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July 28, 1982     Journal Opinion
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July 28, 1982
 

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liT, Number 30 .joint town and school in Bradford-August 2 Bradford voters will be called to a Town and School Meeting to be held t, August 2, at the Bradford Academy on a request for tax stabilization Maska clothing firm. The Canadian to purchase the Channel Mills in Bradford's Industrial Park on ingl scheduled to get underway at 7:30 the second Special Town Meeting in held to decide on the issue of whether in Bradford should be granted a tax break. The last company to Stabilization, New England Bank Support, backing of the voters on June 8. Four tax stabilization were turned clown by Annual Town Meeting in March. is planning to purchase the factory for an additional total investment in the of around $892,000, say company of- estimates say the factory could as 150 people by 1985. Average hourly factory if it opens next year under the .. range from $4.50 to $5.00 per Mills has laid off a large portion of its work fit fabrics began slipping a ago. The new interested buyer produces with hockey shirts as a major item. .funding is available .for outdoor projects NEW HAMPSHIRE-- Does your New school district, or county need help in projects? to Joseph Quinn, director of the office of at the State's Department of Economic Development, his agency to help. Qulnn said some funding is types of projects due to money left and Water Conservation Fund said these funds are targeted toward the land and constructing or facilities or park lands. These be public and they must be outdoors. cities, towns, school distri:ts, and ligible to apply for up to $55,000 in under the program -- the funding Provide 50 percent of the money for the groups submitting applications must of funds available are limited, said that the most critical points of the Procedure are: compliance with federal guidelines, the availability of money or matching funds, and of what a project calls for. be submitted to the Department of and Economic Development through Oct. 29,1982. Your Information the Journal Opinion supplies them and information each week. But, many generates the news and advertising newspaper you are now holding in all this? For your information: The and Second Opinion are owned by of Wondsville. lie's the boss; it is that decides what goes into the which articles fit and where. HIS public relations for the paper, -- laying out both the Journal writing Bear Ridge Speedway re-shooting photos for print, i, and a host of other duties that F at our office in Bradford most days and week. articles and editorials in the are written (unless specified other- and edited by Andy Corrigan of Brad- to reporting on meetings, events, and information from published edits incoming press releases, and Town News -- handles L separates (births, etc.), and other also takes photos, proofreads the been typeset, and delivers about 800 each Tuesday to a portion of our behind our spurts coverage is Bradford. Roe augments his con- photography. Dockham, of Mountain Lakes in charge of advertising in both the His travels each week of area retailers from St. Junction and from Barre to the most visible member of efforts that most enable us to each week. The ads are Julie Marsh, of Bradford, the staff. thousands upon thousands of words are typed into our photo- each week by the herculean el- and finances are overseen by of Bradford. She keeps us organized; and billing, plus ad sales from in addition to other vital duties. wife of our publisher, keeps account to the paper are as our dedicated Town and our featured columnists -- Over the River and Through the Thoughts on the Out-of-doors, are printed by Upper Valley USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont July28,1982 Vermont House and Senate candidates file for office; campaign has begun election this November. Morse will be challenged in the September Republican primary by former St. Johnsbury Selectman William Stowe. So far, Parker will be unchallenged in the Democratic primary, also in September. To the south, in Orange County, two candidates will vie for one Senate seat available in that district. Incumbent Republican Allen Avery, of Fairlee, will be challenged by Rueben Frodin, of Thetford. Neither candidate is facing opposition in their party's primary election race. The House Their are considerably more seats open in Vermont's legislative House of Representatives as there are 106 House districts in the state. Our region is represented by five districts'Ttr the Vermont House: Caledonia-Orange, which serves the towns of This year the Journal Opinion will keep you posted on the status of some of the smaller, local political races that will be brewing in our region, races that might otherwise be touched on lightly by the larger media in our twin states. This week we bring you an introduction to who is running for what legislative position in our section of Vermont. The Senate There are 13 Senate districts in the State of Vermont. Our local region is represented in the Senate through the two districts of Caledonia and Orange Counties -- three Senate seats are available. To the north, in Caledonia County, there are two Senate seats up for grabs. One is held by Republican Gerald Morse, of Groton, the other is held by Democrat Scudder Parker, of St. Johnsbury. Both Morse and Parker have announced their intention to seek re- Groton, Ryegate and Newbury; Orange Two, which serves the towns of Chelsea, Orange, Topsham, Washington, Williamstown, and Tunbridge; Orange Three, which serves the towns of Bradford, Corinth, and Vershire; Orange Four, which serves the towns of Fairlee, Thetford, and West Fairlee; and Orange-Windsor, which serves the towns of Royalton, Sharon, and Stratford. There are a total of six House seats available in the above five area districts. Who is running this year? Well, in the Caledonia- Orange district, incumbent Democrat John Zampieri, of Ryegate, is so far unopposed in both the primary and the November general elections. In the Orange Two district, a heavy primary battle is brewing. Republicans Harry Ashe, of Williamstown, Richard Betts, of Chelsea, and Donald Milne, of Washington, are all seeking their party's Haverhill board hears grievance; roofs, lunches August 4. Such an an- nouncement is not expected to come at the school board's next scheduled meeting-- this Wednesday night at Wood- sville High School. Next Meeting At this week's meeting, the school board is expected to continue their discussion of what to do over repairs needed for roofs at three district school buildings. The board will specifically hear from an engineer regarding the feasibility and financial outlook for replacing a roof at the Woodsville Elementary School. The school board is currently weighing the merits of a pitched-type roof against the school's existing flat variety. WOODSVILLE-- The Haverhill School Board has another week to make their final decision regarding a teacher grievance filed by a former teacher who is con- testing a district ad- ministration decision not to rehire her. The teacher, Mary Ann Robinson, of Woodsville, was granted a maternity leave by the school beard last fall expecting to return to teach six grade at the N. Haverhill school next fall. District of- ficials maintain Robinson did not properly notify the district of her intention to return to her position under the guidelines set up in the Haverhill district teachers contract. But, Robinson, represented by National Education Association (a teachers' union) representative John Fessenden, is arguing otherwise -- that district officials were notified of her intention .to return and that she was passed over in favor of hiring another teacher for the position. Last week the school board was reported to be expected to announce their final decision on the matter by Wednesday, nomination to be placed on the Further north, in the Orange open in this district. In the far southern district ballot in November. Three district, incumbent In the nearby district of in our region, Orange- Democrats Barbara Democrat Wayne Kenyon will Orange Four, incumbent Windsor, another primary MacDonald, of Williamstown, be fending off a challenge Republican Webster Keefe, of battle is becoming apparent in and Ann Schorger, of Chelsea, from Republican Kenneth Thefford, will face opposition a district that also holds only are waging a similar battle. Vittum in the generalelection, from Democrat Doris one seat in the House-- but There are two seats available Both candidates live in Lingelhach in the general only for the Democratic in this district. Bradford. There is one seat election, nomination. (please turn to page 8) Lunch Program According to an agenda for the Wednesday meeting released by the Haverhill Cooperative School District, the school board will also act to renew their contract with the Nutri-Eff school lunch consultants. Nutri-Eff is the computer lunch program group largely responsible for enabling the Haverhill district to pull its ailing school lunch program from a bog of red ink. The program has gone from a $'9,000 deficit at the end of the 1980-81 school year to a projected budget surplus of around $4,000 this June, say district officials. Nutri-Eff founder George Bussell this winter promised to supply the district with the program at a special rate of 1.5 cents per plate "for as long as the program at a special rate of 1.5 cents per plate "for as long as the district wants it." The school hoard is ex- pected to sign for renewal of the contract Wednesday night with little debate over the matter. In a related matter, the school board will also be acting on the hiring of three persons to fill open positions in the district lunch program. These positions include a lunch operator for the James R. Morrill School, a lunch operator for the Woodsville High School, and a lunch helper position at the James R. Morrill School. Nominations for the positions have been made by i the district superintendent's office. Orford School Board acts on lunch deficit ORFORD--TheOrfordSchool fiscal year with a lunch Orford by asking the lunch IT'S FAIR TIME... IT'S HORSE PULLING TIME-- A major attraction at the fair is the horse pulling contest. The above team easily pulled the weighted bolt. More pictures on page 5. Oxbow signs teacher contract; reverses position on smoking BRADFORD-- There was a out-of-state vacationing right and including the general on the tobacco thing. Our drug lengthy agenda awaiting the now," said teacher public, and alcohol problem is serious representative and Oxbow The board will now face a guidance counselor Sue Ming second ruling on a policy that placing a time when the will allow adults and teachers committee might be able to to smoke in designated areas convene at "around the at the school, but will curtail middle of August." completely the use of tobacco School officials at Oxbow by students. had written a ten percent The rest of the policy, of increase in salaries and course, bans alcohol and benefits into the school's 1982- illegal drugs on Oxbow school 83 budget passed at Oxbow's grounds altogether and in- Annual Meeting in March. cludes regulations and Unofficial estimates now say automatic penalties for the negotiated contraCt may tobacco, alcohol, and drug contain increases of about 15 violations. percent. The new policy was drawn However, last year Oxbow up by the school's Substance teachers with education Abuse Committee, which backgrounds of up to six years consists of school officials who at the post-secondary level have also sought the were paid substantially less assistance of State Police than those in careers Corporal Robert Haradon of requiring similar educational the Bradford State Police backgrounds, the teachers Cluster office, said committee argue, member Russ Haviland, Oxbow School Board last week at their first meeting since the Annual School Meetings in Bradford and Newbury, and also their first meeting after a brief respite -- having not met in over a month. At the Thursday meeting, the school board signed a new master contract with the Oxbow Teacher Association, heard a teacher grievance in executive session: voted in their officers for the coming fiscal year, welcomed a new school hoard member from Newbury, ' entered into a lengthy debate regarding the school's proposed new tobacco, drug, and alcohol policy -- all in addition to more routine duties. Although the school board signed the master contract last Thursday, the document will not become official until Board last week decided to take action on their ailing school lunch program in an effort aimed at curtailing a growing deficit problem associated with the school operated fond services. At their regular meeting last Monday, the school board reportedly decided to cut the price of the lunch offered by the program and to reduce the working hours of some of the school's kitchen staff. The move to reduce the price of the per plate cost of an Orford school lunch is said to be aimed at attracting in- creased lunch sales. Declining lunch sales has been cited by school officials as one of the major dilemmas facing the program in recent years. They say students became less interested in buying the school lunches after the per plate cost in O?ford was raised from 55 cents to 70 cents caused in part by cut-hacks in federal lunch program reimbursements. This fall, a school lunch will be reportedly available to Orford students for 60 cents per plate, reug-hly ten cents lower than similar lunches offered by surrounding school districts such as nearby Haverhill. Orford ended the 1981-82 program deficit of $4,448, according to school officials. The school board had been expecting a possible deficit of up to $4,800 in May and earlier last winter voters at Orford's Annual School meeting ap- proved an article that added an additional $I000 to the lunch budget -- school of_ ficials anticipating a budget program's kitchen assistant to work three hours per day instead of five. Orford's lunch program changes will go into effect this September and will reportedly be reviewed by the school board after a two-month trial period. the bargaining committee from the Oxbow Teacher's Association can meet together to decide whether to pen a signature on the contract. The contract has already been on the bargaining table for over six months. "Half of our committee is No Smoking The move to act on the The school board approved policy came after guidance a motion from board member counselor Sue Ming urged the Dan Perry that basically school board toseparate the reversed the idea behind an smoking issue from that of earlier proposed policy that drugs and alcohol. "We've would have required that no been listening to this same tobacco would be allowed on thing for months, but Oxbow school grounds in the everytime we deal with this hands of students, teachers, policy the board gets hung up enough so I think we should get moving." Assistant superintendent Rufus Ansiey told the board that the State Department of Education requires that the above three vices be included in the same policy. Board chairman Aroline Putnam told her colleagues she believed that a no smoking policy would be impossible to enforce on adults, particularly outside of the building. Two board members held firm on their no smoking position: Joseph Rinaldi and Judith Forward. A second reading on the revised policy will be held at the school board's next meeting in August. Elected Officers The board re-elected Put- nam to serve as their chair- overrun even then. The number of Orford students using the school's lunch program dropped from 130.6 during the 1980-81 school year to an average of 94.2 students during the just ended 1981-82 year, district figures show. New Hampshire Depart- ment of Education figures show that for each regular lunch, the federal government reimburses the school with 14 and one-half cents. For those students who cannot afford the lunch, as deemed according to family income, the govern- ment gives the school 58 cents for each reduced price lunch, and $I.08 cents for each free lunch provided by the school. These figures were current for the 1981-82 school year. The above federal reim- bursement figures are said to be lower than that allotted during the previous year. Kitchen labor will be cut in man; Dan Perry will serve as vice chairman; Judith For- ward will act as the board's budget clerk. The school board welcomed newly elected Newbury member JoAnne Arps to their midst. Arps defeated in- cumbent board member (please turn to page 5) [ donors set record 1 WOODSVILLE--Cooperation is particularly gratifying Merryman, Susan Folley, Kimball, Edith Henson, Bradley. by local media, volunteer when the response results in a John Folley, Michelle Jorma Niven, Evangeline Woodsville -- Frank record turnout for the local Sullivan, MichaelBelyea. Anderson, Bruce Anderson, Red Cross Chapter." Mtn. Lakes--- William Hall. Lois Hanson. There was a critical need for Orford-- Devon Plumer. N. Haverhill -- Francis type A Positive blood at this Plermont -- Nelda Coulter, Stoddard, Janet Kinder, time and the response from CorrenaDube. Richard Kinder, Everett donors with this type blood Pike -- Emily Brooks, Hanson, Walter Dellinger, was especially gratifying, said Shirley Grimes, Win. Grimes, Sara White, Rosamond Guy. Jr. Bailey, Janelle Bishop, Donors by town, incquding Warren -- Dale Berglund, Evelyn Elms, Dr. Jack twenty-one first timers, were: Alan Shortt. Pollock, Richard Pollock, Donors from New Hampshire: Haverhill -- Barbara Mary Ingalls, Kim Hanson, Bath-- Marjorie Burt, Bishop, Bruce Bishop, John Robert Clifford, Sr. Rosalie Aldrich, and Donald Mitchell, Margaret Estill, Woodsville  Paul KollishM.D. Thomas Estill, Edward Tetreault, Sharon Drew, Glencliff--EarlRamsey. Morris, Sandra Morris, Denise Drew, Bruce Labs, Lishen--CharlesWilley. Shirley Morris, Earl Arem- Kathleen Labs, Karen Lyman -- Richard Corn- burg! Russell Bigelow, Debra Whalen, Greg Perkins, Ann stock. Bemm. Amature, Jon Vogt, Barbara Monroe -- Denise Leafe, N. Haverhill -- Susan Fournier, Duane Gray, Roger Phyllis Keenan, Pare Keenan, Williams, Marie Tetreault, Fournier, Roxanne Richar- Paul Keenan, John Shauna Kimball, Peter dson, Edward Cook, Virginia O'Malley, Susie Smith, Sandra Ingerson, Beth Pidgeon, Pethaone Winchester, James O'Shaughnessy, Eula Mit- chell, Gall O'Shaughnessy, Betty Maynes, Tim White, Conrad Fournier, Carroll Hastings, Rose Cox, Lois Paye, Kenneth Harward, Shirley Cobb, Deborah Buell, Cynthia Fagnant, James Roy, Victor Roy, Linda Guy, Ronald Fournier, Rita Moses, Jo-Ann Mallett, Richard Sherburne, Jon W. Vogt, Charles Butson, Stephen Lang, Theresa Belyea, Roland Moore, William Harris, Doris Kennedy, H.O. Taylor Jr., Barbara Lamont, Judith (please turn to page 5) staff, Armory personnel, and the weatherman resulted in a new all-time record of 145 donors at the Red Cross blood drawing in Wondsville on Thursday, July 22. "It takes a lot of time and effort to prepare for a blood drawing. Weeks before the established date, local volunteers prepare the ad- vertising, mail out reminder cards to previous donors, enlist a women's club to operate the canteen, enlist nurses and . volunteers for specific stations, and dozens of other details," said Al Guy a Red Cross spokesman. "But, it is the donors themselves who make it all worthwhile. It liT, Number 30 .joint town and school in Bradford-August 2 Bradford voters will be called to a Town and School Meeting to be held t, August 2, at the Bradford Academy on a request for tax stabilization Maska clothing firm. The Canadian to purchase the Channel Mills in Bradford's Industrial Park on ingl scheduled to get underway at 7:30 the second Special Town Meeting in held to decide on the issue of whether in Bradford should be granted a tax break. The last company to Stabilization, New England Bank Support, backing of the voters on June 8. Four tax stabilization were turned clown by Annual Town Meeting in March. is planning to purchase the factory for an additional total investment in the of around $892,000, say company of- estimates say the factory could as 150 people by 1985. Average hourly factory if it opens next year under the .. range from $4.50 to $5.00 per Mills has laid off a large portion of its work fit fabrics began slipping a ago. The new interested buyer produces with hockey shirts as a major item. .funding is available .for outdoor projects NEW HAMPSHIRE-- Does your New school district, or county need help in projects? to Joseph Quinn, director of the office of at the State's Department of Economic Development, his agency to help. Qulnn said some funding is types of projects due to money left and Water Conservation Fund said these funds are targeted toward the land and constructing or facilities or park lands. These be public and they must be outdoors. cities, towns, school distri:ts, and ligible to apply for up to $55,000 in under the program -- the funding Provide 50 percent of the money for the groups submitting applications must of funds available are limited, said that the most critical points of the Procedure are: compliance with federal guidelines, the availability of money or matching funds, and of what a project calls for. be submitted to the Department of and Economic Development through Oct. 29,1982. Your Information the Journal Opinion supplies them and information each week. But, many generates the news and advertising newspaper you are now holding in all this? For your information: The and Second Opinion are owned by of Wondsville. lie's the boss; it is that decides what goes into the which articles fit and where. HIS public relations for the paper, -- laying out both the Journal writing Bear Ridge Speedway re-shooting photos for print, i, and a host of other duties that F at our office in Bradford most days and week. articles and editorials in the are written (unless specified other- and edited by Andy Corrigan of Brad- to reporting on meetings, events, and information from published edits incoming press releases, and Town News -- handles L separates (births, etc.), and other also takes photos, proofreads the been typeset, and delivers about 800 each Tuesday to a portion of our behind our spurts coverage is Bradford. Roe augments his con- photography. Dockham, of Mountain Lakes in charge of advertising in both the His travels each week of area retailers from St. Junction and from Barre to the most visible member of efforts that most enable us to each week. The ads are Julie Marsh, of Bradford, the staff. thousands upon thousands of words are typed into our photo- each week by the herculean el- and finances are overseen by of Bradford. She keeps us organized; and billing, plus ad sales from in addition to other vital duties. wife of our publisher, keeps account to the paper are as our dedicated Town and our featured columnists -- Over the River and Through the Thoughts on the Out-of-doors, are printed by Upper Valley USP 598340 Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont July28,1982 Vermont House and Senate candidates file for office; campaign has begun election this November. Morse will be challenged in the September Republican primary by former St. Johnsbury Selectman William Stowe. So far, Parker will be unchallenged in the Democratic primary, also in September. To the south, in Orange County, two candidates will vie for one Senate seat available in that district. Incumbent Republican Allen Avery, of Fairlee, will be challenged by Rueben Frodin, of Thetford. Neither candidate is facing opposition in their party's primary election race. The House Their are considerably more seats open in Vermont's legislative House of Representatives as there are 106 House districts in the state. Our region is represented by five districts'Ttr the Vermont House: Caledonia-Orange, which serves the towns of This year the Journal Opinion will keep you posted on the status of some of the smaller, local political races that will be brewing in our region, races that might otherwise be touched on lightly by the larger media in our twin states. This week we bring you an introduction to who is running for what legislative position in our section of Vermont. The Senate There are 13 Senate districts in the State of Vermont. Our local region is represented in the Senate through the two districts of Caledonia and Orange Counties -- three Senate seats are available. To the north, in Caledonia County, there are two Senate seats up for grabs. One is held by Republican Gerald Morse, of Groton, the other is held by Democrat Scudder Parker, of St. Johnsbury. Both Morse and Parker have announced their intention to seek re- Groton, Ryegate and Newbury; Orange Two, which serves the towns of Chelsea, Orange, Topsham, Washington, Williamstown, and Tunbridge; Orange Three, which serves the towns of Bradford, Corinth, and Vershire; Orange Four, which serves the towns of Fairlee, Thetford, and West Fairlee; and Orange-Windsor, which serves the towns of Royalton, Sharon, and Stratford. There are a total of six House seats available in the above five area districts. Who is running this year? Well, in the Caledonia- Orange district, incumbent Democrat John Zampieri, of Ryegate, is so far unopposed in both the primary and the November general elections. In the Orange Two district, a heavy primary battle is brewing. Republicans Harry Ashe, of Williamstown, Richard Betts, of Chelsea, and Donald Milne, of Washington, are all seeking their party's Haverhill board hears grievance; roofs, lunches August 4. Such an an- nouncement is not expected to come at the school board's next scheduled meeting-- this Wednesday night at Wood- sville High School. Next Meeting At this week's meeting, the school board is expected to continue their discussion of what to do over repairs needed for roofs at three district school buildings. The board will specifically hear from an engineer regarding the feasibility and financial outlook for replacing a roof at the Woodsville Elementary School. The school board is currently weighing the merits of a pitched-type roof against the school's existing flat variety. WOODSVILLE-- The Haverhill School Board has another week to make their final decision regarding a teacher grievance filed by a former teacher who is con- testing a district ad- ministration decision not to rehire her. The teacher, Mary Ann Robinson, of Woodsville, was granted a maternity leave by the school beard last fall expecting to return to teach six grade at the N. Haverhill school next fall. District of- ficials maintain Robinson did not properly notify the district of her intention to return to her position under the guidelines set up in the Haverhill district teachers contract. But, Robinson, represented by National Education Association (a teachers' union) representative John Fessenden, is arguing otherwise -- that district officials were notified of her intention .to return and that she was passed over in favor of hiring another teacher for the position. Last week the school board was reported to be expected to announce their final decision on the matter by Wednesday, nomination to be placed on the Further north, in the Orange open in this district. In the far southern district ballot in November. Three district, incumbent In the nearby district of in our region, Orange- Democrats Barbara Democrat Wayne Kenyon will Orange Four, incumbent Windsor, another primary MacDonald, of Williamstown, be fending off a challenge Republican Webster Keefe, of battle is becoming apparent in and Ann Schorger, of Chelsea, from Republican Kenneth Thefford, will face opposition a district that also holds only are waging a similar battle. Vittum in the generalelection, from Democrat Doris one seat in the House-- but There are two seats available Both candidates live in Lingelhach in the general only for the Democratic in this district. Bradford. There is one seat election, nomination. (please turn to page 8) Lunch Program According to an agenda for the Wednesday meeting released by the Haverhill Cooperative School District, the school board will also act to renew their contract with the Nutri-Eff school lunch consultants. Nutri-Eff is the computer lunch program group largely responsible for enabling the Haverhill district to pull its ailing school lunch program from a bog of red ink. The program has gone from a $'9,000 deficit at the end of the 1980-81 school year to a projected budget surplus of around $4,000 this June, say district officials. Nutri-Eff founder George Bussell this winter promised to supply the district with the program at a special rate of 1.5 cents per plate "for as long as the program at a special rate of 1.5 cents per plate "for as long as the district wants it." The school hoard is ex- pected to sign for renewal of the contract Wednesday night with little debate over the matter. In a related matter, the school board will also be acting on the hiring of three persons to fill open positions in the district lunch program. These positions include a lunch operator for the James R. Morrill School, a lunch operator for the Woodsville High School, and a lunch helper position at the James R. Morrill School. Nominations for the positions have been made by i the district superintendent's office. Orford School Board acts on lunch deficit ORFORD--TheOrfordSchool fiscal year with a lunch Orford by asking the lunch IT'S FAIR TIME... IT'S HORSE PULLING TIME-- A major attraction at the fair is the horse pulling contest. The above team easily pulled the weighted bolt. More pictures on page 5. Oxbow signs teacher contract; reverses position on smoking BRADFORD-- There was a out-of-state vacationing right and including the general on the tobacco thing. Our drug lengthy agenda awaiting the now," said teacher public, and alcohol problem is serious representative and Oxbow The board will now face a guidance counselor Sue Ming second ruling on a policy that placing a time when the will allow adults and teachers committee might be able to to smoke in designated areas convene at "around the at the school, but will curtail middle of August." completely the use of tobacco School officials at Oxbow by students. had written a ten percent The rest of the policy, of increase in salaries and course, bans alcohol and benefits into the school's 1982- illegal drugs on Oxbow school 83 budget passed at Oxbow's grounds altogether and in- Annual Meeting in March. cludes regulations and Unofficial estimates now say automatic penalties for the negotiated contraCt may tobacco, alcohol, and drug contain increases of about 15 violations. percent. The new policy was drawn However, last year Oxbow up by the school's Substance teachers with education Abuse Committee, which backgrounds of up to six years consists of school officials who at the post-secondary level have also sought the were paid substantially less assistance of State Police than those in careers Corporal Robert Haradon of requiring similar educational the Bradford State Police backgrounds, the teachers Cluster office, said committee argue, member Russ Haviland, Oxbow School Board last week at their first meeting since the Annual School Meetings in Bradford and Newbury, and also their first meeting after a brief respite -- having not met in over a month. At the Thursday meeting, the school board signed a new master contract with the Oxbow Teacher Association, heard a teacher grievance in executive session: voted in their officers for the coming fiscal year, welcomed a new school hoard member from Newbury, ' entered into a lengthy debate regarding the school's proposed new tobacco, drug, and alcohol policy -- all in addition to more routine duties. Although the school board signed the master contract last Thursday, the document will not become official until Board last week decided to take action on their ailing school lunch program in an effort aimed at curtailing a growing deficit problem associated with the school operated fond services. At their regular meeting last Monday, the school board reportedly decided to cut the price of the lunch offered by the program and to reduce the working hours of some of the school's kitchen staff. The move to reduce the price of the per plate cost of an Orford school lunch is said to be aimed at attracting in- creased lunch sales. Declining lunch sales has been cited by school officials as one of the major dilemmas facing the program in recent years. They say students became less interested in buying the school lunches after the per plate cost in O?ford was raised from 55 cents to 70 cents caused in part by cut-hacks in federal lunch program reimbursements. This fall, a school lunch will be reportedly available to Orford students for 60 cents per plate, reug-hly ten cents lower than similar lunches offered by surrounding school districts such as nearby Haverhill. Orford ended the 1981-82 program deficit of $4,448, according to school officials. The school board had been expecting a possible deficit of up to $4,800 in May and earlier last winter voters at Orford's Annual School meeting ap- proved an article that added an additional $I000 to the lunch budget -- school of_ ficials anticipating a budget program's kitchen assistant to work three hours per day instead of five. Orford's lunch program changes will go into effect this September and will reportedly be reviewed by the school board after a two-month trial period. the bargaining committee from the Oxbow Teacher's Association can meet together to decide whether to pen a signature on the contract. The contract has already been on the bargaining table for over six months. "Half of our committee is No Smoking The move to act on the The school board approved policy came after guidance a motion from board member counselor Sue Ming urged the Dan Perry that basically school board toseparate the reversed the idea behind an smoking issue from that of earlier proposed policy that drugs and alcohol. "We've would have required that no been listening to this same tobacco would be allowed on thing for months, but Oxbow school grounds in the everytime we deal with this hands of students, teachers, policy the board gets hung up enough so I think we should get moving." Assistant superintendent Rufus Ansiey told the board that the State Department of Education requires that the above three vices be included in the same policy. Board chairman Aroline Putnam told her colleagues she believed that a no smoking policy would be impossible to enforce on adults, particularly outside of the building. Two board members held firm on their no smoking position: Joseph Rinaldi and Judith Forward. A second reading on the revised policy will be held at the school board's next meeting in August. Elected Officers The board re-elected Put- nam to serve as their chair- overrun even then. The number of Orford students using the school's lunch program dropped from 130.6 during the 1980-81 school year to an average of 94.2 students during the just ended 1981-82 year, district figures show. New Hampshire Depart- ment of Education figures show that for each regular lunch, the federal government reimburses the school with 14 and one-half cents. For those students who cannot afford the lunch, as deemed according to family income, the govern- ment gives the school 58 cents for each reduced price lunch, and $I.08 cents for each free lunch provided by the school. These figures were current for the 1981-82 school year. The above federal reim- bursement figures are said to be lower than that allotted during the previous year. Kitchen labor will be cut in man; Dan Perry will serve as vice chairman; Judith For- ward will act as the board's budget clerk. The school board welcomed newly elected Newbury member JoAnne Arps to their midst. Arps defeated in- cumbent board member (please turn to page 5) [ donors set record 1 WOODSVILLE--Cooperation is particularly gratifying Merryman, Susan Folley, Kimball, Edith Henson, Bradley. by local media, volunteer when the response results in a John Folley, Michelle Jorma Niven, Evangeline Woodsville -- Frank record turnout for the local Sullivan, MichaelBelyea. Anderson, Bruce Anderson, Red Cross Chapter." Mtn. Lakes--- William Hall. Lois Hanson. There was a critical need for Orford-- Devon Plumer. N. Haverhill -- Francis type A Positive blood at this Plermont -- Nelda Coulter, Stoddard, Janet Kinder, time and the response from CorrenaDube. Richard Kinder, Everett donors with this type blood Pike -- Emily Brooks, Hanson, Walter Dellinger, was especially gratifying, said Shirley Grimes, Win. Grimes, Sara White, Rosamond Guy. Jr. Bailey, Janelle Bishop, Donors by town, incquding Warren -- Dale Berglund, Evelyn Elms, Dr. Jack twenty-one first timers, were: Alan Shortt. Pollock, Richard Pollock, Donors from New Hampshire: Haverhill -- Barbara Mary Ingalls, Kim Hanson, Bath-- Marjorie Burt, Bishop, Bruce Bishop, John Robert Clifford, Sr. Rosalie Aldrich, and Donald Mitchell, Margaret Estill, Woodsville  Paul KollishM.D. Thomas Estill, Edward Tetreault, Sharon Drew, Glencliff--EarlRamsey. Morris, Sandra Morris, Denise Drew, Bruce Labs, Lishen--CharlesWilley. Shirley Morris, Earl Arem- Kathleen Labs, Karen Lyman -- Richard Corn- burg! Russell Bigelow, Debra Whalen, Greg Perkins, Ann stock. Bemm. Amature, Jon Vogt, Barbara Monroe -- Denise Leafe, N. Haverhill -- Susan Fournier, Duane Gray, Roger Phyllis Keenan, Pare Keenan, Williams, Marie Tetreault, Fournier, Roxanne Richar- Paul Keenan, John Shauna Kimball, Peter dson, Edward Cook, Virginia O'Malley, Susie Smith, Sandra Ingerson, Beth Pidgeon, Pethaone Winchester, James O'Shaughnessy, Eula Mit- chell, Gall O'Shaughnessy, Betty Maynes, Tim White, Conrad Fournier, Carroll Hastings, Rose Cox, Lois Paye, Kenneth Harward, Shirley Cobb, Deborah Buell, Cynthia Fagnant, James Roy, Victor Roy, Linda Guy, Ronald Fournier, Rita Moses, Jo-Ann Mallett, Richard Sherburne, Jon W. Vogt, Charles Butson, Stephen Lang, Theresa Belyea, Roland Moore, William Harris, Doris Kennedy, H.O. Taylor Jr., Barbara Lamont, Judith (please turn to page 5) staff, Armory personnel, and the weatherman resulted in a new all-time record of 145 donors at the Red Cross blood drawing in Wondsville on Thursday, July 22. "It takes a lot of time and effort to prepare for a blood drawing. Weeks before the established date, local volunteers prepare the ad- vertising, mail out reminder cards to previous donors, enlist a women's club to operate the canteen, enlist nurses and . volunteers for specific stations, and dozens of other details," said Al Guy a Red Cross spokesman. "But, it is the donors themselves who make it all worthwhile. It