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Bradford , Vermont
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July 22, 1981     Journal Opinion
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July 22, 1981
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion.July 22, 1981 AST PUBLISHING COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal" M Opinion Wnk mnnlmp Imbked ht $reifm4, ormeM. Sgbscdttiol rclt - Yermt end Nn thmptkbt $.09 per yNr; $6.00 let slz men,ks; eut ef stelo - $12.00 per yeer end $7.00 fer eix montk*; Se ctthen dlKun# $ 2.00. Secend chill petle peld et IImdferd, yerment 05e$3. Peblisked by Nertket Publisldnl Cempeny, Inc., P.0. Ilex 375, IImdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President &amp; Publisher " lL- L Woodsville Bradford / 02.222-5281   603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Policing Bradford Bradford's latest flap over the village police department appears to be the result of a misunderstanding that might have been avoided. The new one-man police depart- ment resigned when told his request for mileage payment for use of his own vehicle as a police car hadn't been authorized by village trustees. He said he thought it had been, and quit on the spot after just one week on the job. Some village officials, in hindsight, concede that the matter could have been handled differentlyto avoid such an outcome. The village was still working out details of a new policy governing the police department when the incident occurred. The policy, including mileage payments and other issues, was to have been taken up at the regular trustees meeting Aug. 12. Now, the meeting presumably+will have to deal wih seeking anger police officer. The trustees might do well this time to encourage voters to attend the Aug. 12 meeting and contribute their ideas on where to go from here, and it might not he a bad idea to try to nail down in advance most financial benefits to be offered the next police candidate so that he, the trustees and the voters will all know where they stand. And since a petition is now being circulated to hire a town policeman, one course of action to he considered is for village and town officials to get together on the possibility of a police department that would cover both town and village. Police work in an era of high crime, even in this generally peaceful area, is a tough job, and since this is also the age of lawsuits, it would seem wise to set up a professional police department with clear lines of authority and direction everybody's lrotection. Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton ' ..................... i Molly Lm00an's report on social welfare Molly Langan, my student intern from Dartmouth College Class of 1983. attended a Social Welfare Council Conference at New England College. I believe that readers of this column will find her report interesting. The New Hampshire Social Welfare Council sponsored a retreat-work session on June 28 to July 2 entitled "An Advance for Social Policy in New Hampshire". The participants included social planners from throughout the state. The work of this year's retreat focused on the development of an information base for public education, discussion and debate on the Implications of major funding cuts in social programs. Conditions in each county were researched, pinpointing demographic data, areas of relative poverty and wealth, community health, and social cohesiorL In this way, specific strengths and problems of each county were identified. This in- formation will aid the concerned public and social planners in expressing their will to elected decisionmakers. The counties encompassed in District No. I ICarroll. Coos, Grafton, ports of Belknap, Merrimack, Stratford and Sullivan ) were found to be in need of many social servmes because of their large proportion of elderly, lack of major urban centers and large geographic areas. The statistical findings for Grafton County characterize these conditions in District No. 1: l. Graftonis home to an economically diverse population whose standard of living differs markedly in the northern and southern county sectors. Some of the lowest New Hampshire per capita incomes occurred in 1975 in Bath and Rumney, while some of the highest showed in Hanover and Waterville. People tend to work in northern Grafton at jobs affected seasonally <tourism while those to the south tend to have higher paying work that may be less affected by a downturning economy (medicine, light industry). 2. While 6.9 per cent of New Hamp- shire's people live in Graflon County, 8.5 per cent of the state's poor live here. translating into about 7,100 people. 3. While nearly 4 percent (2,400) of the county's residents receive welfare assistance, another 6,900 people are estimated to qualify for benefits. Poor elderly account for at least t.600 of those eligible. 4. Side-by-side with wealth resides poverty in Grafton County towns. 7 towns show more than $1 million in interest and dividends for residents alongside sub- stantial percentages of poor people unquestionably, the greatest county wealth lies in the southern sector, while the greatest poverty occurs to the north). 5. Grafton has the highest per capita rate of physicians in the state, due to the heavy concentration of physicians in the Hanover area. Yet, despite the abundance of physicians, Grafton ranks lowes in the state in beds-facilities per I000 persom 65 and older in 1977. Extending the view to include intermediate care facilities bet- wean 1976-1978, Grafton still has the lowest number of beds per 1000 persons age 65 and older. 6. Judging from the utilization figures for welfare assistance of various types, at least 66 per cent of the persons 65 and older estimated to be eligible are not applying for assistance. This fact, combined with the fact of few facilities to care for frail elderly, does not paint a cheery picture for Grafton County's poor elderly. 7. While there is no data available by towns across the county to assess the need for housing, it is well-known that a critical shortage exists in the southern Grafton area-especially affordable, well-located, appropriate housing for low to moderate income families. 8. The alcohol abuse prevalence rate in Grafton County is the highest in the state. Similar statistics were found in other District No. I counties, some of which were even more extreme (Carroll County has the largest percentage of elderly in the state and the lowest median income, Coos County has the highest unemployment rate in the state etc.). Yet. in spite of the greater need for social services in the North Country, those presently available were found to be somewhat underutilized. The causes for this underutilization are probably the rural nature of the area. the intangible yet prevalent value of yankee stalwartness and independence and a general lack of awareness that these services exist. Political awareness and participation in social policy formation were found to be limited by the large distance from the state's capitol and the limited amount of media available to North Country residents. The recently announced can- cellation of the WENH radio news service and the public station in Berlin (due to lack of funding) is expected to worsen this problem. The possibility of setting up a Iransmittor to relay the new public radio station in Concord. WEVO. to the North Country is presently being investigated. However, it will be at least 6 months until this plan could be realized. I am presently conducting a survey of all the social service agencies in District No. 1 in order to discover the expected effects of recent and upcoming budget cuts to their services. This information will help Ray as he represents the North Country in for- ming social policy in New Hampshire in theS0's. Letters to the Ed Snookered ERA Help.for TO the Editor: Under ERA, young women Geising The Vermont Legislature must be drafted equally with was snookered into approving men and involuntarily placed To the Editor: the Equal Rights Amendment in military combat duty. Tragedy has hit Century Farms in Monroe before its full scope became There would be no segregation munityrecently known. I urge rescinding for and no privacy for such that destroyed the the following reasons : women. ERA will also all possessions of If a womanis pregnant and equalize auto insurance family. With the Howard Smith farm, 1797 Samuel in 1849. Samuel's his farm went to his brother married, ERA will wipe out premiums for young women their good Howard Smith's farm in daughter Emma married William, Jr., then to William the husband's obligation to who now pay less than young friends they are North Monroe was bought by Willis Smith, who carried on III, Eugene, and Cecil. his ancestor Capt. Philip the farm for many years. Somewhere alongthelinethe pay hospital and medieal bills, men. It would also eliminate rebuild and start Paddleford in 1797, as part of When Willis died, his son family name was shortened to If pregnant and unmarried, present protection standards again. Lot No. 5. Most of it was Homer moved there and took Hinman. the father will have equal for women in mental in- In order to raise rights to the baby and could stitutions and prisons, and help them in deeded to his son Philipin 1813 over the farm, assisted by his Cecil's wife Harriet says prevent its adoption by others with sex-discrimination moments, Orford and the remainder in 1832. It son Norman, who remained that since his death the farm unless he is identified and his abolished, would require all Saturday, August passed down through the there until 1977, when it was has been rented out. consent obtained. ERA will hsopitals to be fully sex- auction at 3 p.m. family, going to Curtis Pad-sold out of the family to wipe out all laws which say the integrated in patient and traditional baked dleford, then to his widow and Richard Saunders. Bedell farm, 1849 husband must support his wife nurse assignments, ham supper and their only daughter, Mary, The Harley Bedell farm and provide support for his Don't be fooled by the slick Orford Memorial and her husband Homer Hyndman (Hinman) was brought into the family in minor children. The wife and promotional propaganda proceeds Smith. They left it to their son farm, 1843 1849 by William Bedel, who would lose her legal righttobe for ERA. The ERA does not the Giesing Howard, who with his wife John Hyndman came passed it on to his son Edwin, a fulltime homemaker, even put women in the Constitution. Admission will be: opened it to the public as a from Scotland to America in grandson Eugene, and great- while her babies are infants. ERA doesn't even mention supper, $4.00 for the , tourist home under the name 1771, then settled in Ryegate grandson Harland. Harland Under ERA, a divorced of "The Old Homestead." The (Book Two, pages 164-165). subdivided the farmland, now women! ERA doesn't say person. Supper woman's ex-husband won't anything at all about "equal combinedwillbe farm is now operated by After being evicted from his known as Harley View Acres, have any obligation tosupport pay for equal work". ERA We will a another Paddleford descen- home on one of the Deer keeping the old brick house in her at all! Each sex is on its takes away rights from much that you dant, Dennis Paddleford Islands in the Connecticut the family to pass on to own. ERA would alsowipeout w0men and gives rights to paper this Ward. River, he built a house nearby Harland, Jr. and his son , According to the date in Barnet. Harriet Hinman Gerald. It is presently oe- a widow's right to a property homosexuals. According to calendar of painted on the old barn, it was says that you can still see the cupied by Genevieve Bedell exemption. Sen. Sam Ervin, Jr., Tickets may be homosexuals would be the advance by built in 1790. The house too is cellarhole with trees growing Mitchell. The house was built only group of people the ERA Thomson, Mr. very old, perhaps as old as the on it, beside Route 5, half a with bricks made on the farm, would do any good for. Orford, N.H. 03777. barn. mile below Barnetvillage. with clay taken from Hunt Demand that your acceptsdonations John's grandson John Mountain Brook which runs Not exactly legislators rescind their ap- furniture, Johnson farm, 1804 bought land in Monroe in 1843 through the farm. proval of this horrendous Call 603-353-9245. Thomas Johnson bought and 1844 which became the For almost 100 years there his farm south of Monroe family farm. The house that was another Bedell farm in obscene but Amendment! Dr. Enrique H. village in 1804, and it has come he built is still standing. John Monroe, near the southern Frank L. Cutler down through Moses, Richard, used to drive cattle to Boston, boundary of the town. It was To the Editor: Bridport, Vermont Freeman, Elmer (Bob) and also taught "singing school" known as the Soper Bedell After, presumably, a now RichardJohnson. and led the Mclndoos church farm, and the last Bedell summer of special meetings, A HELLO to The original buildings choir. He was unmarried, and please turn to page 5) the House Education and the were on County Road, which Ways and Means Committees Brad.ford went up through the pasture, have come up with a state aid everyone in In1839 the family moved down :[mlllll bill. While not exactly ob-TotheEditor: sday, I went to into the valley and put up a 'I, mmm scene, it certainly has no Today is a very windy but thodontist and new set of buildings on the redeeming social values, sunny day. Leanne has to go brother) went to present main road. But there Even Gov. Snelling's bill will to nethall as she does every was more building yet to be do less harm and it's had Saturday, but David's hockey (host mother), done: the house burned in 1916 enough. Shortcomings in- is cancelled, so we're going to Betty and I went and was rebuilt: the barn blew dude: play some golf. That should be musical, "Evita," down in a freak tornado in 1918 Retreat from "home a good laugh. David is really Majesty's Theatre, and was rebuilt, then the new rule": The bill would about good at it, but I'm another chestra was under one burned in 1954 and was The Flood Control Commission double state funding, thus story, and all of the rebuilt in 1955. increasing, through allocation Last weekend was "Get to really strong Down through the byROBERTA. MICHENFELDER of state aid, state control over, Know Sydney Weekend." I bignight generations the Jolmsons have The Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission and responsibility for local can't remember if I men- had a wonderful been active in community made it's annual report for fiscal1979-1980 a few weeks ago. education, decreasing oi3- tioned this before, but AFS homeabout affairs. Originally their It contains a number of things of interest to valley portunities for the exercise of students in NSW go to Sydney the tennis section of town was a part of residents, among them a policy statement by John Curry the "home rule", for the whole weekend. You're Wimbleton. Bath, but in 1895 Richard present chairman; a report on the dollar amounts paid to Index of "wealth": The allowed to bring a host brother was playing Johnson represented Bath in Vermont and New Hampshire towns that suffer tax losses bill would gauge"wealth" of a or sister. I took Leanne. Early <Australia). We the state legislature and in-duetofloodcontrolstructuresandasetofstatisticafromthe town 50 per cent on fair Friday morning,' Chris until 2:00 a.m. treduced a bill to have his part Corps of Engineers that explains quite a bit, towhit; market value (FMV) of (Calif.), her host sister of the Town of Bath annexed to --the cost of all flood control dams in the valley is property and 50 per cent on Kristen, Leanne and I took the argued with the Monroe. When the bill passed, $87,086,700.00, aggregate personal incom train to Sydney. We walked the time; hel t+anl.tena!ueostis$!,lo.oo, : of!lJltheresidents.l'!]ll!lllililliarolmd Sydney.,. going to ** thedraaea served by these dams is 1,741.19 sq. cetttonpers0nal inc diffnt stores- nights before two years Richard was elected miles, be a timid step forward except whatever we wanted. At 5: 00, pay a $1500 selectman of Monroe. --the height and length of these dams, totalled, is 2,150 that no provision is made for we went back to Central to that he had been Arlie Johnson. Bob'swife, and 22,218 ft., residents to pay their local meet all the other students from says that in the early days, --the recreational pools, where they exist, add up to school taxes on the same basis and also the families we were was there were some sheep and some 2,555 acres, as that on which their town is to stay with for that weekend. McEnroe hens on the place, but mostly If these figures don't ring an immediate bell, recall that a granted or denied state aid -- We stayed with a really nice he was a "dis cows. During the time that while back in this column I mentioned that natural storage personal income. Thus would family, "The Gills." They human race." Bob had the farm they bought areas in the valley had twice the capacity of all dam ira- an income-rich town be denied have seven kids and one short- out of the Registered Holstein calves for poundments already built and so should be preserved at all state aid and the property tax term exchange girl, Lisa from watched the men'S the children for 4-H, and now cost. Youmaywant tothink of them as doing twice the job of would soar in order to raise Milwaukee. Believe it or not, Tonight Borg their herd is all Registered. a dam two-fifths of a mile high and four miles long. And at the school money. This is no they hardly fight at all! I McEnroe -- It The Johnsons also have done a moment they don'tcost us a dime to own or operate, problem for the income-rich would have thought that with good. lot of sugaring. While on the subject of money, the tax loss payments are property owner but it will seven kids there would have Tonight we also Bob suffered for almost 20 interesting, in themselves. Birefly put, towns and cities in force the moderate and low- been some arguments. The AFS concert. We years with Rheumatoid Connecticut and Massachusetts are protected from flooding income owner to sell out. The two oldest boys were at "It's a Small Arthritis, and was greatly by dams and impoundments in New Hampshire and Ver- squeege is even more acute if boarding school, so I didn't get different tan respected for his courage in mont. When the government takes land for a dam and the big that income rich town also to meet them. English, French, carrying on thefarm. In 1974 Imddle behind it, the town in which this happens suffers a tax embraces substantial open Anyway, we went with the Pigeon. Then the he had plastic knuckles in- loss, the land having been taken out of the tax base. Three acreage that could be sold for Gills and ate a Chinese dinner students have to stalled, then both hips towns in southern New Hampshire and 11 in Vermont have intensive development. It and got to bed about 9:30. The Pledge of Allegia replaced. Six months later he this problem and are compensated by the two southern states must be appraised at next day four of us met all of I'm letting my was so much improved that he at a rate of 90 per cent of the actual loss, 50 per cent from development potential, thus the students at Central to everyone really 1 was able to square dance. In Massachusetts and 40 per cent from Connecticut. This producing a high-dollar Grand begin our "Get to Know that I'm thinner, the end he had arthritic arrangement was established by the four state compact that List, thus classing the town as Sydney Weekend." First we pretty good. "wealth-" nodules in his lungs, and created the Commission. It has been challenged on occasion y , thus decreasing walked across the Harbor A big HELLO passed away in July, 1980. as being unrealistic in current terms. According to this state aid even further, in- Bridge (about 1. miles) -- Bradford. Arlie and their son Richard present report the Vermont towns received a total of creasing taxes and pressure to saw the "Love Boat" in are carrying nn the farm. $20,051.13, whilo those in New Hampshire got $10,272.46. sell out, especially where Sydney Harbour!! Then we The policy statement by Chairman Curry is noteworthy on farmable or forestablo acres kind of looked around Hadiock-Gibson farm, 183,3 several counts, He mentions the compact requirement that are concerned, wherever we wanted to go. At Touldey, Reuben Hadlock bought the Commission involve itself in the water resource concerns State-wide appraisal: 12:00 we were supposed to all this farm in 1833. It then went of the valley. Historically the commission has not involved Even though state aid will be meet at the Opera House, but ______.-. to his son Franklin. then his itself in this kind of activity. For one thing, its operating based only 50 per cent on FMV since Leanne, Aja (SriLanka) granddaughter Agnes. who budget made no provision for such engagement. Secondly, of property, all property will and I had already been married Fred Gibson. They the New England River Basins Commission, charged with have to be appraised by some through it, we sat on the steps sold it to their son Frank, the same obligations, had vastlygreater capacities in staff, state agency in order to an- because our feet were killing SCHOOL whose son Elwyn is the facilities and expertise, sure that no town receives us from walking so much. Aja WOODSVILLE" present owner and operator of Well, NERBC is no more. Last week, Sac. Watt issued extra state aid by gota craving for hat chips and Haverhill thefarm, the order that disolves the Water Resourees Council and with manipulating its Grand List a moove (choc. milk) so we Board will Elwyn says that Frank it most federal interest in water related concerns, among appraisals. This is a $4 to $5 got some. By the time we got Woodsville Hadlock built his own barn them NERBC So Mr. Curry's position is well taken. There million undertaking up front, back, everyone was gone. We Library at 7:30 p.] and a lot of others around the are a variety of problems waiting for us in the valley and with a $1 million annual thought that they were consider a village, all of pine. The Gib- some "institutional arrangement", to quote him, will be servicing cost, even assuming probably at the Botanical policy, son's present house was built needed to address those demands, often conflicting, that will (not likely ) that enough Gardens, so we walked and and to consider in 1850, probably also by he made on the valley's water. It remains to be seen whether professional appraisers could walked until we found them..othermatters. Frank Hadlock. in the face of rising costs, inflation, the complexity of the he found in Vermont or even After lunch at the Gardens, we problems, etc., the Commissions $16,000 annual budiet will nearby. All such costly effort, walked about two miles to see LyleFrazerfarm. 1836 be equal to the task. finally, is worthless since paddys Market (something William Frazer came to For the moment one of the most inflammatory issues, the there is only a co-incidental like Quincey Market) and America from Scotland in Northfield Diversion, is on "hold". This plan, to divert relationship between FMV Chinatown. At Paddys Market O] 1824, then bought in 1836 the Connecticut River water to Quabbin Reservoir and then on to and the personal incomes of I bought a kangaroo-skin farm that is still in the family. Boston, ran into stiff opposition from lower valley towns. The the individual resident small wallet and a small pair School Board will Besides farming, William was: proponents lost heart and put the works on the back burner, owners, of ivory earrings with silver at 7:30 p.m. a cattle drover, making many hut the idea is by no means dead. Corporation taxation: No posts. School to trips to Brighton, Mass. with .'n its place we have now the long term problem of hydro recognition is made of the fact Then we walked back to matters, reorgan cattle and sheep, power. At the outset let's agree that hydro power is a good that corporate installations, Central, took the train home hoard, roof bids, William had four sons, the thing. The Commission and I, as a Commissioner and pri,ate such as GE, National Life, and got ready for the bush reading to the three eldest all going West and citizen, are all for it. But that doesn't mean we aren't IBM, Bryant's, the Vernon dance. A bush dance is competition poliCY, the youngest. Oscar. bothered. There are all those nice flood control dams. Much power plant, etc., draw their something like square dan- matters. remaining on the home farm. of the time theydon'tdomuch.Likeinsurance, you only need employees from a great manY ..... cing. It was so much fun . I bed room Evidently the lure of the West them when trouble comes. But the urge to put them to work surroundmg - met a boy, fan, who lives in was fading by the time between time is strong. After all, they are there, they are towns towns which must Sydney and went to Texas for Oscar's three sons came paid for and they do store lots of water, if only in flo0d time. fund the education of the an exchange last year. We along, because they all stayed So what's the objection? Let's go back to that insurance children involved. Logic danced together most of the GRAFTON in Monroe. They shared analogy. Youean borrow or makeloans on many insurance suggests that the school tax time. While I was dancing a N. HA ownership of the home farm, policies, and people do. And when the crunch comes there's should not go just to the host really fast dance with Scott Grafton County with Robert taking over the little left to do the job that the policy was intended to do. So town but that these 'regional" (Ohio), I tripped over Committee will farming, too with the dams. If kept empty, an impoundmant pool will entities should be taxed, for someone eise's feet, fell flat on July 20 at The farm next went to accept any flood water that comes along. If, on the other school purposes, by the state me floor and practically got Haverhill to Lyle Frazer, then his son hand, the pool is partly or completely full, as it will have t be and on a basis of corporate trampled todeath! Theresult budget Bruce. who has built a home if power is to be generated, there is no where for the flood income not FMV of property, was that I twisted my foot and other business. on the property, The farmland water to go but over the spillway. Put simply.the dam can no No f:t matTitnt" couldn't walk on it l was so ' longerdothejobforwhichitwasintenoeu. -- '-"rid ---t ""actice of - y embarrassed! The worst part Frazer,iS now jr.rented to George L. Then what? Do we go downstream a,_:ntlernloat slserl "nlllien dnllar3qann, as that when lan asked to another flood dam? Before you say yes,_taem' unda nually to non-resident , dance again, I couldn t. On no . .,o ............... Sunday, we had a pienie at one DUMP' those figures in paragraph two: e, . ....... -n of nlavbomes et  -:--"-' - Norman Smith farm, 1837 tl m'ernature, note that an appncauon? _'':-: __Y_'_".L' ._ ' ,.., v m .scnool of the colleges in Sydney. Then B The Norman Smith farm s[.ulative a  . the Otta..: The property taxes macte tower !n North Monroe was brought fried on the North HartS. Dam   ....  .-tlfleaat beauN e( state id t',t we came home. It was a good Board of " lonA tion lmSsounu v =q-.' ;. ..... a .......... Into me family in 1857 by R urall .. ,flltsiSjustott.il by thelmst town. weekend. consider the Amos Way, who bought part of the ? ""application" -.--,v .......... prce, but'thepr-" --s has started ann m Herbert G. Ogden farewelIOn Mondayparty forWetheWentstudents to a applicationB r a d f o r d at 7: Hartland, Vt. going to America. On Thur- auditorium. Lot No 5 from James Moore, on course. was then deeded to his son Page 4-The Journal Opinion.July 22, 1981 AST PUBLISHING COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal" M Opinion Wnk mnnlmp Imbked ht $reifm4, ormeM. Sgbscdttiol rclt - Yermt end Nn thmptkbt $.09 per yNr; $6.00 let slz men,ks; eut ef stelo - $12.00 per yeer end $7.00 fer eix montk*; Se ctthen dlKun# $ 2.00. Secend chill petle peld et IImdferd, yerment 05e$3. Peblisked by Nertket Publisldnl Cempeny, Inc., P.0. Ilex 375, IImdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher " lL- L Woodsville Bradford / 02.222-5281   603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Policing Bradford Bradford's latest flap over the village police department appears to be the result of a misunderstanding that might have been avoided. The new one-man police depart- ment resigned when told his request for mileage payment for use of his own vehicle as a police car hadn't been authorized by village trustees. He said he thought it had been, and quit on the spot after just one week on the job. Some village officials, in hindsight, concede that the matter could have been handled differentlyto avoid such an outcome. The village was still working out details of a new policy governing the police department when the incident occurred. The policy, including mileage payments and other issues, was to have been taken up at the regular trustees meeting Aug. 12. Now, the meeting presumably+will have to deal wih seeking anger police officer. The trustees might do well this time to encourage voters to attend the Aug. 12 meeting and contribute their ideas on where to go from here, and it might not he a bad idea to try to nail down in advance most financial benefits to be offered the next police candidate so that he, the trustees and the voters will all know where they stand. And since a petition is now being circulated to hire a town policeman, one course of action to he considered is for village and town officials to get together on the possibility of a police department that would cover both town and village. Police work in an era of high crime, even in this generally peaceful area, is a tough job, and since this is also the age of lawsuits, it would seem wise to set up a professional police department with clear lines of authority and direction everybody's lrotection. Executive Councilor Raymond S. Burton ' ..................... i Molly Lm00an's report on social welfare Molly Langan, my student intern from Dartmouth College Class of 1983. attended a Social Welfare Council Conference at New England College. I believe that readers of this column will find her report interesting. The New Hampshire Social Welfare Council sponsored a retreat-work session on June 28 to July 2 entitled "An Advance for Social Policy in New Hampshire". The participants included social planners from throughout the state. The work of this year's retreat focused on the development of an information base for public education, discussion and debate on the Implications of major funding cuts in social programs. Conditions in each county were researched, pinpointing demographic data, areas of relative poverty and wealth, community health, and social cohesiorL In this way, specific strengths and problems of each county were identified. This in- formation will aid the concerned public and social planners in expressing their will to elected decisionmakers. The counties encompassed in District No. I ICarroll. Coos, Grafton, ports of Belknap, Merrimack, Stratford and Sullivan ) were found to be in need of many social servmes because of their large proportion of elderly, lack of major urban centers and large geographic areas. The statistical findings for Grafton County characterize these conditions in District No. 1: l. Graftonis home to an economically diverse population whose standard of living differs markedly in the northern and southern county sectors. Some of the lowest New Hampshire per capita incomes occurred in 1975 in Bath and Rumney, while some of the highest showed in Hanover and Waterville. People tend to work in northern Grafton at jobs affected seasonally <tourism while those to the south tend to have higher paying work that may be less affected by a downturning economy (medicine, light industry). 2. While 6.9 per cent of New Hamp- shire's people live in Graflon County, 8.5 per cent of the state's poor live here. translating into about 7,100 people. 3. While nearly 4 percent (2,400) of the county's residents receive welfare assistance, another 6,900 people are estimated to qualify for benefits. Poor elderly account for at least t.600 of those eligible. 4. Side-by-side with wealth resides poverty in Grafton County towns. 7 towns show more than $1 million in interest and dividends for residents alongside sub- stantial percentages of poor people unquestionably, the greatest county wealth lies in the southern sector, while the greatest poverty occurs to the north). 5. Grafton has the highest per capita rate of physicians in the state, due to the heavy concentration of physicians in the Hanover area. Yet, despite the abundance of physicians, Grafton ranks lowes in the state in beds-facilities per I000 persom 65 and older in 1977. Extending the view to include intermediate care facilities bet- wean 1976-1978, Grafton still has the lowest number of beds per 1000 persons age 65 and older. 6. Judging from the utilization figures for welfare assistance of various types, at least 66 per cent of the persons 65 and older estimated to be eligible are not applying for assistance. This fact, combined with the fact of few facilities to care for frail elderly, does not paint a cheery picture for Grafton County's poor elderly. 7. While there is no data available by towns across the county to assess the need for housing, it is well-known that a critical shortage exists in the southern Grafton area-especially affordable, well-located, appropriate housing for low to moderate income families. 8. The alcohol abuse prevalence rate in Grafton County is the highest in the state. Similar statistics were found in other District No. I counties, some of which were even more extreme (Carroll County has the largest percentage of elderly in the state and the lowest median income, Coos County has the highest unemployment rate in the state etc.). Yet. in spite of the greater need for social services in the North Country, those presently available were found to be somewhat underutilized. The causes for this underutilization are probably the rural nature of the area. the intangible yet prevalent value of yankee stalwartness and independence and a general lack of awareness that these services exist. Political awareness and participation in social policy formation were found to be limited by the large distance from the state's capitol and the limited amount of media available to North Country residents. The recently announced can- cellation of the WENH radio news service and the public station in Berlin (due to lack of funding) is expected to worsen this problem. The possibility of setting up a Iransmittor to relay the new public radio station in Concord. WEVO. to the North Country is presently being investigated. However, it will be at least 6 months until this plan could be realized. I am presently conducting a survey of all the social service agencies in District No. 1 in order to discover the expected effects of recent and upcoming budget cuts to their services. This information will help Ray as he represents the North Country in for- ming social policy in New Hampshire in theS0's. Letters to the Ed Snookered ERA Help.for TO the Editor: Under ERA, young women Geising The Vermont Legislature must be drafted equally with was snookered into approving men and involuntarily placed To the Editor: the Equal Rights Amendment in military combat duty. Tragedy has hit Century Farms in Monroe before its full scope became There would be no segregation munityrecently known. I urge rescinding for and no privacy for such that destroyed the the following reasons : women. ERA will also all possessions of If a womanis pregnant and equalize auto insurance family. With the Howard Smith farm, 1797 Samuel in 1849. Samuel's his farm went to his brother married, ERA will wipe out premiums for young women their good Howard Smith's farm in daughter Emma married William, Jr., then to William the husband's obligation to who now pay less than young friends they are North Monroe was bought by Willis Smith, who carried on III, Eugene, and Cecil. his ancestor Capt. Philip the farm for many years. Somewhere alongthelinethe pay hospital and medieal bills, men. It would also eliminate rebuild and start Paddleford in 1797, as part of When Willis died, his son family name was shortened to If pregnant and unmarried, present protection standards again. Lot No. 5. Most of it was Homer moved there and took Hinman. the father will have equal for women in mental in- In order to raise rights to the baby and could stitutions and prisons, and help them in deeded to his son Philipin 1813 over the farm, assisted by his Cecil's wife Harriet says prevent its adoption by others with sex-discrimination moments, Orford and the remainder in 1832. It son Norman, who remained that since his death the farm unless he is identified and his abolished, would require all Saturday, August passed down through the there until 1977, when it was has been rented out. consent obtained. ERA will hsopitals to be fully sex- auction at 3 p.m. family, going to Curtis Pad-sold out of the family to wipe out all laws which say the integrated in patient and traditional baked dleford, then to his widow and Richard Saunders. Bedell farm, 1849 husband must support his wife nurse assignments, ham supper and their only daughter, Mary, The Harley Bedell farm and provide support for his Don't be fooled by the slick Orford Memorial and her husband Homer Hyndman (Hinman) was brought into the family in minor children. The wife and promotional propaganda proceeds Smith. They left it to their son farm, 1843 1849 by William Bedel, who would lose her legal righttobe for ERA. The ERA does not the Giesing Howard, who with his wife John Hyndman came passed it on to his son Edwin, a fulltime homemaker, even put women in the Constitution. Admission will be: opened it to the public as a from Scotland to America in grandson Eugene, and great- while her babies are infants. ERA doesn't even mention supper, $4.00 for the , tourist home under the name 1771, then settled in Ryegate grandson Harland. Harland Under ERA, a divorced of "The Old Homestead." The (Book Two, pages 164-165). subdivided the farmland, now women! ERA doesn't say person. Supper woman's ex-husband won't anything at all about "equal combinedwillbe farm is now operated by After being evicted from his known as Harley View Acres, have any obligation tosupport pay for equal work". ERA We will a another Paddleford descen- home on one of the Deer keeping the old brick house in her at all! Each sex is on its takes away rights from much that you dant, Dennis Paddleford Islands in the Connecticut the family to pass on to own. ERA would alsowipeout w0men and gives rights to paper this Ward. River, he built a house nearby Harland, Jr. and his son , According to the date in Barnet. Harriet Hinman Gerald. It is presently oe- a widow's right to a property homosexuals. According to calendar of painted on the old barn, it was says that you can still see the cupied by Genevieve Bedell exemption. Sen. Sam Ervin, Jr., Tickets may be homosexuals would be the advance by built in 1790. The house too is cellarhole with trees growing Mitchell. The house was built only group of people the ERA Thomson, Mr. very old, perhaps as old as the on it, beside Route 5, half a with bricks made on the farm, would do any good for. Orford, N.H. 03777. barn. mile below Barnetvillage. with clay taken from Hunt Demand that your acceptsdonations John's grandson John Mountain Brook which runs Not exactly legislators rescind their ap- furniture, Johnson farm, 1804 bought land in Monroe in 1843 through the farm. proval of this horrendous Call 603-353-9245. Thomas Johnson bought and 1844 which became the For almost 100 years there his farm south of Monroe family farm. The house that was another Bedell farm in obscene but Amendment! Dr. Enrique H. village in 1804, and it has come he built is still standing. John Monroe, near the southern Frank L. Cutler down through Moses, Richard, used to drive cattle to Boston, boundary of the town. It was To the Editor: Bridport, Vermont Freeman, Elmer (Bob) and also taught "singing school" known as the Soper Bedell After, presumably, a now RichardJohnson. and led the Mclndoos church farm, and the last Bedell summer of special meetings, A HELLO to The original buildings choir. He was unmarried, and please turn to page 5) the House Education and the were on County Road, which Ways and Means Committees Brad.ford went up through the pasture, have come up with a state aid everyone in In1839 the family moved down :[mlllll bill. While not exactly ob-TotheEditor: sday, I went to into the valley and put up a 'I, mmm scene, it certainly has no Today is a very windy but thodontist and new set of buildings on the redeeming social values, sunny day. Leanne has to go brother) went to present main road. But there Even Gov. Snelling's bill will to nethall as she does every was more building yet to be do less harm and it's had Saturday, but David's hockey (host mother), done: the house burned in 1916 enough. Shortcomings in- is cancelled, so we're going to Betty and I went and was rebuilt: the barn blew dude: play some golf. That should be musical, "Evita," down in a freak tornado in 1918 Retreat from "home a good laugh. David is really Majesty's Theatre, and was rebuilt, then the new rule": The bill would about good at it, but I'm another chestra was under one burned in 1954 and was The Flood Control Commission double state funding, thus story, and all of the rebuilt in 1955. increasing, through allocation Last weekend was "Get to really strong Down through the byROBERTA. MICHENFELDER of state aid, state control over, Know Sydney Weekend." I bignight generations the Jolmsons have The Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission and responsibility for local can't remember if I men- had a wonderful been active in community made it's annual report for fiscal1979-1980 a few weeks ago. education, decreasing oi3- tioned this before, but AFS homeabout affairs. Originally their It contains a number of things of interest to valley portunities for the exercise of students in NSW go to Sydney the tennis section of town was a part of residents, among them a policy statement by John Curry the "home rule", for the whole weekend. You're Wimbleton. Bath, but in 1895 Richard present chairman; a report on the dollar amounts paid to Index of "wealth": The allowed to bring a host brother was playing Johnson represented Bath in Vermont and New Hampshire towns that suffer tax losses bill would gauge"wealth" of a or sister. I took Leanne. Early <Australia). We the state legislature and in-duetofloodcontrolstructuresandasetofstatisticafromthe town 50 per cent on fair Friday morning,' Chris until 2:00 a.m. treduced a bill to have his part Corps of Engineers that explains quite a bit, towhit; market value (FMV) of (Calif.), her host sister of the Town of Bath annexed to --the cost of all flood control dams in the valley is property and 50 per cent on Kristen, Leanne and I took the argued with the Monroe. When the bill passed, $87,086,700.00, aggregate personal incom train to Sydney. We walked the time; hel t+anl.tena!ueostis$!,lo.oo, : of!lJltheresidents.l'!]ll!lllililliarolmd Sydney.,. going to ** thedraaea served by these dams is 1,741.19 sq. cetttonpers0nal inc diffnt stores- nights before two years Richard was elected miles, be a timid step forward except whatever we wanted. At 5: 00, pay a $1500 selectman of Monroe. --the height and length of these dams, totalled, is 2,150 that no provision is made for we went back to Central to that he had been Arlie Johnson. Bob'swife, and 22,218 ft., residents to pay their local meet all the other students from says that in the early days, --the recreational pools, where they exist, add up to school taxes on the same basis and also the families we were was there were some sheep and some 2,555 acres, as that on which their town is to stay with for that weekend. McEnroe hens on the place, but mostly If these figures don't ring an immediate bell, recall that a granted or denied state aid -- We stayed with a really nice he was a "dis cows. During the time that while back in this column I mentioned that natural storage personal income. Thus would family, "The Gills." They human race." Bob had the farm they bought areas in the valley had twice the capacity of all dam ira- an income-rich town be denied have seven kids and one short- out of the Registered Holstein calves for poundments already built and so should be preserved at all state aid and the property tax term exchange girl, Lisa from watched the men'S the children for 4-H, and now cost. Youmaywant tothink of them as doing twice the job of would soar in order to raise Milwaukee. Believe it or not, Tonight Borg their herd is all Registered. a dam two-fifths of a mile high and four miles long. And at the school money. This is no they hardly fight at all! I McEnroe -- It The Johnsons also have done a moment they don'tcost us a dime to own or operate, problem for the income-rich would have thought that with good. lot of sugaring. While on the subject of money, the tax loss payments are property owner but it will seven kids there would have Tonight we also Bob suffered for almost 20 interesting, in themselves. Birefly put, towns and cities in force the moderate and low- been some arguments. The AFS concert. We years with Rheumatoid Connecticut and Massachusetts are protected from flooding income owner to sell out. The two oldest boys were at "It's a Small Arthritis, and was greatly by dams and impoundments in New Hampshire and Ver- squeege is even more acute if boarding school, so I didn't get different tan respected for his courage in mont. When the government takes land for a dam and the big that income rich town also to meet them. English, French, carrying on thefarm. In 1974 Imddle behind it, the town in which this happens suffers a tax embraces substantial open Anyway, we went with the Pigeon. Then the he had plastic knuckles in- loss, the land having been taken out of the tax base. Three acreage that could be sold for Gills and ate a Chinese dinner students have to stalled, then both hips towns in southern New Hampshire and 11 in Vermont have intensive development. It and got to bed about 9:30. The Pledge of Allegia replaced. Six months later he this problem and are compensated by the two southern states must be appraised at next day four of us met all of I'm letting my was so much improved that he at a rate of 90 per cent of the actual loss, 50 per cent from development potential, thus the students at Central to everyone really 1 was able to square dance. In Massachusetts and 40 per cent from Connecticut. This producing a high-dollar Grand begin our "Get to Know that I'm thinner, the end he had arthritic arrangement was established by the four state compact that List, thus classing the town as Sydney Weekend." First we pretty good. "wealth-" nodules in his lungs, and created the Commission. It has been challenged on occasion y , thus decreasing walked across the Harbor A big HELLO passed away in July, 1980. as being unrealistic in current terms. According to this state aid even further, in- Bridge (about 1. miles) -- Bradford. Arlie and their son Richard present report the Vermont towns received a total of creasing taxes and pressure to saw the "Love Boat" in are carrying nn the farm. $20,051.13, whilo those in New Hampshire got $10,272.46. sell out, especially where Sydney Harbour!! Then we The policy statement by Chairman Curry is noteworthy on farmable or forestablo acres kind of looked around Hadiock-Gibson farm, 183,3 several counts, He mentions the compact requirement that are concerned, wherever we wanted to go. At Touldey, Reuben Hadlock bought the Commission involve itself in the water resource concerns State-wide appraisal: 12:00 we were supposed to all this farm in 1833. It then went of the valley. Historically the commission has not involved Even though state aid will be meet at the Opera House, but ______.-. to his son Franklin. then his itself in this kind of activity. For one thing, its operating based only 50 per cent on FMV since Leanne, Aja (SriLanka) granddaughter Agnes. who budget made no provision for such engagement. Secondly, of property, all property will and I had already been married Fred Gibson. They the New England River Basins Commission, charged with have to be appraised by some through it, we sat on the steps sold it to their son Frank, the same obligations, had vastlygreater capacities in staff, state agency in order to an- because our feet were killing SCHOOL whose son Elwyn is the facilities and expertise, sure that no town receives us from walking so much. Aja WOODSVILLE" present owner and operator of Well, NERBC is no more. Last week, Sac. Watt issued extra state aid by gota craving for hat chips and Haverhill thefarm, the order that disolves the Water Resourees Council and with manipulating its Grand List a moove (choc. milk) so we Board will Elwyn says that Frank it most federal interest in water related concerns, among appraisals. This is a $4 to $5 got some. By the time we got Woodsville Hadlock built his own barn them NERBC So Mr. Curry's position is well taken. There million undertaking up front, back, everyone was gone. We Library at 7:30 p.] and a lot of others around the are a variety of problems waiting for us in the valley and with a $1 million annual thought that they were consider a village, all of pine. The Gib- some "institutional arrangement", to quote him, will be servicing cost, even assuming probably at the Botanical policy, son's present house was built needed to address those demands, often conflicting, that will (not likely ) that enough Gardens, so we walked and and to consider in 1850, probably also by he made on the valley's water. It remains to be seen whether professional appraisers could walked until we found them..othermatters. Frank Hadlock. in the face of rising costs, inflation, the complexity of the he found in Vermont or even After lunch at the Gardens, we problems, etc., the Commissions $16,000 annual budiet will nearby. All such costly effort, walked about two miles to see LyleFrazerfarm. 1836 be equal to the task. finally, is worthless since paddys Market (something William Frazer came to For the moment one of the most inflammatory issues, the there is only a co-incidental like Quincey Market) and America from Scotland in Northfield Diversion, is on "hold". This plan, to divert relationship between FMV Chinatown. At Paddys Market O] 1824, then bought in 1836 the Connecticut River water to Quabbin Reservoir and then on to and the personal incomes of I bought a kangaroo-skin farm that is still in the family. Boston, ran into stiff opposition from lower valley towns. The the individual resident small wallet and a small pair School Board will Besides farming, William was: proponents lost heart and put the works on the back burner, owners, of ivory earrings with silver at 7:30 p.m. a cattle drover, making many hut the idea is by no means dead. Corporation taxation: No posts. School to trips to Brighton, Mass. with .'n its place we have now the long term problem of hydro recognition is made of the fact Then we walked back to matters, reorgan cattle and sheep, power. At the outset let's agree that hydro power is a good that corporate installations, Central, took the train home hoard, roof bids, William had four sons, the thing. The Commission and I, as a Commissioner and pri,ate such as GE, National Life, and got ready for the bush reading to the three eldest all going West and citizen, are all for it. But that doesn't mean we aren't IBM, Bryant's, the Vernon dance. A bush dance is competition poliCY, the youngest. Oscar. bothered. There are all those nice flood control dams. Much power plant, etc., draw their something like square dan- matters. remaining on the home farm. of the time theydon'tdomuch.Likeinsurance, you only need employees from a great manY ..... cing. It was so much fun . I bed room Evidently the lure of the West them when trouble comes. But the urge to put them to work surroundmg - met a boy, fan, who lives in was fading by the time between time is strong. After all, they are there, they are towns towns which must Sydney and went to Texas for Oscar's three sons came paid for and they do store lots of water, if only in flo0d time. fund the education of the an exchange last year. We along, because they all stayed So what's the objection? Let's go back to that insurance children involved. Logic danced together most of the GRAFTON in Monroe. They shared analogy. Youean borrow or makeloans on many insurance suggests that the school tax time. While I was dancing a N. HA ownership of the home farm, policies, and people do. And when the crunch comes there's should not go just to the host really fast dance with Scott Grafton County with Robert taking over the little left to do the job that the policy was intended to do. So town but that these 'regional" (Ohio), I tripped over Committee will farming, too with the dams. If kept empty, an impoundmant pool will entities should be taxed, for someone eise's feet, fell flat on July 20 at The farm next went to accept any flood water that comes along. If, on the other school purposes, by the state me floor and practically got Haverhill to Lyle Frazer, then his son hand, the pool is partly or completely full, as it will have t be and on a basis of corporate trampled todeath! Theresult budget Bruce. who has built a home if power is to be generated, there is no where for the flood income not FMV of property, was that I twisted my foot and other business. on the property, The farmland water to go but over the spillway. Put simply.the dam can no No f:t matTitnt" couldn't walk on it l was so ' longerdothejobforwhichitwasintenoeu. -- '-"rid ---t ""actice of - y embarrassed! The worst part Frazer,iS now jr.rented to George L. Then what? Do we go downstream a,_:ntlernloat slserl "nlllien dnllar3qann, as that when lan asked to another flood dam? Before you say yes,_taem' unda nually to non-resident , dance again, I couldn t. On no . .,o ............... Sunday, we had a pienie at one DUMP' those figures in paragraph two: e, . ....... -n of nlavbomes et  -:--"-' - Norman Smith farm, 1837 tl m'ernature, note that an appncauon? _'':-: __Y_'_".L' ._ ' ,.., v m .scnool of the colleges in Sydney. Then B The Norman Smith farm s[.ulative a  . the Otta..: The property taxes macte tower !n North Monroe was brought fried on the North HartS. Dam   ....  .-tlfleaat beauN e( state id t',t we came home. It was a good Board of " lonA tion lmSsounu v =q-.' ;. ..... a .......... Into me family in 1857 by R urall .. ,flltsiSjustott.il by thelmst town. weekend. consider the Amos Way, who bought part of the ? ""application" -.--,v .......... prce, but'thepr-" --s has started ann m Herbert G. Ogden farewelIOn Mondayparty forWetheWentstudents to a applicationB r a d f o r d at 7: Hartland, Vt. going to America. On Thur- auditorium. Lot No 5 from James Moore, on course. was then deeded to his son