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August 5, 1981     Journal Opinion
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o the sky ose magnificent women in their machines first woman to pilot her own Harriet Quimby and other World War I, Oakes spent 8 balloon--was Mary H. Myers women's involvement, and to shoot and swim, all of which months tracking down women at Little Falls, N.Y., in 1880. records were set each step of were considered masculine aircraft across the English early female aviators have Channel. A spunky, deter- been a little-known chapter in mined, dark-eyed beauty, the annals of flight. Harriet Quimby captured the That is one oversight that admiration of men and women Claudia Oakes, assistant alike in the early 1900s She curator of aeronautics at the was America's darling as she Smithsonian's National Air looped and whirled through and Space Museum, hopes to the air wearing a plum-rectify While doing the colored satin flying suit research for a book, U.S. Yet, the daring exploits of Women in Aviation through 'Rita C. Bobowsid News Service about pioneers of and certain names ly leap to mind: the Jimmy Charles Lindbergh, '--the first States to license and the m @ _o ! Z e- l t- O E aviation pioneers who made headlines and heads turn during the early days of flight. Oakes' interest in early aviation goes hack a long way, even before her employment at the Smithsonian in 1969. "My father, who was born in 1905, told me of seeing a demonstration in rural Tennessee of what was probably a Curtiss Pusher when he was 6 or 7 years old," she says. That image, coupled with her fascination with things Edwardian, eventually led her to research and record the role of early women aviators. "When aviation was in its infancy," Oakes says, "it was considered radical for a woman to involve herself in any aspect, be it pilot, passenger or even promoter." But in spite of all the ob- stacles-family, friends, training, funds, equip- ment-women wanted to fly, and fly they did. The first American woman to pilot her own aircraft--a Mrs. Myers, later billed professionally as "Carlotta, the Lady Aeronaut," became known throughout the Nor- theast for her ballooning skills and was often hired to per- form at festivals. In 1886, she established a new world altitude record of 4 miles in a balloon filled with natural gas instead of hydrogen--a record even more astonishing because she did it without using oxygen equipment. In the early 1900s, women graduated from balloons to airplanes. They were willing passengers in the new-fangled flying machines, though the flights were such rarities that they were treated as hard news. The June 20, 1911, edition of the Detroit Free Press carried a front-page account of women who, without a trace of fear in their walk, climbed into planes and flew as passengers at the 1911 Detroit Air Meet. The headline proclaimed "Three Detroit Women Venture in Biplane." As aviation grew, so too did Harriet Quimby (left) made aviation history in the early 1900s as the first woman in the United States to hold a pilot's license and the first woman to pilot her own aircraft across the English Channel. the way. Georgia "Tiny" Broadwick became the first women to parachute from an airplane over Griffith Park in Los Angeles; Lillian Todd, of New York City, the first woman to design her own aircraft, and Julia Clark, the first U.S. woman killed in an airplane crash, in 1912 at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield. "If any one thing can set these women apart, it would be their independence," Oakes says. "These women were leading unusual lives even before getting into aviation." Take Blanche Scott, hired by the Willys Overland Company to drive an Overland car from New York to San Francisco as a publicity stunt, thus becoming the first woman to drive coast-to-coast by automobile. While passing through Dayton, Ohio, she learned of the existence of the Wright School and became interested in flying. Later that same year, 1910, she became the first American woman to solo. Or consider Bessica Raiche of Beloit, Wisc. Bessica was indeed a modern woman--for one thing, she wore bloomers. She also drove a car and liked endeavors. But what really set her home town buzzing was the French husband she brought back from an over- seas trip. Bessica also began flying in 1910, but lost out to Blanche Scott as the first woman to solo. With her husband she later formed the French- American Aeroplane Com- pany, designing and building her own airplanes. Never one to be content with traditional "woman's work," Bessica returned to school to study medicine after her retirement from aviation and became a practicing physician. Harriet Quimby was a well- known journalist of the day and a drama critic for Leslie's Weekly, a popular magazine. The uncertainty surrounding her past (Harriet let on that she was born into a wealthy California family while evidence indicates that she was the daughter of a Michigan farmer) added to the mystique. "Harriet was very am- bitious and very determined," Oakes says. "She used her imagination to help her get ahead, inventing, for exam- ple, a more prominent background to promote (please turn to page 8A) Aviation pioneer Blanche Scott thrilled spectators round the country in the early 1900s with her aerial maneuvers. Scott, the first woman in the United States to make a solo airplane flight, is shown in the cockpit of her plane. mtw NOUin'P'S#ON VIIIMOlil I, Number 15 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont August 5, 1981 Bminem as usual Clin,'00h River... a white elephant WASHINGTON, D.C.-- When Reactor. per cent over the original restricted nature of the Tens- ground that should he filled ill This is a sturdy cart that will hold more than 5 cubic feet of whatever you must transport. Use it to tote leaves, soil, debris, firewood; large wheels let it move easily. Start the project by assembling the bin, which consists of parts 1, 2, 3, and 4. Best procedure is to assemble the sides to the back, then add the bottom and finally, the front. Use waterproof glue and 8d galvanized box nails for all joints. Next, shape the axle blocks and attach them to the bin with glue and two %" x 3" carriage bolts. Use a fiat washer and then a lock washer under the nut. The bushings suggested will be available from a machine shoo supply store. If you wish to eliminate them, drill holes through the blocks to suit the axle diameter, but make the blocks of maple or a similar tough wood and coat the hole with grease before placing the axle. The legs (part No. 8) will not {please turn to page 4A) ',, / it finally appeared that Congress was going to seriously cut federal spending and reduce inflation, it resorted instead to business as usual tactics by passing massive public work projects, which wilt cost the taxpayers close to $10 billion. This week the House of Representatives abandoned its responsibility as a budget cutter and inflation fighter by approving continued funding in 1982 for two Tennessee projects -- the Clinch River Breeder Reactor and the Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway. I strongly opposed both projects. It is an unfortunate set of In the words of Dr. Edward Teller, the father of the atom, a leader in nuclear develop- ment, and a strong supporter of nuclear power, "Clinch River is technically obsolete, and its small scale and large cost make it throughly in- consistent with badly needed economy in government." A project of even greater financial fraud is the Ten- nessee Tombighee Waterway, a canal to link Tennessee and the Tomhigbee Rivers to the Gulf of Mexico. Considered one of the most wasteful projects in our nation's history, the cost of Tenn-Tom has increased 1000 estimates made ten years ago. According to a General Accounting Office (GAO) report, the 1969 cost estimates of the project made by the Corps of Engineers was $230 million. As of 1980, the GAO predicts completion costs to he $3 billion. And that's conservative ! Of even greater significance are reports that the massive project is an obsolete tran- sportation alternative and will have little to show for our invested money. Navigationally, the deep channel of the paralleling Mississippi River is much preferred to the extremely Tom. Consequently, it has not and not with water. yet been determined who will The bottom line on the use the waterway and for what Clinch River Breeder and the purposes. Tennessee Tombigbee Canal The Tenn-Tom canal, at its is that these are classic pork inception, might have been a barrel programs which un- workable project, justifiably bleed the taxpayer Nonetheless, with recently and which fly in the face of developed rail transport and current public demands for the preferred use of the Ohio rigorous budget cutting. or Mississippi Rivers, where In light of cutbacks in social 20-40 barge tows are utilized services, education and other rather than 6-8 barge tows in federally administered the Term-Tom, continuation of programs, I cannot justify the project is absurd, continued government sup- The Tenn-Tom canal con- port of these projects and tinues as a federal work deeply regret the action which project which incumbent Congress has taken. congressmen use to get re- EDITOR'S NOTE: Seepage 4 elected. It is a bole in the of Journal Opinion" circumstances when, in this ----._ )g;f bUyngtuesaUoterit n --1 al O "l" O jl -- sidize gold plated boon- neffatta set In Llttleton doggies In continuing these projects, the federal gover- LITTLETONrge aegal -,,,, ,=:: ............. ,:: ,:::,:,:  ..... ,,,:,:i" , .... nment isartificallY supporting of Automotive Supply "- ....  :::,--. i:   ilJ >  .:"'' ":: =:"': :: and subsidizing projec Associates bas announced that ...... .: 'mhhTlk  -i : .... *:. which, on their own merits, Sanel Auto Parts, Inc., in Jm,,   q|;i , ...... .=: . ..... '! " ........ cannotandshouldnotsurviv.e, cooperation with C'.mmpion ...... :::=: ' ............ ' The Clinch River Breeder. Spark Plugs will be spen- .....  "" " . " Reactor, a truly white soring the Grand Prix " .... t', U Iflk - ---- elephant, enjoys the dubious Division If, Canadian-   qIJil[I &; ..... distinction of presently run- American Open Invitational I [] S [] m m : ning at a 600 per cent cost as part of this year's 1981N. H. ::I [ 1 [] lm overrun. _ Chrysler-Dodge International   l The exverimontal breeder Regatta .... " L  : ::--:--  ...........  reactor, which has been on the It will be held Sept. 12-13 on o; ........ ............... :'.:' drawing board since1970, will Moore Dam on Rte. 18 in .   .... ............ ::::,: .... ....... : .............. ::i. cost the taxpayer $3 billion Littleton.  .........  ........ ........  ' .................. "  ............. before it is completed over The feature race will be the " SPEEDSTER--Boats llke this will compete in Canadian-American regatta on seven times its original Grand National World Moore Dam in IAttleton Sept, 12-13, GARDEN CART estimated cost of $422 million Championship sponsed by in 1972. During the same TonderCorporation. laterdate.  ...... For more information on the HAS A FRIEND TOLD YOU schedule of events and special " " discount advance tickets, ENERGY SHIELD SYSTEMS, w t0.m, v #tcdels I.iet I 2pc. 2 I l:X:. 3 Ipc. 4 Ipc. 5 2 lS. 6 Ipc. 7 2 pcs. 8 2 pcs. 9 2pcs. this size, . I 1 of Opinion I $5.00 ' A Complete Enero Company For  infonaation, kek i tte Business t or  (802) 439-5700. x 12 x 36 exterior  x 12x 26 exterio iNy.xxxl  x 20 x 30 exterior phood x 16 x 20 xtedor plywood  x 2 x 30 lumber l" diameter dowel x 26" 1'/ x 3 x 6 hardwood xlx26 lurnlnum or steel bar stock l 6" diameter wheels " x Y cme txs w/flat washer, lock waM'ner and nut " x 2" carrta Ix w/flt , lock washer and nuts suit outside diameter o( axle The length of part #3 nd the ' heist d part #4 ere oemze so m1t se can be judged on ossenl. period, private utilities' participation in the project has declined from 61 per cent to 9 per cent. In other words, Congress is going to scruff off 91 per cent of the project's costs to already angry tax- payers. This, to me, is unacceptable. Consequently, this close to total government subsidy of the Clinch River project is entirely incompatible with our free market approach to energy. Over the past months, Congress has taken the position that energy development and com- merdalization projects should be primarily a private sector responsibility. Other federal energy subsidies have been significantly terminated -- with the indigestible exception of the Clinch River Breeder OLD TOY8, DOLLS Furniture of aH kinds, antiques, anything old TOP PRICE8 PAID trill VILLAGE 'I'|AD|| Tel. (802) 157-2716 Sam Kaiser Jet. Rt. 302 & Rt. S Wells R,er, Vt. Racers from across the United States and Canada are expected to attend this year's event to compete for world records and $20,000 in prize money. Other special events will include the U. S. Navy Band for both days, a water ski show and several other at- tractions to be announced at a WEEKEND WARRIOR If you are planning to start an exercise program to im- prove cardiovascular fitness, the Heart Association suggests that you check with your doctor. Many physicians recommend a stress test or give patients an exercise prescription tailored to in- dividual needs. write Littleton Area Chamber of Commerce, P. O. Box 105, Littleton N. H. 03561, or call (603) 444-6561. PAINTING We do complete exterior scraping and painting Call Fortunatl Brothers 802-439-6179 Authorized VOLKSWAGEN AUDI--MAZDA Sales & Service CROSSWAY MOTORS Barre-Montpelier Rd. 802.222-.$434 , , WEST FAIRLEE CENTER CHURCH MIDDLE BROOK ROAD SUNDAY August 9--7:30 PM Rev. Edgar Jackson Lunch is now being served on the deck of BONNIE OAKS overlooking Lake Morey... .. SOME FRIEND HAPPY BIRTHDAY RON Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 REST" n NEST 00MPGROUND ..... We accommodate all kinds of campers including on-sitecamper rentals. V4 Mile off 1-91 at Exit 14 E. Thetford, Vt., 802.785.2997 o the sky ose magnificent women in their machines first woman to pilot her own Harriet Quimby and other World War I, Oakes spent 8 balloon--was Mary H. Myers women's involvement, and to shoot and swim, all of which months tracking down women at Little Falls, N.Y., in 1880. records were set each step of were considered masculine aircraft across the English early female aviators have Channel. A spunky, deter- been a little-known chapter in mined, dark-eyed beauty, the annals of flight. Harriet Quimby captured the That is one oversight that admiration of men and women Claudia Oakes, assistant alike in the early 1900s She curator of aeronautics at the was America's darling as she Smithsonian's National Air looped and whirled through and Space Museum, hopes to the air wearing a plum-rectify While doing the colored satin flying suit research for a book, U.S. Yet, the daring exploits of Women in Aviation through 'Rita C. Bobowsid News Service about pioneers of and certain names ly leap to mind: the Jimmy Charles Lindbergh, '--the first States to license and the m @ _o ! Z e- l t- O E aviation pioneers who made headlines and heads turn during the early days of flight. Oakes' interest in early aviation goes hack a long way, even before her employment at the Smithsonian in 1969. "My father, who was born in 1905, told me of seeing a demonstration in rural Tennessee of what was probably a Curtiss Pusher when he was 6 or 7 years old," she says. That image, coupled with her fascination with things Edwardian, eventually led her to research and record the role of early women aviators. "When aviation was in its infancy," Oakes says, "it was considered radical for a woman to involve herself in any aspect, be it pilot, passenger or even promoter." But in spite of all the ob- stacles-family, friends, training, funds, equip- ment-women wanted to fly, and fly they did. The first American woman to pilot her own aircraft--a Mrs. Myers, later billed professionally as "Carlotta, the Lady Aeronaut," became known throughout the Nor- theast for her ballooning skills and was often hired to per- form at festivals. In 1886, she established a new world altitude record of 4 miles in a balloon filled with natural gas instead of hydrogen--a record even more astonishing because she did it without using oxygen equipment. In the early 1900s, women graduated from balloons to airplanes. They were willing passengers in the new-fangled flying machines, though the flights were such rarities that they were treated as hard news. The June 20, 1911, edition of the Detroit Free Press carried a front-page account of women who, without a trace of fear in their walk, climbed into planes and flew as passengers at the 1911 Detroit Air Meet. The headline proclaimed "Three Detroit Women Venture in Biplane." As aviation grew, so too did Harriet Quimby (left) made aviation history in the early 1900s as the first woman in the United States to hold a pilot's license and the first woman to pilot her own aircraft across the English Channel. the way. Georgia "Tiny" Broadwick became the first women to parachute from an airplane over Griffith Park in Los Angeles; Lillian Todd, of New York City, the first woman to design her own aircraft, and Julia Clark, the first U.S. woman killed in an airplane crash, in 1912 at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield. "If any one thing can set these women apart, it would be their independence," Oakes says. "These women were leading unusual lives even before getting into aviation." Take Blanche Scott, hired by the Willys Overland Company to drive an Overland car from New York to San Francisco as a publicity stunt, thus becoming the first woman to drive coast-to-coast by automobile. While passing through Dayton, Ohio, she learned of the existence of the Wright School and became interested in flying. Later that same year, 1910, she became the first American woman to solo. Or consider Bessica Raiche of Beloit, Wisc. Bessica was indeed a modern woman--for one thing, she wore bloomers. She also drove a car and liked endeavors. But what really set her home town buzzing was the French husband she brought back from an over- seas trip. Bessica also began flying in 1910, but lost out to Blanche Scott as the first woman to solo. With her husband she later formed the French- American Aeroplane Com- pany, designing and building her own airplanes. Never one to be content with traditional "woman's work," Bessica returned to school to study medicine after her retirement from aviation and became a practicing physician. Harriet Quimby was a well- known journalist of the day and a drama critic for Leslie's Weekly, a popular magazine. The uncertainty surrounding her past (Harriet let on that she was born into a wealthy California family while evidence indicates that she was the daughter of a Michigan farmer) added to the mystique. "Harriet was very am- bitious and very determined," Oakes says. "She used her imagination to help her get ahead, inventing, for exam- ple, a more prominent background to promote (please turn to page 8A) Aviation pioneer Blanche Scott thrilled spectators round the country in the early 1900s with her aerial maneuvers. Scott, the first woman in the United States to make a solo airplane flight, is shown in the cockpit of her plane. mtw NOUin'P'S#ON VIIIMOlil I, Number 15 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont August 5, 1981 Bminem as usual Clin,'00h River... a white elephant WASHINGTON, D.C.-- When Reactor. per cent over the original restricted nature of the Tens- ground that should he filled ill This is a sturdy cart that will hold more than 5 cubic feet of whatever you must transport. Use it to tote leaves, soil, debris, firewood; large wheels let it move easily. Start the project by assembling the bin, which consists of parts 1, 2, 3, and 4. Best procedure is to assemble the sides to the back, then add the bottom and finally, the front. Use waterproof glue and 8d galvanized box nails for all joints. Next, shape the axle blocks and attach them to the bin with glue and two %" x 3" carriage bolts. Use a fiat washer and then a lock washer under the nut. The bushings suggested will be available from a machine shoo supply store. If you wish to eliminate them, drill holes through the blocks to suit the axle diameter, but make the blocks of maple or a similar tough wood and coat the hole with grease before placing the axle. The legs (part No. 8) will not {please turn to page 4A) ',, / it finally appeared that Congress was going to seriously cut federal spending and reduce inflation, it resorted instead to business as usual tactics by passing massive public work projects, which wilt cost the taxpayers close to $10 billion. This week the House of Representatives abandoned its responsibility as a budget cutter and inflation fighter by approving continued funding in 1982 for two Tennessee projects -- the Clinch River Breeder Reactor and the Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway. I strongly opposed both projects. It is an unfortunate set of In the words of Dr. Edward Teller, the father of the atom, a leader in nuclear develop- ment, and a strong supporter of nuclear power, "Clinch River is technically obsolete, and its small scale and large cost make it throughly in- consistent with badly needed economy in government." A project of even greater financial fraud is the Ten- nessee Tombighee Waterway, a canal to link Tennessee and the Tomhigbee Rivers to the Gulf of Mexico. Considered one of the most wasteful projects in our nation's history, the cost of Tenn-Tom has increased 1000 estimates made ten years ago. According to a General Accounting Office (GAO) report, the 1969 cost estimates of the project made by the Corps of Engineers was $230 million. As of 1980, the GAO predicts completion costs to he $3 billion. And that's conservative ! Of even greater significance are reports that the massive project is an obsolete tran- sportation alternative and will have little to show for our invested money. Navigationally, the deep channel of the paralleling Mississippi River is much preferred to the extremely Tom. Consequently, it has not and not with water. yet been determined who will The bottom line on the use the waterway and for what Clinch River Breeder and the purposes. Tennessee Tombigbee Canal The Tenn-Tom canal, at its is that these are classic pork inception, might have been a barrel programs which un- workable project, justifiably bleed the taxpayer Nonetheless, with recently and which fly in the face of developed rail transport and current public demands for the preferred use of the Ohio rigorous budget cutting. or Mississippi Rivers, where In light of cutbacks in social 20-40 barge tows are utilized services, education and other rather than 6-8 barge tows in federally administered the Term-Tom, continuation of programs, I cannot justify the project is absurd, continued government sup- The Tenn-Tom canal con- port of these projects and tinues as a federal work deeply regret the action which project which incumbent Congress has taken. congressmen use to get re- EDITOR'S NOTE: Seepage 4 elected. It is a bole in the of Journal Opinion" circumstances when, in this ----._ )g;f bUyngtuesaUoterit n --1 al O "l" O jl -- sidize gold plated boon- neffatta set In Llttleton doggies In continuing these projects, the federal gover- LITTLETONrge aegal -,,,, ,=:: ............. ,:: ,:::,:,:  ..... ,,,:,:i" , .... nment isartificallY supporting of Automotive Supply "- ....  :::,--. i:   ilJ >  .:"'' ":: =:"': :: and subsidizing projec Associates bas announced that ...... .: 'mhhTlk  -i : .... *:. which, on their own merits, Sanel Auto Parts, Inc., in Jm,,   q|;i , ...... .=: . ..... '! " ........ cannotandshouldnotsurviv.e, cooperation with C'.mmpion ...... :::=: ' ............ ' The Clinch River Breeder. Spark Plugs will be spen- .....  "" " . " Reactor, a truly white soring the Grand Prix " .... t', U Iflk - ---- elephant, enjoys the dubious Division If, Canadian-   qIJil[I &; ..... distinction of presently run- American Open Invitational I [] S [] m m : ning at a 600 per cent cost as part of this year's 1981N. H. ::I [ 1 [] lm overrun. _ Chrysler-Dodge International   l The exverimontal breeder Regatta .... " L  : ::--:--  ...........  reactor, which has been on the It will be held Sept. 12-13 on o; ........ ............... :'.:' drawing board since1970, will Moore Dam on Rte. 18 in .   .... ............ ::::,: .... ....... : .............. ::i. cost the taxpayer $3 billion Littleton.  .........  ........ ........  ' .................. "  ............. before it is completed over The feature race will be the " SPEEDSTER--Boats llke this will compete in Canadian-American regatta on seven times its original Grand National World Moore Dam in IAttleton Sept, 12-13, GARDEN CART estimated cost of $422 million Championship sponsed by in 1972. During the same TonderCorporation. laterdate.  ...... For more information on the HAS A FRIEND TOLD YOU schedule of events and special " " discount advance tickets, ENERGY SHIELD SYSTEMS, w t0.m, v #tcdels I.iet I 2pc. 2 I l:X:. 3 Ipc. 4 Ipc. 5 2 lS. 6 Ipc. 7 2 pcs. 8 2 pcs. 9 2pcs. this size, . I 1 of Opinion I $5.00 ' A Complete Enero Company For  infonaation, kek i tte Business t or  (802) 439-5700. x 12 x 36 exterior  x 12x 26 exterio iNy.xxxl  x 20 x 30 exterior phood x 16 x 20 xtedor plywood  x 2 x 30 lumber l" diameter dowel x 26" 1'/ x 3 x 6 hardwood xlx26 lurnlnum or steel bar stock l 6" diameter wheels " x Y cme txs w/flat washer, lock waM'ner and nut " x 2" carrta Ix w/flt , lock washer and nuts suit outside diameter o( axle The length of part #3 nd the ' heist d part #4 ere oemze so m1t se can be judged on ossenl. period, private utilities' participation in the project has declined from 61 per cent to 9 per cent. In other words, Congress is going to scruff off 91 per cent of the project's costs to already angry tax- payers. This, to me, is unacceptable. Consequently, this close to total government subsidy of the Clinch River project is entirely incompatible with our free market approach to energy. Over the past months, Congress has taken the position that energy development and com- merdalization projects should be primarily a private sector responsibility. Other federal energy subsidies have been significantly terminated -- with the indigestible exception of the Clinch River Breeder OLD TOY8, DOLLS Furniture of aH kinds, antiques, anything old TOP PRICE8 PAID trill VILLAGE 'I'|AD|| Tel. (802) 157-2716 Sam Kaiser Jet. Rt. 302 & Rt. S Wells R,er, Vt. Racers from across the United States and Canada are expected to attend this year's event to compete for world records and $20,000 in prize money. Other special events will include the U. S. Navy Band for both days, a water ski show and several other at- tractions to be announced at a WEEKEND WARRIOR If you are planning to start an exercise program to im- prove cardiovascular fitness, the Heart Association suggests that you check with your doctor. Many physicians recommend a stress test or give patients an exercise prescription tailored to in- dividual needs. write Littleton Area Chamber of Commerce, P. O. Box 105, Littleton N. H. 03561, or call (603) 444-6561. PAINTING We do complete exterior scraping and painting Call Fortunatl Brothers 802-439-6179 Authorized VOLKSWAGEN AUDI--MAZDA Sales & Service CROSSWAY MOTORS Barre-Montpelier Rd. 802.222-.$434 , , WEST FAIRLEE CENTER CHURCH MIDDLE BROOK ROAD SUNDAY August 9--7:30 PM Rev. Edgar Jackson Lunch is now being served on the deck of BONNIE OAKS overlooking Lake Morey... .. SOME FRIEND HAPPY BIRTHDAY RON Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $10.00 REST" n NEST 00MPGROUND ..... We accommodate all kinds of campers including on-sitecamper rentals. V4 Mile off 1-91 at Exit 14 E. Thetford, Vt., 802.785.2997