folks, greedy, for gain. Delinquent teenagers Oh, how we condemn. The sins of the nation and blame it on them: By the laws of the blamesless the Savior made known Who is there among us to cast the first stone? For in so many cases -- it's sad, but it's true-- The title "DELINQUENT" fits older folks, too! Berdie Perry "Key Women" W. Topsham, Vt. The Bradford Recreation Council, through the pages of the Journal Opinion, is looking for volunteer help for its Summer Recreation Program. People interested in sharing their knowledge in the following areas are needed: photography, kits and crafts, dancing, tennis, gymnastics, pupp.etry, guitar, wood- carving and nature crafts. Passing on your knowledge will be helpful to the children of our community. The program will be held at Memorial Field, Monday thru Friday, beginning July 27th thru August 7th from I0:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Boys and girls, ages 7-15, will he taking part in the program. Bradford residents may participate at no charge. The program will he available to others at a nominal fee of $I.00 per day. Interested people can call 802-222-9387 after 4 p.m. for further information. Carolyn Jefts Recreation Ceordinutor Bradford, Vt. ON DEAN'S LIST BURLINGTON--Mary Kelly of S. Ryegate was named to the Dean's List at Trinity College for the second semester of 1981. A student must achieve and maintain a 3.3 grade point average to receive the recognition. BITS OF INFORMATION In America and France a billion is a thousand million. In Great Britain and Germany it is a million million. If you want to be a billionaire, you'll find it easier if you stay right here in America Block grant program -(Jr" The advantages of the block grants will then become clear: --increased coordination --decentralization --economy-efficiency --effective targeting --innovation Q: Aren't block grants actually cleverly designed devices that will result in entire programs being wiped out and millions of low-income people being thrown into the streets? A: No This is what many special interest groups would like you to believe. It is not true. Unfortunately, the block grant issue has gotten con- fused with the budget reduction package. This confusion has not been entirely unintentional, either. The single issue organizations, often looking out for their own interests instead of the interests of those they purportedly serve, have whipped the general public into a state of hysteria by feeding them a steady stream of misinformation about the effect and purpose of the block grant. The intent of the block grants is to redirect many federal programs and im- prove the delivery of federal funds. So, in the Administration effort to give Block grants will all but eliminate the federal overhead involved in ad- ministering the categoricais. For example, implementing the education block grants would make a significant number of Education Department employees ex- pendable. With funding for these programs in block grants and with the day to day decision-making at the local and State level, much of the justification for retaining a separate Department of Education would be eliminated. One of the real advantages to the block grant concept is that it provides a way of reducing Federal bureaucracy without in- creasing the need for more state and local administrative personnel and costs. Q: How will funds be distributed under the block grants? A: Funds will be distributed according to an objective, statutory formula that will take funding decisions out of the hands of subjective bureaucrats and introduce an element of fairness and equity not currently present in the categorical system. Under the current categorical system, (continued fpoLm page 3) / GOP Platform. Q: How would the President's block grants begin to redress the overwhelming imbalance threatening our system of federalism? A: In reality, the initial budgetary savings that will be derived from the block grants will be relatively minor. Total savings in FY82 are expected to he approximately $4 billion. The real savings and significance of the block grants will become apparent in the long term. More than 10,000 specific, individual grants to State-local gover- nments will be cut to less than 500. with corresponding ef- ficiencies resulting from the elimination of separate plans, applications, reports and other Federal requirements. they will eliminate is calcified federal layer of administration. Q: Won't giving ad- ministrative authoritY for these programs result in the state and local governments hiring more bureaucrats at that level? Aren't we just shifting bureaucrats around? meeting is scheduled for July 22, at 7:30 p.m. at the Brad- ford Academy Auditorium, for a final decision. Before this meeting of July 22 takes place, all concerned persons have been asked to submit to the Board of Adjustment, in writing, their objections and reasons why the proposed dump issue should be killed. The letters should be submitted to Shirley Beresford, Russell Wood or Arthur Young, all of Bradford. These letters should be reinforced with written statements from experts, such as Water Board members or experts, soil experts, real estate appraisers, en- vironmentally concerned people, etc., all to. be con- sidered and acted upon by the Board Panel. . .It was pointed out by per- sons at the meeting the following: I. In all probability, the dump would contaminate at least two wells, one well which supplies three families. 2. In all probability it would drain into the Waits River enough to do damage to Bradford's drinking, water supply, to say nothing of af- fecting the fish in the river. 3. It would definitely in- crease the traffic on Route 25 by perhaps 1000 cars a week "going to the dump." {They would go by twice, as they went to and as they came from). 4. Although illegal, it could well receive chemical wastes from sources that would pollute far worse than any septic system. 5. It (the dump) would lOUt two or three men out of a job," creating personal hardships. for them and their families. These men make their livelihood by having dump routes. 6. It would destroy that land for generations for any productive use, and continue to be a draining, polluted area. 7. It would be against the wishes and desires of every family in that immediate area, "argi some not so im- be installed: " I leave you with' this thought; for those who don't know the inside story of this dump proposal, it would he wise to do a little personal research to see just who would benefit from this $21,000 plus a year job. Bradford has been defaced enough and I think it is about time for someone to rise up in anger and call a halt!! The question that concerns everyone is this: Which is more important at this time-- a new dump site at the proposed location or a healthy, clean water supply for individuals close by the site and even the whole Village of Bradford? Think about it and then do something!! Jessie Gilman Bradford, Vt. Categorical funding stresses the application for funds; secondary importance is attached to how the funds will be used once they are received. Block grant funding will remove the uncertainty and the element of com- petition for federal funds. This will allow state-local officials to concentrate on how best to area has had a barn or home fire at some time during its history. Disasters always seem to bring people together, and fires are np exception. They are almost always followed by a great outpouring of concern that is turned into practical help: neighborhood women bringing in food, taking care of children, and sharing clothing, furniture, etc.. while the menfolks provide housing for cattle, help clear away rubMe and start the rebuilding. Some of the farm fires in this area in recent years have been as follows: deliver assistance to needy States and localities more proficiency at grantsmanship individuals. deeisionmaking authority, is emphasized. The question Block grant funding formula decentralization of federal becomes: how we manage to distribution will ensure programs ,would have been convince the federal gover-stability of funding, thus proposed in the absence of any nment that our program is removing another major effort to reduce overall ex- worthy of being funded? headache for administrators. pendRures. Actually, the block grants aimed at truncating this special interest coalition, and other groups like it, and reduce the size of the federal government. The only thing Wednesday, July IS the WELLS RIVER: Blue Mt. Union School Board, 7: 30 p.m. It's strange but tree: over the past 15 years, though official rates of taxation went down, actual went up. Here is how it happened. A great many citizens, hard pressed by started urging cuts in federal income tax rates early sixties. As prices started going up, their salaries went up, which pushed them into brackets. As a result, their after-tax income than before they got their raises. Congress responded to their pleas for relief federal income tax rams in 1964 and 1965. The rates during those two years averaged about example, in 1964, the top-bracket rate, for those highest incomes, was trimmed from a huge 91% Uncle Sam, instead of taking away nine out of dollars of a top earner's income, was willing to little less than eight. On the other hand, the bottom-bracket from 20% to 16%. In the case of a person in circumstances, Uncle Sam, who had been out of every ten earned, was willing to In 1965, the top rate was trimmed again to 70%. And the bottom rate was cut from Then in 1979, for most taxpayers, there was in another rate cut, Personal exemptions were $750 to $1000, and various tax brackets were which meant that many people were not higher brackets they would have been otherwise. At first glance, all the "tax cutting" should have brought a great big smile to taxpayer's face, and left a bigger bulge in fact is, cuts in the tax rate have not been big up with inflation. On the average, taxpayers in 1964 paid 12% of their earnings in federal taxes. Now 18%. Here's the explanation. Over the past 15 years, wages and up about as fast as the consumer price index. typical family in 1964 had an income of $8, grown today to $18,815  just about enou inflation. But because that family is in a higher than it was in 1964, and pays more for Social purchasing power is now actually $1,056 the dollar's 1979 value. What's the answer? The best answer, of significantly curb federal spending, and thus But short of that, economists are urging a federal tax rates each year  to the average family's purchasing power. FAIRLE: Zoning Board of Adjustment, Thursday, July lS BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Planning Commission. WELLS RIVER: Trustees, 1:30p.m. Friday, July 17 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2 p.m, saturday, July IS FAIRLEE: Annual meeting of Lake Morey Protective Assn., Bonnie Oaks, 4 p.m. Monday, July 20 PIERMONT: Planning Board, 8 p.m. ORFORD: Planning Board, 7:30p.m., N. HAVERHILL: Gi'afton County Executive Committee meets to work on 192 budget recommendations, Courthouse, 9a.m. Tuesday, July 21 NEWBURY: Elementary School Board, 7:30p m. GROTON: Selectmen, 7 p.m. HAVERHILL: Planning Board, 7 p.m. LYME: Planning Board, 7: 30 p.m. Reconstruction Even with volunteer labor and discounts on building materials, much more money was needed. Waiter's ap- plication for a government loan seemed to he getting nowhere until Congressman Monroe: Elmer Johnson. Linfieid Ward. Bath: Raymond Hill. Woodsville: James Rowe, Eden Aldrich. Carroll Hastings Swiftwater: Ruth Kimball and Fran Wilkins, North Haverhill: Ralph and Herbert Reed, Gerald Stoddard, Irving Thayer, C.V. Elms, Colin Cassady, Kevin Kennedy, Chesley Norman. Haverhill: Dean Thor. burn. Pike: Elmore Fuller. Warren: Claude Foote. Other barn fires Nearly every farm in the Piermont: Freeman A: No. It: is important to Robie, Frank Ellsworth, remember that the programs Beulah Morrill, Henry Noyes. being consolidated- * Lyme: Bernard Tullar, decentralized are already, for Walter Record, Ed Olsen all intentsandpurpoes, being I Everett King place). administered at the state-local Norwich: Verb Drew. level in some form or another. Thetford: Atkinson farm. Fairlee: Hobart place (now Don Stocking ), Bradford: Almon Groton: Herman Clark. Burgess, Gallerani auction (Note: If you have any barn, Dan Brick. additions or corrections for Corinth: Devins Brothers, this "list, (since about 1950) Bryce Metcalf, Nelson Willey. please call 603-787-6315 im- Newbury: Kendall Welch, mediately, as we are already SewellPage, WalterRenfrew. laying out pages for Book gyega: H.IIgll/,-n,,,., Throe. ) corn CALE killed. Fortunately, 38 of James Cleveland and others Waiter's heifers were boar- stepped in and helped cut red ding for the winter in tape so that barn construction Massachusetts. and were still could get underway before there, winter. WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens' Luncheon, of Christ Vestry, serving at noon. ReservationS: NEWBURY: Community Health Services, will check hypertension, weight and diabetes 4p.m. BRADFORD: Bradford Academy & Trustees special meeting to interview Elementary School staff, Bradford ElementarY, WELLS RIVER: Community Health nurse will check hypertension, weight and Church of Christ, 9 a.m. - I p.m. BRADFORD: Bingo, Legion Hall, 7: 30 p.m. Thtwsday, July IS NEWBURY: Story hour for children 3-5, Library, 10 a.m. ORFORD: Al-Anon Friduy, July 17 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations 222-4782. FAIRLEE: Book sale for benefit Anee's Book Barn on Rte. Saturday, july 18 THETFORD CENTER: Old Home Methodist Church and Thefford Center parade at 11 a.m., auction at I p.m., other events. VERSHIRE: Chicken barbecue at Vershire Show to benefit Vershire Volunteer Fire Dept., Sunday, July IS FAIRLEE: Summer Roy. Willian Martin's Chapel, Lake Morey Rd. East, 9:30 ORFORDVILLE: Ham dinner Orfordville Town Hall, Adults $4, childre settings 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 21 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations 222-4782. HANOVER: Talk on Buddhism by Roger ( of Karme Choling, Buddhist meditation Howe Library, 8 p.m. THETFORD HILL: Films on by Thefford Library Federation, p.m. WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' Christ vestry, serving at noon. 757-2206. Friduy, July 24-25 STRAFFORD: Rummage sale, United July 24 7-9 p.m., July 25, 9-II a.m., for Church Women. Saturday, July MONTPELIER: Second annual TournamenL Montpelier Recreation registration fee, call (802 POST MILLS: Annual summer fair Congregational Church, begins 5 p.m. Serviee to honor Wednesday, July 22 "We are joining the rest of The BRADFORD: Zoning Board of Adjustment meeting on the country on NatimmlPOW- Reco Limlaw dump proposal, Bradford Academy Auditorium, 7:0 MIA Recognition Day in service p.m. remembering the very special Staff, HAVRHIT .l .. f',,m,.,t;, html Prmrd 7..qlfl n m saerifio# mriz I,, it.^._ WHITE RIVER JCT.-- A persons special chapel service said W. A, honoring former American of the prisoners of war and those missing in action will be held "I am at the Veterans and Administration Medical and Regional Officer Center join . Friday, July 17. he addea. Rev. William Nelson, Over chaplain at the Veterans service Administration, will conduct prisoners the service beginning at 12:30 p.m. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-July 15, 1981 tTHEAST PUBLISHI NG COMPANY, Inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly Hwpaper peMbked in Ikmltd, Vermut. Sebscrllptien rates. Verment end New Hampshire- St.O0 per yoM; $6,0{)fer six memlhs; t of iote $||.OS pot ylr  $F,OS fr six moaflls; Sol |x dtscent $2.00. Second ckm; peerage pew st SnMiferd, Vemelot sse3$. Pvblisked by Nrtkeett Puldlsktq Cempeny, Inc,, P,O, |ez 3711, Smdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford /  , ; Woodsville 802.222-5281  ,  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper I Editorial 00,,Lette s to the Edito ) Q--00on00 00l00,'shearlt00( r r , abo., " Limlaw dump Fireworks are expensive Volunteer The first meeting with the To the Editor: Road and watched the display help needed the proposed Limlaw Dump, As I sit here figuring up the without contributing a dime. was well attended, by beth WHEN IS A TAX CUT  who expenses on our 'ourth What does this mean? It To the Editor : sides of the issue. Another f - NOT A TAX CUT? means that we cannot con- tinue to put on this annual display every year. In closing, just let me say that those of who shoot them off are in constant danger of one blowing up in the tube and injuring or even killing one of us. Our thanks to all who contributed towards the display and thanks to all who helped in any way this year. E. Ryegate Recreation Program Russ Buliard, Treas. E. Ryegate, Vt. Annual Fireworks Display, which I consider to be one gf the best in the area, I can t help but wonder what the public thinks. Do they think that the fireworks company gives us the fireworks. Well, they don't! There is a lot of time and effort that goes into these displays. Th'i-s year we lost $328 on our display. Why? Because many people refused to give a donation and many many more lined Route 5, the Interstate and the Monroe A e .for our time To the Editor: The following reading was read by Mrs. Eleanor Bragg at our UMW Church meeting. Some of us felt we would like to share it with everyone. .................... ARE THI KIIREALLYTO BLAME? ...... " --" We read in the papers and hear on the air. The dump and the voters Some of Bradford's current problems in deciding on a permanent town dump might have been avoided if selectmen bad taken a public reading through the ballot box in advance. Selectmen first decided to quit the Colbeth dump in Newbury because of an increase in the cost there from some $11,000 a year to $15,600, an understandable effort to save the taxpayers money. But the choice of the Powers dump in Wells River as a temporary site stirred an outcry because of the distance involved, and negotiations with the proposed new Limlaw dump raised further hackles among residents in that area who don't want to live near a dump. It took a 5ome 100 approval of the legal voters of the town." A lot of the t0-do could have been avoided if the voters had been con- suited in the first place. Even though the law authorizes selectmen to make certain decisions on town business without a public vote, there are some issues too important to be decided without such a vote and the dump issue is one of them. The dump issue is still up in the air despite the one-year renewal agreeznent with Colbeth and the pending application of Limlaw's dump for which Bradford has authorized a $1,000 deposit, refun- dable if the town decides not to use it. While the issue is fresh in the public mind, it may well be time for Brad- ford to consider creating it's own on a one-year renewable contract at the higher price, while negotiations apparently still continue with Limlaw. Fortunately, the selectmen saw the message in the 100-signature petition and agreed not to make any further decision on a dump site "without the Such an alternative, which hasn't been widely considered to date, would certainly be better than jumping from bed to bed to find a suitable dump at reasonable cost for the town's citizens. After all, it is the citizens who pay for it through their taxes. Walter Record's fire Generous neighbors Rebuilding and restocking seemed impossible, but neigh- bors and friends immediately organized fund-raising drives for the Records. Nearby dairy farmer Everett "Shine" King offered Walter "the pick of his herd" and urged other far- mers to do the same. Many responded with either animals or money, which, with Waiter's 38 heifers, gave his new herd a good start. The building fund With the help of a lot of people, the barn was finally rebuilt and restocked. Walter now has 165 Holsteins and 40 sheep. He still has a mor- tgage, but least he :has the animals to earn money to help pay it off. and has shelter for them. Concerned children Besides the adults, the children of the community showed great concern and sympathy after the fire. Everything was going fine for Walter Record of Lyme. He had spent 15 or 20 years developing a high-producing herd of Registered Holsteins, and at the beginning of April, 1977, he was looking forward to a good year of selling breeding stock and paying off some of the mortgage. His 40 ewes were ready to lamb in two weeks He had lots of feed left at the end of winter, plenty of corn and hay, and the bills were almost caught up. All of this changed on the night of April 2. when Walter and his mother, Ada Record, were awakened by pounding on their door and by shouts that their barn was on fire. Within minutes it was all ablaze and spreading to the silo and milkhouse, fanned by benefited from a great variety Walter and Ada had always of community activities: a welcomed neighborhood benefit auction of donated children at the farm. as well goods totaling $6500, a sale of garden plants earning $1500, benefit foodsales by school children, a barbecue and a supper, each with en- tertainment, also a sale of high winds. Five fire depar-coffee and doughnuts at tments came. but about all Canaan Fair by the4-H club, a they could do was maintain a benefit cocktail party, and screen of water to protect the raffling of two handmade Records' 200-year.old house, afghans and a "barnyard Only three of their 119 cattle escaped from the barn, and two of them were so badly burned that they had to be destroyed Waiter figured that at least his sheep were safe. because they could run into an outside yard where they were ued to being fed -- but the sh, ,ured the barn as a refugt ,:,d saved inside, to suffocate and burn Walter also lost some of his collection of exotic birds --his peacocks, Diamond doves, and Japanese silky bantams. His three pigs were burned, but were not as school classes on field trips, and would answer their questions and make them feel at home. After the fire they received a donation of ten cents from a record grade child, and the following letter: "'I am sorry your barn burned down. I hope you can get enough money to build another barn. So wegan come out and visit you again..." Other children wrote: "I am verry verry sorry your seap and pigs and cow are dead,.." "I am sory that your baron got brned down. I want to giv you something, but al I have is a rabit and chicens../' "I am sorry your farm was a fire. The cows are sad. Me to..." "I hope you can build your cattle up again because you worked so hard. I hope you are all right . . . Good luck and I hope my letter will chier you up." design" quilt made by 34 friends. These activities plus generous cash contributions swelled the building fund to more than $20.000. Ada Record made sure that each and every contributor was thanked individually. Of killing and stealing and crime everywhere. We sigh and say, as we notice the trend, "This young generation.., where will it end?" But can we be sure that it's their fault alone, That maybe a part of it isn't our own? Are we less guilty, who place in their way too many things that lead them astray? Too much money, too much idle time; Too many mcies of passion and crime; Too many books not fit to be read; Too much evil in what they hear said; Too many children encouraged to roam; Too many parents who don't stay at home. Kids don't make the movies, they don't write the books, They don't paint gay pictures of gangsters and crooks; They don't make the liquor, they don't run the bars; They don't make the laws and they'don't sell the cars; They don't peddle the drugs that addle the brain, That's all done by older folks, greedy, for gain. Delinquent teenagers Oh, how we condemn. The sins of the nation and blame it on them: By the laws of the blamesless the Savior made known Who is there among us to cast the first stone? For in so many cases -- it's sad, but it's true-- The title "DELINQUENT" fits older folks, too! Berdie Perry "Key Women" W. Topsham, Vt. The Bradford Recreation Council, through the pages of the Journal Opinion, is looking for volunteer help for its Summer Recreation Program. People interested in sharing their knowledge in the following areas are needed: photography, kits and crafts, dancing, tennis, gymnastics, pupp.etry, guitar, wood- carving and nature crafts. Passing on your knowledge will be helpful to the children of our community. The program will be held at Memorial Field, Monday thru Friday, beginning July 27th thru August 7th from I0:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Boys and girls, ages 7-15, will he taking part in the program. Bradford residents may participate at no charge. The program will he available to others at a nominal fee of $I.00 per day. Interested people can call 802-222-9387 after 4 p.m. for further information. Carolyn Jefts Recreation Ceordinutor Bradford, Vt. ON DEAN'S LIST BURLINGTON--Mary Kelly of S. Ryegate was named to the Dean's List at Trinity College for the second semester of 1981. A student must achieve and maintain a 3.3 grade point average to receive the recognition. BITS OF INFORMATION In America and France a billion is a thousand million. In Great Britain and Germany it is a million million. If you want to be a billionaire, you'll find it easier if you stay right here in America Block grant program -(Jr" The advantages of the block grants will then become clear: --increased coordination --decentralization --economy-efficiency --effective targeting --innovation Q: Aren't block grants actually cleverly designed devices that will result in entire programs being wiped out and millions of low-income people being thrown into the streets? A: No This is what many special interest groups would like you to believe. It is not true. Unfortunately, the block grant issue has gotten con- fused with the budget reduction package. This confusion has not been entirely unintentional, either. The single issue organizations, often looking out for their own interests instead of the interests of those they purportedly serve, have whipped the general public into a state of hysteria by feeding them a steady stream of misinformation about the effect and purpose of the block grant. The intent of the block grants is to redirect many federal programs and im- prove the delivery of federal funds. So, in the Administration effort to give Block grants will all but eliminate the federal overhead involved in ad- ministering the categoricais. For example, implementing the education block grants would make a significant number of Education Department employees ex- pendable. With funding for these programs in block grants and with the day to day decision-making at the local and State level, much of the justification for retaining a separate Department of Education would be eliminated. One of the real advantages to the block grant concept is that it provides a way of reducing Federal bureaucracy without in- creasing the need for more state and local administrative personnel and costs. Q: How will funds be distributed under the block grants? A: Funds will be distributed according to an objective, statutory formula that will take funding decisions out of the hands of subjective bureaucrats and introduce an element of fairness and equity not currently present in the categorical system. Under the current categorical system, (continued fpoLm page 3) / GOP Platform. Q: How would the President's block grants begin to redress the overwhelming imbalance threatening our system of federalism? A: In reality, the initial budgetary savings that will be derived from the block grants will be relatively minor. Total savings in FY82 are expected to he approximately $4 billion. The real savings and significance of the block grants will become apparent in the long term. More than 10,000 specific, individual grants to State-local gover- nments will be cut to less than 500. with corresponding ef- ficiencies resulting from the elimination of separate plans, applications, reports and other Federal requirements. they will eliminate is calcified federal layer of administration. Q: Won't giving ad- ministrative authoritY for these programs result in the state and local governments hiring more bureaucrats at that level? Aren't we just shifting bureaucrats around? meeting is scheduled for July 22, at 7:30 p.m. at the Brad- ford Academy Auditorium, for a final decision. Before this meeting of July 22 takes place, all concerned persons have been asked to submit to the Board of Adjustment, in writing, their objections and reasons why the proposed dump issue should be killed. The letters should be submitted to Shirley Beresford, Russell Wood or Arthur Young, all of Bradford. These letters should be reinforced with written statements from experts, such as Water Board members or experts, soil experts, real estate appraisers, en- vironmentally concerned people, etc., all to. be con- sidered and acted upon by the Board Panel. . .It was pointed out by per- sons at the meeting the following: I. In all probability, the dump would contaminate at least two wells, one well which supplies three families. 2. In all probability it would drain into the Waits River enough to do damage to Bradford's drinking, water supply, to say nothing of af- fecting the fish in the river. 3. It would definitely in- crease the traffic on Route 25 by perhaps 1000 cars a week "going to the dump." {They would go by twice, as they went to and as they came from). 4. Although illegal, it could well receive chemical wastes from sources that would pollute far worse than any septic system. 5. It (the dump) would lOUt two or three men out of a job," creating personal hardships. for them and their families. These men make their livelihood by having dump routes. 6. It would destroy that land for generations for any productive use, and continue to be a draining, polluted area. 7. It would be against the wishes and desires of every family in that immediate area, "argi some not so im- be installed: " I leave you with' this thought; for those who don't know the inside story of this dump proposal, it would he wise to do a little personal research to see just who would benefit from this $21,000 plus a year job. Bradford has been defaced enough and I think it is about time for someone to rise up in anger and call a halt!! The question that concerns everyone is this: Which is more important at this time-- a new dump site at the proposed location or a healthy, clean water supply for individuals close by the site and even the whole Village of Bradford? Think about it and then do something!! Jessie Gilman Bradford, Vt. Categorical funding stresses the application for funds; secondary importance is attached to how the funds will be used once they are received. Block grant funding will remove the uncertainty and the element of com- petition for federal funds. This will allow state-local officials to concentrate on how best to area has had a barn or home fire at some time during its history. Disasters always seem to bring people together, and fires are np exception. They are almost always followed by a great outpouring of concern that is turned into practical help: neighborhood women bringing in food, taking care of children, and sharing clothing, furniture, etc.. while the menfolks provide housing for cattle, help clear away rubMe and start the rebuilding. Some of the farm fires in this area in recent years have been as follows: deliver assistance to needy States and localities more proficiency at grantsmanship individuals. deeisionmaking authority, is emphasized. The question Block grant funding formula decentralization of federal becomes: how we manage to distribution will ensure programs ,would have been convince the federal gover-stability of funding, thus proposed in the absence of any nment that our program is removing another major effort to reduce overall ex- worthy of being funded? headache for administrators. pendRures. Actually, the block grants aimed at truncating this special interest coalition, and other groups like it, and reduce the size of the federal government. The only thing Wednesday, July IS the WELLS RIVER: Blue Mt. Union School Board, 7: 30 p.m. It's strange but tree: over the past 15 years, though official rates of taxation went down, actual went up. Here is how it happened. A great many citizens, hard pressed by started urging cuts in federal income tax rates early sixties. As prices started going up, their salaries went up, which pushed them into brackets. As a result, their after-tax income than before they got their raises. Congress responded to their pleas for relief federal income tax rams in 1964 and 1965. The rates during those two years averaged about example, in 1964, the top-bracket rate, for those highest incomes, was trimmed from a huge 91% Uncle Sam, instead of taking away nine out of dollars of a top earner's income, was willing to little less than eight. On the other hand, the bottom-bracket from 20% to 16%. In the case of a person in circumstances, Uncle Sam, who had been out of every ten earned, was willing to In 1965, the top rate was trimmed again to 70%. And the bottom rate was cut from Then in 1979, for most taxpayers, there was in another rate cut, Personal exemptions were $750 to $1000, and various tax brackets were which meant that many people were not higher brackets they would have been otherwise. At first glance, all the "tax cutting" should have brought a great big smile to taxpayer's face, and left a bigger bulge in fact is, cuts in the tax rate have not been big up with inflation. On the average, taxpayers in 1964 paid 12% of their earnings in federal taxes. Now 18%. Here's the explanation. Over the past 15 years, wages and up about as fast as the consumer price index. typical family in 1964 had an income of $8, grown today to $18,815  just about enou inflation. But because that family is in a higher than it was in 1964, and pays more for Social purchasing power is now actually $1,056 the dollar's 1979 value. What's the answer? The best answer, of significantly curb federal spending, and thus But short of that, economists are urging a federal tax rates each year  to the average family's purchasing power. FAIRLE: Zoning Board of Adjustment, Thursday, July lS BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Planning Commission. WELLS RIVER: Trustees, 1:30p.m. Friday, July 17 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2 p.m, saturday, July IS FAIRLEE: Annual meeting of Lake Morey Protective Assn., Bonnie Oaks, 4 p.m. Monday, July 20 PIERMONT: Planning Board, 8 p.m. ORFORD: Planning Board, 7:30p.m., N. HAVERHILL: Gi'afton County Executive Committee meets to work on 192 budget recommendations, Courthouse, 9a.m. Tuesday, July 21 NEWBURY: Elementary School Board, 7:30p m. GROTON: Selectmen, 7 p.m. HAVERHILL: Planning Board, 7 p.m. LYME: Planning Board, 7: 30 p.m. Reconstruction Even with volunteer labor and discounts on building materials, much more money was needed. Waiter's ap- plication for a government loan seemed to he getting nowhere until Congressman Monroe: Elmer Johnson. Linfieid Ward. Bath: Raymond Hill. Woodsville: James Rowe, Eden Aldrich. Carroll Hastings Swiftwater: Ruth Kimball and Fran Wilkins, North Haverhill: Ralph and Herbert Reed, Gerald Stoddard, Irving Thayer, C.V. Elms, Colin Cassady, Kevin Kennedy, Chesley Norman. Haverhill: Dean Thor. burn. Pike: Elmore Fuller. Warren: Claude Foote. Other barn fires Nearly every farm in the Piermont: Freeman A: No. It: is important to Robie, Frank Ellsworth, remember that the programs Beulah Morrill, Henry Noyes. being consolidated- * Lyme: Bernard Tullar, decentralized are already, for Walter Record, Ed Olsen all intentsandpurpoes, being I Everett King place). administered at the state-local Norwich: Verb Drew. level in some form or another. Thetford: Atkinson farm. Fairlee: Hobart place (now Don Stocking ), Bradford: Almon Groton: Herman Clark. Burgess, Gallerani auction (Note: If you have any barn, Dan Brick. additions or corrections for Corinth: Devins Brothers, this "list, (since about 1950) Bryce Metcalf, Nelson Willey. please call 603-787-6315 im- Newbury: Kendall Welch, mediately, as we are already SewellPage, WalterRenfrew. laying out pages for Book gyega: H.IIgll/,-n,,,., Throe. ) corn CALE killed. Fortunately, 38 of James Cleveland and others Waiter's heifers were boar- stepped in and helped cut red ding for the winter in tape so that barn construction Massachusetts. and were still could get underway before there, winter. WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens' Luncheon, of Christ Vestry, serving at noon. ReservationS: NEWBURY: Community Health Services, will check hypertension, weight and diabetes 4p.m. BRADFORD: Bradford Academy & Trustees special meeting to interview Elementary School staff, Bradford ElementarY, WELLS RIVER: Community Health nurse will check hypertension, weight and Church of Christ, 9 a.m. - I p.m. BRADFORD: Bingo, Legion Hall, 7: 30 p.m. Thtwsday, July IS NEWBURY: Story hour for children 3-5, Library, 10 a.m. ORFORD: Al-Anon Friduy, July 17 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations 222-4782. FAIRLEE: Book sale for benefit Anee's Book Barn on Rte. Saturday, july 18 THETFORD CENTER: Old Home Methodist Church and Thefford Center parade at 11 a.m., auction at I p.m., other events. VERSHIRE: Chicken barbecue at Vershire Show to benefit Vershire Volunteer Fire Dept., Sunday, July IS FAIRLEE: Summer Roy. Willian Martin's Chapel, Lake Morey Rd. East, 9:30 ORFORDVILLE: Ham dinner Orfordville Town Hall, Adults $4, childre settings 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 21 BRADFORD: Senior citizens' luncheon, Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. Reservations 222-4782. HANOVER: Talk on Buddhism by Roger ( of Karme Choling, Buddhist meditation Howe Library, 8 p.m. THETFORD HILL: Films on by Thefford Library Federation, p.m. WELLS RIVER: Senior citizens' Christ vestry, serving at noon. 757-2206. Friduy, July 24-25 STRAFFORD: Rummage sale, United July 24 7-9 p.m., July 25, 9-II a.m., for Church Women. Saturday, July MONTPELIER: Second annual TournamenL Montpelier Recreation registration fee, call (802 POST MILLS: Annual summer fair Congregational Church, begins 5 p.m. Serviee to honor Wednesday, July 22 "We are joining the rest of The BRADFORD: Zoning Board of Adjustment meeting on the country on NatimmlPOW- Reco Limlaw dump proposal, Bradford Academy Auditorium, 7:0 MIA Recognition Day in service p.m. remembering the very special Staff, HAVRHIT .l .. f',,m,.,t;, html Prmrd 7..qlfl n m saerifio# mriz I,, it.^._ WHITE RIVER JCT.-- A persons special chapel service said W. A, honoring former American of the prisoners of war and those missing in action will be held "I am at the Veterans and Administration Medical and Regional Officer Center join . Friday, July 17. he addea. Rev. William Nelson, Over chaplain at the Veterans service Administration, will conduct prisoners the service beginning at 12:30 p.m.