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August 5, 1981     Journal Opinion
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Page 4,The Journal Oplnion-August S, 1981 I J l II I IIIIII I IIIR IIII I I Ill I I IIIIII I Ill It tt I EAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. [ II j Publisher of Journal i Opinion Weekly umpoper imtdisked in Ikedhwd. VeneNt. Selncrletien rqotoo - Vormeet Nd NOW Jlemkire. $9.H per year; St.00 fw sis ruN,ks; Nt of ste - $I|.N per yeer ud $7.00 fer elu neath;  ttilom diecemn $2.00. Seceded elms peeloge pew ot |n;dfed, Vot 11|033. Published by Nertkust Pebllekiq Company, IK., P.0. ha 178, Ilmdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford .   Woodsville 02-222-5281  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper I IEd,,or,a, i Courage, or demagoguery? Vermont's Rep. James M. Jeffords, who cast the only Republican vote against President Reagan's budget and tax cut legislation in Congress, says his action will be widely misunderstood, and he is probably right. On the one hand, his vote and his statement that "Somebody has to stand up against the demagoguery" can be interpreted as a courageous stand against the special interest tax. cuts that were tacked onto the Reagan bill for the oil companies and major corporations that might need a federal bail-out like Chrysler Corp. On the other hand, Jeffords' vote could be looked at as an easy pitch at Vermont votes in the next congressional election. Jeffords said he could not vote for either the Republican tax measure or the Democratic alternative because himself to go so far in opposition to his own party as to vote for the Democra tic version. "I can't go back to Vermont and tell an elderly widow that we have had to cut her Social Security so that we can afford new multi-billion welfare programs for the oil companies and a few of the other wealthiest cor- porations in the world," Jeffords said . . "I cannot submit to nearly $20 billion in blackmail for special giveaways which cannot be explained, in terms of economic philosophy or in terms of need." There are those in Washington who say Jeffords will be a dead duck with the l.eagan White House from now on and that any time he wants something for Vermont, he'll be lucky to, get his telephone call answered. It remains to be seen what Jeffords' relations will be with the Reagan wealthy special interestS.., in the next congressional election. Well, maybe, but sometimes in Congress it becomes necessary to vote for the "least worst" measure, since it was obvious that one of the tax cut versions was going to be enacted. Jeffords apparently could not bring One politician's act of political courage is another politic!an's demagoguery, and the outcome wW depend on how the voters of Vermont view it. , Pork barrel politics New Hampshire Republican Congressman Judd Gregg is tilting at windmills in his effort to block the Clinch River breeder reactor in Tennessee that is favored by President Reagan and powerful Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker, who happens to be from Tennessee. While the Reagan Administration chopped away at small federal spending items such as a few million dollars to develop wood energy projects that could help New Englanders, it didn't cut a dime from the $228 million to begin construction of the Clinch River project in which more than $1 billion has already been invested and final costs are estimated at $3 billion, mostly federal money Critics of the Clinch River project, who include some knowledgeable nuclear experts, say it is not only too costly, but that its technology is seriously out of date even before construction begins. This nuclear energy project is called a "breeder" because it produces more nuclear fuel than it uses, namely plutonium which can be used for making bombs--another reason why some critics oppose it. Suppose terrorists make an effort to get some of that plutonium? Gregg notes that the Reagan Administration is cutting federal funds for social services, education and other programs. "It is an unfortunate set of cir- cumstauces when, in his era of budget austerity, Congress continues to subsidize gold plated boondoggles." Gregg would probably have a better chance of killing the unnecessary Clinch River project if he happemd to be Republican Majority Leader of the U.S. Senate. But he isn't. Howard Baker of Tennessee is, and the taxpayers of New Hampshire and the rest of the nation will have to subsidize this giant project of questionable value. It's something to think about while you're chopping wood for the wood stove this winter. Letters to the Editor00 From Washington to Moscow Leahy's stand on stopping the arms race, I am introducing an article he wrote in The Leahy Letter  Summer Report 1981, VERMONTERS FOR SURVIVAL As relations between the United States and the Soviet Union  worsened and the prospecis for nuclear arms reduction dimmed throughout 1980 and early this year, i Vermonters continued to ask me a single question: How can we as individual citizens , encourage our government to resume nuclear arrn negotiations? Vermonters of all ages and political af- filiations have called, written and asked me each weekend when I was home: How can we help stop the nuclear arms race? My answer has been to encourage people to get in- volved. Citizens cannot and must not simply rely on their national government to ad- dress this question. The all- encompassing issues -- the survival of our civilization as we know it -- demands action of us all. Vermonters have recognized this moral responsibility. The awesome power to destroy -- from Vergennes to Vladivostok -- convinced many of us that there must he a debate at all levels of government on the need to stop the growth of these weapons. On Town Meeting Day of this year, a number of Ver- mont communities debated this question, and 16 passed resolutions. Recently, I conveyed these resolutions to President Reagan and sub- mitted them to he printed in the Congressional Record. The communities which acted were: Andover, Bakersfield, Burlington, Duxbury, Fairfield, Fletcher, Jericho, Milton, Moretown, Mt. Holly, Norwich, Rich- mond, Ripton, St. Albans, Thetford and Waterbury. Most of these resolutions call upon Vermont's Congressional delegation to request the President to propose to the Soviet Union a moratorium on the testing, production and deployment of all nuclear warheads, missiles and delivery systems, and to devise verification safeguards satisfactory to both countries. I share Vermonters' deep concern about the danger posed to all of us by the escalation of nuclear weapons. I am convinced that the enormous complexity of the issue of nuclear proliferation should en- courage the United States to revive discussions with the Soviet Union on SALT and related matters. In all likelihood the President will resume SALT talks within a year. Certainly nuclear arms limitation constitutes one of the most important issues of our time. The Vermont resolutions demonstrate the height of public concern with the issue of arms limitation in Vermont. Holyoke Homer: Bradford, Vt. Canceb mee00 To the Editor: Because of last-minute changes in the schedule of Congress in Washington, I am forced to postpone the public office hours I had scheduled in Bradford on Tuesday, August Eugene 00tman's Century Farm Eugene Eastman's farm in East Corinth received a Century Farm plaque in 1958. Mr. Eastman is a descendant of Hannah Eastman, who was taken prisoner by the Indians in 1704 (Book Two, pages 30- 34). The first part of the farm came into the hands of Eastman ancestors in 1794, when Caleb Stevens deeded 50 acres of Lot No. 51 to Ben- jamin Scribner of Salisbury, N. H. Benjamin had married Martha Knight of Atkinson, N. H. in 1793. Their residence was still in Salisbury when they bought 50 more acres of Lot No. 51 from Nathan Taplin in 1796, but it is believed that they moved to their land in East Corinth soon after that. (Deeds 3-59 and 3-183. ) (Note: According to Eastman family tradition, the Knight family farm bordered the Scribner farm in East Corinth, and the two farms were joined when Benjamin Scribner and Martha Knight were married. An early deed (3-66) shows that Samuel White deeded 100 acres of the westerly part of Lot No. 51 to Joseph Knight of Atkinson in 1793. The names on later deeds indicate that Joseph even- tually deeded this land to his sons. Joseph may have been a brother of Martha, but we have not, been able to find any deeds from him to her or to Benjamin Seribuer. However, it is possible that some portion of the Knight land could have been deeded later to the Eastmans by some other owner in between. It is not a question that can he solved in an hour or two of research.) Benjamin and Martha's 100 acres eventually were deeded to their son Benjamin, Jr. He died in 1853, and his wife Rachel deeded the place to their children Harrison and Charlotte in 1856, reserving for herself lifetime oc- cupancy. However, Harrison and his wife Amanda decided have changed. When Jennie married Scott Eastman and came to live on the farm, his mother, Charlotte, and grandmother, Rachel, were both still alive and lived with them in the same household. It was 32 years before Jennie and Scott had the house to themselves and their children, and then it was only six years before Eugene married Honora and brought her there to live. By then it was Jennie's turn to be taken care of, and Honora did take care of her, through a long illness, along dance, and thought that was really something. A couple times Gene was called on to he a judge for the Fiddlers Contest at the Cracker Barrel Bazaar, but he never really felt comfortable judging somebody eise's fiddling. One night Gene came home late from a dance and left his fiddle and hat on the kitchen table. During the night his cat, who had had an en- counter with a skunk, came in through the cat hole and nested down in Gene's hat. The next day Gene tried to air with caring for her own out that hat, but that didn't children. " accomplish much, so when the The original log cabin on local cleaner came by he gave this place was built across him the smelly hat. The from the present ski tow by cleaner hadn't gone far Benjamin Scribner soon after he came in 1796, and the present house soon after that. The roof was raised and the rooms upstairs added about 1875. The old original ham burned in 1944 and was replaced with the present one. The Eastman farm had the usual animals and ac- tivities of oldtime farms, raising lambs, turkeys, chickens, oxen, and dairy cattle. They also raised purebred Morgan horses, dealing frequently with Arthur Peters of Bradford for "horse trading" or stud service. In 1890, Scott East- man got First Premium at the East Corinth Fair for his yoke of oxen, in competition with 41 others from the Town of Corinth. Through the years the Eastmans did some logging and a lot of sugaring. Their last tap was in 1969, when Gene tapped 1700 trees, with the help of his two Belgian horses. That same year, he sold his cows and retired from farming. As in many farming communities, the Eastmans "changed work" with their neighbors, giving each other help and sharing equipment for planting, digging potatoes, and haying. There was always down the road when he came back to Eastmans' and asked Gene to air out the hat a little longer. Gene served as a selec- tman for the Town of Corinth for 39 years in a row, retiring in 1976 just before his eightieth birthday -- at that time, a record in the State of Vermont for longest continuous service as a selectman. During that time he served with two generations of at least two Corinth families: Fred and Jim Hood, and Worthy and Dnstin White. Others serving with him have been Murdo McLend, Leonard Thompson, Wayland Jordan, John Williams, Richard Devins, and Leonard Simpson. In the early days of Gene's career as a selectman, they had responsibility for bridges on the town roads, and the selectmen themselves went right out into the woods and hauled in timber with horses or tractors to fix the bridges, making up stringers, planks, or whatever was needed. Gene can remember even earlier days when the road in front of his house was graded with six oxen and a read machine. The workers would stop at his house for a glass of cider before continuing on to move their family to the company for supper, too, and West. Neg'mouey for ,the friend sta!faovernlght.. trip, and not expecting ever to There was always a .need come baok,,larrison deeded for extra income, and Gene his share of the farm to Charlotte's husband Emerson Eastman for $2,000. The Eastmans have some letters which he wrote while he was on the way west and sent home by pony express. Family lore says that Charlotte used to smoke a clay pipe. Charlotte and Emerson Eastman had a daughter and twin sons who died in childhood, but another' son, Winfield Scott Eastman, Eastman found various ways, such as by giving haircuts, many of them for Pike Hill miners. He also fiddled for dancing. When he was still a boy he was musical, and one day tried out a neighbor's violin. He "fiddled around" with it a little, and did so well that everyone agreed he should make use of his talent and take lessons. So he strapped his violin to his bicycle and rode to Bradford to a violin teacher. After a few known as Scott, grew up and lessons the teacher said Gene stayed on the farm. His wife ,played better than he did. So was Jennie Batchelder. They he started fiddling for dances, had four sons, and the weddings, and parties, and youngest, Eugene, stayed on joined with his son Glynn, the farm and is still here. His Winnie Hight of East Corinth, wife was Honora Murphy of and Dick Ellis of South Bradford. Royalton to form the Keynote The living arrangements Band, with AI Monte to call the of the Eastmans in earlier changes for dancing. He was generations show how times paid a dollar for his first their way. When the base for the bllektop amadwu'put in past his house, Gene worked with-the road crew, drawing stones with a stoneboat, nine hours a day at 4.00 a day for himself and his horses. For many years, Gene served as a trustee for the Washington Electric Cooperative. Ski tow at Eastmans' Another Eastman family activity for the last 45 years has been the ski tow on their land, almost across the road from their buildings --the oldest continuously operating ski tow in the country. PLANNING MEETING BRADFORD--The Bradford Planning Committee will meet Thursday, Aug. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Bradford Academy conference room. 4.. I am especially concerned atbut this because it will be  .....................................................................  " " physically impossible, at this late date, for me to inTorm residents of the area of the Executive Councilor change prior to the 4th by direct mailings. Therefore, I would deeply Raymond S. Burton appreciate any publicity you ....  .. _......__ _. __. = could provide to the change, so that residentsof the areawill  in Po not be inconvenienced e rstmouth The shirtsleeve session had been scheduled for 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. on the 4th at Bradford Town Hall. Because I must be in Washington at that time, I have had to reschndule the session for Wednesday, August 12, from 11:30 a.m. to I p.m. The short notice of this change is unfortunate, and I am hopeful that word can be spread in time so that people will not travel to Bradford on the 4th for a nonexistent session. Again, let me express in advance my gratitude for any assistance you could provide in informing area residents of the change, (The schedule for all other shirtsleeve sessions in August is unchanged.) James M. Jeffords Vermont Congressman To the Editor: By making this walk, these with the USSR a permanent Under the sponsorship of the Vermonters hope to gain the moratorium on nuclear American Friends Service support of their fellow Ver- weapons. Committee and the monters, as they ask the In Montpelier, on Friday, TOWN NURSE Ecumenical Council Peace members of our Vermont Augnst7th, following a parade A Community "Health Committee of Vermont, many Congressional delegation to in the morning, Senator Services town nurse will check Vermonters will march from introduce into Congress a Patrick Leahy, John Kenneth diabetes, weight and hyper- Washington, Vt. to Moscow, resolution calling for an ira- Galbraith and other tension today, Aug. 5, from 9 Vt., starting on Thursday, mediate nuclear weapons prominent speakers will a.m.-12 p.m. at the Bradford August 6th (Hiroshima Day) freeze (U.S.andUS.S.R.)and address a large rally on the Senior Center, and from 1-4 and finishing in Moscow. further, to call upon the State House lawn. p.m. at the E. Corinth Saturday, Augustgth. Administration to negotiate To illustrate Senator Library. The July 31st meeting of the Governor and Council was held at the Wentworth Collidge Historical House in Portsmouth in the same room that former Governor Benning Wentworth used to held Council meetings. One of my goals is to have the Council meet outside of Concord where and when possible: The interest generated by this meeting being held in Portsmouth was good and I believe productive in allowing citizens to see who makes much of state policy that eventually governs them. We are planning to meet in Laconia on October 28 at the Belknap Mill. The Council approved a number of projects which have a direct hearing on District One Highway sale of public lands (small plots) were okayed in Woodsville, Littleton and Gorham. A special com- mission was appointed consisting of Charles Hepburn of Sugar Hill, Paul LaFond of Bath, and Maurice Stearin of Laconia to look into a short alteration on Route 49 in the Town of Waterville Valley. Weatherization funds in addition to earlier authorization were okayed to Community Action Agencies in Coos, Carroll, and Grafton Counties and to Community Action in Belknap Merrimack County Community Action. The use of credit cards was approved for the Mount Washington State Park. Final authorization of the sale of bonds guaranteed by the state for pollution abatement projects was given for the Town of Lisbon. Headrest in Lebanon and Lakes Region Community Health Agency Inc. of Laconia were given the final go ahead for Alcohol and Drug Prevention Programs. The Developmental Disabilities Council was authorized to enter into a contract with the Wolfeboro Children's Center. The state by approval of the council entered into a $427,000 contract with the Boston & Maine Railroad for the rebuilding of 12 miles of track and roadbed on the Conway branch line, south of Ossipee. A number of nominations of interest to District One were made for confirmation or denial by the Council (expected at the August 12th.meeting) Dr. Ernest Town- send for Superintendent of the State Hospital and Glenn L. Levesque for the N.H. Retirement System Beard of Trustees. Wayne Mook of Chocorua for the N.H. State Board of Auctioneers, and Kenneth R. McCulleck of Littletnn was nominated and confirmed for the N.H. Barbering and Cosmetology Board. As Councilor for District One, I would like to pay tribute to George McGee of Lincoln for his many years of service to the State of New Hampshire and the Water Resources Board. Mr. McGee was replaced on the Water Resources Board by Delbert Downing of Salem by a unanimous vote of the Council. The next meeting of the Governor and Council will be August 12 at l0 a.m. in the State House. I would be most happy to see any citizens from this area in attendance. Alcoholism and You with UNCLE MILTS( As many of you know, I run the Alcohol and CRASH Program at the Woodstock on Saturdays. People always ask, "Why Saturday? five years ago, Barbara Chase was Woodstock Correctional Center and she conceived a weekend sentence mainly for people who are during the week and who had a drinking complished two things: the guy kept his job and not getting drunk over the weekend. The very successful. The weekender took the Alcohol Class Saturday morning and night if he had a DWI or Careless and N The program received some publicity and writeup in the National Graham of CBS News recently worthy of a spot on CBS's SUNDAY MORNING from 9: 00-10: 30. Last weekend the CBS News Team filmed the weekend of a typical weekender. his wife in his home on Friday, Center on Friday night, and being put into a cell; Alcohol Education CRASH Course on Saturday night. They took a which was condensed into a 10-minuto segment and ! Sunday, August 2. For people who have had the first DWI and are with a Blood Alcohol Concentration of .20 or second time, you might enjoy seeing what could you. SKIERS BEWARE Drunk skiers are proving to be a "traffic mountain slopes of Europe, according to a London Times. "About four of on an average day are caused by drink," said Werner director of the mountain rescue squad The biggest worry of the rescue team is that endanger the "innocent Sunday Skier." Also, here's a letter from an alcoholic to his may give you some food for thought: An open letter to my family: I am an alcoholic; I need help. Don't allow me to lie to you and accept it for the so doing, yon encourage me to lie. The truth may but get at it. Don't let me outsmart yon. This only teaches responsibility and to lose respect for you at the same Don't let me exploit you or take advantage doing, you become an accomplice to my sibility. Don't lecture me, moralize, scold, praise, blame, when I'm drunk or sober. And don't pour out m may feel better but the situation will he worse. Don't accept my promiseS. This is just my postponing pain. And don't keep switching agreement is made, stick to it. Don't lose your temper with me. It will destroy yoJ possibility of helping me. Don't allow your anxiety do for myself. Don't cover up or abort the consequences of my reduces the crisis but perpetuates the illness. Above all, don't run away from reality my illness, gets worse as my drinking learn, to understand and to plan for my recovery. from a doctor, a counselor, or a psychologist, a alcoholic, from God. I cannot help myself. I hate myself, but I love you. To do nothing is choice you can make for us. Pleasel ' if yon have Uncle Mllty, OCMH, 5 Maple Street, Randolph, Vt. Our River The/on00 r/ver by GEOFF DATES What was it like to hike and canoe the 411-mile necticut River from the Quebec-New Hampshire Long Island Sound? In the next few columns I will1 you a good idea just what it was like, excerpts from my daily journal. On May 29, eight of us drove up tc northern New Hampshire with a trailer-load of supplies for the beginning of the Connecticut shed Council's "Source to the Sea" awareness, publicity, and fund-raising venture, Sea was to last 23 days, and the first two the wildest and most difficult... May 30 -- To the Source -- "Time to write of conditions -- wet notebook, wet tent, dim fatigue. We just accomplished Day No. 1 of and somehow we're right on schedule. We Moose Falls campsite in George D. miles by road from the Canadian border, at 9: We are a group of six right now: Mike and Walter Linck, Ralph Jimenez, Sherry Blunt, Drew and Jean Smith will drive the extra cars travel today..." We hiked up to the height slash between Quebec and New Hampshire located an old trail in to the sidered to he the river's source (although I running into the lake). "Lake" may the river's source; "pond" is pond, with water lillies blanketing lining the shores, we also found evidence of outlet. There we reached into the algae-laden ceremonial drink before plunging down Lake, less than a mile away but over 400 elevation. From the Third Lake we spent whacking and skirting some rather areas, then worked our way get a good view of the upper Upper Valley. spotted with evidence of another specle locations we found moose droppings and pressive "rubs" on young maples, where a time rubbing the velvet off his rack. Rain began to fall as we reached the summit back to Moose Falls, where food and shelter miserable and very wet. The view had not impressive. Willard Scott, the park's resident ranger, Florence, noted our bedraggled condition hot coffee and cookies in his warm cottage. preciate it. May 31 -- "Day No. 2 is not off to a very requested rain (so that we could canoes), but really, not still no lessening of this steady cool rain can be hour ago, Mike and I found each other respective tents at the rain. 'It seems to said 'Yeah,' I replied doubtfully, 'Give it in this. particularly with most things wet on co .et blue jeans, socks, and perien ,..." The day actually got worse before it got {please turn to page S) Page 4,The Journal Oplnion-August S, 1981 I J l II I IIIIII I IIIR H I I Ill I I IIIIII I Ill It tt I EAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. [ II j Publisher of Journal i Opinion Weekly umpoper imtdisked in Ikedhwd. VeneNt. Selncrletien rqotoo - Vormeet Nd NOW Jlemkire. $9.H per year; St.00 fw sis ruN,ks; Nt of ste - $I|.N per yeer ud $7.00 fer elu neath;  ttilom diecemn $2.00. Seceded elms peeloge pew ot |n;dfed, Vot 11|033. Published by Nertkust Pebllekiq Company, IK., P.0. ha 178, Ilmdfenl. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford .   Woodsville 02-222-5281  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper I IEd,,or,a, i Courage, or demagoguery? Vermont's Rep. James M. Jeffords, who cast the only Republican vote against President Reagan's budget and tax cut legislation in Congress, says his action will be widely misunderstood, and he is probably right. On the one hand, his vote and his statement that "Somebody has to stand up against the demagoguery" can be interpreted as a courageous stand against the special interest tax. cuts that were tacked onto the Reagan bill for the oil companies and major corporations that might need a federal bail-out like Chrysler Corp. On the other hand, Jeffords' vote could be looked at as an easy pitch at Vermont votes in the next congressional election. Jeffords said he could not vote for either the Republican tax measure or the Democratic alternative because himself to go so far in opposition to his own party as to vote for the Democra tic version. "I can't go back to Vermont and tell an elderly widow that we have had to cut her Social Security so that we can afford new multi-billion welfare programs for the oil companies and a few of the other wealthiest cor- porations in the world," Jeffords said . . "I cannot submit to nearly $20 billion in blackmail for special giveaways which cannot be explained, in terms of economic philosophy or in terms of need." There are those in Washington who say Jeffords will be a dead duck with the l.eagan White House from now on and that any time he wants something for Vermont, he'll be lucky to, get his telephone call answered. It remains to be seen what Jeffords' relations will be with the Reagan wealthy special interestS.., in the next congressional election. Well, maybe, but sometimes in Congress it becomes necessary to vote for the "least worst" measure, since it was obvious that one of the tax cut versions was going to be enacted. Jeffords apparently could not bring One politician's act of political courage is another politic!an's demagoguery, and the outcome wW depend on how the voters of Vermont view it. , Pork barrel politics New Hampshire Republican Congressman Judd Gregg is tilting at windmills in his effort to block the Clinch River breeder reactor in Tennessee that is favored by President Reagan and powerful Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker, who happens to be from Tennessee. While the Reagan Administration chopped away at small federal spending items such as a few million dollars to develop wood energy projects that could help New Englanders, it didn't cut a dime from the $228 million to begin construction of the Clinch River project in which more than $1 billion has already been invested and final costs are estimated at $3 billion, mostly federal money Critics of the Clinch River project, who include some knowledgeable nuclear experts, say it is not only too costly, but that its technology is seriously out of date even before construction begins. This nuclear energy project is called a "breeder" because it produces more nuclear fuel than it uses, namely plutonium which can be used for making bombs--another reason why some critics oppose it. Suppose terrorists make an effort to get some of that plutonium? Gregg notes that the Reagan Administration is cutting federal funds for social services, education and other programs. "It is an unfortunate set of cir- cumstauces when, in his era of budget austerity, Congress continues to subsidize gold plated boondoggles." Gregg would probably have a better chance of killing the unnecessary Clinch River project if he happemd to be Republican Majority Leader of the U.S. Senate. But he isn't. Howard Baker of Tennessee is, and the taxpayers of New Hampshire and the rest of the nation will have to subsidize this giant project of questionable value. It's something to think about while you're chopping wood for the wood stove this winter. Letters to the Editor00 From Washington to Moscow Leahy's stand on stopping the arms race, I am introducing an article he wrote in The Leahy Letter  Summer Report 1981, VERMONTERS FOR SURVIVAL As relations between the United States and the Soviet Union  worsened and the prospecis for nuclear arms reduction dimmed throughout 1980 and early this year, i Vermonters continued to ask me a single question: How can we as individual citizens , encourage our government to resume nuclear arrn negotiations? Vermonters of all ages and political af- filiations have called, written and asked me each weekend when I was home: How can we help stop the nuclear arms race? My answer has been to encourage people to get in- volved. Citizens cannot and must not simply rely on their national government to ad- dress this question. The all- encompassing issues -- the survival of our civilization as we know it -- demands action of us all. Vermonters have recognized this moral responsibility. The awesome power to destroy -- from Vergennes to Vladivostok -- convinced many of us that there must he a debate at all levels of government on the need to stop the growth of these weapons. On Town Meeting Day of this year, a number of Ver- mont communities debated this question, and 16 passed resolutions. Recently, I conveyed these resolutions to President Reagan and sub- mitted them to he printed in the Congressional Record. The communities which acted were: Andover, Bakersfield, Burlington, Duxbury, Fairfield, Fletcher, Jericho, Milton, Moretown, Mt. Holly, Norwich, Rich- mond, Ripton, St. Albans, Thetford and Waterbury. Most of these resolutions call upon Vermont's Congressional delegation to request the President to propose to the Soviet Union a moratorium on the testing, production and deployment of all nuclear warheads, missiles and delivery systems, and to devise verification safeguards satisfactory to both countries. I share Vermonters' deep concern about the danger posed to all of us by the escalation of nuclear weapons. I am convinced that the enormous complexity of the issue of nuclear proliferation should en- courage the United States to revive discussions with the Soviet Union on SALT and related matters. In all likelihood the President will resume SALT talks within a year. Certainly nuclear arms limitation constitutes one of the most important issues of our time. The Vermont resolutions demonstrate the height of public concern with the issue of arms limitation in Vermont. Holyoke Homer: Bradford, Vt. Canceb mee00 To the Editor: Because of last-minute changes in the schedule of Congress in Washington, I am forced to postpone the public office hours I had scheduled in Bradford on Tuesday, August Eugene 00tman's Century Farm Eugene Eastman's farm in East Corinth received a Century Farm plaque in 1958. Mr. Eastman is a descendant of Hannah Eastman, who was taken prisoner by the Indians in 1704 (Book Two, pages 30- 34). The first part of the farm came into the hands of Eastman ancestors in 1794, when Caleb Stevens deeded 50 acres of Lot No. 51 to Ben- jamin Scribner of Salisbury, N. H. Benjamin had married Martha Knight of Atkinson, N. H. in 1793. Their residence was still in Salisbury when they bought 50 more acres of Lot No. 51 from Nathan Taplin in 1796, but it is believed that they moved to their land in East Corinth soon after that. (Deeds 3-59 and 3-183. ) (Note: According to Eastman family tradition, the Knight family farm bordered the Scribner farm in East Corinth, and the two farms were joined when Benjamin Scribner and Martha Knight were married. An early deed (3-66) shows that Samuel White deeded 100 acres of the westerly part of Lot No. 51 to Joseph Knight of Atkinson in 1793. The names on later deeds indicate that Joseph even- tually deeded this land to his sons. Joseph may have been a brother of Martha, but we have not, been able to find any deeds from him to her or to Benjamin Seribuer. However, it is possible that some portion of the Knight land could have been deeded later to the Eastmans by some other owner in between. It is not a question that can he solved in an hour or two of research.) Benjamin and Martha's 100 acres eventually were deeded to their son Benjamin, Jr. He died in 1853, and his wife Rachel deeded the place to their children Harrison and Charlotte in 1856, reserving for herself lifetime oc- cupancy. However, Harrison and his wife Amanda decided have changed. When Jennie married Scott Eastman and came to live on the farm, his mother, Charlotte, and grandmother, Rachel, were both still alive and lived with them in the same household. It was 32 years before Jennie and Scott had the house to themselves and their children, and then it was only six years before Eugene married Honora and brought her there to live. By then it was Jennie's turn to be taken care of, and Honora did take care of her, through a long illness, along dance, and thought that was really something. A couple times Gene was called on to he a judge for the Fiddlers Contest at the Cracker Barrel Bazaar, but he never really felt comfortable judging somebody eise's fiddling. One night Gene came home late from a dance and left his fiddle and hat on the kitchen table. During the night his cat, who had had an en- counter with a skunk, came in through the cat hole and nested down in Gene's hat. The next day Gene tried to air with caring for her own out that hat, but that didn't children. " accomplish much, so when the The original log cabin on local cleaner came by he gave this place was built across him the smelly hat. The from the present ski tow by cleaner hadn't gone far Benjamin Scribner soon after he came in 1796, and the present house soon after that. The roof was raised and the rooms upstairs added about 1875. The old original ham burned in 1944 and was replaced with the present one. The Eastman farm had the usual animals and ac- tivities of oldtime farms, raising lambs, turkeys, chickens, oxen, and dairy cattle. They also raised purebred Morgan horses, dealing frequently with Arthur Peters of Bradford for "horse trading" or stud service. In 1890, Scott East- man got First Premium at the East Corinth Fair for his yoke of oxen, in competition with 41 others from the Town of Corinth. Through the years the Eastmans did some logging and a lot of sugaring. Their last tap was in 1969, when Gene tapped 1700 trees, with the help of his two Belgian horses. That same year, he sold his cows and retired from farming. As in many farming communities, the Eastmans "changed work" with their neighbors, giving each other help and sharing equipment for planting, digging potatoes, and haying. There was always down the road when he came back to Eastmans' and asked Gene to air out the hat a little longer. Gene served as a selec- tman for the Town of Corinth for 39 years in a row, retiring in 1976 just before his eightieth birthday -- at that time, a record in the State of Vermont for longest continuous service as a selectman. During that time he served with two generations of at least two Corinth families: Fred and Jim Hood, and Worthy and Dnstin White. Others serving with him have been Murdo McLend, Leonard Thompson, Wayland Jordan, John Williams, Richard Devins, and Leonard Simpson. In the early days of Gene's career as a selectman, they had responsibility for bridges on the town roads, and the selectmen themselves went right out into the woods and hauled in timber with horses or tractors to fix the bridges, making up stringers, planks, or whatever was needed. Gene can remember even earlier days when the road in front of his house was graded with six oxen and a read machine. The workers would stop at his house for a glass of cider before continuing on to move their family to the company for supper, too, and West. Neg'mouey for ,the friend sta!faovernlght.. trip, and not expecting ever to There was always a .need come baok,,larrison deeded for extra income, and Gene his share of the farm to Charlotte's husband Emerson Eastman for $2,000. The Eastmans have some letters which he wrote while he was on the way west and sent home by pony express. Family lore says that Charlotte used to smoke a clay pipe. Charlotte and Emerson Eastman had a daughter and twin sons who died in childhood, but another' son, Winfield Scott Eastman, Eastman found various ways, such as by giving haircuts, many of them for Pike Hill miners. He also fiddled for dancing. When he was still a boy he was musical, and one day tried out a neighbor's violin. He "fiddled around" with it a little, and did so well that everyone agreed he should make use of his talent and take lessons. So he strapped his violin to his bicycle and rode to Bradford to a violin teacher. After a few known as Scott, grew up and lessons the teacher said Gene stayed on the farm. His wife ,played better than he did. So was Jennie Batchelder. They he started fiddling for dances, had four sons, and the weddings, and parties, and youngest, Eugene, stayed on joined with his son Glynn, the farm and is still here. His Winnie Hight of East Corinth, wife was Honora Murphy of and Dick Ellis of South Bradford. Royalton to form the Keynote The living arrangements Band, with AI Monte to call the of the Eastmans in earlier changes for dancing. He was generations show how times paid a dollar for his first their way. When the base for the bllektop amadwu'put in past his house, Gene worked with-the road crew, drawing stones with a stoneboat, nine hours a day at 4.00 a day for himself and his horses. For many years, Gene served as a trustee for the Washington Electric Cooperative. Ski tow at Eastmans' Another Eastman family activity for the last 45 years has been the ski tow on their land, almost across the road from their buildings --the oldest continuously operating ski tow in the country. PLANNING MEETING BRADFORD--The Bradford Planning Committee will meet Thursday, Aug. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Bradford Academy conference room. 4.. I am especially concerned atbut this because it will be  .....................................................................  " " physically impossible, at this late date, for me to inTorm residents of the area of the Executive Councilor change prior to the 4th by direct mailings. Therefore, I would deeply Raymond S. Burton appreciate any publicity you ....  .. _......__ _. __. = could provide to the change, so that residentsof the areawill  in Po not be inconvenienced e rstmouth The shirtsleeve session had been scheduled for 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. on the 4th at Bradford Town Hall. Because I must be in Washington at that time, I have had to reschndule the session for Wednesday, August 12, from 11:30 a.m. to I p.m. The short notice of this change is unfortunate, and I am hopeful that word can be spread in time so that people will not travel to Bradford on the 4th for a nonexistent session. Again, let me express in advance my gratitude for any assistance you could provide in informing area residents of the change, (The schedule for all other shirtsleeve sessions in August is unchanged.) James M. Jeffords Vermont Congressman To the Editor: By making this walk, these with the USSR a permanent Under the sponsorship of the Vermonters hope to gain the moratorium on nuclear American Friends Service support of their fellow Ver- weapons. Committee and the monters, as they ask the In Montpelier, on Friday, TOWN NURSE Ecumenical Council Peace members of our Vermont Augnst7th, following a parade A Community "Health Committee of Vermont, many Congressional delegation to in the morning, Senator Services town nurse will check Vermonters will march from introduce into Congress a Patrick Leahy, John Kenneth diabetes, weight and hyper- Washington, Vt. to Moscow, resolution calling for an ira- Galbraith and other tension today, Aug. 5, from 9 Vt., starting on Thursday, mediate nuclear weapons prominent speakers will a.m.-12 p.m. at the Bradford August 6th (Hiroshima Day) freeze (U.S.andUS.S.R.)and address a large rally on the Senior Center, and from 1-4 and finishing in Moscow. further, to call upon the State House lawn. p.m. at the E. Corinth Saturday, Augustgth. Administration to negotiate To illustrate Senator Library. The July 31st meeting of the Governor and Council was held at the Wentworth Collidge Historical House in Portsmouth in the same room that former Governor Benning Wentworth used to held Council meetings. One of my goals is to have the Council meet outside of Concord where and when possible: The interest generated by this meeting being held in Portsmouth was good and I believe productive in allowing citizens to see who makes much of state policy that eventually governs them. We are planning to meet in Laconia on October 28 at the Belknap Mill. The Council approved a number of projects which have a direct hearing on District One Highway sale of public lands (small plots) were okayed in Woodsville, Littleton and Gorham. A special com- mission was appointed consisting of Charles Hepburn of Sugar Hill, Paul LaFond of Bath, and Maurice Stearin of Laconia to look into a short alteration on Route 49 in the Town of Waterville Valley. Weatherization funds in addition to earlier authorization were okayed to Community Action Agencies in Coos, Carroll, and Grafton Counties and to Community Action in Belknap Merrimack County Community Action. The use of credit cards was approved for the Mount Washington State Park. Final authorization of the sale of bonds guaranteed by the state for pollution abatement projects was given for the Town of Lisbon. Headrest in Lebanon and Lakes Region Community Health Agency Inc. of Laconia were given the final go ahead for Alcohol and Drug Prevention Programs. The Developmental Disabilities Council was authorized to enter into a contract with the Wolfeboro Children's Center. The state by approval of the council entered into a $427,000 contract with the Boston & Maine Railroad for the rebuilding of 12 miles of track and roadbed on the Conway branch line, south of Ossipee. A number of nominations of interest to District One were made for confirmation or denial by the Council (expected at the August 12th.meeting) Dr. Ernest Town- send for Superintendent of the State Hospital and Glenn L. Levesque for the N.H. Retirement System Beard of Trustees. Wayne Mook of Chocorua for the N.H. State Board of Auctioneers, and Kenneth R. McCulleck of Littletnn was nominated and confirmed for the N.H. Barbering and Cosmetology Board. As Councilor for District One, I would like to pay tribute to George McGee of Lincoln for his many years of service to the State of New Hampshire and the Water Resources Board. Mr. McGee was replaced on the Water Resources Board by Delbert Downing of Salem by a unanimous vote of the Council. The next meeting of the Governor and Council will be August 12 at l0 a.m. in the State House. I would be most happy to see any citizens from this area in attendance. Alcoholism and You with UNCLE MILTS( As many of you know, I run the Alcohol and CRASH Program at the Woodstock on Saturdays. People always ask, "Why Saturday? five years ago, Barbara Chase was Woodstock Correctional Center and she conceived a weekend sentence mainly for people who are during the week and who had a drinking complished two things: the guy kept his job and not getting drunk over the weekend. The very successful. The weekender took the Alcohol Class Saturday morning and night if he had a DWI or Careless and N The program received some publicity and writeup in the National Graham of CBS News recently worthy of a spot on CBS's SUNDAY MORNING from 9: 00-10: 30. Last weekend the CBS News Team filmed the weekend of a typical weekender. his wife in his home on Friday, Center on Friday night, and being put into a cell; Alcohol Education CRASH Course on Saturday night. They took a which was condensed into a 10-minuto segment and ! Sunday, August 2. For people who have had the first DWI and are with a Blood Alcohol Concentration of .20 or second time, you might enjoy seeing what could you. SKIERS BEWARE Drunk skiers are proving to be a "traffic mountain slopes of Europe, according to a London Times. "About four of on an average day are caused by drink," said Werner director of the mountain rescue squad The biggest worry of the rescue team is that endanger the "innocent Sunday Skier." Also, here's a letter from an alcoholic to his may give you some food for thought: An open letter to my family: I am an alcoholic; I need help. Don't allow me to lie to you and accept it for the so doing, yon encourage me to lie. The truth may but get at it. Don't let me outsmart yon. This only teaches responsibility and to lose respect for you at the same Don't let me exploit you or take advantage doing, you become an accomplice to my sibility. Don't lecture me, moralize, scold, praise, blame, when I'm drunk or sober. And don't pour out m may feel better but the situation will he worse. Don't accept my promiseS. This is just my postponing pain. And don't keep switching agreement is made, stick to it. Don't lose your temper with me. It will destroy yoJ possibility of helping me. Don't allow your anxiety do for myself. Don't cover up or abort the consequences of my reduces the crisis but perpetuates the illness. Above all, don't run away from reality my illness, gets worse as my drinking learn, to understand and to plan for my recovery. from a doctor, a counselor, or a psychologist, a alcoholic, from God. I cannot help myself. I hate myself, but I love you. To do nothing is choice you can make for us. Pleasel ' if yon have Uncle Mllty, OCMH, 5 Maple Street, Randolph, Vt. Our River The/on00 r/ver by GEOFF DATES What was it like to hike and canoe the 411-mile necticut River from the Quebec-New Hampshire Long Island Sound? In the next few columns I will1 you a good idea just what it was like, excerpts from my daily journal. On May 29, eight of us drove up tc northern New Hampshire with a trailer-load of supplies for the beginning of the Connecticut shed Council's "Source to the Sea" awareness, publicity, and fund-raising venture, Sea was to last 23 days, and the first two the wildest and most difficult... May 30 -- To the Source -- "Time to write of conditions -- wet notebook, wet tent, dim fatigue. We just accomplished Day No. 1 of and somehow we're right on schedule. We Moose Falls campsite in George D. miles by road from the Canadian border, at 9: We are a group of six right now: Mike and Walter Linck, Ralph Jimenez, Sherry Blunt, Drew and Jean Smith will drive the extra cars travel today..." We hiked up to the height slash between Quebec and New Hampshire located an old trail in to the sidered to he the river's source (although I running into the lake). "Lake" may the river's source; "pond" is pond, with water lillies blanketing lining the shores, we also found evidence of outlet. There we reached into the algae-laden ceremonial drink before plunging down Lake, less than a mile away but over 400 elevation. From the Third Lake we spent whacking and skirting some rather areas, then worked our way get a good view of the upper Upper Valley. spotted with evidence of another specle locations we found moose droppings and pressive "rubs" on young maples, where a time rubbing the velvet off his rack. Rain began to fall as we reached the summit back to Moose Falls, where food and shelter miserable and very wet. The view had not impressive. Willard Scott, the park's resident ranger, Florence, noted our bedraggled condition hot coffee and cookies in his warm cottage. preciate it. May 31 -- "Day No. 2 is not off to a very requested rain (so that we could canoes), but really, not still no lessening of this steady cool rain can be hour ago, Mike and I found each other respective tents at the rain. 'It seems to said 'Yeah,' I replied doubtfully, 'Give it in this. particularly with most things wet on co .et blue jeans, socks, and perien ,..." The day actually got worse before it got {please turn to page S)