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July 21, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4The Journal Opinion-July 21, i982 )RTHEAST PUBLISHi N(; COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion WoeklT newOel idbked ia Ilredlwd. Vermut. $vbudpes ro - Vermt mul New Nempsktre - St.00 pr ycr; $6.1H} fr Idx ks; ! if I0 S|t.00 Ir r lind ST.00 fer siz nths; Senier citizen dbceNt $2.N. Sxlmd ci| ISlle IHdd o! |nldfecd, Vermont 0S0$|. Pwblildked by Nertkeelt Pbllskil Compeny, Inc., P.O. hx Sill. IImdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher An Independent Newspaper Editorial Questions on judicial policy In the discussion of law there will probably always be a question over when to impose the maximum sen- tence allowed under the law and what conditions shd_d predetermine a minimum sentence. There may also be continuing debate as to whether a sentence should be aimed as a deterrent or as a ptmishment, or both. This week we raise these questions for a number of reasons. The first reason is because of the debate stirred last week OVer the sentencing of Louis Hamlin III to a 45 year mira'mum sentence. that decision, two of the three judges pronouncing the sentence over-ruled a third judge who favored a lower minimum sentence of 35 years. The judges favoring the har- sher sentences were lay-judges or elected judge, who may have no formal legal traAng under Vermont The reason subject of sentencing as a deterrent is because of last weekend's brutal murder in Barre of an 18-year old girl. This most recent murder adds an urgency to the debate. We in no way imply that the above two events are connected. At issue in the Ham]in sentence is the following question: what kinds of hienous and vile acts must one carry out to obtain a straight maximum sentence? Louis Hamlin was a teenager (probably a determining factor in the minimum sentence) when be and James Savage com- mitted the most degrading and tor- turous of acts on two innocent 12-year old girls in Essex Junction -- leaving one dead and the other with the nightmare of her experience. Hamlin could he released at the age of 52. Unfortunately, we don't have an answer but we may have spotted a problem. The murder in Barre raises the question of whether or not the policies of our State's judicial system, through the sentencing of criminals in murder and aggravated rape cases, are providing an effective enough deterrent to the mbrally deranged individuals who chose to commit these types of crimes, legaUy sane andunder their own frw will. The problem has not been created in the courts. The frequency of murder and rape cases is not caused by the judiciul system itself but by the society in which it has been deemed to perform under our constitution. However, one has to wonder if Vermont's judicial policy is adequately following its society on a parallel plane in the instances of violent crimes. Letters to the Editor_J Communities greatest assets To the Editor: My heartfelt thanks for the fine article about the Wood- sville fire on page I of your July 14th edition. Two of the community's greatest assets, the Fire Departments and local hospital, gained recognition for doing that which they are there b do. Too often these valuable serwces are taken for granted, ignored or berated for their costs. Your fine coverage and accurate reporting not only makes good news. but demonstrates positive support for those who serve their community. For Cottage Hospital and the local fire departments Edward A. Loranger Woodsville Outstandine lob ambulance volunteers To the Editor: I am sending the below letter from Dr. Frechette in order to give credit to the Ambulance Volunteers for the work they did at the fire in Woodsville on July 7. In the hour and a half bet- ween 6:30 and 8:00 p.m.. these volunteers treated and transported 13 firemen to Cottage Hospital. The duty crew for that shift was Sandi lngerson, Theresa Belyea and Michelle Demers. Also responding were Harold Taylor, Jr., Don Stapelfeld, Peter Gould, Brenda White and Doris Kennedy, thus avoiding the need for us to send out a general alert. We also had help at the scene for several of the hospital staff, some of the Lisbon Life and Piermont FAST Squads, as well as several bystanders and firemen. I commend all of these volunteers for doing such a fine job keeping track of the vital signs for each fireman and treating them at the scene. I remind you that these trained volunteers (many were trained by the Haverhill Chapter of the Red Cross at no charge) work many hours a month without pay and deserve recognition for their good work just as our out- standing firemen do. Dick Guy Dick Guy, President Cottage Hospital Ambulance Service Cottage Hospital Woodsville, N.H. 03785 Dear Dick: f would like to commend the Cottage Hospital Ambulance Squad for the job they did at the recent fire in handling a large number of firemen with heat exhaustion. Treatment in Rules should be upheld To (he Editor: Doug Emerson's letter in your July 14 issue has prompted me to write. Doug, there are a great many racing fans who share your views. I have been at- tending the races at Bear Ridge Raceway for several years and I have been ap- palled at some of the incidents that we have had to witness. It is incredible that week after week we are not allowed to watch good dirt track racing due to a few "hot- heads" who push, shove and are poor sports in general. (Chuck, Danny & Clayton, you are at the top of the list). The rules should be upheld at all times and we should not have to watch favoritism shown. Thanks, to you drivers who drive a good clean race -- it must be discouraging to you fellows to put up with what you have to week after week. Marvin Lewis Washington, Vt. Tufts or Jeffords .for the House? the field was done so well that To the Editor: there was very little for us to The Vermont Democrats do in the Emergency Room may well have a sort of when the patients arrived. I delayed-action "primary" for also was impressed with how Congressman this year, when smoothly things went. David K. Frechette, M.D. Woodsville/ff/ells River Fourth of July., 1983 To the Editor: At this time, I would like to thank each and every person who participated in any way in the 1982 Fourth of July Celebration, whether as a spectator, participant, worker or committee person. We appreciate it. The Woodsville Area Fourth of July Committee. Inc. was formed under the laws and regulations of the State of New a.m. on July 4, 1983. We have already requested par- ticipation of some parade units for this occasion. We realize some improvements can be made in the years ahead, as we learn from our mistakes, and we hope these improvements can be made without charge to the spec- ta tor. The Committee will be meeting each month from now Hampshire and the charter is until next year. making plans filed with e Seclrery  for the 19a3 celebration, If you tate. It is a comunt * wouldlik'*tb' pdrticie in deavor created by a group of any way next year. or can give interested local people for the the committee a lead as to a intent and purpose of celebrating the Fourth of July, and is a non-profit organization. All expenses have been paid for by funds raised by sponsors of our souvemr brochure and the raffle ticket donations, as well as contributions by par- ticipating vendors. Our 1983 celebration will start with a parade at 11:00 prospective unit, idea or person, we do welcome suggestions. Anyway, thanks again to everyone. I appreciate the opportunity to have served on this committee. Stewart Leete S. Ryegate Fourth of July Parade Chairman Common carrier pipelines sought by producers / by JOHN C. BROMLEY Mr. Bromley is a Denver.based freelance Journalist and a .former director of Research for the Office of the Governor of Colorado. ()  i. SSand/IVS2 Very few price increases perturb the American consumer as much as does the rising price of natural gas, the commodity upon which both home heating and the American industrial and office sectors d d eor years, alarmed by consumption- conscious public officials who have de, handed that thermostats be turned down in offices and restaurants, homeowners -- by now shivering a little -- wait their turn. It is only a matter of time, they feel,  government, perhaps prodded to urgency by a shutoff of the one- third of American natural gas which is imported, t0rns therrdoatats down at home, leaving the general population to huddle in their warmest clotbes against an electric oven. Nor are such visions apocalyptic. The ot, as well as the demand curve, of natural gas has risen enormously. The gas which was once a waste product, flared off in the oil fields of yore, is now a precious commodity in an industry with $47 billion in total fixed costs, And, witb new potential for profit, as. well as a stable, rising demand for gas, independent producers of natural gas have atarted a small war against the industry giants, the trammission companies through whe pipelines flow the gas bought by local utilities for home con- sumption. rough the efforts of members of a p of independent gas rs called the Ammciatien for Equal Access to Natural Gas Markets and Suppli, in. depadents are addressing themselves to the needs of both the producer and the consumer. Led by, among others, Dave Wilson of Consolidated Oil and Gas and Bob Kadane of KRM Petroleum, both Colorado-based independent producers with broad in- stretehi from Louisiana to California, the members of Equal Accs hope to break the trammiuion companies' present stranglehold on the market. NotAng the federal control of the gas market since 1933, a cycle only recently days, or sell his new well, usually to the same transmission company that refused him access to the pipeline, In order to remedy this situation, Equal Access proposes amending the Natural Gas Act so that natural gas transmission pipelines are made common carriers. The designation of pipelines as common carriers -- entities with rights of con- demnation and eminent domain, but required to carry everybody's product- was achieved in the crude oil market as early as 1911, when the Rockefeller Trust was broken. Only in this way, argue members m Equal Access, does incentive arise to bring the consumer the least, instead of the most expensive gas. For common carriers, whether railroads or pipelines, are per- mitted to charge only a common tariff fixed by law for commodity tran- " sportation, regardless of ownership. With common carrier status for pipelines, natural gas would enter the free market for the first time since controls were instituted in 1933, for producers -- in the absence of controlled prices as well -- could negotiate directly with consumers, i.e., the local utility and its ratepayers. In contrast, as things stand now both consumers and producers are captives of the pipeline owners, to whom the producer must sell, and sell without negotiation. Equal Access contends that the geographic dislocation of the market -- New York gas drilled in Mississippi, for instance -- will pobably correct itself when independents can negotiate to satisfy demand from the nearest supply. And the opening of California and New Mexico wells ought to reduce gas costs to the people of.San Francisco, even as the price of natural gas is progressively decon- trolled. San Franciscans, says Wilson, "now pay for gas at double the average domestic price." Kadane and Wilson, both veterans of the oil and gas price wars of the 1970s, hope for constructive change through their goal of equal access for all producers to natural gas pipelines. For instance, they see, within a year, a 25 percent increase in the amount of natural gas drilled- awin- crease which would cut current imports in half. "All we ask," says Wilson "is a genuinely national, competitive market." reversed by the Congress and the Reagan administration, these producers claim that the changes they propose will bring about a competitive and national natural gas market. The market dislocation of which Equal Access members complain is the product of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 by which transmission companies -- the owners of natural gas pipelines -- are permitted to establish their own whooly- owned exploration and development subsidiaries. It is from these subsidiaries that parent companies buy the most ex- pensive gasses, ensured by law that they can pass both development costs and transmission expenses on to the beleagured consumer. In turn, while bringing high-cost Alakan ($12.00 per Metric Cubic Foot), Canadian or Mexican gas ($4.94 per MCF) to consumers, the transmission companies pass up, and effectively close off, domestic suppliers of gas (whose product costs an average of $2,00 per MCF.) This infuriates in- dependent producers, who do not have access to pipeline as a matter of right. According to Kadane and Wilson, tran- smission companies are engaging in "a monopolistic pactice which impoverishes consuIIlers. ' ' Wilson uses the example of the California supplier, Pacific Gas and Electric, which has formed a company called Alberta and Southern as a wholly owned subsidiary. In the periods of light gas demand, such as summer and fall, the independents charge that Pacific Gas and Electric packs its lines with Alberta and Southern gas, effectively closing gas wells both in California and New Mexico which would, if PG&E would buy on an open market, sell for less than Alberta and Southern's prices. But cheaper gas means PG&E gets a lesser percentage for carrying it. Not only is the consumer gouged by the present market system, says Equal Access President Wilson, but the producer "is like,the slave Iove Emancipation," For the producer, a parson who drills wells but owns no pipeline, is forced by the current system to beg access to the nearest pipeline and thence to market -- a request which may well be refused. Aad if it is refused, the producer has no recourse other than to cap his well in holms of better Democrat Kaplan may con- front "Democrat" Jeffords in the November elections -- unless challenger Tufts, conservative Republican, defeats "Republican" Jef- fords in the September primaries. Jeffords has a long and consistent voting record-- one that shows him up as more Democrat than many avowed Democrats. Not enough Vermont voters realize this. Kaplan, of course, barring a Tufts defeat in September, has no chance against Jeffords. For him to disagree with major positions taken by Jeffords would be to disagree with his own party. Jeffords, of course, like Stafford, has been "all heart" -- favoring all manner of social programs but delicately declining to increase general taxes to pay for them. On the contrary, he has resorted to printing press "dollars" inflation) thus so debilitating that "dollar" that ordinary people are unable to save against their own exigencies and so are obliged to turn to the federal government for help. Example: Jeffords and Stafford, by debilitating the "dollar", make it impossible for parents to save for a child's college education, then, "all heart", vote for big federal aid college programs. William Tufts, an aware, well educated, energetic young man, moved to a somewhat remote hill farm in Bethel several years ago with negligible economic resources but outstanding deter- mination, did his own house building and work, entered the iusurance field, became top agent for a top firm. He worked hard to persuade someone else to take on "Democrat" Jeffords; when no one else volunteered, he did. (Forget about the unusual hat and boots, worn for "recognition" purposes, and references to movie stars. Both are political ploys and unnecessary. Even his ex- cursions in morality, though pertinent to the times, have no particular bearing on the major governmental issues facing the next Congress. ) As new man in the House, of course, he will lack the seniority -- which Jeffords has put to such poor use. He will lack the kind of legal training which enables Jeffords to talk so per. suasively out of both sides of his mouth. He will lack the political vote-trading debts to other House members and funding debts to powerful political action committees which so bedevil so many long-time House members. Jeffords, by his record, has proven his dedication to a liberal, let-government-do-it- a nd-make-the-savers-pay-for. it (inflation) philosophy. Tufts, whose philosophical convictions center on home rule, individual responsibility, limited federal government and an honest currency, should serve Vermont well. He will be hampered, of course, by the kind of cam- paign funds Jeffords receives from various political action committees, mostly from out- of-state. He will have to try to match whatever Jeffords chooses to spend. He could use some help Herbert G. Ogden Hartland, Vt. The Chalmers and Mills There were various skills and trades represented in the Chalmers and Mills families, but between them they had more than the usual number of designers and builders of houses. Willia m Chalmers family William Chalmers. a flax- dresser, came from Scotland to Newbury in 1834. He made plans for establishing a fac- tory in Corinth for the manufacture of thread and cordage rope), and ordered machinery for the mill from Scotland -- but because of tariff problems, it was ten years befor it was delivered. Finally Mr. Chalmers was able to set up his factory, in connection with a Dr. Hin- ckley (probably Israel Hin- ckley) of Corinth. This was later owned and operated by Barnes Brothers. (According to the Corinth history, Major Joel Barnes, a Civil War veteran, operated a rope and thread factory at Goose Green. ) Wi]ham Chalmers had eight sons, of whom seven. were carpenters, and two of these were also architects. William's son George worked in Boston as a carpenter until the gold rush, then in 1850 went to California, where he designed and built a large number of houses. Carpenters were so scarce out there at that time that he earned ten dollars a day -- a huge sum in those days. George also owned and operated ,a large cattle ranch there in partnership with his brother Alexander Alexander later returned to Vermont and built a mill for sawing and finishiug.lumber, also worked as a contractor and builder. He and another brother, Robert, built a house for their parents (off the Sand Road, house No. 30 on the map following page 253 in the 1977 History of Newbury). A description of the house says that it "shows its architecture, with a cupola, arch top openings, and unusual siding made of pieces of thin board applied onto the boards." t The" present owner is Terrence Maitland. Robert started working with Alexander as a carpenter at age 15. Before he was 20 years old, he had complete charge of a sawmill in Lawrence, Massachusetts. When he was 20. he and his brother William Jr. went to Jackson, Mississippi, where they designed and erected the buildings for a plantation, also a church. Returning to Newbury, they engaged in the lumber business, building a sawmill in which they used the first circular saw in the town of Newbury. They also raised fine horses. Their partnership lasted for 18 years, then in 1872 Robert went to California. He stayed there two years, then worked for five years "in Lowell, Mass., designing and building several blocks and residences. In 1879 he returned to the homestead in Newbury, where he continued his work of drafting plans and preparing specifications for public and private buildings. It was considered that as a worker in wood, he had few equals. Four more brothers worked as carpenters: John built several houses in Newbury, then in 1864, he and James had charge of a gang of men erecting a hospital in Washington, D.C. They also built houses in Springfield and Lowell, Mass., and business blocks and the high school building in Lowell. Brother Albert also worked with them in Lowell. Meanwhile, William Jr. continued farming at the homestead and running his sawmill, later with the help of the youngest brother. Henry. Memorable trip to England To the Editor : wended our way to our final Little did we know, as we destination, Harlow, England left Wells River on July 21, the North Country Chorus and appendages, the adventure that was ahead. Bill Eastman, president of the North Country Chorus, had arranged a singing tour of England and Wales. He had visited in the spring to verify the towns and halls where the chorus was to sing. We traveled to Boston to board a 747 from Logan to Heathrow Airport in London, arriving at 8:00 a.m. June 22 -- London time. Upon arrival we were picked up by two buses with marvelous drivers from Manchester, England, George and Archie. The adventure began; on to Stratford-On.Avon and then to Coventry Cathedral for the first concert where the chorus sang Faure's Requiem at noon. Mter touring a bit the adventure took us to Stuckton- on-Tees in the northern part of England. The people there accepted us with open arms and presented us with a luscious meal upon arrival. Mter a concert in the evening and two nights there, we left for Manchester. As we waved goodbye to the city members and chorus members and families, we knew a very special friendship had been kindled. Our entrance into the Manchester Town Hall was an unforgetable experience. Town officials were waiting to escort us to the grand banquet room for a scrumptious dinner. After a whirlwind concert including the chorus and the Wind Band of Man- 'chester, we crawled to our accommodations for the night. Bright and early the next morning we were on our way to Llandudno, Wales and an 11:0o a.m. service at St. John's Methodist Church. There the chorus raised the rafters with song to a congregation of 600 or more. At the end the parish en- tertained us with a very good meal. A little weary we returned to Manchester to have a short night's sleep preparing to venture on to Heroford in the morning for a concert for the school children at the Shire Hall at 2:30 in the afternoon. After another concert at 7:00 p.m., we retired to our private homes. Between the concerts we were able to enjoy this lovely city and get to know the flavor Of the English people. As we and the biggest concert, "The Dream of Gerontius", we were able to see a great deal of the English countryside and its history. In our tour we absorbed, Bath, Cambridge, Stonehenge, Salisbury, Banbury, York just to mention a few. On July fifth, after being royally entertained by the Harlow "luvs", we waved and sang goodbye as our memorable adventure of England came to a close. It was a beautiful trip. The people of England welcomed us with open arms and we made so many delightful friends. It will be a trip long remembered by each one of us, as Ameribans left their mark on the British and the English left their mark on the Americans. Our special thanks and warmest feeling go to Bill Eastman, Mary Rowe, Director, and Katrina Munn, our pianist, and Michael Kibblewhite of Harlow. England, conductor. Thank you, North Country Chorus. Jeanne Holmes Member af the North Country Chorus New Hampshire aviators awarded Air Medals CONCORD-- Maj. Gen. Joseph L. Fant, Deputy First United States Army Com- mander, Ft. Deveas, Ma., will join Governor Hugh J. Gallen as he awards the Air Medal to four New Hampshire Army National Guard aviators on Sunday, July 25. Captain John Weedcn of Hooksett; Chief Warrant Officer Ronald Boyle of Londonderry; Staff Sgt. Waiter Lessard of Hooksett; and Staff Sgt. James Holub of London, all members of the 397th Medical Detachment here, assisted in the rescue of two Pennsylvania ice- climbers on Mount Washington last January. The aviators were called to state active duty on January 26, in the third day of the search for Hugh Herr, 17, and Jdfrey Batzer, 21. In spite of the extreme weather con- ditlons, sub-zero *tem- peratures, deep snow and ( please turn to page 11 Elizabeth Miller of remembers grandmother to Henry" on Henry was the family to live there, death in 1929. George Chal George younger brother Sr., came to Scotland four settled on a farm brother's Lake. He ori weaver, but molder and Strickland's iron Bradford. Of his sons, was a lawyer, minister, and while seminary. William Wallace was a wheelwright maker in was the father Chalmers of builder and houses. Robert's s also a builder I houses. Wayne'S Cindy did much of for the 1977 ! Newbary. One of the George named Christian. Philip C. were the of Elizabeth ford. John According to History of NewburY, family of Topsha tn from Robert Mills, from north of Ireland and settled in He had a son grandson John serving in the Indian War Revolution. He original grantee but settled in (at the Frank Brock last John Mills vss his abilit as a of present 1780. The ori Mr. Mills built small, but has been greatly enlarged, the roo to add another used to be Davenport house, 1912 was owned Brock, and later Brock. John Mills' settled on the (Judge Brock's which he Ben Porter for Topsham. Before Topsham, for several yearS just below the known as 'the house. ( Note: time has research on houses. Any additional welcome. ) Archibald with his about 1818, to the as the Wild that goes north Corinth - East three miles from line. His children along that road. Archibald children, William, Calvin, Horace, and Hiram. All carpenters of rare they probably buildings in any equal Ac( to formation (known as Arch Jr. took over of the Cog Washington else started it, as the ravine. Jacob's Ladder it, They are alsO built the Newbury the family houses in 1 Chelsea, also tWO, and building of Manchester, N Archibald Chalmers. Sources: Newbury (190'2 Ryegate (1912), Corinth (1964) ; County Gazetteer Doris Miller, G andKim GraY. Page 4The Journal Opinion-July 21, i982 )RTHEAST PUBLISHi N(; COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion WoeklT newOel idbked ia Ilredlwd. Vermut. $vbudpes ro - Vermt mul New Nempsktre - St.00 pr ycr; $6.1H} fr Idx ks; ! if I0 S|t.00 Ir r lind ST.00 fer siz nths; Senier citizen dbceNt $2.N. Sxlmd ci| ISlle IHdd o! |nldfecd, Vermont 0S0$|. Pwblildked by Nertkeelt Pbllskil Compeny, Inc., P.O. hx Sill. IImdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher An Independent Newspaper Editorial Questions on judicial policy In the discussion of law there will probably always be a question over when to impose the maximum sen- tence allowed under the law and what conditions shd_d predetermine a minimum sentence. There may also be continuing debate as to whether a sentence should be aimed as a deterrent or as a ptmishment, or both. This week we raise these questions for a number of reasons. The first reason is because of the debate stirred last week OVer the sentencing of Louis Hamlin III to a 45 year mira'mum sentence. that decision, two of the three judges pronouncing the sentence over-ruled a third judge who favored a lower minimum sentence of 35 years. The judges favoring the har- sher sentences were lay-judges or elected judge, who may have no formal legal traAng under Vermont The reason subject of sentencing as a deterrent is because of last weekend's brutal murder in Barre of an 18-year old girl. This most recent murder adds an urgency to the debate. We in no way imply that the above two events are connected. At issue in the Ham]in sentence is the following question: what kinds of hienous and vile acts must one carry out to obtain a straight maximum sentence? Louis Hamlin was a teenager (probably a determining factor in the minimum sentence) when be and James Savage com- mitted the most degrading and tor- turous of acts on two innocent 12-year old girls in Essex Junction -- leaving one dead and the other with the nightmare of her experience. Hamlin could he released at the age of 52. Unfortunately, we don't have an answer but we may have spotted a problem. The murder in Barre raises the question of whether or not the policies of our State's judicial system, through the sentencing of criminals in murder and aggravated rape cases, are providing an effective enough deterrent to the mbrally deranged individuals who chose to commit these types of crimes, legaUy sane andunder their own frw will. The problem has not been created in the courts. The frequency of murder and rape cases is not caused by the judiciul system itself but by the society in which it has been deemed to perform under our constitution. However, one has to wonder if Vermont's judicial policy is adequately following its society on a parallel plane in the instances of violent crimes. Letters to the Editor_J Communities greatest assets To the Editor: My heartfelt thanks for the fine article about the Wood- sville fire on page I of your July 14th edition. Two of the community's greatest assets, the Fire Departments and local hospital, gained recognition for doing that which they are there b do. Too often these valuable serwces are taken for granted, ignored or berated for their costs. Your fine coverage and accurate reporting not only makes good news. but demonstrates positive support for those who serve their community. For Cottage Hospital and the local fire departments Edward A. Loranger Woodsville Outstandine lob ambulance volunteers To the Editor: I am sending the below letter from Dr. Frechette in order to give credit to the Ambulance Volunteers for the work they did at the fire in Woodsville on July 7. In the hour and a half bet- ween 6:30 and 8:00 p.m.. these volunteers treated and transported 13 firemen to Cottage Hospital. The duty crew for that shift was Sandi lngerson, Theresa Belyea and Michelle Demers. Also responding were Harold Taylor, Jr., Don Stapelfeld, Peter Gould, Brenda White and Doris Kennedy, thus avoiding the need for us to send out a general alert. We also had help at the scene for several of the hospital staff, some of the Lisbon Life and Piermont FAST Squads, as well as several bystanders and firemen. I commend all of these volunteers for doing such a fine job keeping track of the vital signs for each fireman and treating them at the scene. I remind you that these trained volunteers (many were trained by the Haverhill Chapter of the Red Cross at no charge) work many hours a month without pay and deserve recognition for their good work just as our out- standing firemen do. Dick Guy Dick Guy, President Cottage Hospital Ambulance Service Cottage Hospital Woodsville, N.H. 03785 Dear Dick: f would like to commend the Cottage Hospital Ambulance Squad for the job they did at the recent fire in handling a large number of firemen with heat exhaustion. Treatment in Rules should be upheld To (he Editor: Doug Emerson's letter in your July 14 issue has prompted me to write. Doug, there are a great many racing fans who share your views. I have been at- tending the races at Bear Ridge Raceway for several years and I have been ap- palled at some of the incidents that we have had to witness. It is incredible that week after week we are not allowed to watch good dirt track racing due to a few "hot- heads" who push, shove and are poor sports in general. (Chuck, Danny & Clayton, you are at the top of the list). The rules should be upheld at all times and we should not have to watch favoritism shown. Thanks, to you drivers who drive a good clean race -- it must be discouraging to you fellows to put up with what you have to week after week. Marvin Lewis Washington, Vt. Tufts or Jeffords .for the House? the field was done so well that To the Editor: there was very little for us to The Vermont Democrats do in the Emergency Room may well have a sort of when the patients arrived. I delayed-action "primary" for also was impressed with how Congressman this year, when smoothly things went. David K. Frechette, M.D. Woodsville/ff/ells River Fourth of July., 1983 To the Editor: At this time, I would like to thank each and every person who participated in any way in the 1982 Fourth of July Celebration, whether as a spectator, participant, worker or committee person. We appreciate it. The Woodsville Area Fourth of July Committee. Inc. was formed under the laws and regulations of the State of New a.m. on July 4, 1983. We have already requested par- ticipation of some parade units for this occasion. We realize some improvements can be made in the years ahead, as we learn from our mistakes, and we hope these improvements can be made without charge to the spec- ta tor. The Committee will be meeting each month from now Hampshire and the charter is until next year. making plans filed with e Seclrery  for the 19a3 celebration, If you tate. It is a comunt * wouldlik'*tb' pdrticie in deavor created by a group of any way next year. or can give interested local people for the the committee a lead as to a intent and purpose of celebrating the Fourth of July, and is a non-profit organization. All expenses have been paid for by funds raised by sponsors of our souvemr brochure and the raffle ticket donations, as well as contributions by par- ticipating vendors. Our 1983 celebration will start with a parade at 11:00 prospective unit, idea or person, we do welcome suggestions. Anyway, thanks again to everyone. I appreciate the opportunity to have served on this committee. Stewart Leete S. Ryegate Fourth of July Parade Chairman Common carrier pipelines sought by producers / by JOHN C. BROMLEY Mr. Bromley is a Denver.based freelance Journalist and a .former director of Research for the Office of the Governor of Colorado. ()  i. SSand/IVS2 Very few price increases perturb the American consumer as much as does the rising price of natural gas, the commodity upon which both home heating and the American industrial and office sectors d d eor years, alarmed by consumption- conscious public officials who have de, handed that thermostats be turned down in offices and restaurants, homeowners -- by now shivering a little -- wait their turn. It is only a matter of time, they feel,  government, perhaps prodded to urgency by a shutoff of the one- third of American natural gas which is imported, t0rns therrdoatats down at home, leaving the general population to huddle in their warmest clotbes against an electric oven. Nor are such visions apocalyptic. The ot, as well as the demand curve, of natural gas has risen enormously. The gas which was once a waste product, flared off in the oil fields of yore, is now a precious commodity in an industry with $47 billion in total fixed costs, And, witb new potential for profit, as. well as a stable, rising demand for gas, independent producers of natural gas have atarted a small war against the industry giants, the trammission companies through whe pipelines flow the gas bought by local utilities for home con- sumption. rough the efforts of members of a p of independent gas rs called the Ammciatien for Equal Access to Natural Gas Markets and Suppli, in. depadents are addressing themselves to the needs of both the producer and the consumer. Led by, among others, Dave Wilson of Consolidated Oil and Gas and Bob Kadane of KRM Petroleum, both Colorado-based independent producers with broad in- stretehi from Louisiana to California, the members of Equal Accs hope to break the trammiuion companies' present stranglehold on the market. NotAng the federal control of the gas market since 1933, a cycle only recently days, or sell his new well, usually to the same transmission company that refused him access to the pipeline, In order to remedy this situation, Equal Access proposes amending the Natural Gas Act so that natural gas transmission pipelines are made common carriers. The designation of pipelines as common carriers -- entities with rights of con- demnation and eminent domain, but required to carry everybody's product- was achieved in the crude oil market as early as 1911, when the Rockefeller Trust was broken. Only in this way, argue members m Equal Access, does incentive arise to bring the consumer the least, instead of the most expensive gas. For common carriers, whether railroads or pipelines, are per- mitted to charge only a common tariff fixed by law for commodity tran- " sportation, regardless of ownership. With common carrier status for pipelines, natural gas would enter the free market for the first time since controls were instituted in 1933, for producers -- in the absence of controlled prices as well -- could negotiate directly with consumers, i.e., the local utility and its ratepayers. In contrast, as things stand now both consumers and producers are captives of the pipeline owners, to whom the producer must sell, and sell without negotiation. Equal Access contends that the geographic dislocation of the market -- New York gas drilled in Mississippi, for instance -- will pobably correct itself when independents can negotiate to satisfy demand from the nearest supply. And the opening of California and New Mexico wells ought to reduce gas costs to the people of.San Francisco, even as the price of natural gas is progressively decon- trolled. San Franciscans, says Wilson, "now pay for gas at double the average domestic price." Kadane and Wilson, both veterans of the oil and gas price wars of the 1970s, hope for constructive change through their goal of equal access for all producers to natural gas pipelines. For instance, they see, within a year, a 25 percent increase in the amount of natural gas drilled- awin- crease which would cut current imports in half. "All we ask," says Wilson "is a genuinely national, competitive market." reversed by the Congress and the Reagan administration, these producers claim that the changes they propose will bring about a competitive and national natural gas market. The market dislocation of which Equal Access members complain is the product of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 by which transmission companies -- the owners of natural gas pipelines -- are permitted to establish their own whooly- owned exploration and development subsidiaries. It is from these subsidiaries that parent companies buy the most ex- pensive gasses, ensured by law that they can pass both development costs and transmission expenses on to the beleagured consumer. In turn, while bringing high-cost Alakan ($12.00 per Metric Cubic Foot), Canadian or Mexican gas ($4.94 per MCF) to consumers, the transmission companies pass up, and effectively close off, domestic suppliers of gas (whose product costs an average of $2,00 per MCF.) This infuriates in- dependent producers, who do not have access to pipeline as a matter of right. According to Kadane and Wilson, tran- smission companies are engaging in "a monopolistic pactice which impoverishes consuIIlers. ' ' Wilson uses the example of the California supplier, Pacific Gas and Electric, which has formed a company called Alberta and Southern as a wholly owned subsidiary. In the periods of light gas demand, such as summer and fall, the independents charge that Pacific Gas and Electric packs its lines with Alberta and Southern gas, effectively closing gas wells both in California and New Mexico which would, if PG&E would buy on an open market, sell for less than Alberta and Southern's prices. But cheaper gas means PG&E gets a lesser percentage for carrying it. Not only is the consumer gouged by the present market system, says Equal Access President Wilson, but the producer "is like,the slave Iove Emancipation," For the producer, a parson who drills wells but owns no pipeline, is forced by the current system to beg access to the nearest pipeline and thence to market -- a request which may well be refused. Aad if it is refused, the producer has no recourse other than to cap his well in holms of better Democrat Kaplan may con- front "Democrat" Jeffords in the November elections -- unless challenger Tufts, conservative Republican, defeats "Republican" Jef- fords in the September primaries. Jeffords has a long and consistent voting record-- one that shows him up as more Democrat than many avowed Democrats. Not enough Vermont voters realize this. Kaplan, of course, barring a Tufts defeat in September, has no chance against Jeffords. For him to disagree with major positions taken by Jeffords would be to disagree with his own party. Jeffords, of course, like Stafford, has been "all heart" -- favoring all manner of social programs but delicately declining to increase general taxes to pay for them. On the contrary, he has resorted to printing press "dollars" inflation) thus so debilitating that "dollar" that ordinary people are unable to save against their own exigencies and so are obliged to turn to the federal government for help. Example: Jeffords and Stafford, by debilitating the "dollar", make it impossible for parents to save for a child's college education, then, "all heart", vote for big federal aid college programs. William Tufts, an aware, well educated, energetic young man, moved to a somewhat remote hill farm in Bethel several years ago with negligible economic resources but outstanding deter- mination, did his own house building and work, entered the iusurance field, became top agent for a top firm. He worked hard to persuade someone else to take on "Democrat" Jeffords; when no one else volunteered, he did. (Forget about the unusual hat and boots, worn for "recognition" purposes, and references to movie stars. Both are political ploys and unnecessary. Even his ex- cursions in morality, though pertinent to the times, have no particular bearing on the major governmental issues facing the next Congress. ) As new man in the House, of course, he will lack the seniority -- which Jeffords has put to such poor use. He will lack the kind of legal training which enables Jeffords to talk so per. suasively out of both sides of his mouth. He will lack the political vote-trading debts to other House members and funding debts to powerful political action committees which so bedevil so many long-time House members. Jeffords, by his record, has proven his dedication to a liberal, let-government-do-it- a nd-make-the-savers-pay-for. it (inflation) philosophy. Tufts, whose philosophical convictions center on home rule, individual responsibility, limited federal government and an honest currency, should serve Vermont well. He will be hampered, of course, by the kind of cam- paign funds Jeffords receives from various political action committees, mostly from out- of-state. He will have to try to match whatever Jeffords chooses to spend. He could use some help Herbert G. Ogden Hartland, Vt. The Chalmers and Mills There were various skills and trades represented in the Chalmers and Mills families, but between them they had more than the usual number of designers and builders of houses. Willia m Chalmers family William Chalmers. a flax- dresser, came from Scotland to Newbury in 1834. He made plans for establishing a fac- tory in Corinth for the manufacture of thread and cordage rope), and ordered machinery for the mill from Scotland -- but because of tariff problems, it was ten years befor it was delivered. Finally Mr. Chalmers was able to set up his factory, in connection with a Dr. Hin- ckley (probably Israel Hin- ckley) of Corinth. This was later owned and operated by Barnes Brothers. (According to the Corinth history, Major Joel Barnes, a Civil War veteran, operated a rope and thread factory at Goose Green. ) Wi]ham Chalmers had eight sons, of whom seven. were carpenters, and two of these were also architects. William's son George worked in Boston as a carpenter until the gold rush, then in 1850 went to California, where he designed and built a large number of houses. Carpenters were so scarce out there at that time that he earned ten dollars a day -- a huge sum in those days. George also owned and operated ,a large cattle ranch there in partnership with his brother Alexander Alexander later returned to Vermont and built a mill for sawing and finishiug.lumber, also worked as a contractor and builder. He and another brother, Robert, built a house for their parents (off the Sand Road, house No. 30 on the map following page 253 in the 1977 History of Newbury). A description of the house says that it "shows its architecture, with a cupola, arch top openings, and unusual siding made of pieces of thin board applied onto the boards." t The" present owner is Terrence Maitland. Robert started working with Alexander as a carpenter at age 15. Before he was 20 years old, he had complete charge of a sawmill in Lawrence, Massachusetts. When he was 20. he and his brother William Jr. went to Jackson, Mississippi, where they designed and erected the buildings for a plantation, also a church. Returning to Newbury, they engaged in the lumber business, building a sawmill in which they used the first circular saw in the town of Newbury. They also raised fine horses. Their partnership lasted for 18 years, then in 1872 Robert went to California. He stayed there two years, then worked for five years "in Lowell, Mass., designing and building several blocks and residences. In 1879 he returned to the homestead in Newbury, where he continued his work of drafting plans and preparing specifications for public and private buildings. It was considered that as a worker in wood, he had few equals. Four more brothers worked as carpenters: John built several houses in Newbury, then in 1864, he and James had charge of a gang of men erecting a hospital in Washington, D.C. They also built houses in Springfield and Lowell, Mass., and business blocks and the high school building in Lowell. Brother Albert also worked with them in Lowell. Meanwhile, William Jr. continued farming at the homestead and running his sawmill, later with the help of the youngest brother. Henry. Memorable trip to England To the Editor : wended our way to our final Little did we know, as we destination, Harlow, England left Wells River on July 21, the North Country Chorus and appendages, the adventure that was ahead. Bill Eastman, president of the North Country Chorus, had arranged a singing tour of England and Wales. He had visited in the spring to verify the towns and halls where the chorus was to sing. We traveled to Boston to board a 747 from Logan to Heathrow Airport in London, arriving at 8:00 a.m. June 22 -- London time. Upon arrival we were picked up by two buses with marvelous drivers from Manchester, England, George and Archie. The adventure began; on to Stratford-On.Avon and then to Coventry Cathedral for the first concert where the chorus sang Faure's Requiem at noon. Mter touring a bit the adventure took us to Stuckton- on-Tees in the northern part of England. The people there accepted us with open arms and presented us with a luscious meal upon arrival. Mter a concert in the evening and two nights there, we left for Manchester. As we waved goodbye to the city members and chorus members and families, we knew a very special friendship had been kindled. Our entrance into the Manchester Town Hall was an unforgetable experience. Town officials were waiting to escort us to the grand banquet room for a scrumptious dinner. After a whirlwind concert including the chorus and the Wind Band of Man- 'chester, we crawled to our accommodations for the night. Bright and early the next morning we were on our way to Llandudno, Wales and an 11:0o a.m. service at St. John's Methodist Church. There the chorus raised the rafters with song to a congregation of 600 or more. At the end the parish en- tertained us with a very good meal. A little weary we returned to Manchester to have a short night's sleep preparing to venture on to Heroford in the morning for a concert for the school children at the Shire Hall at 2:30 in the afternoon. After another concert at 7:00 p.m., we retired to our private homes. Between the concerts we were able to enjoy this lovely city and get to know the flavor Of the English people. As we and the biggest concert, "The Dream of Gerontius", we were able to see a great deal of the English countryside and its history. In our tour we absorbed, Bath, Cambridge, Stonehenge, Salisbury, Banbury, York just to mention a few. On July fifth, after being royally entertained by the Harlow "luvs", we waved and sang goodbye as our memorable adventure of England came to a close. It was a beautiful trip. The people of England welcomed us with open arms and we made so many delightful friends. It will be a trip long remembered by each one of us, as Ameribans left their mark on the British and the English left their mark on the Americans. Our special thanks and warmest feeling go to Bill Eastman, Mary Rowe, Director, and Katrina Munn, our pianist, and Michael Kibblewhite of Harlow. England, conductor. Thank you, North Country Chorus. Jeanne Holmes Member af the North Country Chorus New Hampshire aviators awarded Air Medals CONCORD-- Maj. Gen. Joseph L. Fant, Deputy First United States Army Com- mander, Ft. Deveas, Ma., will join Governor Hugh J. Gallen as he awards the Air Medal to four New Hampshire Army National Guard aviators on Sunday, July 25. Captain John Weedcn of Hooksett; Chief Warrant Officer Ronald Boyle of Londonderry; Staff Sgt. Waiter Lessard of Hooksett; and Staff Sgt. James Holub of London, all members of the 397th Medical Detachment here, assisted in the rescue of two Pennsylvania ice- climbers on Mount Washington last January. The aviators were called to state active duty on January 26, in the third day of the search for Hugh Herr, 17, and Jdfrey Batzer, 21. In spite of the extreme weather con- ditlons, sub-zero *tem- peratures, deep snow and ( please turn to page 11 Elizabeth Miller of remembers grandmother to Henry" on Henry was the family to live there, death in 1929. George Chal George younger brother Sr., came to Scotland four settled on a farm brother's Lake. He ori weaver, but molder and Strickland's iron Bradford. Of his sons, was a lawyer, minister, and while seminary. William Wallace was a wheelwright maker in was the father Chalmers of builder and houses. Robert's s also a builder I houses. Wayne'S Cindy did much of for the 1977 ! Newbary. One of the George named Christian. Philip C. were the of Elizabeth ford. John According to History of NewburY, family of Topsha tn from Robert Mills, from north of Ireland and settled in He had a son grandson John serving in the Indian War Revolution. He original grantee but settled in (at the Frank Brock last John Mills vss his abilit as a of present 1780. The ori Mr. Mills built small, but has been greatly enlarged, the roo to add another used to be Davenport house, 1912 was owned Brock, and later Brock. John Mills' settled on the (Judge Brock's which he Ben Porter for Topsham. Before Topsham, for several yearS just below the known as 'the house. ( Note: time has research on houses. Any additional welcome. ) Archibald with his about 1818, to the as the Wild that goes north Corinth - East three miles from line. His children along that road. Archibald children, William, Calvin, Horace, and Hiram. All carpenters of rare they probably buildings in any equal Ac( to formation (known as Arch Jr. took over of the Cog Washington else started it, as the ravine. Jacob's Ladder it, They are alsO built the Newbury the family houses in 1 Chelsea, also tWO, and building of Manchester, N Archibald Chalmers. Sources: Newbury (190'2 Ryegate (1912), Corinth (1964) ; County Gazetteer Doris Miller, G andKim GraY.