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July 28, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Publisher of Jumal i Opinion Weakb/newspaper publiakad in |redfard, Verment. avkocripflan rates - Vermont and New Hampshire - $9.00 par year; $1.0O far six meatks; nut of start - $T2.00 par year end $7.00 far six months: Senior citizen dilcnat $2.00. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford Woisvillc 02-222-5281 60:I-747-2016 P An Independent Newspaper i L , ......,. L_ i , i ; 1 *Editorial Senate subcommittee acts effectively on acid rain Last week a Senate Subcommittee on Environment and Public Works, chaired by Vermont Senator Robert Stafford, unanimously passed a proposal aimed at reducing the amount of pollutants pumped into the air in 31 eastern states -- pollutants that are causing Acid Rain. The proposal was an amendment to the federal Clea Air Act aimed at reducing the amount of pollutants generated by factories and other sources mainly in the mid- northeastern industrial states. The amendment passed by the sub- committee proposes to reduce the amount of sulfur pollutants by 8- million tons over 12 years. Although an earlier amendment pushed by Stafford would have reduced sulfur emissions by ten-tons over the same time period, "the passage of last week's amendment can be seen as a major victory in the fight against Acid Rain. For a time it looked as though some membexs of the Environment and Public Works Committee were intent on sending through only a mushy version of the amendment which called for "additional research" into the problem but very little action. There is considerable basis behind the contention that the sulfur reductions called for in the amend- ment may not actually rid Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, and Nor- them New York from the bouts of Acid Rain that have poisoned hun- dreds of lakes and ponds, rendering them uninhabitable to fish and plant life00 We need, however, a clean air program that can get through the legislature and get through it quickly. We need some type of working program that can specifically address THE KOCH FAMILY the problem -- a program that in ............................................. cludes at least some real restrictions Craftsmen of recorders on sulfur and nitrogen oxides before it is too late. Hopefully, our representatives will continue to fight for more effective industrial regulations as continued research yields additional effective alternatives. As we have said before, Acid Rain will assuredly have a disasterous effect on our region's economy as more and more lakes die off. But an even darker problem associated with Acid Rain looms in the future. What effect will Acid Rain actually have on us as a population? Already Vermont Attorney General John Zaston and Environmental Secretary Brendan Whittaker have called for the federal Environmental Protection Agency to act on the problem citing what they believe is the effect of Acid Rain on the water supply in the Vermont Town of Bennington. Easton and Whittaker said early this winter that acidity, caused by Acid Rain in the town's water supply, caused lead water pipes in the town to erode causing lead contamination. This example should caution us to the many yet unseen dangerstof Acid Rain lurking ahead. So we are encouraged by the passage of substantial measures to curtail Acid Rain passed in Sen. Stafford's subcommittee last week. It is about time that we have seen some effective action on one of the most pressing issues facing those of us living in the Northeast. Monetary madness than 11 percent. As a result, by the spring of 1981. shortly after Mr. Reagan became president, inflion was raging out of control and interest rates were above 20 percent. At that point the Federal Reserve, in a new fit of monetary madness, leaped upon the money supply and began choking, it, until it was limp and lifeless. From April to October the money supply actually declined. This totally irresponsible con- traction of the money supply, following fight on the heels of a totally irresponsible expansion of the money supply, plunged the economy into its worst decline since the Great Depression. Now we are again presented with op- timistic predictions from the ad- ministration and most private economists. President Reagan says that the recession is bottoming out. The blue chip forecasters are echoing his opinion. And indeed, they may be right. Preliminary data indicate that the economy grew a little in the second quarter. Moreover, the July 1 tax cut will be substantial. Unlike the first installment last October, this cut will be only partially undone by bracket creep and recent federal, state and local tax increases. Unfortunately, fiscal sanity is once more being accompanied by monetary madness. Last fall, after being strangled nearly to death, the moribund money supply sud- denly sprang to life and advanced vigorously. From September to January it increased at the astonishing annualized rate of 15 percent. It was this increase that caused the economy to stir during the spring. But since January the Federal Reserve has again been squeezing the money supply into lifelessness. At the end of June the money supply, M-1. was by THOMAS B. SILVER Dr. Silver is president of Public Research. Syndicated. {} PuNic hxrch, 5ycmed, 1982 Las[ fall, few people expected a severe economic decline. In fact, most economists believed that we would avoid recession altogether. On October 26, 1981, the Wall Street Journal reported that: A group of some 49 forecasters surveyed monthly by Blue Chip Economic Indicators... looks for a slight rise of 0.5 percent in the real GNP in the fourth quarter, with stronger gains coming in 1982. Expectations of a stronger economy in 1982 stem in large part from a belief that the Reagan administration tax cuts will be stimulating business. Despite my support of President Reagan's tax cuts, I strongly dissented from this rosy consensus view. On October 27, in an article entitled, "Will President Reagan be the next Hoover?," I predicted a "severe economic slump" and suggested that the president "should caution his countrymen that terrible economic shocks and storms may lie directly ahead," Tliere were strong reasons for eessimism last fall. First, the tax cut had n delayed and diluted. Second, it had been offset by bracket creep and increased social security taxes. Third--and most important--monetary policy had been unpcecedentedly erratic. For a whole year, from April 1980 to April 1981, the Federal Reserve had allowed the money supply to run wild. Month after month it raged upward at the torrid rate of more stenciled trays -- he was one of the first in the country to do stenciling in the oldtime way. In addition he started a small photography business. Finances were slim, going into the Depression years, and by that time he and Liilie had added sons William Jr. and John to the family. Making recorders In the fall of 1932, Leslie Dewing of Norwich, a teacher at the City and Country School in New York City, suggested that Mr. Koch try his hand at making recorders for the school, as there were none being made in this country at that time and it was difficult to obtain them from abroad. He agreed to give it a try, and began experimenting with a variety of woods, finally chasing Cuban mahogany for his first soprano recorders. In Leslie Dewing's words, he had "infinite patience, a true ear, and a marvelous eye for design. He was always working, reading, and thinking of new ideas. He would come down when he had found a new wood and made a recorder from it, all wreathed in smiles, and so happy -- it was delightful. He did not copy any instrument. He looked for, and found, original solutions for making his recorders." He conducted tests to determine the shrinkage of various kinds of wood, and when Cuban mahogany became unavailable in 1934, he selected cocobolo wood for his recorders. It was a year or so before he thought the soprano and alto recorders he was making were good enough to sell -- but after that they sold as fast as he could make them. For two years he sold recorders to various in- dividuals and to schools, but after that he allowed G. Schirmer exclusive rights for handling them. As the business grew, Mr. Koch expanded his shop space by adding to the back of it the old corncrib from over by the barn. Lillie says they moved it over with a couple of horses, then George Lavoie put clapboards on over the old corncrib slats. They used this building for storing and drying the lumber for the recorders. Around 1942 Mr. Koch made his first bass recorder. At that time, during World War II, there was no metal available for keys or for the conventional mouthpiece tube, so he evolved his own bore design, which eliminated the need for either keys or mouthpiece tube. He constantly sought new ways in which to improve his recorders, but his procedure in making them remained essentially unchanged through the years, as described in a 1964 newspaper article: "Each instrument is made from one square blank of wood and the parts of the blank are always kept together on special racks. Thus, when the instrument is finished, the color and grain of the parts will match each other (also the shrinkage will be equal). The bores are first rough-drilled and the ex- teriors rough-turned. Then the pieces are stored for about two months so that strains existing in the fibers may disappear. "After this period, bores and lengths are finished to accurate sizes. Then the ex- teriors are finish-turned to correct shape and dimensions and finally varnished. When this is dry, the instrument is hand-rubbed and polished. Cork joints are then fitted and cemented in place. In a fixture called a 'drill jig' the tone holes are drilled. "Native woods used are generally impregnated with a wax mixture, which increases their moisture resistance. Cocobolo does not require this because it is naturally filled with waxes and resins. "The last and most im- portant step is the tuning." Through the years For most of the time this was a "one man industry," William Koch of Haverhill, N.H., was renowned for his fine work- manship in the manufacture of recorders a musical wind- instrument made of wood). Mr. Koch came from New York City, where he had worked as a machinist and toolmaker, then later as foreman in a machine shop that made sp.ial printing machinery. His wife Lillie says that when they were living in an apartment in Brooklyn they had two bedrooms, but one of them was converted into a workshop, complete with lathe. The Koches soon decided that they had had enough of city life and moved to ttaverhilL where they bought the old house built by General John Montgomery of the War of 1812). When they were loading up their household goods to move, the lathe took so much room that they coutdn't hring much of their furniture. So when they got to Haverhill they had to find furniture for their house, and antiques purchased from local households seemed to be the most economical and prac- tical. Following the example of Mr. Koch's sister and brother- in-law, Elizabeth and Robert Royce, who were operating the White Cupboard Inn in Woedstock, Vermont, they opened their house in ttaverhill as an inn. The first two years, while their inn was closed for the winter, they stayed with the Royces in Woodstock and Mr. Koch spent his time refinishing antique furniture. The Koches' summer guests at the "Montgomery House" showed considerable interest in the antiques with which the Shouse was fur- nished, and bought so many of them that the Koches had to keep replacing them and gradually they shifted away from innkeeping into the antiq ue business Adjacent to the Koches' house was the old Bell Store building, which they con- verted into a workshop for refinishing antiques. Mr. Koch also started making-to-order reproductions of carved bed- frames, mirrors, trestle tables, wing chairs and several billion dollars lower than it was at its peak in January. It may well be, therefore, that the recession will continue through the second half of 1982, or that the incipient recovery will be anemic. If so, our financial system will continue to he dangerously vulnerable to major unex- pected shocks, in addition to the steadily mounting toll of corporate and personal bankruptcies and failures of financial institutions. The long range prospects for the economy are bright, so long as President Reagan refuses to he deflected from his present course of tax cuts and moderate growth of the money supply. Reduction of government taxing, spending, and regulation is wise. The growth rate of the money supply, though dangerously volatile, is slowing. From April 1980 to April 1981 it was greater than 11 percent, but during the past year it has fallen to around 4 percent. Once the Federal Reserve succeeds in its announced goal of making money grow both slowly and steadily, we can look forward to a prolonged and healthy economic recovery. William Koch making a recorder. (Le tters to the Edit Fourth Amendment right to be free To the Editor: My bill amends the statute to Finally, this bill I would like to bring to your provide that whenever a the importance attention S. 2548, legislation I businessman refuses entry to places on recently introduced, an OSHA inspector, a warrant right to be As you know, the shall be required for the in- unreasonable Occupational Safety and spection, government Health Act authorizes in- As we all know, Supreme believe is one spection of factories and other Court interpretations of the precious workplaces for health and 4th Amendment may change the Constitution. safety hazards or violation of from time to time, and S. 254 can to encourage OSHA's standards. Although will safeguard this in- this legislation the Act is silent on the terpretation through you informed question of whether a warrant codification. In addition it will ments. If you is required for the inspection, make sure that all or comments, the 1975 Marshall v. Barlow's businessmen are aware that servations are Inc. Supreme Court ruling the law gives them this right, welcome. clearly and unequivocally since at the present time only holds that inspection withouta a very small percentage of warrant or its equivalent employers deny entry to an violates the 4th Amendment. inspector without a warrant. Washi To the Editor: I was pleased Katherine Blaisdelrs history of Chalmers-Mills in the Opinion. I married into the Chalmers Family. Just recently, I have heard of three of W.W. Chalmers' Wagons. One is over a sugar Seekin00 a Chalmers' uw00on house, another, over a hay kept in the to read loft, and a third was in an old Museum. TheSe shed 40 years ago. prior to 1900. One has Chalmers' Boot Compare the. buggy name on it. I don't know these well-mane about the others, cars that last l0 Is there one in good shape dare to trade that is easier to get at? It Doris ' seems as though one should be THE FAIR IN JO TAKF_ ALL THE MAPBLES--- The Journal Opinion team wn thel trophy for "Moot Outstanding Effort" during bath tub racing last was sponsored by the Jaycees. The captain of the team (not in dinated the team effort for the big win. Team members were JameS Julie Marsh, Glenn Dockham, Andy Corrigan (hidden from view), Dockham (the driver in the bath tub yelling "help"). The "JO" next to last. although before and after World War II, Mr. Koch was helped for about six years by Ralph Rogers, who is now in charge of teaching wood- working at Dartmouth College. Mr. Koch's elder son, William Jr., a graduate in forestry from the University of New Hampshire, worked with him from about 1950 to 1965. Mr. Koch was en- thnsiastically content with smalltown life. He ap- preciated the friendliness of the people and the beauty of the countryside, and spent many happy hours fishing the local brooks and the Con- necticut River. At one time he spent about two months getting the church clock revived and going, and electrified it, then kept it maintained. He also designed the original stagecoach sign at the monument between the commons, During the later years of his life he was increasingly plagued by acute arthritis of his hands, but he found ways to compensate for his limitations, remaining to the end an extraordinary craft- sman. The family traditions are being carried on by the Koch sons. Although William Jrt is working for Sanders Associates in Nashua as a manufacturing engineer, he still is carrying on recorder manufacturing in a limited way. John Koch is a professional musician, a pianist, composer, and teacher of piano and recorder. Sources: Lillie and John Koch; also an article by John Koch, "William Koch: 1892- 1970," reprinted from American Recorder Magazine, 1971. Other articles have appeared in Business Week, Sept. 19, 1953, in Time Magazine, and in various newspapers. Note: The Haverhill Historical Society is presenting a concert by Elizabeth Clendenning, violinist, Bettina Roulier, cellist, and John Koch, pianist, at the Haverhill Congregational Church on Sunday afternoon, August I, at 3:00. Everyone is welcome. An offering will he received for the benefit of the Ladd Street School Restoration Fund. Dairy show Parade ffiEETI Wednesday, July 28 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Haverhill School Board, 7:30 p.111. Friday, July 30 WOODSVITJ.W.: Haverhill District Court, 2: 00p'" Monday, August 2 BRADFORD: Special Town and WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, ?:00P Jn"  FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 3 , _ $, WOODSVILLE: District Commissioners, 7: v. GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 4 ORFORD: Selectmen, a:00p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. WARREN: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Publisher of Jumal i Opinion Weakb/newspaper publiakad in |redfard, Verment. avkocripflan rates - Vermont and New Hampshire - $9.00 par year; $1.0O far six meatks; nut of start - $T2.00 par year end $7.00 far six months: Senior citizen dilcnat $2.00. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford Woisvillc 02-222-5281 60:I-747-2016 P An Independent Newspaper i L , ......,. L_ i , i ; 1 *Editorial Senate subcommittee acts effectively on acid rain Last week a Senate Subcommittee on Environment and Public Works, chaired by Vermont Senator Robert Stafford, unanimously passed a proposal aimed at reducing the amount of pollutants pumped into the air in 31 eastern states -- pollutants that are causing Acid Rain. The proposal was an amendment to the federal Clea Air Act aimed at reducing the amount of pollutants generated by factories and other sources mainly in the mid- northeastern industrial states. The amendment passed by the sub- committee proposes to reduce the amount of sulfur pollutants by 8- million tons over 12 years. Although an earlier amendment pushed by Stafford would have reduced sulfur emissions by ten-tons over the same time period, "the passage of last week's amendment can be seen as a major victory in the fight against Acid Rain. For a time it looked as though some membexs of the Environment and Public Works Committee were intent on sending through only a mushy version of the amendment which called for "additional research" into the problem but very little action. There is considerable basis behind the contention that the sulfur reductions called for in the amend- ment may not actually rid Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, and Nor- them New York from the bouts of Acid Rain that have poisoned hun- dreds of lakes and ponds, rendering them uninhabitable to fish and plant life00 We need, however, a clean air program that can get through the legislature and get through it quickly. We need some type of working program that can specifically address THE KOCH FAMILY the problem -- a program that in ............................................. cludes at least some real restrictions Craftsmen of recorders on sulfur and nitrogen oxides before it is too late. Hopefully, our representatives will continue to fight for more effective industrial regulations as continued research yields additional effective alternatives. As we have said before, Acid Rain will assuredly have a disasterous effect on our region's economy as more and more lakes die off. But an even darker problem associated with Acid Rain looms in the future. What effect will Acid Rain actually have on us as a population? Already Vermont Attorney General John Zaston and Environmental Secretary Brendan Whittaker have called for the federal Environmental Protection Agency to act on the problem citing what they believe is the effect of Acid Rain on the water supply in the Vermont Town of Bennington. Easton and Whittaker said early this winter that acidity, caused by Acid Rain in the town's water supply, caused lead water pipes in the town to erode causing lead contamination. This example should caution us to the many yet unseen dangerstof Acid Rain lurking ahead. So we are encouraged by the passage of substantial measures to curtail Acid Rain passed in Sen. Stafford's subcommittee last week. It is about time that we have seen some effective action on one of the most pressing issues facing those of us living in the Northeast. Monetary madness than 11 percent. As a result, by the spring of 1981. shortly after Mr. Reagan became president, inflion was raging out of control and interest rates were above 20 percent. At that point the Federal Reserve, in a new fit of monetary madness, leaped upon the money supply and began choking, it, until it was limp and lifeless. From April to October the money supply actually declined. This totally irresponsible con- traction of the money supply, following fight on the heels of a totally irresponsible expansion of the money supply, plunged the economy into its worst decline since the Great Depression. Now we are again presented with op- timistic predictions from the ad- ministration and most private economists. President Reagan says that the recession is bottoming out. The blue chip forecasters are echoing his opinion. And indeed, they may be right. Preliminary data indicate that the economy grew a little in the second quarter. Moreover, the July 1 tax cut will be substantial. Unlike the first installment last October, this cut will be only partially undone by bracket creep and recent federal, state and local tax increases. Unfortunately, fiscal sanity is once more being accompanied by monetary madness. Last fall, after being strangled nearly to death, the moribund money supply sud- denly sprang to life and advanced vigorously. From September to January it increased at the astonishing annualized rate of 15 percent. It was this increase that caused the economy to stir during the spring. But since January the Federal Reserve has again been squeezing the money supply into lifelessness. At the end of June the money supply, M-1. was by THOMAS B. SILVER Dr. Silver is president of Public Research. Syndicated. {} PuNic hxrch, 5ycmed, 1982 Las[ fall, few people expected a severe economic decline. In fact, most economists believed that we would avoid recession altogether. On October 26, 1981, the Wall Street Journal reported tha t: A group of some 49 forecasters surveyed monthly by Blue Chip Economic Indicators... looks for a slight rise of 0.5 percent in the real GNP in the fourth quarter, with stronger gains coming in 1982. Expectations of a stronger economy in 1982 stem in large part from a belief that the Reagan administration tax cuts will be stimulating business. Despite my support of President Reagan's tax cuts, I strongly dissented from this rosy consensus view. On October 27, in an article entitled, "Will President Reagan be the next Hoover?," I predicted a "severe economic slump" and suggested that the president "should caution his countrymen that terrible economic shocks and storms may lie directly ahead," Tliere were strong reasons for eessimism last fall. First, the tax cut had n delayed and diluted. Second, it had been offset by bracket creep and increased social security taxes. Third--and most important--monetary policy had been unpcecedentedly erratic. For a whole year, from April 1980 to April 1981, the Federal Reserve had allowed the money supply to run wild. Month after month it raged upward at the torrid rate of more stenciled trays -- he was one of the first in the country to do stenciling in the oldtime way. In addition he started a small photography business. Finances were slim, going into the Depression years, and by that time he and Liilie had added sons William Jr. and John to the family. Making recorders In the fall of 1932, Leslie Dewing of Norwich, a teacher at the City and Country School in New York City, suggested that Mr. Koch try his hand at making recorders for the school, as there were none being made in this country at that time and it was difficult to obtain them from abroad. He agreed to give it a try, and began experimenting with a variety of woods, finally chasing Cuban mahogany for his first soprano recorders. In Leslie Dewing's words, he had "infinite patience, a true ear, and a marvelous eye for design. He was always working, reading, and thinking of new ideas. He would come down when he had found a new wood and made a recorder from it, all wreathed in smiles, and so happy -- it was delightful. He did not copy any instrument. He looked for, and found, original solutions for making his recorders." He conducted tests to determine the shrinkage of various kinds of wood, and when Cuban mahogany became unavailable in 1934, he selected cocobolo wood for his recorders. It was a year or so before he thought the soprano and alto recorders he was making were good enough to sell -- but after that they sold as fast as he could make them. For two years he sold recorders to various in- dividuals and to schools, but after that he allowed G. Schirmer exclusive rights for handling them. As the business grew, Mr. Koch expanded his shop space by adding to the back of it the old corncrib from over by the barn. Lillie says they moved it over with a couple of horses, then George Lavoie put clapboards on over the old corncrib slats. They used this building for storing and drying the lumber for the recorders. Around 1942 Mr. Koch made his first bass recorder. At that time, during World War II, there was no metal available for keys or for the conventional mouthpiece tube, so he evolved his own bore design, which eliminated the need for either keys or mouthpiece tube. He constantly sought new ways in which to improve his recorders, but his procedure in making them remained essentially unchanged through the years, as described in a 1964 newspaper article: "Each instrument is made from one square blank of wood and the parts of the blank are always kept together on special racks. Thus, when the instrument is finished, the color and grain of the parts will match each other (also the shrinkage will be equal). The bores are first rough-drilled and the ex- teriors rough-turned. Then the pieces are stored for about two months so that strains existing in the fibers may disappear. "After this period, bores and lengths are finished to accurate sizes. Then the ex- teriors are finish-turned to correct shape and dimensions and finally varnished. When this is dry, the instrument is hand-rubbed and polished. Cork joints are then fitted and cemented in place. In a fixture called a 'drill jig' the tone holes are drilled. "Native woods used are generally impregnated with a wax mixture, which increases their moisture resistance. Cocobolo does not require this because it is naturally filled with waxes and resins. "The last and most im- portant step is the tuning." Through the years For most of the time this was a "one man industry," William Koch of Haverhill, N.H., was renowned for his fine work- manship in the manufacture of recorders a musical wind- instrument made of wood). Mr. Koch came from New York City, where he had worked as a machinist and toolmaker, then later as foreman in a machine shop that made sp.ial printing machinery. His wife Lillie says that when they were living in an apartment in Brooklyn they had two bedrooms, but one of them was converted into a workshop, complete with lathe. The Koches soon decided that they had had enough of city life and moved to ttaverhilL where they bought the old house built by General John Montgomery of the War of 1812). When they were loading up their household goods to move, the lathe took so much room that they coutdn't hring much of their furniture. So when they got to Haverhill they had to find furniture for their house, and antiques purchased from local households seemed to be the most economical and prac- tical. Following the example of Mr. Koch's sister and brother- in-law, Elizabeth and Robert Royce, who were operating the White Cupboard Inn in Woedstock, Vermont, they opened their house in ttaverhill as an inn. The first two years, while their inn was closed for the winter, they stayed with the Royces in Woodstock and Mr. Koch spent his time refinishing antique furniture. The Koches' summer guests at the "Montgomery House" showed considerable interest in the antiques with which the Shouse was fur- nished, and bought so many of them that the Koches had to keep replacing them and gradually they shifted away from innkeeping into the antiq ue business Adjacent to the Koches' house was the old Bell Store building, which they con- verted into a workshop for refinishing antiques. Mr. Koch also started making-to-order reproductions of carved bed- frames, mirrors, trestle tables, wing chairs and several billion dollars lower than it was at its peak in January. It may well be, therefore, that the recession will continue through the second half of 1982, or that the incipient recovery will be anemic. If so, our financial system will continue to he dangerously vulnerable to major unex- pected shocks, in addition to the steadily mounting toll of corporate and personal bankruptcies and failures of financial institutions. The long range prospects for the economy are bright, so long as President Reagan refuses to he deflected from his present course of tax cuts and moderate growth of the money supply. Reduction of government taxing, spending, and regulation is wise. The growth rate of the money supply, though dangerously volatile, is slowing. From April 1980 to April 1981 it was greater than 11 percent, but during the past year it has fallen to around 4 percent. Once the Federal Reserve succeeds in its announced goal of making money grow both slowly and steadily, we can look forward to a prolonged and healthy economic recovery. William Koch making a recorder. (Le tters to the Edit Fourth Amendment right to be free To the Editor: My bill amends the statute to Finally, this bill I would like to bring to your provide that whenever a the importance attention S. 2548, legislation I businessman refuses entry to places on recently introduced, an OSHA inspector, a warrant right to be As you know, the shall be required for the in- unreasonable Occupational Safety and spection, government Health Act authorizes in- As we all know, Supreme believe is one spection of factories and other Court interpretations of the precious workplaces for health and 4th Amendment may change the Constitution. safety hazards or violation of from time to time, and S. 254 can to encourage OSHA's standards. Although will safeguard this in- this legislation the Act is silent on the terpretation through you informed question of whether a warrant codification. In addition it will ments. If you is required for the inspection, make sure that all or comments, the 1975 Marshall v. Barlow's businessmen are aware that servations are Inc. Supreme Court ruling the law gives them this right, welcome. clearly and unequivocally since at the present time only holds that inspection withouta a very small percentage of warrant or its equivalent employers deny entry to an violates the 4th Amendment. inspector without a warrant. Washi To the Editor: I was pleased Katherine Blaisdelrs history of Chalmers-Mills in the Opinion. I married into the Chalmers Family. Just recently, I have heard of three of W.W. Chalmers' Wagons. One is over a sugar Seekin00 a Chalmers' uw00on house, another, over a hay kept in the to read loft, and a third was in an old Museum. TheSe shed 40 years ago. prior to 1900. One has Chalmers' Boot Compare the. buggy name on it. I don't know these well-mane about the others, cars that last l0 Is there one in good shape dare to trade that is easier to get at? It Doris ' seems as though one should be THE FAIR IN JO TAKF_ ALL THE MAPBLES--- The Journal Opinion team wn thel trophy for "Moot Outstanding Effort" during bath tub racing last was sponsored by the Jaycees. The captain of the team (not in dinated the team effort for the big win. Team members were JameS Julie Marsh, Glenn Dockham, Andy Corrigan (hidden from view), Dockham (the driver in the bath tub yelling "help"). The "JO" next to last. although before and after World War II, Mr. Koch was helped for about six years by Ralph Rogers, who is now in charge of teaching wood- working at Dartmouth College. Mr. Koch's elder son, William Jr., a graduate in forestry from the University of New Hampshire, worked with him from about 1950 to 1965. Mr. Koch was en- thnsiastically content with smalltown life. He ap- preciated the friendliness of the people and the beauty of the countryside, and spent many happy hours fishing the local brooks and the Con- necticut River. At one time he spent about two months getting the church clock revived and going, and electrified it, then kept it maintained. He also designed the original stagecoach sign at the monument between the commons, During the later years of his life he was increasingly plagued by acute arthritis of his hands, but he found ways to compensate for his limitations, remaining to the end an extraordinary craft- sman. The family traditions are being carried on by the Koch sons. Although William Jrt is working for Sanders Associates in Nashua as a manufacturing engineer, he still is carrying on recorder manufacturing in a limited way. John Koch is a professional musician, a pianist, composer, and teacher of piano and recorder. Sources: Lillie and John Koch; also an article by John Koch, "William Koch: 1892- 1970," reprinted from American Recorder Magazine, 1971. Other articles have appeared in Business Week, Sept. 19, 1953, in Time Magazine, and in various newspapers. Note: The Haverhill Historical Society is presenting a concert by Elizabeth Clendenning, violinist, Bettina Roulier, cellist, and John Koch, pianist, at the Haverhill Congregational Church on Sunday afternoon, August I, at 3:00. Everyone is welcome. An offering will he received for the benefit of the Ladd Street School Restoration Fund. Dairy show Parade ffiEETI Wednesday, July 28 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. WOODSVILLE: Haverhill School Board, 7:30 p.111. Friday, July 30 WOODSVITJ.W.: Haverhill District Court, 2: 00p'" Monday, August 2 BRADFORD: Special Town and WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, ?:00P Jn"  FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 3 , _ $, WOODSVILLE: District Commissioners, 7: v. GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 4 ORFORD: Selectmen, a:00p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. NEWBURY: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. WARREN: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m.