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August 5, 1981     Journal Opinion
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August 5, 1981
 

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August 5, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 .from Newbury&apos;s Barrel Bazaar Bushey has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to a misdemeanor charge of dumping untreated waste from the Wells River Corning Fibers paper plant into the Wells River. He was released on $1,000 personal recognizance bond pending a pre-sentencing hearing. Bushey was the second official of the Wells River plant to plead guilty in the case. The first was Plant Manager Reginald Hunt. The 57-ycar-old Bushey, who lives in Ashuelot, N.H., could Second guilty plea in ponution case BURLINGT()N--WilIiam be sentenced to a maximum Bushey acted as vice $25,OO0 fine and one year in jail president and general for each of seven counts of violating pollution laws. The corporation has been charged with six felony counts punishable by up to five years in jail, but Judge Albert Coffrin commented, "I've always been curious as to how you jail a corporation." Bushey and Maury Wallace of Ithaca, N.Y., bought the plant from the state of Ver- mont in 1977 in a low-interest state industrial development loan, promising to install pollution control equipment. manager of the plant. The prosecution charged that Bushey on one occasion instructed employees to dump paper stock that had clogged a paper-making machine and wash it through pipes into the river, and on another occasion to wash untreated sludge from a holding tank into the river. Investigators last April said they found some pollution control equipment the owners had promised to install lying unused in a shed. Newbury. group at Cracker Barrel !ii: Piermont00 The annual Day Family Reunion was held at Piermont Town Hall on July 26 with 21 members of the family coming from Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire. Mrs. Eugene Robbins at- tended the 53rd college class reunion (University of Ver- mont) held on July 21 at Randolph, Vt. She then drove to Suffield, Conn. to help her sister Dorothy Smith celebrate her 81st birthday. Mrs. Paul Godzyk of Wilmington, Mass. and Miss Elizabeth Godzyk of Lawrence, Mass. spent two days last week with their Waits River ,,,,, Rev. Mark Demers was welcomed at our church on Sunday morning, July 26, as our new pastor. The message of the morning was "Baptism -- The Total Transition," scriptures from the books of Genesis, Romans and Mat- thew. The Sunday services BOW! Charles Barnes of Newbury at will continue to alternate with test. of old OF YESTERYEARExhibit by Newbury Historical Society at Cracker the church at W. Topsham. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Forger and Mrs. Cameron of Barre visited his mother, Gladys Sawyer, Sunday, taking her and Mr. Aldrich for a tour of the White Mountains. They visited Franconia Notch, the  tramway and other points of ..... interest en route. .... : Forty-four of the 65 im- mediate members of the Batten family gathered Sunday at the Russell Batten home in West Topsham for their annual family picnic. Among those attending were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burns and two children of Georgia, Vt.; Mrs. Nancy Colosi and 3 sons of Washington, D.C.; Denver Woodcock, Can- terbury, N.H.; Mrs. Dwight Woodcock, Meredith, N.H.; Drs. Janet and John Mitchell, Colchester; Leslie Batten and family, Cabot; the Roland I I brother and uncle Robert Evans. A large crowd filled the F'iermont Town Hall on July 24 to attend the Piermont Historical Society's annual "Roots" program. This year it featured the history of the Underhill Family and hostess for the evening was Mrs. Stephen Underhill. Tracing the family history from 1445 until the present with accounts of their particular family branches were Hugh Underhill, Lawrence Underhill, Evelyn Morrill, Agnes Perkins, Miriam Norton, Janet and JoAnn Winn, and Charles Thompson I  ] Mrs. Clinton Sawyer 439-5445 Putney family, Websterville; Mrs. Louise Gilman and son 4Vlatthew Doe of Richmond; Mr. and Mrs. Steven Tillotson and Lisa, E.. CorintkThe Kenneth Battens; Gardner Batten family; Randy Batten family, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Tillotson; Mrs. Rachel Knapp and two daughters, and others from town. The afternoon was filled with reminiscing, fun and games for all ages. This being Nancy's bir- thday, she was presented a. shower of cards and a large decorated cake. The cake was made by Linda Tillotson. Mrs. Berdina Perry and Raymond Tillotson were in Hanover Monday to be with their brother, Dwight Tillotson of Plymouth who underwent heart surgery at the Mary Hitchcock Hospital. Harry Clark is a patient at the Central Vermont Hospital in Berlin where he was taken by ambulance Wednesday morning. Seventeen members of the Golden Agers met Wednesday noon at Fellowship Hall for a pot luck dinner and social hour. AM I BID? "---Cracl-er Barrel auction at is conducted by Archie Steenburgh of AUCTION W. Newbury, ,,,, ,,,,, practice session before Contest at Cracker Barrel oule Auto Sales, me 181 South Main Street Barre, Vermont entral Vermont Datsun-Volvo 80247941540 IL clothinta care center -up and delivery service The flower beds in front of the local post office are ad- mired by all that go for their mail. Mr. and Mrs. John Hill from Islington, Mass., and two granddaughters Jennifer and Elizabeth from Hyde Park, Mass., recently visited Mrs. Solan Stevens for a few days. Some people are wondering why the church bell rings each night at six o'clock. It is to remind people to pray for peace. People who complain about their news not being in the paper should remind them- selves if they had told the reporter or not. Last Friday Mrs. Edward Colson; Miss Edith Meara and Mrs. Solan Stevens were in St. Johnsbury to call on Miss Eleanor Lasell, who was so delighted to see them. The Health Service Clinic will meet in early August at Newbury Bailey Club House. Watch for the date. Mr. and Mrs. James Chaddick and son Jeremy Ill from New Mexico have been spending three weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Vervoort and while here they all visited in Maine. Guests at Mr. and Mrs. Russell Blackmer have been Mr. and Mrs. Russell M. Blackmer, Rusty and Robin from Lincoln, Neb. for a week, also Mrs. Marjory,Clemence from Worcester, Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ginsell from Worcester, Mass., Donna Ginsell from Wilton, NH, and David from Worcester, Mass. Mrs. Ernest Hemmings and Mrs. Edward Colson spent Saturday July 25 visiting friends at Newfound Lake, N.H. N Phone 444-2742 Call collect. (of Colchester, Vt.) Also participating in the program were John Underhill, Ernest Underhill, Cynthia, Calvin, Stephen and Jeffrey Underhill, and Daniel, Faith and Lois Norton, as well as the scene-stealer of the show little Beth Underhill, newly adopted daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Underhill. The choral group consisted of Janet and JoAnn Winn, Agnes Perkins, Cynthia Underhill and Faith Norton  with Miriam (Underhill) Norton as pianist. Mrs. Mary Koloseike of Rochester, N.Y., and Mrs. Janet Dagenhart of Windsor, Conn., were unable to attend but sent reports of their family branches which were read. Helen Underhill was especially happy to have all of her five children together for the occasion and had the John Underhill family from Far. mington, N.H., the Ernest Underhill family from Andover, Conn., and the Richard Norton family from Nashua, N.H. as weekend guests. Guests last week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Martin were Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Ripley of Abington, Mass.; their grandson Bruce Bergquist and three friends from Brockton, Mass.; and another grandson Scott Holmes with his wife and two daughters also from Brockton, Mass. Certainly the highspot of the Piermont summer social season was the wedding of Leslie Gould to Bruce Henry on July 25 at, t*summer home of Mr. an'Mrs. Russell Gould on the shore of Lake Armington. Over 300 guests marveled at the beautiful ceremony in its picturesque setting and enjoyed the sumptuous banquet that followed. The town congratulates the newlyweds. Bertha Carleton SEARS ROEBUCK, Woodsville, N.H. WELLS RIVER LANDRoMAT, Wells River. Vt. PIKE STORE. Pike. N.H. McLAM's'STORE, E. Corinth, Vt. FAIRLEE GENiRAL, Foiriee, Vt. ORFORDVILL STORE, Orfordville, N .H I 429-3868 Miss Alison Putnam from the former Margaret Burlington and Larry Butler Hayward home for the from Bristol spent the summer. weekend at the Putnam home Mr. and Mrs. James Halley and were at the Cottage from Concord, N.H. havebeen Hospital to see her father. All members of the Donald Carleton family have been so appreciative of the many kindnesses done for them by their neighbors and friends while Julia was in the hospital. Julia was so thrilled over the. sunshine box and the baby shower. It is so wonderful to have people think of her and it surely cheered her up a great deal. On Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 8 p.m. Professor Don Sailers of Emory University, Alanta, Ga., Will lead a community sing in the W. Newbury Church and all are cordially invited to attend and are looking forward to the in- teresting evening. Mrs. Charles Ernshaw from Cape Cod is occupying Mrs. "Franty" McFarland's house for a couple of weeks. Donald Putnam has been moved from the intensive care room to a semi-private room at the hospital. Mrs. Solan Stevens has received word that her great grand nephew from Rochester, N.Y. and is to play at the Symphony Orchestra some time in August. Mr. and Mrs. Einard Swenson were in Northboro, Mass., Sunday tO Tuesday to attend the funeral of her brother who passed away on Saturday. Also attending the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Richard Swenson and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Clements. There was an error in last week's paper as the Haverland baby has been named Brenna Lynn. The Ray Clarks have named their new daughter India Newberry Clark. Keith Flynn, a State Police officer, who has been living in an apartment in the old Tyler Store, has moved to the Alex Urquhart house up the North Road: Mr. and Mrs, Walter Noltic from Maryland are occupying recent callers in town. The Nick Huntoon's family that have been living up the North Road in the Alex Urquhart's house have moved to their new home recently built near the Peach Brook four corners up a short distance toward the road to Newbury. Donald Putnam suffered a heart attack on Thursday while at work and con- seqnently is in the intensive care unit at Cottage Hospital at this writing on Saturday. Menders of AS(: named for N.H. WASHINGTON, D.C.--Secretary of Agriculture John Block has appointed Elwin C. Hardy, of Hollis, as chairman of the New Hampshire Agricultural Stabilization and Con- servation (ASC) Committee. Named as committee members were Woodrow W. Allard of Conway, and Ber- nard W. Campbell of Salem. The committee administers federal farm programs in New Hampshire. Hardy, 61, has been farming for 43 years and currently has a 475-acre fruit and vegetable operation in Hillsborough County. He also operates a large roadside stand selling other produce, including nursery products. He has served as an ASC county and community committeeman, as chairman of the county committee, as a member of the State ASC Committee and also as chairman. Allard has been farming for 46 years and now has a 450- acre dairy and forestry operation in Carroll County with 40 milking cows. He has served a total of 32 years as a county and community ASC committeeman with 4z years as a member of the state ASC Committee. Gravel removal project sought The Grafton County Con- servation District has asked the North Country Resource Conservation and Develop- ment Project for assistance in gravel removal from rivers and major streams. District, state and federal agencies have received an increasing number of inquiries about removal of gravel bars to ease the spring flow of ice to reduce flooding. Farm, commercial, industrial and residential land uses have all been affected by flooding from ice jams. The problems are obvious but the solutions are complex. Indiscriminant dredging of Corinth Eleanor Burroughs 429-..%4"/ Town Clerk Jack Lear- month, along with 17 other officials from throughout the state, was invited by Gov. Snelling to attend a State- Local Advisory Group last Wednesday in Montpelier. Subjects discussed were Federalism reform; state- local issues, problems and concerns and improving state- local relations as a national goal. Snelling begins his term as qhairman of the National Governor's Association on Aug. 11 and he had asked the' officials for advice as to what areas he should emphasize at N.G.A. Visitors in the home of George and Ruth Elie this past week were her daughter Shirley Alexander and a daughter and son, Bonnie and Kevin Bailey, all of Great Barrington, Mass. Shirley is employed at the American Institute of Economic Research and Kevin is a student at Berkshire Com- munity College. While here they all visited at the Durant Cemetery in Cabot. Rev. Gareth Tobin, State Director of Child Evangelism Fellowship was the supply speaker at the church in Corinth Center on Sunday, July 26. Following the mor- ning service a pot-luck dinner was held on the grounds. Rev. and Mrs. Karl Kepler of Dividing Creek, N.J.,,spent Wednesday with Eleanor Burroughs. ne00ia I 1 may shift the river's energy and " cause problems '4 elsewhere. Water quality and fish habitat may be affected. Water rights and lan- downership compound the Former Wentworth man dies in Tampa issue, officials said. The Conservation District WENTWORTH--Arnold W. Waiters- "Housing and Stevens, 60, of Tampa, Fla., Developing firm. asked for help to expedite the died in Tampa Hospital July Survivors are his wife, removal of gravel in designated areas where 23. Annie Belle Stevens; a son problems arise and to put Born in Maidstone, Vt., the Arnold; a step-son, Salem together a technical team to son of Glen and Maude O,Rourke, all of Tampa; two assist withspecific requests. Stevens, he moved to Went- sisters, June Smith of Wen- The course of action is worth where he attended tworth, and Marion Wheeler of unknown at this time but school. Gloversville, N.Y.; and four discussions will start in early He was" a World War II brothers, Glen of Guildhall, August. The North Country veteran, serving in the U.S. Vt., Harold of Nor- RC&D Project was. Army Air Corps. in the thunderland; Edward and established in 1968 to bring ' Panama Canal Zone. He has Carroll of Wentworth. together people from many lived in Florida since 1950. He Interment was in Tampa. disciplines and interests in was employed by the Jim helping to solve the area's problems and in developing [/o E. McAflister, E. Thetford, dies opportunities toward better E. THETFORD--Wilbur E. Thetford most of his life. use of land and water. McAllister, 77, died July 27 at He is survived by his wife; Alice Peck Day Hospital after one daughter, Jill Jackson; a long illness, four grandchildren, one great- He was born in E. Barnard, grandchild, all of E. Tbetford: on Sept. 5, 1903, the son of nieces and cousins. William and Laura (Green- Graveside services were in wood) McAllister. the South View Cemetery in Mr. McAllister was Randolph July30. educated in Pompanoosuc The Day Funeral Home in schools. He married Lucy Randolph is in charge of Scribner in 1934 and owned arrangements. and operated a farm in E. Market Day revived on connnon by MARCELLA HOFFMANN WENTWORTH--In the original Wentworth town charter of 1766 it was granted "that as soon as the said town shall consist of fifty families a Market Day may be opened and kept." Wentworth has revived this event and on Saturday, August 1, as they have done for the last six years, the Wentworth Historical Society held Market Day from 10 a.m.4 p.m. on the town common. Interestingly enough, this common was once a common burying ground. In 1787 Phillip White gave one acre of ground for this purpose. It was used for this purpose until 1817. In 1790 the first"meeting house was erected. Elegant dwellings were built and there was much excitement that Wentworth might become a shiretown. The dead were removed to the present Village Cemetery. However, all efforts failed and the Village Common, where once only grief and mourning were heard, became the center of business and amusement. .Here in this historic and picturesque setting the Historical Society held Market Day. Articles of every description were 'on sale, including examples of the local arts and crafts, and of the cooks and. bakers' skills. A GOOD PERCHat of a horse-drawn wagon In N. Haverhill Fair parade is good vantage point. < MIDWAY SCENE---Game of chance on the midway of N. Haverhill air. GIVE IT A WHIRL,---Lights from rides light up N. Haverhill Fair. A TRIBUTE In Loving memory of Marjorie M. Hood Birth -- Aug. 4 -- 1894 Death -- Oct. 23-- 1980 "God Giveth -- God Taketh away. May your soul rest in peace." Sadly Missed Your son, Lynwood Hood N. Haverhill dies N. HAVERHILL--Edith R. Phillip J. Germain of Milton, Germain, 59, died at her home Fla., Frederick J. Germain July 28after a long illness. Sr., of Benton, N.ll., James B. She was born in Littleton, Germain of Lebanon, Joseph N.H., and lived in North H. Germain Jr. of Barre, and Haverhill for 26 years. She Brian J. Germain of Orford; was married to Joseph H. two daughters, Maria Ger- GermainSr.,whediedin1975. main of Hartford, Conn., and Mrs. Germain was era- Sarahjean A. Harris of North ployed as a cook by the Haverhill, and 12 grand- Grafton County Nursing children. Home. She was a member of A Mass of Christian Burial St. Joseph Catholic Church in was celebrated Aug. 2 at St. Wondsville, and a member of Joseph Church in Woodsville. the Order of Eagles Auxiliary Burial followed in St. Rose of in Littleton. Lima Cemetery in Littleton, She is survived by five sons, N.H. Alice Thompson dies in N.Y. N. HAVERHILL--Alice May semeadow Cemetery in N. Thompson, 82, died July 26 in Haverhill. Geneva, N.Y., after a long Memorial contributions illness, may be made to the Gideon She was born in Haverhill Living Memorial Bible, .p.o. and lived there most of her Box 328, Barre, Vt. 05641. life. She moved to Geneva to live with her son, Robert Thompson. TOWN NURSE Mrs. Thompson was a A Community Health member of the United Services, Inc., town nurse will Methodist Church of N. check hypertension, weight Haverhill. She was the and diabetes Aug. 12 from 9 assistant town clerk for many years in Haverhill. a.m.-1 p.m. at Tracy Hall in She is survived by two sons, Norwich and 7-9 p.m. t Thetford Hill Church. Gorge B. Thompson of N. HiVerhill and Robert E. Thompson of Geneva; a sister, Isabelle Whitehill of Ryegate Corner; 10 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren, i970 iUSPANG,'dtop, 302 Funeral services were July V8. Runs good. Many new 30 in the Ricker Funeral parts. Needs some body work. Home, Birch Lane, Wood- sville. Burial was in Hor- Ca1180-333-9143. 2t--8-12--.c . .00,,rltl ,4ge,nc00 Jnw. 1 Montebello Street Woodsville, NH 03785 603-747-2000 BROKER:  ASS(K'IATES: Albine A. Leuthold  Paul Mayette 787-fi270 Robert Dupuis 41-2531 List No. 255 -- Handyman's special! This 3 apartment building on a large lot is an excellent op- portunity to own your home with extra income -- or take advantage of the ideal business location. Some remodeling material is included at this very reasonable price of $15,000. List No. 256 -- Just move in and enjoy! A nice neigh- borhood and easy living in this 3 bedroom ranch with the convenience of electric heat. On a landscaped lot with a beautiful view of the mountains. Attached 2 car garage plus many extras. Yours for $52,000, N At Gray's Held, Rt. 5, Fairlee, Vt. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 STARTING AT 9:30 A.M. ANTIQUES-- FURNITURE  TOOLS Oak roll top desk, secretary, butter worker, 1912 black cherry writing desk, library table w-leaves & drawer, Acme Oakleaf parlor stove, jam cabinet, 5 drawer chest of drawers, 6 drawer chest of drawers, butter churn (Rutland), 2- plank bottom Boston rockers, marble top vanity, maple Cushman table w-6 chairs (nice shape), lift top commode, sewing stand, maple harvest table w-drop leaves, iron tea kettle, hall tree, 2 pc. matching couch set, wicker sewing basket w- brass feet, jug, crock, mirrors, picture frames, Shaker type night stand, kerosene lamps, lamp base, clocks, lanterns, 4 pc. pine bedroom set w-acorn pulls, wicker chairs, Victorian type couch, lamps, dropleaf gate leg table, maple table, hat rocks, chairs, stands, book- cases, cupboards, dishes, pans, linens, lamp glass shades, dressing table, large kitchen cabinet w-glass doors, radio, record player, T.V, picnic basket, built in dish washer, rockers, screens, fans, wood box, 2 oak leaves, ladder step stool, Cash register, some tools, beds, trunk, folding chairs, bottles, canning jars, sign, doors, oak desk, skates, freezer wrap, kegs, nails, Hibachi, new Norman stoves, plus much more. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH ON GROUNDS AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. ' 195-4348 or llRl-ZlSl August 5, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 .from Newbury's Barrel Bazaar Bushey has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to a misdemeanor charge of dumping untreated waste from the Wells River Corning Fibers paper plant into the Wells River. He was released on $1,000 personal recognizance bond pending a pre-sentencing hearing. Bushey was the second official of the Wells River plant to plead guilty in the case. The first was Plant Manager Reginald Hunt. The 57-ycar-old Bushey, who lives in Ashuelot, N.H., could Second guilty plea in ponution case BURLINGT()N--WilIiam be sentenced to a maximum Bushey acted as vice $25,OO0 fine and one year in jail president and general for each of seven counts of violating pollution laws. The corporation has been charged with six felony counts punishable by up to five years in jail, but Judge Albert Coffrin commented, "I've always been curious as to how you jail a corporation." Bushey and Maury Wallace of Ithaca, N.Y., bought the plant from the state of Ver- mont in 1977 in a low-interest state industrial development loan, promising to install pollution control equipment. manager of the plant. The prosecution charged that Bushey on one occasion instructed employees to dump paper stock that had clogged a paper-making machine and wash it through pipes into the river, and on another occasion to wash untreated sludge from a holding tank into the river. Investigators last April said they found some pollution control equipment the owners had promised to install lying unused in a shed. Newbury. group at Cracker Barrel !ii: Piermont00 The annual Day Family Reunion was held at Piermont Town Hall on July 26 with 21 members of the family coming from Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire. Mrs. Eugene Robbins at- tended the 53rd college class reunion (University of Ver- mont) held on July 21 at Randolph, Vt. She then drove to Suffield, Conn. to help her sister Dorothy Smith celebrate her 81st birthday. Mrs. Paul Godzyk of Wilmington, Mass. and Miss Elizabeth Godzyk of Lawrence, Mass. spent two days last week with their Waits River ,,,,, Rev. Mark Demers was welcomed at our church on Sunday morning, July 26, as our new pastor. The message of the morning was "Baptism -- The Total Transition," scriptures from the books of Genesis, Romans and Mat- thew. The Sunday services BOW! Charles Barnes of Newbury at will continue to alternate with test. of old OF YESTERYEARExhibit by Newbury Historical Society at Cracker the church at W. Topsham. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Forger and Mrs. Cameron of Barre visited his mother, Gladys Sawyer, Sunday, taking her and Mr. Aldrich for a tour of the White Mountains. They visited Franconia Notch, the  tramway and other points of ..... interest en route. .... : Forty-four of the 65 im- mediate members of the Batten family gathered Sunday at the Russell Batten home in West Topsham for their annual family picnic. Among those attending were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burns and two children of Georgia, Vt.; Mrs. Nancy Colosi and 3 sons of Washington, D.C.; Denver Woodcock, Can- terbury, N.H.; Mrs. Dwight Woodcock, Meredith, N.H.; Drs. Janet and John Mitchell, Colchester; Leslie Batten and family, Cabot; the Roland I I brother and uncle Robert Evans. A large crowd filled the F'iermont Town Hall on July 24 to attend the Piermont Historical Society's annual "Roots" program. This year it featured the history of the Underhill Family and hostess for the evening was Mrs. Stephen Underhill. Tracing the family history from 1445 until the present with accounts of their particular family branches were Hugh Underhill, Lawrence Underhill, Evelyn Morrill, Agnes Perkins, Miriam Norton, Janet and JoAnn Winn, and Charles Thompson I  ] Mrs. Clinton Sawyer 439-5445 Putney family, Websterville; Mrs. Louise Gilman and son 4Vlatthew Doe of Richmond; Mr. and Mrs. Steven Tillotson and Lisa, E.. CorintkThe Kenneth Battens; Gardner Batten family; Randy Batten family, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Tillotson; Mrs. Rachel Knapp and two daughters, and others from town. The afternoon was filled with reminiscing, fun and games for all ages. This being Nancy's bir- thday, she was presented a. shower of cards and a large decorated cake. The cake was made by Linda Tillotson. Mrs. Berdina Perry and Raymond Tillotson were in Hanover Monday to be with their brother, Dwight Tillotson of Plymouth who underwent heart surgery at the Mary Hitchcock Hospital. Harry Clark is a patient at the Central Vermont Hospital in Berlin where he was taken by ambulance Wednesday morning. Seventeen members of the Golden Agers met Wednesday noon at Fellowship Hall for a pot luck dinner and social hour. AM I BID? "---Cracl-er Barrel auction at is conducted by Archie Steenburgh of AUCTION W. Newbury, ,,,, ,,,,, practice session before Contest at Cracker Barrel oule Auto Sales, me 181 South Main Street Barre, Vermont entral Vermont Datsun-Volvo 80247941540 IL clothinta care center -up and delivery service The flower beds in front of the local post office are ad- mired by all that go for their mail. Mr. and Mrs. John Hill from Islington, Mass., and two granddaughters Jennifer and Elizabeth from Hyde Park, Mass., recently visited Mrs. Solan Stevens for a few days. Some people are wondering why the church bell rings each night at six o'clock. It is to remind people to pray for peace. People who complain about their news not being in the paper should remind them- selves if they had told the reporter or not. Last Friday Mrs. Edward Colson; Miss Edith Meara and Mrs. Solan Stevens were in St. Johnsbury to call on Miss Eleanor Lasell, who was so delighted to see them. The Health Service Clinic will meet in early August at Newbury Bailey Club House. Watch for the date. Mr. and Mrs. James Chaddick and son Jeremy Ill from New Mexico have been spending three weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Vervoort and while here they all visited in Maine. Guests at Mr. and Mrs. Russell Blackmer have been Mr. and Mrs. Russell M. Blackmer, Rusty and Robin from Lincoln, Neb. for a week, also Mrs. Marjory,Clemence from Worcester, Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ginsell from Worcester, Mass., Donna Ginsell from Wilton, NH, and David from Worcester, Mass. Mrs. Ernest Hemmings and Mrs. Edward Colson spent Saturday July 25 visiting friends at Newfound Lake, N.H. N Phone 444-2742 Call collect. (of Colchester, Vt.) Also participating in the program were John Underhill, Ernest Underhill, Cynthia, Calvin, Stephen and Jeffrey Underhill, and Daniel, Faith and Lois Norton, as well as the scene-stealer of the show little Beth Underhill, newly adopted daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Underhill. The choral group consisted of Janet and JoAnn Winn, Agnes Perkins, Cynthia Underhill and Faith Norton  with Miriam (Underhill) Norton as pianist. Mrs. Mary Koloseike of Rochester, N.Y., and Mrs. Janet Dagenhart of Windsor, Conn., were unable to attend but sent reports of their family branches which were read. Helen Underhill was especially happy to have all of her five children together for the occasion and had the John Underhill family from Far. mington, N.H., the Ernest Underhill family from Andover, Conn., and the Richard Norton family from Nashua, N.H. as weekend guests. Guests last week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Martin were Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Ripley of Abington, Mass.; their grandson Bruce Bergquist and three friends from Brockton, Mass.; and another grandson Scott Holmes with his wife and two daughters also from Brockton, Mass. Certainly the highspot of the Piermont summer social season was the wedding of Leslie Gould to Bruce Henry on July 25 at, t*summer home of Mr. an'Mrs. Russell Gould on the shore of Lake Armington. Over 300 guests marveled at the beautiful ceremony in its picturesque setting and enjoyed the sumptuous banquet that followed. The town congratulates the newlyweds. Bertha Carleton SEARS ROEBUCK, Woodsville, N.H. WELLS RIVER LANDRoMAT, Wells River. Vt. PIKE STORE. Pike. N.H. McLAM's'STORE, E. Corinth, Vt. FAIRLEE GENiRAL, Foiriee, Vt. ORFORDVILL STORE, Orfordville, N .H I 429-3868 Miss Alison Putnam from the former Margaret Burlington and Larry Butler Hayward home for the from Bristol spent the summer. weekend at the Putnam home Mr. and Mrs. James Halley and were at the Cottage from Concord, N.H. havebeen Hospital to see her father. All members of the Donald Carleton family have been so appreciative of the many kindnesses done for them by their neighbors and friends while Julia was in the hospital. Julia was so thrilled over the. sunshine box and the baby shower. It is so wonderful to have people think of her and it surely cheered her up a great deal. On Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 8 p.m. Professor Don Sailers of Emory University, Alanta, Ga., Will lead a community sing in the W. Newbury Church and all are cordially invited to attend and are looking forward to the in- teresting evening. Mrs. Charles Ernshaw from Cape Cod is occupying Mrs. "Franty" McFarland's house for a couple of weeks. Donald Putnam has been moved from the intensive care room to a semi-private room at the hospital. Mrs. Solan Stevens has received word that her great grand nephew from Rochester, N.Y. and is to play at the Symphony Orchestra some time in August. Mr. and Mrs. Einard Swenson were in Northboro, Mass., Sunday tO Tuesday to attend the funeral of her brother who passed away on Saturday. Also attending the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Richard Swenson and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Clements. There was an error in last week's paper as the Haverland baby has been named Brenna Lynn. The Ray Clarks have named their new daughter India Newberry Clark. Keith Flynn, a State Police officer, who has been living in an apartment in the old Tyler Store, has moved to the Alex Urquhart house up the North Road: Mr. and Mrs, Walter Noltic from Maryland are occupying recent callers in town. The Nick Huntoon's family that have been living up the North Road in the Alex Urquhart's house have moved to their new home recently built near the Peach Brook four corners up a short distance toward the road to Newbury. Donald Putnam suffered a heart attack on Thursday while at work and con- seqnently is in the intensive care unit at Cottage Hospital at this writing on Saturday. Menders of AS(: named for N.H. WASHINGTON, D.C.--Secretary of Agriculture John Block has appointed Elwin C. Hardy, of Hollis, as chairman of the New Hampshire Agricultural Stabilization and Con- servation (ASC) Committee. Named as committee members were Woodrow W. Allard of Conway, and Ber- nard W. Campbell of Salem. The committee administers federal farm programs in New Hampshire. Hardy, 61, has been farming for 43 years and currently has a 475-acre fruit and vegetable operation in Hillsborough County. He also operates a large roadside stand selling other produce, including nursery products. He has served as an ASC county and community committeeman, as chairman of the county committee, as a member of the State ASC Committee and also as chairman. Allard has been farming for 46 years and now has a 450- acre dairy and forestry operation in Carroll County with 40 milking cows. He has served a total of 32 years as a county and community ASC committeeman with 4z years as a member of the state ASC Committee. Gravel removal project sought The Grafton County Con- servation District has asked the North Country Resource Conservation and Develop- ment Project for assistance in gravel removal from rivers and major streams. District, state and federal agencies have received an increasing number of inquiries about removal of gravel bars to ease the spring flow of ice to reduce flooding. Farm, commercial, industrial and residential land uses have all been affected by flooding from ice jams. The problems are obvious but the solutions are complex. Indiscriminant dredging of Corinth Eleanor Burroughs 429-..%4"/ Town Clerk Jack Lear- month, along with 17 other officials from throughout the state, was invited by Gov. Snelling to attend a State- Local Advisory Group last Wednesday in Montpelier. Subjects discussed were Federalism reform; state- local issues, problems and concerns and improving state- local relations as a national goal. Snelling begins his term as qhairman of the National Governor's Association on Aug. 11 and he had asked the' officials for advice as to what areas he should emphasize at N.G.A. Visitors in the home of George and Ruth Elie this past week were her daughter Shirley Alexander and a daughter and son, Bonnie and Kevin Bailey, all of Great Barrington, Mass. Shirley is employed at the American Institute of Economic Research and Kevin is a student at Berkshire Com- munity College. While here they all visited at the Durant Cemetery in Cabot. Rev. Gareth Tobin, State Director of Child Evangelism Fellowship was the supply speaker at the church in Corinth Center on Sunday, July 26. Following the mor- ning service a pot-luck dinner was held on the grounds. Rev. and Mrs. Karl Kepler of Dividing Creek, N.J.,,spent Wednesday with Eleanor Burroughs. ne00ia I 1 may shift the river's energy and " cause problems '4 elsewhere. Water quality and fish habitat may be affected. Water rights and lan- downership compound the Former Wentworth man dies in Tampa issue, officials said. The Conservation District WENTWORTH--Arnold W. Waiters- "Housing and Stevens, 60, of Tampa, Fla., Developing firm. asked for help to expedite the died in Tampa Hospital July Survivors are his wife, removal of gravel in designated areas where 23. Annie Belle Stevens; a son problems arise and to put Born in Maidstone, Vt., the Arnold; a step-son, Salem together a technical team to son of Glen and Maude O,Rourke, all of Tampa; two assist withspecific requests. Stevens, he moved to Went- sisters, June Smith of Wen- The course of action is worth where he attended tworth, and Marion Wheeler of unknown at this time but school. Gloversville, N.Y.; and four discussions will start in early He was" a World War II brothers, Glen of Guildhall, August. The North Country veteran, serving in the U.S. Vt., Harold of Nor- RC&D Project was. Army Air Corps. in the thunderland; Edward and established in 1968 to bring ' Panama Canal Zone. He has Carroll of Wentworth. together people from many lived in Florida since 1950. He Interment was in Tampa. disciplines and interests in was employed by the Jim helping to solve the area's problems and in developing [/o E. McAflister, E. Thetford, dies opportunities toward better E. THETFORD--Wilbur E. Thetford most of his life. use of land and water. McAllister, 77, died July 27 at He is survived by his wife; Alice Peck Day Hospital after one daughter, Jill Jackson; a long illness, four grandchildren, one great- He was born in E. Barnard, grandchild, all of E. Tbetford: on Sept. 5, 1903, the son of nieces and cousins. William and Laura (Green- Graveside services were in wood) McAllister. the South View Cemetery in Mr. McAllister was Randolph July30. educated in Pompanoosuc The Day Funeral Home in schools. He married Lucy Randolph is in charge of Scribner in 1934 and owned arrangements. and operated a farm in E. Market Day revived on connnon by MARCELLA HOFFMANN WENTWORTH--In the original Wentworth town charter of 1766 it was granted "that as soon as the said town shall consist of fifty families a Market Day may be opened and kept." Wentworth has revived this event and on Saturday, August 1, as they have done for the last six years, the Wentworth Historical Society held Market Day from 10 a.m.4 p.m. on the town common. Interestingly enough, this common was once a common burying ground. In 1787 Phillip White gave one acre of ground for this purpose. It was used for this purpose until 1817. In 1790 the first"meeting house was erected. Elegant dwellings were built and there was much excitement that Wentworth might become a shiretown. The dead were removed to the present Village Cemetery. However, all efforts failed and the Village Common, where once only grief and mourning were heard, became the center of business and amusement. .Here in this historic and picturesque setting the Historical Society held Market Day. Articles of every description were 'on sale, including examples of the local arts and crafts, and of the cooks and. bakers' skills. A GOOD PERCHat of a horse-drawn wagon In N. Haverhill Fair parade is good vantage point. < MIDWAY SCENE---Game of chance on the midway of N. Haverhill air. GIVE IT A WHIRL,---Lights from rides light up N. Haverhill Fair. A TRIBUTE In Loving memory of Marjorie M. Hood Birth -- Aug. 4 -- 1894 Death -- Oct. 23-- 1980 "God Giveth -- God Taketh away. May your soul rest in peace." Sadly Missed Your son, Lynwood Hood N. Haverhill dies N. HAVERHILL--Edith R. Phillip J. Germain of Milton, Germain, 59, died at her home Fla., Frederick J. Germain July 28after a long illness. Sr., of Benton, N.ll., James B. She was born in Littleton, Germain of Lebanon, Joseph N.H., and lived in North H. Germain Jr. of Barre, and Haverhill for 26 years. She Brian J. Germain of Orford; was married to Joseph H. two daughters, Maria Ger- GermainSr.,whediedin1975. main of Hartford, Conn., and Mrs. Germain was era- Sarahjean A. Harris of North ployed as a cook by the Haverhill, and 12 grand- Grafton County Nursing children. Home. She was a member of A Mass of Christian Burial St. Joseph Catholic Church in was celebrated Aug. 2 at St. Wondsville, and a member of Joseph Church in Woodsville. the Order of Eagles Auxiliary Burial followed in St. Rose of in Littleton. Lima Cemetery in Littleton, She is survived by five sons, N.H. Alice Thompson dies in N.Y. N. HAVERHILL--Alice May semeadow Cemetery in N. Thompson, 82, died July 26 in Haverhill. Geneva, N.Y., after a long Memorial contributions illness, may be made to the Gideon She was born in Haverhill Living Memorial Bible, .p.o. and lived there most of her Box 328, Barre, Vt. 05641. life. She moved to Geneva to live with her son, Robert Thompson. TOWN NURSE Mrs. Thompson was a A Community Health member of the United Services, Inc., town nurse will Methodist Church of N. check hypertension, weight Haverhill. She was the and diabetes Aug. 12 from 9 assistant town clerk for many years in Haverhill. a.m.-1 p.m. at Tracy Hall in She is survived by two sons, Norwich and 7-9 p.m. t Thetford Hill Church. Gorge B. Thompson of N. HiVerhill and Robert E. Thompson of Geneva; a sister, Isabelle Whitehill of Ryegate Corner; 10 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren, i970 iUSPANG,'dtop, 302 Funeral services were July V8. Runs good. Many new 30 in the Ricker Funeral parts. Needs some body work. Home, Birch Lane, Wood- sville. Burial was in Hor- Ca1180-333-9143. 2t--8-12--.c . .00,,rltl ,4ge,nc00 Jnw. 1 Montebello Street Woodsville, NH 03785 603-747-2000 BROKER:  ASS(K'IATES: Albine A. Leuthold  Paul Mayette 787-fi270 Robert Dupuis 41-2531 List No. 255 -- Handyman's special! This 3 apartment building on a large lot is an excellent op- portunity to own your home with extra income -- or take advantage of the ideal business location. Some remodeling material is included at this very reasonable price of $15,000. List No. 256 -- Just move in and enjoy! A nice neigh- borhood and easy living in this 3 bedroom ranch with the convenience of electric heat. On a landscaped lot with a beautiful view of the mountains. Attached 2 car garage plus many extras. Yours for $52,000, N At Gray's Held, Rt. 5, Fairlee, Vt. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12 STARTING AT 9:30 A.M. ANTIQUES-- FURNITURE  TOOLS Oak roll top desk, secretary, butter worker, 1912 black cherry writing desk, library table w-leaves & drawer, Acme Oakleaf parlor stove, jam cabinet, 5 drawer chest of drawers, 6 drawer chest of drawers, butter churn (Rutland), 2- plank bottom Boston rockers, marble top vanity, maple Cushman table w-6 chairs (nice shape), lift top commode, sewing stand, maple harvest table w-drop leaves, iron tea kettle, hall tree, 2 pc. matching couch set, wicker sewing basket w- brass feet, jug, crock, mirrors, picture frames, Shaker type night stand, kerosene lamps, lamp base, clocks, lanterns, 4 pc. pine bedroom set w-acorn pulls, wicker chairs, Victorian type couch, lamps, dropleaf gate leg table, maple table, hat rocks, chairs, stands, book- cases, cupboards, dishes, pans, linens, lamp glass shades, dressing table, large kitchen cabinet w-glass doors, radio, record player, T.V, picnic basket, built in dish washer, rockers, screens, fans, wood box, 2 oak leaves, ladder step stool, Cash register, some tools, beds, trunk, folding chairs, bottles, canning jars, sign, doors, oak desk, skates, freezer wrap, kegs, nails, Hibachi, new Norman stoves, plus much more. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH ON GROUNDS AUCTIONEERS: C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT. ' 195-4348 or llRl-ZlSl