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August 12, 1981     Journal Opinion
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August 12, 1981
 

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, Number 32 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont . ! !Hl'S :',!|N3 I0  August 12, 1981 Charles Haskins man 9th decade IGAN most of us, can take us that may seem lhe past; the great of the 30's, World Cold war in the some of us the are beginning that category we "Even though he has ad- vanced in age, Mr. Haskins has maintained an interest in the bank and has assisted us with his comments." Haskins has donated a considerable part of his extensive coin collection to the bank. His donation is on display in the lobby of the bank's main office in Bradford. Haskins of Haskins graduated from the celebrated his Bradford Academy in 1909. last week Television is a part of the , remembers a time 20th century Charles Haskins us cannot. He views with mixed feelings. "I a time before think people used to do more and says he has seen was the coming Haskins his father telling drills for Union off to the civil "on the plain golf course is now amazement at seeing events on the screen as they actually father Alfred happen. his family to Haskins married Mabele years ago from Emerson in 1925, who is still was born in living but at a local nursing father William home. He dislikes living alone now but says he visits his wife has two every day. A long-time Harold 88, member of Charity Lodge No. and 43 of the Masons, The Brad- now lives in ford Methodist Church and other local organizations, for the Haskins is also one of the Bank for 37 original charter members of in 1921 and the local American Legion 1958. Before Post No. 20. The post was served in the founded in 1919. Expeditionary Haskins advises today's during World youth "to assume respon- for sibility and above all to have a epartment in sense of discipline." He .C. from 1917 to credits his long, successful life "to the kindness of the people for the of Bradford." I Bank says, Library plan blocked of the addition with has been the Gover- for the rejected plans , not include an town install an Would cost Newbury. blasts phone COyRPainenSwi?VNerrtOe/spite a 1979 Fire destroys Haverhill barn nesses, including two state agreement by the phone HAVERHILL--Fire for smoke inhalation at the Haverhill Fire Department at after another fire destroyed neighboring farms. companies not to do so. legislators, criticized New England Telephone Co. and Continental Telephone Co. at a state Public Service Board hearing last Thursday for improperly billing customers for in-town calls. A total of approximately 50 persons attended the hearing m which State Rep. John Zampieri and State Sen. Scudder Parker clashed with telephone representatives. Zampien said he was among these who had been billed for calls within the town of The tford revises school bus policy THETFORD--The Thetford School District has revised its policy on transportation. "The utmost consideration will be given to planning routes so that no student will be on a bus any longer than necessary," the policy states. "If road conditions are such that the busses cannot reach the usual pick-up point, it becomes the parents' responsibility to make a decision to keep the child home from school or tran- sporting the student them- selves. If school is to be closed because of road conditions, students will be notified on local radio stations," it added. "The driver on each bus is responsible for discipline and safety of his passengers. If a student is a discipline problem, the driver is to report the problem to the principal of the school the child attends. After contacting the parents, the child may temporarily or perm+aaatly be denied the right to ride. The safety of all students is most important," it said. "It shall be the policy of the board that when a physical or visiting before TV came health impairment makes it "S along, ays Haskins, "Peoplenecessary, the driver of the used to do a lot of visiting in bus shall assist such students the afternoons and evenings on and off the bus," the policy and I think TV has hurt that." says. However, Haskins does enjoy watching the news and admits Woman to a certain amount of Town officials said they still want the town offices located in the library addition and would look for other ways to win approval under state cedes. Eleanor Crary, chairman of the library trustees, said it would he difficult to raise additional funds to include an elevator. The building fund the town has already raised $154,000 of plans," said the $186,000 cost of the who helped' building, sheadded. rev/ews new school roo.f Thetford The engineers eased fears of decided to some residents that the mg the present leaky roof might look collapse. "The structure is in pitched roof excellent shape," said Roger Thrall. made after firm of said Linda Emerson although Same as a on BMU board avoid ex- r The GROTON--Selectmen have is ap- appointed Linda Emerson to fill the Blue Mountain Union I pitched School board position from over Groton left vacant by the classes resignation of Gaff A. Davis. school. (please turn to page 3) Douglas Dapice of Burlington, a New England Telephone attorney, conceded there had been billing problems but said most of them had been solved and that it was up to customers to catch the errors on their bills and correct them. Zampieri and Parker said the burden of correcting improper billing should rest with the telephone companies and not the customers. W. Scott Mahoney of Newbury said the real victims of the situation are the aged, blind and ill who do not know that calls within the town are toll-free. "A lot of older people assume that whatever goes into a computer is absolutely true," Mahoney added. Another Newbury resident, Karl Sehwenke, produced 15 monthly bills dating back to 1979 which he said included overcharges totaling $40.35 and that he and his wife had made 83 calls to Continentars business office_to get them corrected. "I find that ob- noxiously appalling," he said. PSB Hearing Examiner Rexford E. Roberts set Sept. 15 for all parties to submit their requests for action which he will submit to the PSB for a binding decision. The Peoples' Organization of Wells River (POWR) Valley) has demanded that the phone companies make a complete audit of Newbury customers from 1979 and refund all overpayments with interest; include printed notices with bills explaining how customers can have improper charges removed; spot audits to check for future b|lling rs; and esblish- ment of a trust fund by the companies to pay legal and other expenses of public in- terest groups in the dispute. Dapice indicated a complete audit would he prohibitively expensive and the cost would have to he passed on to telephone users. destroyed a barn and 125 tons scene and at Cottage Hospital approximately 5 p.m. Other his previous barn 12 years Most of the farm's 80 of hay at the Dean Thornburn in Woodsville. Firemen from fire departments to respond ago. He said he is unsure of his milking machines and other farm on Route I0 last Friday. 14 towns including Haverhill, were from Bath, Monroe, plans but thinks he may machinery were saved from The cause of the blaze has Piermont', Woodsville, Newbury, W. Newbury and rebuild again, the fire. A milk house 25 feet not been determined. Bradford and Wells River Lisbon. Thornburn said he thinks all from the barn was untouched The firefighters were responded to the fire. Thronburn said the barn of his cows are accounted for. by the fire. reported to have been treated The fire was reported to the was one that had been rebuilt Most of his cows are staying at .., . ., BINNED BARN--Fireflghters finish up six-hanr job of putting out Haverhill barn fire. CETA program helps N. Country cool to plan kids learn to work is safe after WOODSVILLE--Summer Tim Whalen, Grafton county jobs are scarce these days but summer CETA (Com- prehensive Employment Training Act) youth program coordinator and Woodsville High School guidance coun- six days on Black Mt. SEARCHERS--Haverhill Police Chief Stephen Savage and members of search team from N.H. Fish and Game Department and State Police coordinate search for missing woman, who was found after six days on Black Mountain. N. HAVERHILL--Athree-day in Haverhill, Mass., has been Ronald Evans directed the staying for the summer at the search effort. Lyme Kiln campground, a Bloodhounds were used place the Robillard family has without result, divers sear- frequented during the sum- ched two ponds near the mer for the past 18 years, campground and searchers Haverhill Police Chief covered 40 to 50 miles of trails Stephen Savage said on on the mountain in the first Thursday August 6 that the two days of the search. couple "had been having Mrs. Robillard became difficulties" and that Mrs. aware of the search effort Robillard had mailed a note to after she saw a helicopter over Mr. Robillard from Haverhill, the mountain. Police said she Mass. postmarked August 3 had previously been unable to hear calls from the: rescue that alluded to her "depressed party because of her loca_t!on state." Police said Mrs. Robillard near a brook off the Titus had gone up on the mountain Brook trail. "to think things over." The incident came just one The search was being month after another resident conducted primarily by of Haverhill, Mass., disap- members of the New Ham- peared on the mountain. pshire State Police and the Jevin Barker 11, an autistic Fish and Game Department in child ,wandered from his numbers ranging from 10-20 family s campsiteat_tt) e Lyme men. Fish and Game Sgt. (pleaseturntopage5) selor, says his program offers a rare chance for area teenagers to gain valuable work experience and earn a few extra dollars at the same time. Fifteen Woodsville youths " 'S are employed m CETA Summer Youth Employment Program. The program has job sites at Cottage Hospital, the Woodsville Highway Dept., the Woodsville Town Recreation Program, the Grafton County Home. Two youths are also helping with the maintenance of the Woodsville Elementary and high school this summer. Whalen says contrary to the notion that such programs are a "free ride" for the par- ' " " " 't l hcpants, hs kds real y work." The participant's work hours and performance are closely monitored by job site supervisors and their evaluations are reviewed by state and federal monitors. According to Whalen, par- ticipants also receive career education materials and labor market orientation conducted by professional counselors. Whalen says the program's ( please turn to page 8) Union 36 meets tomorrow CORINTH--The Union 36 School Board reviewed and t discussed the insulation in- stallation by Energy Shields Systems of W. Topsham recently. J. Eilertsen made the motion to make the final payment to Energy Shield withholding $300 for the two strato-therms until they have been installed. G. Pierson seconded and the motion carried. The board held lengthy discussions on the following subjects: the upstairs storage area, school roof, and school district finances. It was decided to delve into these subjects further at the next regular meeting Aug. 13. search for a missing Haverhill, Mass., woman ended Saturday afternoon when Mytina Ellen Robillard walked out of the woods to her husband's cabin at the Lyme Kiln campground after six cold and wet days on Black Mountain. Mrs. Robillard was described by a police spokesman as being "hungry and cold" but i9 otherwise good condition considering her experience. She was treated at Cottage Hospital Saturday night and Sunday for a in- fection on her left foot and was expected to return home Monday. Mrs. Robillard and her husband have been separated for a number of months, ac- cording to police. Her husband Alfred, who lives at the YMCA ! on Air Force fH]ghts CONCORD--The Air Force which the Air Force Hecker contended that the has proposed a compromise avoid training flights during Air Force proposal to the plan for low-level training foliage season and other Federal Aviation flights of the A-10 bomber over major events, and would stay Administration to establish a New Hampshire's White away from county fairs, military operations area Mountains, but Executive tourist attractions and (MOA) would keep  other Counselor Ray Burton of Bath populated areas, military and civilian aircraft wants the flights ended The Air Force wants to out of the area during training altogether, create a new Yankee II missions, and thus improve After a meeting of Air Force Military Operations Area in the situation. representatives and state which the jet bombers can fly "It's hard for us to believe officials, including Burton, within I00 feet of the ground at they are going to stay within Gov. Hugh Gallen and speeds up to 500 miles per the MOA as proposed," said Congressman Judd Gregg in hour. Chairman Francis J. Costello Concord, Burton told the No decisions were made at of the New Hampshire Journal Opinlon that there are last Friday's meeting and Aeronautics Commission. other more suitable areas for Gov. Gallen's press aide, "We're looking for assurances the Air Force to conduct the Jennifer Murray, said "The we're going to he able to know high-speed training flights, governor told them he wants how and where the flights are Other North  Country to hear what the residents say. going to be conducted." residents joined Burton in He wants to know how they Costello cited complaints objecting to the fligh, ts on feel about the possible corn- that military planes ignored grounds that the noise in- promise." normal air traffic patterns at terferes with the tourist Hecker told Gallon the Moultonboro, North Conway, season and frightens livestock creation of a military Twin Mountain and Lebanon in the scenic tourist and operations area would limit airports. farming area. the number f military flights sbaUa' !eaf!c(Pi!r;itenit; taha  Burton said in an interview in the White Mountain region. ) that some jet pilots "We'll have to sit back and y a ransmit to deliberately buzz objects and digest all this and see where my passengers is in jeopar- buildings on the ground just we go from here," said Rep. dy," said Wylie Apte, director for the fun of it. Jeffords, who arranged the of the White Mountain Airport Gen. Guy L. Hecker, Jr., meeting of the Air Force, state in North Conway. en- Gallen has asked the FAA to congressional liaison for the officials, and secretary of the Air Force, vironmentalists who also prepare an environmental proposed a compromise in oppose the flights. (please turn to page 3) DAM WORK--Central Vermont Public Service Corp. begins work on lowering Bradford Dam in hydroelectric project. !i , Number 32 Serwng Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont . ! !Hl'S :',!|N3 I0  August 12, 1981 Charles Haskins man 9th decade IGAN most of us, can take us that may seem lhe past; the great of the 30's, World Cold war in the some of us the are beginning that category we "Even though he has ad- vanced in age, Mr. Haskins has maintained an interest in the bank and has assisted us with his comments." Haskins has donated a considerable part of his extensive coin collection to the bank. His donation is on display in the lobby of the bank's main office in Bradford. Haskins of Haskins graduated from the celebrated his Bradford Academy in 1909. last week Television is a part of the , remembers a time 20th century Charles Haskins us cannot. He views with mixed feelings. "I a time before think people used to do more and says he has seen was the coming Haskins his father telling drills for Union off to the civil "on the plain golf course is now amazement at seeing events on the screen as they actually father Alfred happen. his family to Haskins married Mabele years ago from Emerson in 1925, who is still was born in living but at a local nursing father William home. He dislikes living alone now but says he visits his wife has two every day. A long-time Harold 88, member of Charity Lodge No. and 43 of the Masons, The Brad- now lives in ford Methodist Church and other local organizations, for the Haskins is also one of the Bank for 37 original charter members of in 1921 and the local American Legion 1958. Before Post No. 20. The post was served in the founded in 1919. Expeditionary Haskins advises today's during World youth "to assume respon- for sibility and above all to have a epartment in sense of discipline." He .C. from 1917 to credits his long, successful life "to the kindness of the people for the of Bradford." I Bank says, Library plan blocked of the addition with has been the Gover- for the rejected plans , not include an town install an Would cost Newbury. blasts phone COyRPainenSwi?VNerrtOe/spite a 1979 Fire destroys Haverhill barn nesses, including two state agreement by the phone HAVERHILL--Fire for smoke inhalation at the Haverhill Fire Department at after another fire destroyed neighboring farms. companies not to do so. legislators, criticized New England Telephone Co. and Continental Telephone Co. at a state Public Service Board hearing last Thursday for improperly billing customers for in-town calls. A total of approximately 50 persons attended the hearing m which State Rep. John Zampieri and State Sen. Scudder Parker clashed with telephone representatives. Zampien said he was among these who had been billed for calls within the town of The tford revises school bus policy THETFORD--The Thetford School District has revised its policy on transportation. "The utmost consideration will be given to planning routes so that no student will be on a bus any longer than necessary," the policy states. "If road conditions are such that the busses cannot reach the usual pick-up point, it becomes the parents' responsibility to make a decision to keep the child home from school or tran- sporting the student them- selves. If school is to be closed because of road conditions, students will be notified on local radio stations," it added. "The driver on each bus is responsible for discipline and safety of his passengers. If a student is a discipline problem, the driver is to report the problem to the principal of the school the child attends. After contacting the parents, the child may temporarily or perm+aaatly be denied the right to ride. The safety of all students is most important," it said. "It shall be the policy of the board that when a physical or visiting before TV came health impairment makes it "S along, ays Haskins, "Peoplenecessary, the driver of the used to do a lot of visiting in bus shall assist such students the afternoons and evenings on and off the bus," the policy and I think TV has hurt that." says. However, Haskins does enjoy watching the news and admits Woman to a certain amount of Town officials said they still want the town offices located in the library addition and would look for other ways to win approval under state cedes. Eleanor Crary, chairman of the library trustees, said it would he difficult to raise additional funds to include an elevator. The building fund the town has already raised $154,000 of plans," said the $186,000 cost of the who helped' building, sheadded. rev/ews new school roo.f Thetford The engineers eased fears of decided to some residents that the mg the present leaky roof might look collapse. "The structure is in pitched roof excellent shape," said Roger Thrall. made after firm of said Linda Emerson although Same as a on BMU board avoid ex- r The GROTON--Selectmen have is ap- appointed Linda Emerson to fill the Blue Mountain Union I pitched School board position from over Groton left vacant by the classes resignation of Gaff A. Davis. school. (please turn to page 3) Douglas Dapice of Burlington, a New England Telephone attorney, conceded there had been billing problems but said most of them had been solved and that it was up to customers to catch the errors on their bills and correct them. Zampieri and Parker said the burden of correcting improper billing should rest with the telephone companies and not the customers. W. Scott Mahoney of Newbury said the real victims of the situation are the aged, blind and ill who do not know that calls within the town are toll-free. "A lot of older people assume that whatever goes into a computer is absolutely true," Mahoney added. Another Newbury resident, Karl Sehwenke, produced 15 monthly bills dating back to 1979 which he said included overcharges totaling $40.35 and that he and his wife had made 83 calls to Continentars business office_to get them corrected. "I find that ob- noxiously appalling," he said. PSB Hearing Examiner Rexford E. Roberts set Sept. 15 for all parties to submit their requests for action which he will submit to the PSB for a binding decision. The Peoples' Organization of Wells River (POWR) Valley) has demanded that the phone companies make a complete audit of Newbury customers from 1979 and refund all overpayments with interest; include printed notices with bills explaining how customers can have improper charges removed; spot audits to check for future b|lling rs; and esblish- ment of a trust fund by the companies to pay legal and other expenses of public in- terest groups in the dispute. Dapice indicated a complete audit would he prohibitively expensive and the cost would have to he passed on to telephone users. destroyed a barn and 125 tons scene and at Cottage Hospital approximately 5 p.m. Other his previous barn 12 years Most of the farm's 80 of hay at the Dean Thornburn in Woodsville. Firemen from fire departments to respond ago. He said he is unsure of his milking machines and other farm on Route I0 last Friday. 14 towns including Haverhill, were from Bath, Monroe, plans but thinks he may machinery were saved from The cause of the blaze has Piermont', Woodsville, Newbury, W. Newbury and rebuild again, the fire. A milk house 25 feet not been determined. Bradford and Wells River Lisbon. Thornburn said he thinks all from the barn was untouched The firefighters were responded to the fire. Thronburn said the barn of his cows are accounted for. by the fire. reported to have been treated The fire was reported to the was one that had been rebuilt Most of his cows are staying at .., . ., BINNED BARN--Fireflghters finish up six-hanr job of putting out Haverhill barn fire. CETA program helps N. Country cool to plan kids learn to work is safe after WOODSVILLE--Summer Tim Whalen, Grafton county jobs are scarce these days but summer CETA (Com- prehensive Employment Training Act) youth program coordinator and Woodsville High School guidance coun- six days on Black Mt. SEARCHERS--Haverhill Police Chief Stephen Savage and members of search team from N.H. Fish and Game Department and State Police coordinate search for missing woman, who was found after six days on Black Mountain. N. HAVERHILL--Athree-day in Haverhill, Mass., has been Ronald Evans directed the staying for the summer at the search effort. Lyme Kiln campground, a Bloodhounds were used place the Robillard family has without result, divers sear- frequented during the sum- ched two ponds near the mer for the past 18 years, campground and searchers Haverhill Police Chief covered 40 to 50 miles of trails Stephen Savage said on on the mountain in the first Thursday August 6 that the two days of the search. couple "had been having Mrs. Robillard became difficulties" and that Mrs. aware of the search effort Robillard had mailed a note to after she saw a helicopter over Mr. Robillard from Haverhill, the mountain. Police said she Mass. postmarked August 3 had previously been unable to hear calls from the: rescue that alluded to her "depressed party because of her loca_t!on state." Police said Mrs. Robillard near a brook off the Titus had gone up on the mountain Brook trail. "to think things over." The incident came just one The search was being month after another resident conducted primarily by of Haverhill, Mass., disap- members of the New Ham- peared on the mountain. pshire State Police and the Jevin Barker 11, an autistic Fish and Game Department in child ,wandered from his numbers ranging from 10-20 family s campsiteat_tt) e Lyme men. Fish and Game Sgt. (pleaseturntopage5) selor, says his program offers a rare chance for area teenagers to gain valuable work experience and earn a few extra dollars at the same time. Fifteen Woodsville youths " 'S are employed m CETA Summer Youth Employment Program. The program has job sites at Cottage Hospital, the Woodsville Highway Dept., the Woodsville Town Recreation Program, the Grafton County Home. Two youths are also helping with the maintenance of the Woodsville Elementary and high school this summer. Whalen says contrary to the notion that such programs are a "free ride" for the par- ' " " " 't l hcpants, hs kds real y work." The participant's work hours and performance are closely monitored by job site supervisors and their evaluations are reviewed by state and federal monitors. According to Whalen, par- ticipants also receive career education materials and labor market orientation conducted by professional counselors. Whalen says the program's ( please turn to page 8) Union 36 meets tomorrow CORINTH--The Union 36 School Board reviewed and t discussed the insulation in- stallation by Energy Shields Systems of W. Topsham recently. J. Eilertsen made the motion to make the final payment to Energy Shield withholding $300 for the two strato-therms until they have been installed. G. Pierson seconded and the motion carried. The board held lengthy discussions on the following subjects: the upstairs storage area, school roof, and school district finances. It was decided to delve into these subjects further at the next regular meeting Aug. 13. search for a missing Haverhill, Mass., woman ended Saturday afternoon when Mytina Ellen Robillard walked out of the woods to her husband's cabin at the Lyme Kiln campground after six cold and wet days on Black Mountain. Mrs. Robillard was described by a police spokesman as being "hungry and cold" but i9 otherwise good condition considering her experience. She was treated at Cottage Hospital Saturday night and Sunday for a in- fection on her left foot and was expected to return home Monday. Mrs. Robillard and her husband have been separated for a number of months, ac- cording to police. Her husband Alfred, who lives at the YMCA ! on Air Force fH]ghts CONCORD--The Air Force which the Air Force Hecker contended that the has proposed a compromise avoid training flights during Air Force proposal to the plan for low-level training foliage season and other Federal Aviation flights of the A-10 bomber over major events, and would stay Administration to establish a New Hampshire's White away from county fairs, military operations area Mountains, but Executive tourist attractions and (MOA) would keep  other Counselor Ray Burton of Bath populated areas, military and civilian aircraft wants the flights ended The Air Force wants to out of the area during training altogether, create a new Yankee II missions, and thus improve After a meeting of Air Force Military Operations Area in the situation. representatives and state which the jet bombers can fly "It's hard for us to believe officials, including Burton, within I00 feet of the ground at they are going to stay within Gov. Hugh Gallen and speeds up to 500 miles per the MOA as proposed," said Congressman Judd Gregg in hour. Chairman Francis J. Costello Concord, Burton told the No decisions were made at of the New Hampshire Journal Opinlon that there are last Friday's meeting and Aeronautics Commission. other more suitable areas for Gov. Gallen's press aide, "We're looking for assurances the Air Force to conduct the Jennifer Murray, said "The we're going to he able to know high-speed training flights, governor told them he wants how and where the flights are Other North  Country to hear what the residents say. going to be conducted." residents joined Burton in He wants to know how they Costello cited complaints objecting to the fligh, ts on feel about the possible corn- that military planes ignored grounds that the noise in- promise." normal air traffic patterns at terferes with the tourist Hecker told Gallon the Moultonboro, North Conway, season and frightens livestock creation of a military Twin Mountain and Lebanon in the scenic tourist and operations area would limit airports. farming area. the number f military flights sbaUa' !eaf!c(Pi!r;itenit; taha  Burton said in an interview in the White Mountain region. ) that some jet pilots "We'll have to sit back and y a ransmit to deliberately buzz objects and digest all this and see where my passengers is in jeopar- buildings on the ground just we go from here," said Rep. dy," said Wylie Apte, director for the fun of it. Jeffords, who arranged the of the White Mountain Airport Gen. Guy L. Hecker, Jr., meeting of the Air Force, state in North Conway. en- Gallen has asked the FAA to congressional liaison for the officials, and secretary of the Air Force, vironmentalists who also prepare an environmental proposed a compromise in oppose the flights. (please turn to page 3) DAM WORK--Central Vermont Public Service Corp. begins work on lowering Bradford Dam in hydroelectric project. !i