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Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
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July 29, 1981     Journal Opinion
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July 29, 1981
 

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Page 8-The Journal Opinion-July 29, 1981 Vershire to celebrate two.hundredth year VERSHIRE--Vershire is Department will serve bar- formerly the South Vershire celebrating its 200th birthday Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 1- 2, beginning on Saturday at 10 a.m. with a parade along Rte. 113 from Eagle Hollow corner to the Town Center Building. Presentation of prizes will be followed by lunch offered by the Vershire P.T.A. Gow Snelling is expected to arrive by helicopter between 1-1:30 p.m. to participate in a program of speeches and music by the faculty of the Walden hool, a summer music camp for composers in Vershire Center. Crafts, plants, rummage and books will be on sale during the afternoon, and there vill be games and pony rides for children. The Ver- shire Volunteer Fire becued chicken between 5-8 p.m., with salad, rolls and pie to go with it. From 8 p.m. until midnight a country dance will be held in front of the town office with music by Stage Road. During an intermission in the dance, at 1O p.m., fireworks will be set off from the hillside overlooking the Town Center: On Sunday, the Vershire Historical Society is planning an Old Home Day celebration which a number of former Vershire residents and descendants of early Vershire settlers are expected to at- tend. A picnic lunch will be held at 1 p.m., with coffee and punch provided, on the grounds of the Town Center Building, Major antiques show scheduled at Dartmouth HANOVER--A major an- tiques show featuring 36 dealers from Maine to Georgia is coming to Dart- mouth's Thompson Arena as a benefit for the Friends of Hopkins Center Aug. 5, 6, and 7. Managed by John Fifield of Lottsburg, Virginia, one of the foremost antique show professionals in the nation who organizes the annual Ellis Memorial Show in Boston, the Friends of Hopkins Center August Antique Show will be the only show of its size and statute in Northern New England this summer, the sponsors said. Mrs. David T. Mclaughlin, wife of the president- designate of Dartmouth College, will be hoaorary chairman of the event. Co-sponsored by the Hopkins Center, the show will take place amid displays of plants and trees by local florists and nurseries in a setting reminiscent of the Boston Flower Show. A weview party will open the show Aug. 5 from 5-9 p.m. A ticket to this party, featuring a buffet and wine, will entitle the ticketholder to an early look at the items for sale, a tax Plans for informative lectures during the show are also underway. Serving on the committee for the Antique Show are Mrs. Douglas Ballin of Thetford, Mrs. John C. Chickering of Etna, Mrs. Nancy Carleton of Norwich, Mr. Howard Coffin of Woodstock, Alan Dingwall of W. Lebanon, Robert Fer- nald of Etna, Robert MacMillen of Lyme, Mls. Donald Magili of Hanover, Mrs. Brantz Mayor of Hanover, Mrs. Herman Redden of Stratford, Paul Sanderson of Hartford, James Steffensen of Hanover, Mrs. Garrett Mott of South Pom- h'et, and Edwin Willard of Hanover. The Friends of Hopkins Center raise funds for the support of Dartmouth's Hopkins Center for the per- forming and visual arts. This year. the organization has budgeted more than $25,000 for programs at the Center. Church, which was moved to its present location in 1979 and recently renovated. The Historical Society will hold its Annual Meeting at 2:30 p.m. to be followed at 3 p.m. by a program of slides and movies of the 1976 Bicentennial parade and the moving of the church building. Exhibits of old pictures and relics of the town's past will be on display in the Town Center Building. All are invited to attend. . Barre turning shed (continued from page I ) Midwest, a molinologist who specializes in industrial mills and windmills, an assistant professor of historic preservation at the University of Arkansas, mechanical engineers and a number of museum officials. The Historic American Engineering Record was created in 1969 after surveys indicated the nation was rapidly losing many of its historic industrial buildings. The surveys led to the creation of a new profession, historic industrial archeology, and the creation of HAER as a counterpart of the Historic American Building Survey, created in 1933 under the National Park Service. HAER's first project in 1969 recorded the Cohoes area of New York State in the Hudson River Valley. HAER provides a per- manent record of old in- dustrial buildings, machinery, bridges, viaducts, tran- sportation and com- munications systems that are filed in the Library of Congress in Washington and are available to the public, including historical societies and other interested groups. HAER officials became Mrs. Frank Logan of Hanover aware of the Barre granite is president, turning operation through a . Thetford school (continued from page ! ) deduction, and free admissioh to the show on Aug. 6 and 7. They also recommended a ..... . ...... .s^. s ballasted membrane with Show hom uJ, utu= twu 3 ........... ver . :n .- ,, - a .... tlIulatlonoll-valueoxo Thursday and i0 alto., o p.m. m=mucmam'omnz,HmarLan on Friday. Regular admission approximate cost of $45,000. All recommendations are subject to interpretation of codes by the State Depart- ment of Labor and Industry. Pantel - Thrall will contact the Department of Labor and Industry for clarifieatien of codes. FAIRLEE AUCTION FAIRLEE--The Lord's Acre Auction will he held on the Fairlee Common starting at 10 a.m. Aug. 1 for the benefit of the Federated Church Sunday School. William Godfrey will be auctioneer. is $3. Coffee and luncheon will be served both days, and dinner will be served Thur- sday. Bringing many ideas from the Boston Flower Show, Mrs. Clifford Fifield of Orford is co- chairman of the event with Mrs. Frederick Appall of Hanover. With dealer booths, exhibitions of locally-made furniture and decorative items such as a display of samplers, the event promises to he afine,, opportunity for the colleet0r and for anyone who enjoys looking at antiques. master's thesis by a UVM graduate student. In such a survey as was conducted at Barre, sur- veyorsin this case the UVM students--swarm over the building taking detailed measurements, notes and sketches of the building and tmhlnsry to be :later :' piled into a formal record including drawings, photographs, historical and architectural background. The Barre operation was chosen by HAER as significant because Grearsen & Lane is one of only three granite turning sheds in the nation and it had several original unique machines that had been created especially for the shed. The HAER study is so thorough that the granite turning shed, including its machinery, could be recreated from scratch from the detailed record on file in Washington. TO KHOOL CLOTHES FOR GIRLS & BOYS SIZES 4-14 NAME BRANDS YOU KNOW AND TRUST Health. Tex "I 4Bd Y the Kid 4 Le00s Woodavllle, N.H. St. JolmsbtWy, Vt. pROF i CLE0000ERS Your complete lothinfl care center For pick-up and delivery service * Bradford gets new cop (continued from page !) special town meeting to consider a town police department. Spaulding estimates it would cost the town about $55,000 in salaries for a three- man police department, plus other costs such as rent and maintenance. "I feel that is probably a low figure," he added. The town will set up a citizens' advisory committee to report to the Aug. 25 meeting on the proposed town police department and Spaulding asked for volun- teers to serve on the com- mittee. "I would like them (ad- visory committee members) to present something to the town such as facts and figures and a projected time-line and come up with a plan that could be voted on, perhaps at the March town meeting. I fear rushing into this and if it's done well, it may save problems in the future," she said. She said the possible role of the newly hired village policeman is also something the committee could consider, including whether the town might utilize his services part of the time, or to establish a combined village-town police department. "There are all kinds of possibilities," she said. Phone 444-2742 Call collect. ARS ROEBUCK, Woodsville, N.H WELTS RIVER LANDROMAT, Wells River. Vl. PIK! STORE, Pike. N.H. McLAM'$ STORE, , Corinth. Vt FAIRLEE GENtERAL, foirlee. Vt. ORFOROVILLE STORE OrfocdviJle. N.H i . Valley Fair delights the young and the old TAKING A BATH--Pam Humphrey and Vermont State Jaycee President Ray ,!wemburg parade in vehicle previously used for bathtub ces. ANOTHER CHAMP--Donald Wight of Randolph, Champion Showman of Junior Dairy Show. CHAMP-ION NOVICE--GaB Frost of Thefford, Champion Novice Showman of Junior Dairy Show. (continued from page 1 ) Barre-tones, and the Odell Walker Show enlivened the evening hours. There were winners of each evenings' door prizes. The flower show and general exhibits attested to local domestic and agricultural talent. And, of course, there was the midway with the ferris wheel and merry-go-round. This year saw the in- troduction of the first annual bathtub derby. The teenagers won but it was fun for all. Many gathered along the Main Street to watch the Sunday afternoon parade. From little tots to a plumed Indian on pinto mare with a colt by her side, they mar- ched. There were floats, the ever- popular brass band, Snoopy, tambourine dancers, old cars and much more. A brigade of trucks concluded the parade. SLOW TUB--"We wuz robbed!" -- one of the also-ran teams in bathtub race. Seniors on parade BRADFORD--The Orange proximately East Senior Center van was appropriately decorated and f rode in the Connecticut Valley Fair parade with ap- YOUNG CHAMPION--John Spauiding of S. Royalton, Champion Junior Showman of Junior Dairy Show at Connecticut Valley Fair, poses with his entry. / -'/ " I equipment driving l II f ,.. because we've got the best darn service in the Valley. Come on down to see why people keep coming back for our services. ! CAREFUL,--Entrant in farm contest backs into tight space. GET READY! --Demolition Derby promoter gives last minute instructions. TRI-V ILLAGE AUCTION W. TOPSHAM-r-The Tri- Village Fire Department will hold an auction at l0 a.m. Saturday, AUg. 15, rain or shine, at Martel's Farm on Rte. 25 one-half mile south of W. Topsham Village. The auction will include antiques, "attic treasures," and what- nots. Proceeds will go for the benefit of the Tri-Village Fire Department. Articles for the auction are being solicited for donation and consignment. For pick up, call Ted Martel at 439-5902 or Roland Peixotto at 439-6920. ? 12 seniors dressed in "Gay Nineties" attire. ons were nearu along the parade route. All par- ticipants in the van had a merry time and smiled as they went by the reviewing stand. They are all planning for next year. iiii,iiiiiiiiii!iii  !i!!:i!! IT'S MAGIC!--Magicians Scott Wight (in ma and Jeff Mills mystify audiences as McKinney of White River Jet. assists. Body disappear but one hand and one foot show. THE TAYLOR-PALMER AGENCY, Hours: 9AM-SPM SERVICE: 29 Main Street Bradford, Vt. t-802-222- 1t111,81,11 Complete your good looks with Pulsar. The slim, high-fashion good looks of a Pulsar Quartz ladies' dress watch adds the perfect accent to ony look, for any occasion, work or play. Practical elegance that never needs winding. And starting at only $49.50. Who could turn down the completing touch for yoUr wardrobe? Pulsar Quartz. Always a beat beyond. In technology. In volue. S.F. McAIlister QUALITY JEWELERS xz0s - - $145 747-3482 Woodlle, N.H. On Sat., Aug. 8, 1981 only we will be closed at 12 Blake Chevrolet Bradford, Vermont 222-5236 I I I J I J J TM Wathing " " can you very 00t00tibve, In competitive times like these, your education can make a difference. It can affect your ability to get ahead, to change careers, or to find the kind of job you really want. But if you're like manypeople, you can't find the time to attend classes on campus. Now, you can earn college credits at home. Classes begin Sept. 7 on all Vermont ETV channels. Find out more about college courses on television by mailing in the coupon. After all, you're a busy person, but not too busy to get ahead. For further information: Call collect (802)447-0123 Mon.-Fri. 9am to 9pm or return this coupon: llI l II mm lllll I I i i i i i ii 1 i [ II Mail coupon to: II Vermont ETV College Courses | C/o Vermont College I Montpr mont O56O2, I . II Name - Address II City & State IZipCode jO I1 ill ill i 1 i i 1 1 i i 1 lll| | ill ill i1 | Please send me more information on: D vew o tP, e ledsml system r'l Contemporary Hearth ISSUES Problems and ilulons f'l Hunntllel Through the/t Sur,y ot the fne and formir -- I"1 It's Everybody's Busineea .... E xs the x bus=aes - C3 uerszenn Page 8-The Journal Opinion-July 29, 1981 Vershire to celebrate two.hundredth year VERSHIRE--Vershire is Department will serve bar- formerly the South Vershire celebrating its 200th birthday Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 1- 2, beginning on Saturday at 10 a.m. with a parade along Rte. 113 from Eagle Hollow corner to the Town Center Building. Presentation of prizes will be followed by lunch offered by the Vershire P.T.A. Gow Snelling is expected to arrive by helicopter between 1-1:30 p.m. to participate in a program of speeches and music by the faculty of the Walden hool, a summer music camp for composers in Vershire Center. Crafts, plants, rummage and books will be on sale during the afternoon, and there vill be games and pony rides for children. The Ver- shire Volunteer Fire becued chicken between 5-8 p.m., with salad, rolls and pie to go with it. From 8 p.m. until midnight a country dance will be held in front of the town office with music by Stage Road. During an intermission in the dance, at 1O p.m., fireworks will be set off from the hillside overlooking the Town Center: On Sunday, the Vershire Historical Society is planning an Old Home Day celebration which a number of former Vershire residents and descendants of early Vershire settlers are expected to at- tend. A picnic lunch will be held at 1 p.m., with coffee and punch provided, on the grounds of the Town Center Building, Major antiques show scheduled at Dartmouth HANOVER--A major an- tiques show featuring 36 dealers from Maine to Georgia is coming to Dart- mouth's Thompson Arena as a benefit for the Friends of Hopkins Center Aug. 5, 6, and 7. Managed by John Fifield of Lottsburg, Virginia, one of the foremost antique show professionals in the nation who organizes the annual Ellis Memorial Show in Boston, the Friends of Hopkins Center August Antique Show will be the only show of its size and statute in Northern New England this summer, the sponsors said. Mrs. David T. Mclaughlin, wife of the president- designate of Dartmouth College, will be hoaorary chairman of the event. Co-sponsored by the Hopkins Center, the show will take place amid displays of plants and trees by local florists and nurseries in a setting reminiscent of the Boston Flower Show. A weview party will open the show Aug. 5 from 5-9 p.m. A ticket to this party, featuring a buffet and wine, will entitle the ticketholder to an early look at the items for sale, a tax Plans for informative lectures during the show are also underway. Serving on the committee for the Antique Show are Mrs. Douglas Ballin of Thetford, Mrs. John C. Chickering of Etna, Mrs. Nancy Carleton of Norwich, Mr. Howard Coffin of Woodstock, Alan Dingwall of W. Lebanon, Robert Fer- nald of Etna, Robert MacMillen of Lyme, Mls. Donald Magili of Hanover, Mrs. Brantz Mayor of Hanover, Mrs. Herman Redden of Stratford, Paul Sanderson of Hartford, James Steffensen of Hanover, Mrs. Garrett Mott of South Pom- h'et, and Edwin Willard of Hanover. The Friends of Hopkins Center raise funds for the support of Dartmouth's Hopkins Center for the per- forming and visual arts. This year. the organization has budgeted more than $25,000 for programs at the Center. Church, which was moved to its present location in 1979 and recently renovated. The Historical Society will hold its Annual Meeting at 2:30 p.m. to be followed at 3 p.m. by a program of slides and movies of the 1976 Bicentennial parade and the moving of the church building. Exhibits of old pictures and relics of the town's past will be on display in the Town Center Building. All are invited to attend. . Barre turning shed (continued from page I ) Midwest, a molinologist who specializes in industrial mills and windmills, an assistant professor of historic preservation at the University of Arkansas, mechanical engineers and a number of museum officials. The Historic American Engineering Record was created in 1969 after surveys indicated the nation was rapidly losing many of its historic industrial buildings. The surveys led to the creation of a new profession, historic industrial archeology, and the creation of HAER as a counterpart of the Historic American Building Survey, created in 1933 under the National Park Service. HAER's first project in 1969 recorded the Cohoes area of New York State in the Hudson River Valley. HAER provides a per- manent record of old in- dustrial buildings, machinery, bridges, viaducts, tran- sportation and com- munications systems that are filed in the Library of Congress in Washington and are available to the public, including historical societies and other interested groups. HAER officials became Mrs. Frank Logan of Hanover aware of the Barre granite is president, turning operation through a . Thetford school (continued from page ! ) deduction, and free admissioh to the show on Aug. 6 and 7. They also recommended a ..... . ...... .s^. s ballasted membrane with Show hom uJ, utu= twu 3 ........... ver . :n .- ,, - a .... tlIulatlonoll-valueoxo Thursday and i0 alto., o p.m. m=mucmam'omnz,HmarLan on Friday. Regular admission approximate cost of $45,000. All recommendations are subject to interpretation of codes by the State Depart- ment of Labor and Industry. Pantel - Thrall will contact the Department of Labor and Industry for clarifieatien of codes. FAIRLEE AUCTION FAIRLEE--The Lord's Acre Auction will he held on the Fairlee Common starting at 10 a.m. Aug. 1 for the benefit of the Federated Church Sunday School. William Godfrey will be auctioneer. is $3. Coffee and luncheon will be served both days, and dinner will be served Thur- sday. Bringing many ideas from the Boston Flower Show, Mrs. Clifford Fifield of Orford is co- chairman of the event with Mrs. Frederick Appall of Hanover. With dealer booths, exhibitions of locally-made furniture and decorative items such as a display of samplers, the event promises to he afine,, opportunity for the colleet0r and for anyone who enjoys looking at antiques. master's thesis by a UVM graduate student. In such a survey as was conducted at Barre, sur- veyorsin this case the UVM students--swarm over the building taking detailed measurements, notes and sketches of the building and tmhlnsry to be :later :' piled into a formal record including drawings, photographs, historical and architectural background. The Barre operation was chosen by HAER as significant because Grearsen & Lane is one of only three granite turning sheds in the nation and it had several original unique machines that had been created especially for the shed. The HAER study is so thorough that the granite turning shed, including its machinery, could be recreated from scratch from the detailed record on file in Washington. TO KHOOL CLOTHES FOR GIRLS & BOYS SIZES 4-14 NAME BRANDS YOU KNOW AND TRUST Health. Tex "I 4Bd Y the Kid 4 Le00s Woodavllle, N.H. St. JolmsbtWy, Vt. pROF i CLE0000ERS Your complete lothinfl care center For pick-up and delivery service * Bradford gets new cop (continued from page !) special town meeting to consider a town police department. Spaulding estimates it would cost the town about $55,000 in salaries for a three- man police department, plus other costs such as rent and maintenance. "I feel that is probably a low figure," he added. The town will set up a citizens' advisory committee to report to the Aug. 25 meeting on the proposed town police department and Spaulding asked for volun- teers to serve on the com- mittee. "I would like them (ad- visory committee members) to present something to the town such as facts and figures and a projected time-line and come up with a plan that could be voted on, perhaps at the March town meeting. I fear rushing into this and if it's done well, it may save problems in the future," she said. She said the possible role of the newly hired village policeman is also something the committee could consider, including whether the town might utilize his services part of the time, or to establish a combined village-town police department. "There are all kinds of possibilities," she said. Phone 444-2742 Call collect. ARS ROEBUCK, Woodsville, N.H WELTS RIVER LANDROMAT, Wells River. Vl. PIK! STORE, Pike. N.H. McLAM'$ STORE, , Corinth. Vt FAIRLEE GENtERAL, foirlee. Vt. ORFOROVILLE STORE OrfocdviJle. N.H i . Valley Fair delights the young and the old TAKING A BATH--Pam Humphrey and Vermont State Jaycee President Ray ,!wemburg parade in vehicle previously used for bathtub ces. ANOTHER CHAMP--Donald Wight of Randolph, Champion Showman of Junior Dairy Show. CHAMP-ION NOVICE--GaB Frost of Thefford, Champion Novice Showman of Junior Dairy Show. (continued from page 1 ) Barre-tones, and the Odell Walker Show enlivened the evening hours. There were winners of each evenings' door prizes. The flower show and general exhibits attested to local domestic and agricultural talent. And, of course, there was the midway with the ferris wheel and merry-go-round. This year saw the in- troduction of the first annual bathtub derby. The teenagers won but it was fun for all. Many gathered along the Main Street to watch the Sunday afternoon parade. From little tots to a plumed Indian on pinto mare with a colt by her side, they mar- ched. There were floats, the ever- popular brass band, Snoopy, tambourine dancers, old cars and much more. A brigade of trucks concluded the parade. SLOW TUB--"We wuz robbed!" -- one of the also-ran teams in bathtub race. Seniors on parade BRADFORD--The Orange proximately East Senior Center van was appropriately decorated and f rode in the Connecticut Valley Fair parade with ap- YOUNG CHAMPION--John Spauiding of S. Royalton, Champion Junior Showman of Junior Dairy Show at Connecticut Valley Fair, poses with his entry. / -'/ " I equipment driving l II f ,.. because we've got the best darn service in the Valley. Come on down to see why people keep coming back for our services. ! CAREFUL,--Entrant in farm contest backs into tight space. GET READY! --Demolition Derby promoter gives last minute instructions. TRI-V ILLAGE AUCTION W. TOPSHAM-r-The Tri- Village Fire Department will hold an auction at l0 a.m. Saturday, AUg. 15, rain or shine, at Martel's Farm on Rte. 25 one-half mile south of W. Topsham Village. The auction will include antiques, "attic treasures," and what- nots. Proceeds will go for the benefit of the Tri-Village Fire Department. Articles for the auction are being solicited for donation and consignment. For pick up, call Ted Martel at 439-5902 or Roland Peixotto at 439-6920. ? 12 seniors dressed in "Gay Nineties" attire. ons were nearu along the parade route. All par- ticipants in the van had a merry time and smiled as they went by the reviewing stand. They are all planning for next year. iiii,iiiiiiiiii!iii  !i!!:i!! IT'S MAGIC!--Magicians Scott Wight (in ma and Jeff Mills mystify audiences as McKinney of White River Jet. assists. Body disappear but one hand and one foot show. THE TAYLOR-PALMER AGENCY, Hours: 9AM-SPM SERVICE: 29 Main Street Bradford, Vt. t-802-222- 1t111,81,11 Complete your good looks with Pulsar. The slim, high-fashion good looks of a Pulsar Quartz ladies' dress watch adds the perfect accent to ony look, for any occasion, work or play. Practical elegance that never needs winding. And starting at only $49.50. Who could turn down the completing touch for yoUr wardrobe? Pulsar Quartz. Always a beat beyond. In technology. In volue. S.F. McAIlister QUALITY JEWELERS xz0s - - $145 747-3482 Woodlle, N.H. On Sat., Aug. 8, 1981 only we will be closed at 12 Blake Chevrolet Bradford, Vermont 222-5236 I I I J I J J TM Wathing " " can you very 00t00tibve, In competitive times like these, your education can make a difference. It can affect your ability to get ahead, to change careers, or to find the kind of job you really want. But if you're like manypeople, you can't find the time to attend classes on campus. Now, you can earn college credits at home. Classes begin Sept. 7 on all Vermont ETV channels. Find out more about college courses on television by mailing in the coupon. After all, you're a busy person, but not too busy to get ahead. For further information: Call collect (802)447-0123 Mon.-Fri. 9am to 9pm or return this coupon: llI l II mm lllll I I i i i i i ii 1 i [ II Mail coupon to: II Vermont ETV College Courses | C/o Vermont College I Montpr mont O56O2, I . II Name - Address II City & State IZipCode jO I1 ill ill i 1 i i 1 1 i i 1 lll| | ill ill i1 | Please send me more information on: D vew o tP, e ledsml system r'l Contemporary Hearth ISSUES Problems and ilulons f'l Hunntllel Through the/t Sur,y ot the fne and formir -- I"1 It's Everybody's Busineea .... E xs the x bus=aes - C3 uerszenn