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Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
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August 19, 1981     Journal Opinion
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August 19, 1981
 

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,, Page 4-The Journal Opinion-August 19, 1981 L IJl I II I III i nil in I ill RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. ' Publisher of Journal M Opinion Wookly nowopopor ilwbllhod in Ikodlor|, Vormont. IblldpltH cuto! - Votmoll! ond Now Nompohko - St.O| 1841r VWl $0,00 t0t' l|l m0lll; lit  stem - $12.00 por yur Nd $7.00 roy lilt nemtbu;  cJtbon dbeoHt $L00. hcud ciell pellO0l pew it studied. Yonunt 05033. PebMsbod by Nmtbmn! PebHlkiq Compen•, Inc., P.O. Ben $7|, |malted. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher J f02-222-528 ! L  .M%  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper ',__ Editorial ,, Teaching the value of work Many of the federal social programs now being slashed by the Reagan Administration haven't fulfilled their promise and thus deserve to be cut. The CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Tralnin Act) program is no ex- ception. This program has been abused in so many ways over the years that it does not deserve to exist. Unless of course, it is properly directed by local supervisors who are not a part of the bureaucratic structure. The program was designed to give on-the-job experience and a modest paycheck to those willing to work in areas where jobs, particularly at the entry level, are hard to find. Such an opportunity was given to 45 Grafton County youths, including 15 in Woodsville, in a CETA Summer Youth Employment Program, as outlined in the Journal, last most of it. "The kids really work," said Tim Whalen, who directed the recent job project. They performed such tasks as maintenance work at Woodsville High School, helped run an area recreation program for children, learned secretarial skills at Cottage Hospital, and other tasks. They earned every penny of the $3.35 per hour minimum wage they received. Workers in the program had to have clearance from school guidance counselors on the basis of need. In addition to specific skills picked up on the job, these young people also learned the value of good work habits and responsibility on the job. These are jobs which ordinarily would not have been available in such areas as the Woodsville job market, which Whalen termed "lousy." From where we sit, ny program. that encourages people tO work anddo a good spent. I I Ill l l l t Lettersto the Editor New town police department Hospital is sensitive to needs is reconnnended in To the Editor: showed the same caring and On July 1, 1981 my mother, concern to my mother. It was BRADFORD--The Town of law enforcement services possible from the day to day Lolabel Hood, was admittedto also nice not to feel talked Bradford's Police Committee available to the Town of running of a police depart- the hospital for surgery and down to. has recommended that the Bradford. Most noticeable of merit. was placed on the eighth floor. Quite frankly, I was sur- town establish a two-man these are the State Police who The committee feels that She had to stay for the entire prised that the staff of such a police department at an an- have recently signed a lease, qualified experienced people month and received excellent care. I am writing to express my gratitude to the staff of the Mary Hitchcok Memorial Hospital for the care and kind consideration that was shown to my mother and to me. I especially wish to thank the nursing staff on the eighth floor and in the Intensive Care Unit. They took the time to explain to me what was happening and why. They large hospital was so sensitive to the personal needs of the patient, and even beyond that, to the needs of the patient's family. I am so used to being treated like a number in places where a lot of people are served at one time. This was not the case at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. I send my most sincere and heartfelt thanks. Allen Hood Hanover, N.H. Burton supports Ru 112 project BATH--Executive Councilor Mountain National Forests. Ray Burton has asked Gov. The funds would be used for Hugh Gallon to support a upgrading and widening of $799,000 highway ira-this much-used road. This provement project for Rte. money is available through 112. the 1982 Public Lands High- "It has come to my attention way Funds," Burton wrote to that the New Hampshire Gallen. Department of Public Works "I am writing to ask you to and Highways has applied for support this much-needed $799,000 for improvements on work on this road. It is used New Hampshire Route 112 not only by tourists but by which runs betweon North people going to and from work Woodstock and Bath, New in the Haverhill and Lincoln- Hampshire. Much of this route Woodstock areas," Burton goes through the White added. Historic survey LYME--During the next several weeks, the Upper Valley -- Lake Sunapee Council will conduct a survey of historic structures in Lyme. The survey team consists of David Jescavage, historic planner with the Council, and two summer interns, John Erdmann of S. Royalton and Kevin Coburn of Montpelier. The team is working with Lyme selectmen, planning board, and Conservation Commission members. The Town of Lyme contains many old structures possessing a colorful history. Recent population growth pressures may ,challenge the Town's resources and once historic features are gone, they cannot be replaced. Old buildings may often be used for alternative uses more cheaply demolishing them and building new ones The survey provides an is set/n Lyme ventory for inclusion in a Lyme Comprehensive Plan; a list of buildings which could he preserved by economic development activities; and an inventory of a vital resource to he considered when reviewing development proposals. No individual will be required to take any action regarding this survey. The result will be a list for the town to use as its residents see fit. For further information, contact David Jescavage at the Council office, 314 National Bank Building, Lebanon, N.H. 03766, or telephone (603) 448-1680. BITS & PIECES A woman and her teenage daughter were watching a typical, romantic movie of the Thirties on TV. After it had nual cost of $44,250, plus $12,000 in initial "set-up" costs, and create a police commission to oversee it. "The committee recom- mends that if we have a police department that it be an adequate one, rather than a 'make-do' one," said the report to town selectmen. It proposed putting the police department into operation next year. The committee, made up of members appointed by the selectmen, also noted that Bradford Village had ex- pressed interest in contracting with the town for additional coverage to back up its one- man police department. The committee said the costs of a town police department along lines of its recommendations would result in a tax rate of 28 cents per $I00 of appraised valuation for the first year, meaning a tax of $28 for the year for a resident with property appraised at $I0,000 up to $280 for a resident with property appraised at $1oo,0oo. The full text of the report follows: POLICE COMMITTEE REPORT There are presently three Lake Morey group meets FAIRLEE--The Lake Morey Protective Association held its annual meeting July 18, at Bonnie Oaks. The officers for the coming year are President Margaret Dwinell; Vice President Richard Finn; Secretary-Treasurer Mary McCleskey. New directors elected were William Pierce, James South- worth, Nancy Bonneville, William Freetz. It was voted to donate $100 each to the Fairlee Fire Department and Fairlee Public Library. There was a moment of silence in respect for two deceased members, Howard future growth of the Town. The survey is divided into four phases: a "windshield survey" to find potential structures; a detailed ar- chitectural survey of each structure; a compilation of survey data with Lyme's history; publication of an Historic Resource Survey ,Report to be turned over to Lyme residents. The benefits to Lyme will include a listing of structures appropriate for National valuable: Register nomination; an in- pie! realize that two n always he able calls in general adequate size for uual clih Wil and Eth Dllon. rrlkt mo inSm:  as of those days did, the daughter secretary-treasurer and was turned to her mother and said, "Gee, Morn, your movies ended where ours begin." QUOTES Practice does not make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi BITS & PIECES Anything scarce is praise, for exam- Bicentennial and Century Farms in Thetford Arthur Palmer's ancestor in their house, such as a now Frederick P. (also known Emily, who lived here in the p. and Benjamin, who came from Danbury, N. H. in 1867. They raised Morgan horses, oxen, and sheep, then shifted to dairy cattle. Edward bought out his brother, then the farm descended to his son Frederick and grandson Edward, who took over in 1961. Ed Clay had cattle originally, but now just eleven sheep. He says the best crop on the farm has always been stones. There was only one family that ever owned this farm before the Clays, and that was the Gilletts. Samuel Gillett and his family were among the first settlers of Thetford. Samuel was one of the first selectmen of the town and one of the founders of the first church, but his name suddenly disappeared from town records at the time of the Revolution. He was a Tory and fled to Nova Scotia, never to return. His property in Thetford was confiscated, probably by his neighbor Timothy Bartholemew, under authority from the state. However, Samuel's son Simon did not share his father's political views, and joined the Continental Army. When Simon finally returned after the war he discovered that two-thirds of the family farm had been sold. With the help of two freed slaves who returned with him, he was able to earn money to buy back some of the lost land. Simon's son Joseph and grandson Joseph con- tinued on the farm, then the second Joseph sold it to the Clays in 1867. The Clays have since bought hack most of the remainder of the original Gillett farm. Nearby is Tory Hollow, where some of the Tories are said to have hidden before escaping to Canada. Ed Clay says that on his farm there as Sonny). Mr. Howard says that his father graduated from high school in 1893 and wanted to he an architect, but couldn't afford the schooling. He stayed on the farm and helped his father (Roger) pay off debts on the farm. His mother had died @hen he was in his early teens, so the father and son kept house for themselves for 15 years or so, until the son Timothy Bartholemew bought record of sale of right-of-way in 1769 the land that includes to the railroad in 1847, and his present farm, Lot No. 33 Arthur's great-great- from the original right of grandfather Hazen Bartlett's David Barber. Timothy contract towork as a bowman moved to Thetford about 1772 for the Connecticut River from Connecticut. Old family Valley Steam-Boat Company papers say that Timothy was in 1832. Also, old deeds show noted for his intellect and sales of part of the farm's land piety and often served his to Abijah Howard for slate :: town in public office, also as a quarries. , surveyor. During the The Palmers' original Revolution he was appointed barn was on the same side of by the state to sell confiscated the road as the house. Some of TorypropertyinThetfordand its timbers were used in several nearby towns (in- building the present barn in cluding the land that is now the late 1890's. Labor for Edward Clay's). Old tales also building the second barn cost tell of Timothysinglehandedly a total of $550. How times grappling with and killing a change! bear that had invaded his ii sheepfold. At the age of 80 he Fred Howard farm. 1777 ' was so vigorous that he could According to Fred  still spring from the ground Howard, Jr., his ancestor . into his saddle. Abijah came from Con- . After Timothy's death in necticut to Thetford in the 1831 his farm passed to earlyyears of settlement, but /. Timothy, Jr., then to his sister had to return downcountry .' Abigail, who had married because of sickness. He came : Joseph Hosford. They lived in hack in 1775. In 1777 he built a the little house on the property sawmill near the District No. 2 '" known as the "Red House." schoolhouse. The earliest, deed :::i Other heirs owning the larger we can find was written in :!'house were Harriet Brown and 1782, confirming an earlier L  her husband John, whodeeded deed which had been "con- . it to Henry Palmer in 1872. sumed by fire" and evidently L Henry's wife Lucy was a never recorded. Abijah /) granddaughter of Abigail earned his living by farming Hosford. and by operating the mill, but i; . Henry and Lucy had lived lost his life in 1618 by falling m Pontiac, Illinois for a through the floor of the mill. number of years, but they His son Abijah continued didn't like it there, par- the mill and the farm. In the ticularly because the water next generation, his son didn't tastelikehome.Soafte? Ichabod Truman Howard several visits home to Ver- divided the farm around 1850, ...... mont they returned to stay, the northern half going to a around 1867. They lived in the daughter and eventually out of Red House until Henry bought the family, although it now the Barthelemew farm in 1872. has been bought back. Succeeding genarations on the Truman kept the southern half farm have been Arthur B. and movedthere, constructing Palmer, A. Maxwell, and now buildings in the present Arthur F. location. Succeeding The Palmers have found generations on the farm have sorts of old family papers been Roger, Frederick T., and stone house until about 1963. She lived to be 101 years old, dying about 1974. In 1976 the place was deeded tp Helen Huggett, a connection of the family who has lived here most of her life. She and her husband George took care of the place for many years and it was willed to them by Emily. Helen's son later lived in the stone house. The farmland on the place is rented to Vaughan Farms. Helen has recently retired from working at Gray's auctions for 33 years. Latham place, 1802 Arthur Latham of Lyme bought his property in Thetford in 1802, but it was not the permanent home of the family until his son William Harris Latham moved here in 1827. After William Harris's death in 1868, the farmland was sold, but his daughter Azuba Latham Barney retained the house, which was owned by her daughter, Lucy Latham Barnet Mott from 1875 to 1940. From 1880 to 1910 it was known as the Murfey house, being occupied by a Latham cousin, William L. Murfey. The Latham house is now the summer home of Charles Latham, another descendant of Arthur and William. He teaches history at Episcopal Academy in Philadelphia and wrote A Short llistory of Thetford, Vermont in 1972, as well as compiling the Thetford map showing 1858 and 1960 owners of residences (copy posted in town clerk's office). The Latham house was built 200 or more years ago, probably in the 1770's. was married. After all those years of bachelor housekeeping, the two men had to spend two months plastering and painting to get the house into shape for a woman to move into. One day the town lister came and knocked at the front door. When the doorknob came off in his hands he stepped back and one of the steps collapsed under him and he landed in a heap. He just laughed about it, but nowadays probably somebody would have gotten sued. Emily Child place, 1788 William Child, a Revolutionary soldier from Lyme, came to Thetford in 1788, having bought the original rights' of David Carver, Roswell Phelps, and David Hosford. His property included Child's Pond, a natural curiosity which has no visible inlet or outlet. It lies less than 200 feet from the Connecticut River and 150 feet above it. As the soil un- derlying the pond is composed of quicksand, it is a wonder that the pond hasn't disap- peared into the river. The Child farm passed from William to his son Bela, then through Bela's heirs to his son William H. Child. Of William's children, Jonathan, Edward Clay farm, 1867 Mary and Emily, the last The first Clays on this survivor on the place was farm were brothers Edward presented with a pottery bowl in appreciation for her efforts for the association. The following new members were welcomed into the association; Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Rescigno, Mr: and Mrs. Allan Moats, Miss Helen Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Durgin, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Weaver, Mr. and Mrs. John Scott. The annual summer car- nival will be held Aug. 22, with a rain date of Aug. 23, at the Low cottages. Richard Allen spoke on water saving devices and James Colligan reported on the success of the Aqua Net he installed last year to control weeds. James Morgan and Erice Smeltzer reported on the study of the lake project and the various monitoring devices installed this year. WHEN FIRE STRIKES If you suspect fire and the door is NOT hot, open it cautiously. Brace your shoulder against it and keep your head away from the opening. Open it slightly.., be ready to slam it shut if heat and smoke rush in. used to be three dugouts for protection in case of Indian attack. Nobody knows how old the oldest barn on the place is, but it was there before the Clays came, and it has hand-hewed timbers. The old St. Lawrence apple tree was there before the Clays came, too, and it is still bearing. Robert Bacon place, 1882 This land was deeded to Robert Bacon's great- grandfather, Paschal Slack, in 1882, by Reuben Phillips. It passed next to his wife Mary, then to their granddaughter Katie Goulett Bacon, thence to Katie's children, whose shares were deeded to Robert Bacon in 1966. Mr. Bacon says that the place originally had 45 acres, but when Interstate 91 was built it went right through the middle of his land, leaving 13 acres with the house and the rest on the other side of the road, landlocked. Mr. Bacon is a teacher at Thetford Academy. The Bacon farm was originally part of the Wilmott property, and there is still land nearby belonging to Wilmott descendants who live elsewhere. effective 1 September 1981, to operate a cluster office on the second floor of the Academy Building. The five or six of- ficers serving this area will be doing their paperwork and interviewing people here. This affords a certain amount of presence on the streets as their cars will be parked in the center of town. It will also mean that a higher per- centage of their time will he spent in Bradford. A call for assistance will have a better chance of being answered quickly. The Orange County Sheriff's Department offers some services in the area, but generally these have been purchased by the Town or Village. In the summer and fall of 1960 the Selectmen contracted for their services on a one night per week basis on response to several com- plaints of vandalism. The Selectmen discontinued this service as it did not seem to offer a good solution for the cost involved. The Village of Bradford is presently employing one man who both patrols the street and has a phone in his home to answer calls when he is not in uniform. He presently does not leave the Village limits unless he is asked to respond to a major emergency or to back up an officer's call for assistance. The Trustees of the Village have expressed an interest in adding another part time officer and purchasing a vehicle and would be willing to contract with the Town for coverage. The committee reviewed the above services and the kind of incidents that have occurred in the last eighteen months and decided that if the Town should vote for a police department it wou)d have the following functions. A) Patrolling the Town. On a random basis to patrol all the roads paying attention to closed houses and being alert to any unusual incidents. B) Respond to Calls from Townspeople Dispatching can be arranged with the State Police to cover thoae.mA,l'*an officer is on duty. Arrangements will also be made for backup between town officers. C) Fire Assistance A patrolman will respond to all fires and emergency calls within the Town to assist with traffic control. D) Traffic Control Occasionally traffic gets quite conjested around Main and Federal streets and an officer would he expected to direct traffic during the peak hours. E) Visibility. It is the feeling of the committee that having a uniformed officer and patrol car visibly active would serve to reduce potential incidents around the Town. F) Child Protection Several parents have ex- pressed the concern that some type of police coverage and visibility is needed after school hours until parents get home from work when children are apt to he playing without as much supervision as is normal when adults are at home. G) Criminal Investigation If Bradford had their own force some crimes such as Breaking and Entering or Larceny could be investigated in house with the cooperation of other agencies. The State Police are presently so ex- tended that lesser crimes lose out in a priority system. Our own department would have the time to perform a more thorough investigation. The committee recom- mends that if we have a police department that it be an adequate one rather than a "make-do" one. Their recommendations are as follows: A) Hire two full time of. ficers. This is not much more expensive than one and it is much easier to keep a full time person working than a part time employee. Two people would allow for eighty hours of uniformed coverage a week and also coverage when one is absent due to vacations, training or sick leave. B) It is the committee's recommendation that  the Selectmen appoint a Com- mission of five members to oversee the department. This commission will he respon- sible for establishing policies and procedures and seeing they are carried out. The Commission would answer to the Selectmen who would be responsible for budgeting and the hiring-firing functious. In this way it is felt that undue future political influences can be eliminated as much as should be hired and that they some time and should he paid an adequate payers should salary. This would not only provide Bradford with good If the Town so service but would tend to a Police eliminate the department recommended becoming a training ground committee be for larger departments thus work on keeping the turnover in era- policies and ployees lower, department so The committee strongly become recommends that great care This would he taken net to expand the money to department to financially Department burdensome extremes over in fiscal year the future years. We all PROPOS/;D BUDGET SALARIES (2 officers) FRINGE BENEFITS Social security Unemployment Blue Cross OFFICE SUPPLIES OPERATING SUPPLIES VEHICLE MAINTENANCE Gas-oil $1,000.00 Repair & Mnt. 2,000.00 Depreciation 1,500.00 COMMUNICATIONS Telephone $600.00 Radio 200.00 DUES, SUBSCRIPTIONS, MEETINGS Dues, subscription Training $ 150.00 1,000.00 INSURANCE RENT UTILITIES TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES C)tPiTAL SET UP COSTS VEHICLE IIGHTS, RADIOS, OTHER EQUIPMENT OFFICER'S EQUIPMENT OFFICE EQUIPMENT TOTAL CAPITAL COSTS This represents a tax rate of $.28 per $100.00 year operational costs and capital costs. The will give an outline of the expense for APPRAISED VALUE $10,000 25,000 35,000 50,000 75,000 . .... . 100,000 Our River The/on00 t/da/r/00er by BOB UNCK Adrian Block, a Dutch was the known In 1614, when Block claimed he named it the "Freshe Water Riviere." years since its discovery, the "freshe" water rather murky in places and has been regarded world's most beautifully landscaped cesspool. the Connecticut has been called "a That, it most certainly is. Leaving the beautiful rolling farmland hillsides of the Putney, Vermont region we Brattleboro, the largest town on the river up to was there that we first noticed a motorboat traffic. Whatever one's opinions about nuclear within a stone's throw of a nuclear reactor perience. The immense power that concrete block in Vernon, Vt., is cooled bY Connecticut River. We all became silent and approached Vermont Yankee. Our mood lightened as we watched fish past Vernon Dam by way of the ladder. The beautiful Atlantic salmon mont and New Hampshire. With river's health, and a little luck, we may the valley's sporting goods stores within a At Northfield Mountain in Massaehuaetts, Utilities maintains a pump storage station power demand. Pumping the water up uses more power than it produces. Further down we pass through Gorge, guarded upstream by claimed for Louis XV by a soldier 1746. At Turnera Falls, the river dries up aided by a truck is necessary. On to Northampton-- good farmland, beautiful ] In and below Holyoke, the river can foul. Scum clings to the paddles, odors and assault the sepses. Springfield is nicer but found ourselves paddling through fog burning power plant. The water was As the days passed we were these "stark contrasts." The river comeback, however, and we're happy to organization that constantly keeps an eye o its road to recovery. Finally the day dawns that we've all dreaded at the same time. Twelve miles Island Sound we get up at 4:30 a.m. and are a.m. in order to catch the outgoing tide. would have committed us to a day and the tide. Instend, at 9 a.m. we were rocky point, gazing out over the ocean, celebrating the successful completion of ney. The lighthouse under which we sat our conversation with a loud warning to tolling the trip's end. The group was quieter than usual oa tint( would soon be going our separate ways river has created a bond between us disappear, and it made us realize agai is our river.., and it's your river. We beautiful resource that can be vet) recordkeeper said, ,It's sad when a river ,, Page 4-The Journal Opinion-August 19, 1981 L IJl I II I III i nil in I ill RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. ' Publisher of Journal M Opinion Wookly nowopopor ilwbllhod in Ikodlor|, Vormont. IblldpltH cuto! - Votmoll! ond Now Nompohko - St.O| 1841r VWl $0,00 t0t' l|l m0lll; lit  stem - $12.00 por yur Nd $7.00 roy lilt nemtbu;  cJtbon dbeoHt $L00. hcud ciell pellO0l pew it studied. Yonunt 05033. PebMsbod by Nmtbmn! PebHlkiq Compen•, Inc., P.O. Ben $7|, |malted. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher J f02-222-528 ! L  .M%  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper ',__ Editorial ,, Teaching the value of work Many of the federal social programs now being slashed by the Reagan Administration haven't fulfilled their promise and thus deserve to be cut. The CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Tralnin Act) program is no ex- ception. This program has been abused in so many ways over the years that it does not deserve to exist. Unless of course, it is properly directed by local supervisors who are not a part of the bureaucratic structure. The program was designed to give on-the-job experience and a modest paycheck to those willing to work in areas where jobs, particularly at the entry level, are hard to find. Such an opportunity was given to 45 Grafton County youths, including 15 in Woodsville, in a CETA Summer Youth Employment Program, as outlined in the Journal, last most of it. "The kids really work," said Tim Whalen, who directed the recent job project. They performed such tasks as maintenance work at Woodsville High School, helped run an area recreation program for children, learned secretarial skills at Cottage Hospital, and other tasks. They earned every penny of the $3.35 per hour minimum wage they received. Workers in the program had to have clearance from school guidance counselors on the basis of need. In addition to specific skills picked up on the job, these young people also learned the value of good work habits and responsibility on the job. These are jobs which ordinarily would not have been available in such areas as the Woodsville job market, which Whalen termed "lousy." From where we sit, ny program. that encourages people tO work anddo a good spent. I I Ill l l l t Lettersto the Editor New town police department Hospital is sensitive to needs is reconnnended in To the Editor: showed the same caring and On July 1, 1981 my mother, concern to my mother. It was BRADFORD--The Town of law enforcement services possible from the day to day Lolabel Hood, was admittedto also nice not to feel talked Bradford's Police Committee available to the Town of running of a police depart- the hospital for surgery and down to. has recommended that the Bradford. Most noticeable of merit. was placed on the eighth floor. Quite frankly, I was sur- town establish a two-man these are the State Police who The committee feels that She had to stay for the entire prised that the staff of such a police department at an an- have recently signed a lease, qualified experienced people month and received excellent care. I am writing to express my gratitude to the staff of the Mary Hitchcok Memorial Hospital for the care and kind consideration that was shown to my mother and to me. I especially wish to thank the nursing staff on the eighth floor and in the Intensive Care Unit. They took the time to explain to me what was happening and why. They large hospital was so sensitive to the personal needs of the patient, and even beyond that, to the needs of the patient's family. I am so used to being treated like a number in places where a lot of people are served at one time. This was not the case at Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. I send my most sincere and heartfelt thanks. Allen Hood Hanover, N.H. Burton supports Ru 112 project BATH--Executive Councilor Mountain National Forests. Ray Burton has asked Gov. The funds would be used for Hugh Gallon to support a upgrading and widening of $799,000 highway ira-this much-used road. This provement project for Rte. money is available through 112. the 1982 Public Lands High- "It has come to my attention way Funds," Burton wrote to that the New Hampshire Gallen. Department of Public Works "I am writing to ask you to and Highways has applied for support this much-needed $799,000 for improvements on work on this road. It is used New Hampshire Route 112 not only by tourists but by which runs betweon North people going to and from work Woodstock and Bath, New in the Haverhill and Lincoln- Hampshire. Much of this route Woodstock areas," Burton goes through the White added. Historic survey LYME--During the next several weeks, the Upper Valley -- Lake Sunapee Council will conduct a survey of historic structures in Lyme. The survey team consists of David Jescavage, historic planner with the Council, and two summer interns, John Erdmann of S. Royalton and Kevin Coburn of Montpelier. The team is working with Lyme selectmen, planning board, and Conservation Commission members. The Town of Lyme contains many old structures possessing a colorful history. Recent population growth pressures may ,challenge the Town's resources and once historic features are gone, they cannot be replaced. Old buildings may often be used for alternative uses more cheaply demolishing them and building new ones The survey provides an is set/n Lyme ventory for inclusion in a Lyme Comprehensive Plan; a list of buildings which could he preserved by economic development activities; and an inventory of a vital resource to he considered when reviewing development proposals. No individual will be required to take any action regarding this survey. The result will be a list for the town to use as its residents see fit. For further information, contact David Jescavage at the Council office, 314 National Bank Building, Lebanon, N.H. 03766, or telephone (603) 448-1680. BITS & PIECES A woman and her teenage daughter were watching a typical, romantic movie of the Thirties on TV. After it had nual cost of $44,250, plus $12,000 in initial "set-up" costs, and create a police commission to oversee it. "The committee recom- mends that if we have a police department that it be an adequate one, rather than a 'make-do' one," said the report to town selectmen. It proposed putting the police department into operation next year. The committee, made up of members appointed by the selectmen, also noted that Bradford Village had ex- pressed interest in contracting with the town for additional coverage to back up its one- man police department. The committee said the costs of a town police department along lines of its recommendations would result in a tax rate of 28 cents per $I00 of appraised valuation for the first year, meaning a tax of $28 for the year for a resident with property appraised at $I0,000 up to $280 for a resident with property appraised at $1oo,0oo. The full text of the report follows: POLICE COMMITTEE REPORT There are presently three Lake Morey group meets FAIRLEE--The Lake Morey Protective Association held its annual meeting July 18, at Bonnie Oaks. The officers for the coming year are President Margaret Dwinell; Vice President Richard Finn; Secretary-Treasurer Mary McCleskey. New directors elected were William Pierce, James South- worth, Nancy Bonneville, William Freetz. It was voted to donate $100 each to the Fairlee Fire Department and Fairlee Public Library. There was a moment of silence in respect for two deceased members, Howard future growth of the Town. The survey is divided into four phases: a "windshield survey" to find potential structures; a detailed ar- chitectural survey of each structure; a compilation of survey data with Lyme's history; publication of an Historic Resource Survey ,Report to be turned over to Lyme residents. The benefits to Lyme will include a listing of structures appropriate for National valuable: Register nomination; an in- pie! realize that two n always he able calls in general adequate size for uual clih Wil and Eth Dllon. rrlkt mo inSm:  as of those days did, the daughter secretary-treasurer and was turned to her mother and said, "Gee, Morn, your movies ended where ours begin." QUOTES Practice does not make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi BITS & PIECES Anything scarce is praise, for exam- Bicentennial and Century Farms in Thetford Arthur Palmer's ancestor in their house, such as a now Frederick P. (also known Emily, who lived here in the p. and Benjamin, who came from Danbury, N. H. in 1867. They raised Morgan horses, oxen, and sheep, then shifted to dairy cattle. Edward bought out his brother, then the farm descended to his son Frederick and grandson Edward, who took over in 1961. Ed Clay had cattle originally, but now just eleven sheep. He says the best crop on the farm has always been stones. There was only one family that ever owned this farm before the Clays, and that was the Gilletts. Samuel Gillett and his family were among the first settlers of Thetford. Samuel was one of the first selectmen of the town and one of the founders of the first church, but his name suddenly disappeared from town records at the time of the Revolution. He was a Tory and fled to Nova Scotia, never to return. His property in Thetford was confiscated, probably by his neighbor Timothy Bartholemew, under authority from the state. However, Samuel's son Simon did not share his father's political views, and joined the Continental Army. When Simon finally returned after the war he discovered that two-thirds of the family farm had been sold. With the help of two freed slaves who returned with him, he was able to earn money to buy back some of the lost land. Simon's son Joseph and grandson Joseph con- tinued on the farm, then the second Joseph sold it to the Clays in 1867. The Clays have since bought hack most of the remainder of the original Gillett farm. Nearby is Tory Hollow, where some of the Tories are said to have hidden before escaping to Canada. Ed Clay says that on his farm there as Sonny). Mr. Howard says that his father graduated from high school in 1893 and wanted to he an architect, but couldn't afford the schooling. He stayed on the farm and helped his father (Roger) pay off debts on the farm. His mother had died @hen he was in his early teens, so the father and son kept house for themselves for 15 years or so, until the son Timothy Bartholemew bought record of sale of right-of-way in 1769 the land that includes to the railroad in 1847, and his present farm, Lot No. 33 Arthur's great-great- from the original right of grandfather Hazen Bartlett's David Barber. Timothy contract towork as a bowman moved to Thetford about 1772 for the Connecticut River from Connecticut. Old family Valley Steam-Boat Company papers say that Timothy was in 1832. Also, old deeds show noted for his intellect and sales of part of the farm's land piety and often served his to Abijah Howard for slate :: town in public office, also as a quarries. , surveyor. During the The Palmers' original Revolution he was appointed barn was on the same side of by the state to sell confiscated the road as the house. Some of TorypropertyinThetfordand its timbers were used in several nearby towns (in- building the present barn in cluding the land that is now the late 1890's. Labor for Edward Clay's). Old tales also building the second barn cost tell of Timothysinglehandedly a total of $550. How times grappling with and killing a change! bear that had invaded his ii sheepfold. At the age of 80 he Fred Howard farm. 1777 ' was so vigorous that he could According to Fred  still spring from the ground Howard, Jr., his ancestor . into his saddle. Abijah came from Con- . After Timothy's death in necticut to Thetford in the 1831 his farm passed to earlyyears of settlement, but /. Timothy, Jr., then to his sister had to return downcountry .' Abigail, who had married because of sickness. He came : Joseph Hosford. They lived in hack in 1775. In 1777 he built a the little house on the property sawmill near the District No. 2 '" known as the "Red House." schoolhouse. The earliest, deed :::i Other heirs owning the larger we can find was written in :!'house were Harriet Brown and 1782, confirming an earlier L  her husband John, whodeeded deed which had been "con- . it to Henry Palmer in 1872. sumed by fire" and evidently L Henry's wife Lucy was a never recorded. Abijah /) granddaughter of Abigail earned his living by farming Hosford. and by operating the mill, but i; . Henry and Lucy had lived lost his life in 1618 by falling m Pontiac, Illinois for a through the floor of the mill. number of years, but they His son Abijah continued didn't like it there, par- the mill and the farm. In the ticularly because the water next generation, his son didn't tastelikehome.Soafte? Ichabod Truman Howard several visits home to Ver- divided the farm around 1850, ...... mont they returned to stay, the northern half going to a around 1867. They lived in the daughter and eventually out of Red House until Henry bought the family, although it now the Barthelemew farm in 1872. has been bought back. Succeeding genarations on the Truman kept the southern half farm have been Arthur B. and movedthere, constructing Palmer, A. Maxwell, and now buildings in the present Arthur F. location. Succeeding The Palmers have found generations on the farm have sorts of old family papers been Roger, Frederick T., and stone house until about 1963. She lived to be 101 years old, dying about 1974. In 1976 the place was deeded tp Helen Huggett, a connection of the family who has lived here most of her life. She and her husband George took care of the place for many years and it was willed to them by Emily. Helen's son later lived in the stone house. The farmland on the place is rented to Vaughan Farms. Helen has recently retired from working at Gray's auctions for 33 years. Latham place, 1802 Arthur Latham of Lyme bought his property in Thetford in 1802, but it was not the permanent home of the family until his son William Harris Latham moved here in 1827. After William Harris's death in 1868, the farmland was sold, but his daughter Azuba Latham Barney retained the house, which was owned by her daughter, Lucy Latham Barnet Mott from 1875 to 1940. From 1880 to 1910 it was known as the Murfey house, being occupied by a Latham cousin, William L. Murfey. The Latham house is now the summer home of Charles Latham, another descendant of Arthur and William. He teaches history at Episcopal Academy in Philadelphia and wrote A Short llistory of Thetford, Vermont in 1972, as well as compiling the Thetford map showing 1858 and 1960 owners of residences (copy posted in town clerk's office). The Latham house was built 200 or more years ago, probably in the 1770's. was married. After all those years of bachelor housekeeping, the two men had to spend two months plastering and painting to get the house into shape for a woman to move into. One day the town lister came and knocked at the front door. When the doorknob came off in his hands he stepped back and one of the steps collapsed under him and he landed in a heap. He just laughed about it, but nowadays probably somebody would have gotten sued. Emily Child place, 1788 William Child, a Revolutionary soldier from Lyme, came to Thetford in 1788, having bought the original rights' of David Carver, Roswell Phelps, and David Hosford. His property included Child's Pond, a natural curiosity which has no visible inlet or outlet. It lies less than 200 feet from the Connecticut River and 150 feet above it. As the soil un- derlying the pond is composed of quicksand, it is a wonder that the pond hasn't disap- peared into the river. The Child farm passed from William to his son Bela, then through Bela's heirs to his son William H. Child. Of William's children, Jonathan, Edward Clay farm, 1867 Mary and Emily, the last The first Clays on this survivor on the place was farm were brothers Edward presented with a pottery bowl in appreciation for her efforts for the association. The following new members were welcomed into the association; Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Rescigno, Mr: and Mrs. Allan Moats, Miss Helen Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Durgin, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Weaver, Mr. and Mrs. John Scott. The annual summer car- nival will be held Aug. 22, with a rain date of Aug. 23, at the Low cottages. Richard Allen spoke on water saving devices and James Colligan reported on the success of the Aqua Net he installed last year to control weeds. James Morgan and Erice Smeltzer reported on the study of the lake project and the various monitoring devices installed this year. WHEN FIRE STRIKES If you suspect fire and the door is NOT hot, open it cautiously. Brace your shoulder against it and keep your head away from the opening. Open it slightly.., be ready to slam it shut if heat and smoke rush in. used to be three dugouts for protection in case of Indian attack. Nobody knows how old the oldest barn on the place is, but it was there before the Clays came, and it has hand-hewed timbers. The old St. Lawrence apple tree was there before the Clays came, too, and it is still bearing. Robert Bacon place, 1882 This land was deeded to Robert Bacon's great- grandfather, Paschal Slack, in 1882, by Reuben Phillips. It passed next to his wife Mary, then to their granddaughter Katie Goulett Bacon, thence to Katie's children, whose shares were deeded to Robert Bacon in 1966. Mr. Bacon says that the place originally had 45 acres, but when Interstate 91 was built it went right through the middle of his land, leaving 13 acres with the house and the rest on the other side of the road, landlocked. Mr. Bacon is a teacher at Thetford Academy. The Bacon farm was originally part of the Wilmott property, and there is still land nearby belonging to Wilmott descendants who live elsewhere. effective 1 September 1981, to operate a cluster office on the second floor of the Academy Building. The five or six of- ficers serving this area will be doing their paperwork and interviewing people here. This affords a certain amount of presence on the streets as their cars will be parked in the center of town. It will also mean that a higher per- centage of their time will he spent in Bradford. A call for assistance will have a better chance of being answered quickly. The Orange County Sheriff's Department offers some services in the area, but generally these have been purchased by the Town or Village. In the summer and fall of 1960 the Selectmen contracted for their services on a one night per week basis on response to several com- plaints of vandalism. The Selectmen discontinued this service as it did not seem to offer a good solution for the cost involved. The Village of Bradford is presently employing one man who both patrols the street and has a phone in his home to answer calls when he is not in uniform. He presently does not leave the Village limits unless he is asked to respond to a major emergency or to back up an officer's call for assistance. The Trustees of the Village have expressed an interest in adding another part time officer and purchasing a vehicle and would be willing to contract with the Town for coverage. The committee reviewed the above services and the kind of incidents that have occurred in the last eighteen months and decided that if the Town should vote for a police department it wou)d have the following functions. A) Patrolling the Town. On a random basis to patrol all the roads paying attention to closed houses and being alert to any unusual incidents. B) Respond to Calls from Townspeople Dispatching can be arranged with the State Police to cover thoae.mA,l'*an officer is on duty. Arrangements will also be made for backup between town officers. C) Fire Assistance A patrolman will respond to all fires and emergency calls within the Town to assist with traffic control. D) Traffic Control Occasionally traffic gets quite conjested around Main and Federal streets and an officer would he expected to direct traffic during the peak hours. E) Visibility. It is the feeling of the committee that having a uniformed officer and patrol car visibly active would serve to reduce potential incidents around the Town. F) Child Protection Several parents have ex- pressed the concern that some type of police coverage and visibility is needed after school hours until parents get home from work when children are apt to he playing without as much supervision as is normal when adults are at home. G) Criminal Investigation If Bradford had their own force some crimes such as Breaking and Entering or Larceny could be investigated in house with the cooperation of other agencies. The State Police are presently so ex- tended that lesser crimes lose out in a priority system. Our own department would have the time to perform a more thorough investigation. The committee recom- mends that if we have a police department that it be an adequate one rather than a "make-do" one. Their recommendations are as follows: A) Hire two full time of. ficers. This is not much more expensive than one and it is much easier to keep a full time person working than a part time employee. Two people would allow for eighty hours of uniformed coverage a week and also coverage when one is absent due to vacations, training or sick leave. B) It is the committee's recommendation that  the Selectmen appoint a Com- mission of five members to oversee the department. This commission will he respon- sible for establishing policies and procedures and seeing they are carried out. The Commission would answer to the Selectmen who would be responsible for budgeting and the hiring-firing functious. In this way it is felt that undue future political influences can be eliminated as much as should be hired and that they some time and should he paid an adequate payers should salary. This would not only provide Bradford with good If the Town so service but would tend to a Police eliminate the department recommended becoming a training ground committee be for larger departments thus work on keeping the turnover in era- policies and ployees lower, department so The committee strongly become recommends that great care This would he taken net to expand the money to department to financially Department burdensome extremes over in fiscal year the future years. We all PROPOS/;D BUDGET SALARIES (2 officers) FRINGE BENEFITS Social security Unemployment Blue Cross OFFICE SUPPLIES OPERATING SUPPLIES VEHICLE MAINTENANCE Gas-oil $1,000.00 Repair & Mnt. 2,000.00 Depreciation 1,500.00 COMMUNICATIONS Telephone $600.00 Radio 200.00 DUES, SUBSCRIPTIONS, MEETINGS Dues, subscription Training $ 150.00 1,000.00 INSURANCE RENT UTILITIES TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES C)tPiTAL SET UP COSTS VEHICLE IIGHTS, RADIOS, OTHER EQUIPMENT OFFICER'S EQUIPMENT OFFICE EQUIPMENT TOTAL CAPITAL COSTS This represents a tax rate of $.28 per $100.00 year operational costs and capital costs. The will give an outline of the expense for APPRAISED VALUE $10,000 25,000 35,000 50,000 75,000 . .... . 100,000 Our River The/on00 t/da/r/00er by BOB UNCK Adrian Block, a Dutch was the known In 1614, when Block claimed he named it the "Freshe Water Riviere." years since its discovery, the "freshe" water rather murky in places and has been regarded world's most beautifully landscaped cesspool. the Connecticut has been called "a That, it most certainly is. Leaving the beautiful rolling farmland hillsides of the Putney, Vermont region we Brattleboro, the largest town on the river up to was there that we first noticed a motorboat traffic. Whatever one's opinions about nuclear within a stone's throw of a nuclear reactor perience. The immense power that concrete block in Vernon, Vt., is cooled bY Connecticut River. We all became silent and approached Vermont Yankee. Our mood lightened as we watched fish past Vernon Dam by way of the ladder. The beautiful Atlantic salmon mont and New Hampshire. With river's health, and a little luck, we may the valley's sporting goods stores within a At Northfield Mountain in Massaehuaetts, Utilities maintains a pump storage station power demand. Pumping the water up uses more power than it produces. Further down we pass through Gorge, guarded upstream by claimed for Louis XV by a soldier 1746. At Turnera Falls, the river dries up aided by a truck is necessary. On to Northampton-- good farmland, beautiful ] In and below Holyoke, the river can foul. Scum clings to the paddles, odors and assault the sepses. Springfield is nicer but found ourselves paddling through fog burning power plant. The water was As the days passed we were these "stark contrasts." The river comeback, however, and we're happy to organization that constantly keeps an eye o its road to recovery. Finally the day dawns that we've all dreaded at the same time. Twelve miles Island Sound we get up at 4:30 a.m. and are a.m. in order to catch the outgoing tide. would have committed us to a day and the tide. Instend, at 9 a.m. we were rocky point, gazing out over the ocean, celebrating the successful completion of ney. The lighthouse under which we sat our conversation with a loud warning to tolling the trip's end. The group was quieter than usual oa tint( would soon be going our separate ways river has created a bond between us disappear, and it made us realize agai is our river.., and it's your river. We beautiful resource that can be vet) recordkeeper said, ,It's sad when a river