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September 1, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-September 1, 1982 IIII mlml ii I i , ,,= ,m i n iii )RTH EAST PUBLISHi NG COMPANY. Inc. .. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly nowslmpor imbRskod in sredfordo Vooment. SebKrlpfien rites - Vormont ind New Sempshire - $9.00 per year; $6,00 for six mens; out of stohl $12.00 pe your end $7.00 for sis months; Senior citizen dilcHnt $2.00, SocHd cleso postgto peid ut Iredford, Vermont 05033. PubUskod by NortbNst Publishing Compony, Inc., P.0, |ox 3;8, Sradford. , Robert F. Huminski President &amp; Publisher v x Bradford .  Woodsville 02-222-5281  603-7,17-2016 An Independent Newspaper _ i ,,, i, i nlJ i,i i, '"  I 00d,,or,a, l _.J Grafton County employees work for their salaries The Grafton County budget for 1983, as passed by the county's full legislative delegation last week calls for a 6.3 percent budget increase from that of the current year. In holding the budget down from an initial budget recommendation that called for a budget increase of about 14 percent, the legislators backed in their final vote a recommendation from the delegation's Executive Committee that called for the elimination of an increase in salaries and benefits for county employees. The idea behind eliminating the salary increase was an outwardly sound idea in principle. It was an alternative to slicing individual item budgets for county-supported agencies and exiees,Be,'.ause the county will be receiving less financial help from the stateamt federallevels, county officials have found that 1983 is a year in which a relatively small 6.3 percent budget increase can ultimately be translated into a 25 percent increase in the amount of county taxes needed to he raised. This is why many legislators may have been so reluctant to compromise on the issue of a county salary in- crease. This is an election year, which is an unfortunate time to ask a can- didate for the legislature to support a salary increase for government employees which can be translated directly to a slight tax increase -- particularly with the party primary tions just two weeks away. The delegation last Monday defeated at least three measures aimed at offering county employees a four-percent salary increase; or, in absence of a pay increase, a merit bonus system at a cost of about $60,000. In defending the smaller pay increase, Rep. Mary Chambers, D- Hanover, said, "This small amount of money is to say to the employees that we appreciate what they've done... we were elected to take on questions like this and we have to do our job," Ms. Chambers had a point. County employees who must operate and maintain the agencies and services covered under the county budget may. find their roles more challenging and difficult in 1983 as they adjust to their new budgets, many which include increases but lncreases,m0re -likely chase in ration than anything else. County employees operate the county nursing home, they administer programs for the disabled and elderly, they administer welfare services to the growing number of individuals unable to find a place for themselves as our economy worsens, they operate a crowded county court system, they are charged with maintaining an aging correctional center, and for the most part, they work diligently for their salaries. We hope these workers who serve Grafton County can maintain their morale and level of commitment to their jobs in the wake of the county legislative delegation's decision to hold their wages at the present level. * Hydro-power in Piermont (continued from page I) of materials yet to be purchased. "One of the important factors that has helped us to keep our costs so low," Evans said, "is that Don has done all of the government forms, completing and reviewing legal documents, main- taining contact and liaison with lawyers and ac- countants, and responding to the questions of others interested in hydro plants. planning as well as a lot of hard work on the part of everyone," Evans said. Letters to the Edit , , Brin00 back Frank Keene Tothe Editor: The officials must be two months ago Beedecaused I was a bit shocked to read sleeping, or not doing their a big fight, because he the article in the Journal job, because most of the time couldn't have his own way. Opinion on August 25, 1982, they miss what's going on. If Beede is a sore loser and a about Danny Beede and Frank the officials don't know what's troublemaker. We don't need Keene. going on or they don't want to people like him to ruin our fun I can't understand how the know what's going on, then at theraces. officials did not see.Beede hit they shouldn't be there. Bring Frank Keene back to Keene, whenallthe]Panssawit I think it's very unfair for Bear Ridge, he's a hell of a happen, when they were on the Beede to say Frank Keene was good driver. way to the pits, from the "being a big baby about the YvonneAyola track, whole thing," when just about Bradford, Vt. Endorses Scudder Parker TotheEditor: Vermont Senate, Mr. Parker Committee which meets The Vermont Primary is has shown vigorous, effective between legislative sessionsto only a few weeks away and all leadership. His ability to pull hear testimony and recom- voters should be alert to the people together and provide mend action on energy candidates and the issues easily understood ex- matters. He has served on the which they represent when planations of the current Task Force on the Environ- choosing candidates for the issues has resulted in a con- menu of the Eastern Regional General Election in structive response to Conference of the Council of November. problems. This has made an State Governments which has Scudder Parker has shared important contribution to the worked actively for clean air the honor of representing the area in the past two years. He legislation at the Federal level newly reapportioned believes that constituent to combat acid rain. Caledonia Senatorial District service is a vital part of being Mr. Parker resides with his during the past two years and a state legislator and spends wife and two daughters in has announced his candidacy several hours a week East St. Johnsbury, where for for a second term. The newly throughout the year helping the past 13 years he has been reapportioned District corn constituents with their minister of the Third sists of all of Caledonia dealings with the state. Congregational Church and County, the town of Wolcott in While a first term Senator, the Lower Waterford Lamoille County and the he served on the Senate Congregational Church. towns of Newbury, Topsham, Energy and Natural Resource Alice H. Howe and Bradford in Orange Committee and as clerk of the Member of C.O.V.E. County. Senate Education Committee. (Coalition of Vermont Elders) During his first term in the He serves on the Joint Energy St. Johnsbury Consideration for Chamberlain To the Editor: Delegation where the budget percent increase proposal Earlier I had written a letter was finally adopted the offered by Representative supporting Nelson Cham- County Budget was increased Waiters of Lebanon. For- berlain in his quest for a seat by $52,801 on the tie-breaking tunately for the taxpayer, in the House of Represen- votes of Chairman Paul these were all defeated. tatives from the Haverhill- LaMott. It was LaMott who I still feel that Nelson Bath-Piermont District. At also proposed another in- Chamberlain warrants your that time I suggested if the crease in the budget of $60,000 consideration on September taxpayer is interested in" to fund a bonus for County 14. holding down expenditures employees. He proposed an Fred W. Snell Nelson would do a good job. increase in salary for elected Rep. Grafton District 4 At the meeting of the County officials and voted for the 4 Lisbon, N.H. Urges support of Cattani To the Editor : candidacy. He is honest, in- State of Vermont needs men Ourfriend, LouisJ. Cattani. telligent, industrious, likeLouCattani. is a candidate for the office of dedicated, and well qualified Mnriel R. Stimpson Orange County State's for the office. Charles H. Stimpson, Jr. Attorney. We strongly urge all To achieve the best Bradford, Vermont voters to support him in his government possible, the Cigarette smokin00 and To the Editor : cancer has increased at an Regarding the recent article alarming rate due to the in- in the Journal Opinion on crease in smoking by women. teacher smoking, the latest The lesson to be learned medical report says that from this report is very ap- t00,000 die each year from parent, don't smoke and lung cancer mostly due to anyone who does must have a cigarette smoking. The death back hone like a piece of wet rate among women with lung spaghetti. or/ricer The report also stated that it cost the taxpayer billions of dollars to care for the smoke addict in the final stages of lung cancer because very few can afford the extended and expensive medical treatment. M. Nevins Etowah, N.C, , New faculty members be00in (continued from page 1) studied abroad in Rouen. athletics. laude) from Norwich University. Her previous experience includes teaching physical education in the Montpelier schools, water safety instruction in a com- munity recreation program, elementary and college gymnastics instructor, and collegiate ski instructor Taft is a free-style skier, was captain of her college gymnastics team, is ex- perienced in field hockey and soccer competition, and has participated in dramatics activities at the college level Lesley Rowe of Middletown, Conn., has accepted the French teaching position, which was recently expanded to include grades seven and eight. She holds a B.A. and M.A. in French language and literature from the University of Connecticut. and . School delayed The Lamarre Brickyard At the turn of the century and dumped into the "bed". time to move them hill This was a wooden-sided the storm broke, they there was a large and busy brickyard at the foot of Mt. Gardner (the present Charles Bristol place), in the Town of Bath, across the covered bridge from Woodsville. The brickyard was established and run for about 25 years by Eustache Lamarre, who had come from Canada and had worked at other brickyards in the area, Martin Gibson's in East Ryegate and Whitcher's on Mill Street in Woodsville (probably Ira Whitcher's). Mr. Lamarre started the brickyard around 1896. He and his growing family lived in various houses nearby, in- cluding the upstairs of the Abbott house, which happens to be the present home of Wilfred and Margaret Lamarre (Eustache's son and daughter-in-law). Wilfred says that in those days his father used to complain that the house was so cold that the water would freeze in the teakettle. Later Eustache and his family lived in a house on the riverbank -- which was so undermined by the currents of the river that there was i chain around the house to keep it from falling in. Eventually the washout became so serious that two houses there were moved to safer locations nearby. After renting various places, Eustache built the house that is now Charles Bristol's. Wilfred remembers the family telling about one time before he was born, when his older brother Eugene took their baby sister Lena up the hill in her carriage, then let it roll all the way down the hill by itself. It scared them all to death, but Lena was none the worse for the experience. Eustache brought four of his brothers down from Canada to help run the brickyard. They were Augustin, Justinin (known as Lawrence), Auricle and Emile. Augustin was known in the family as "Uncle Cook", because he always worked in the brickyard's boar- dinghouse as the cook. In 1918 the boardinghouse was sold and moved to its present T  - 1-1cation beyond Wilfred's at []l [ [ house, where it was the home J--'-  of Sternie Graham, and now He is an ac- the vacation home of the Sraders. At its height, the brickyard employed 25 men. Most of them were French- Canadians. Eustache liked to have them as workers because they could not speak English, therefore didn't waste a lot of time talking to other people in the village and show up late for work -- or not at all. Edwin Chamberlin. tells about when he was a little boy, standing out in his dooryard and watching the groups of men walking by on the road after coming down from Canada on the train. After the beginning of World War I it was hard to get men from Canada, so Mr. Lamarre brought in workers from Berlin, N.H., many of them Russians (exiles from the Russian Revolution) and Polanders (Polish). Some of the names in the old timebook are Alia Shestak, Wajill Lanian, Frank Bedavich, John Soucapau, Sava Carolich, Adam Lapin, Vickolay Shostick, Steve Mesolocisky and Andrey Urinck. Some of them used to read Russian- language newspapers, probably sent here for them by relatives in Berlin. For awhile there was an Egyptian, Warele Shrami, who lived at the boar- dinghouse, but when Uncle Cook was away, he and the others ate their meals at the Lamarres' house, and Wilfred's stepmother cooked for them. After each meal, Warele would express his appreciation by coming around the table to Mrs. Lamarre and kissing her hand. This caused her con- siderable embarrassment, it not being a local custom, but even if she disappeared into the kitchen he would follow her and kiss her hand. semicircle where the clay was mixed with water and left to soak for a day to soften the hard chunks. Next, two shovelsfull of clay per shovelfull of sand, along with the necessary amount of water, were mixed in the "brick machine." This was a large hopper with revolving blades, propelled by a horse turning a sweep in a circle around the machine and the bed. (This is why the bed was semicicular.) Therd were three brick machines, and when times were busy, all three were going at once. The horses had to be swapped and rested fairly often, as they would get dizzy, going around and around in circles. The bricks were formed in wooden molds, usually made of cherry wood, and each would hold six bricks. The mold was dipped in a tub of water so the bricks would slide out of it more easily -- making "waterstruck" bricks, as opposed to "sandstruck" bricks which have come from a mold dipped in sand. Waterstruck bricks were more desirable, but harder to make and therefore more expensive. A skilled brickmaker or "striker" would push the mold under the blades of the brick machine by means of a lever, then step on a treadle which would press the clay mixture into the mold and scrape off the surplus. Next in the production line was the mold carrier, who loaded three full molds on a two-wheeled cart and wheeled them away to the yard. On the way he had to watch out not to get run into by the horse that was powering the machine. Wilfred says that some of the horses were pretty good and would slow down if they saw the brick carrier coming out, but others wouldn't pay any attention. Also, if the brick machine hit a stone, some of the horses would stop, while others would keep going and force the sweep pole and break it. The yard was a fiat area of ground about 40 feet wide and perfectly smooth, where the bricks were first dried. The mold carrier would slide the mold off the cart and flip it pull a lightweight the remainder. started blowing drying shed, they panels on the sides place that the leaking through steady drip on one make a hole brick. After the burned (baked or didn't have to worrY rain anymore. Burning the The kiln for bricks was a long with a series of arches along the Behind each bricks to be fired were in such a way as long, narrow opening was bricks, down the draft, against it was a metal door with Wilfred has one doors, which found on the site brickyard. Firewood was through the arch replenished as it the arches with a pole 12 to 15 feet pushed quickly, pole caught fire tremendous heat. beginning, as the the last of their could see the steam them. The more out, the hotter they the more draft was ( and the more needed in the fires. kilns had burned for4 days, the loose roof of the off -- otherwise have burned from the The complete firing time was days, and a batch was fired were enough to fill ! sometimes only season, but three business was Selling Eustache b bricks were used the area, inclUC Woodsville High building, the (Hovey's), and engineering and can do a Their two teen-age sons, of a serxes of annUal School lot of, ff not most of, the Andrew and Peter, have Meetings in July, said Munn. electrical work. This has worked all summer doing Walls(tom has predicted the been a substantial saving all the necessary "odd sprayed insulation in the to the whole venture." jobs." school's gymnasium may take Smith is a broadcast "We havecompletedthis slightly longer to dry than engineer employed at the project with an eye to long- most of the other sections of broadcast tower on Mr. term investment. But the school building. Ascutney. because it is a high risk Munn said Monday morning Evans handles all of the venture we recognized the that the insulation project is paper work which includes need for good, thorough part of a $35,000 energy (continued from page l) project approved by Fairlee voters as a line item at their annual School Meeting. Munn said workers have installed storm windows on the outside of the building in addition to the insulation measures. The school also was treated to a new coat of paint this summer and Munn said the school will be in fine shape for the 87 or so students expected to attend the school this fall. Enrollment is expected to increase only slightly com- pared to an enrollment figure of 85 students attending the school last year. "We've also done a lot of work to the playground over the summer which has turned out pretty well," Munn added. The Fairlee principal said that no new major staffing cha-ges have occurred at the school since last year and that all of last year's teachers would be returning. "Actually, the insulation isn't the only thing that made us wait," said Munn about the opening day delay, "we've still got a lot of blackboards to put back up and the con- struction company doing the work still needs some time to get things cleaned up." School officials say the five ., days lost during the delay will %:.  most likely have to be made  up by adding those days to the rest of the school calendar, Eastman Brook Hydro Dam upstream. France. Her work experience in- cludes teaching French at the college and high school level, serving as assistant director of the University of Con- necticut Junior Year in France program, and director of a high school chorus. In addition to a strong French background, she is certified as a teacher of mathematics, has some knowledge of German, and is experienced in amateur dramatics. Guidance Serving as school counselor will be Brian Garrigan. He holds a B.A. degree (cum laude) from Salem State College < Mass.) and M.Ed. in Counseling from Northeastern University. He has experience as a secondary school counselor, college resident director, counselor m a group home, and playground supervisor. He has been active in com- munity affairs, attended several conferences in order to maintain professional skills, and is active in complished brass musician, and ha been very active in student government ac- tivities. New Principal The principal, Dr. Douglas Harris, holds degrees from California State College (A.), West Virginia University, and Kent State (Ph.D: in Special Education Administration). He brings to BMU a broad background as an English teacher, librarian, curriculum consultant, college instructor, and evaluation specialist, with a special emphasis on programs for talented and gifted education. Other in- terests and activities have included professional baseball, writing, volunteer fireman, religious instructor, civic organizations, and sports officiating. Dr. Harris will be con- centrating on increased parent involvement in the school, a five-year plan for curriculum revision, revised discipline codes, and effective staff evaluation. 4 Approve county (continued from page t ) will have to raise. To give an idea of hew county taxes have effected individual towns in the past, this is how taxes in the town of Haverhill were broken down this year: 69 percent of Haverhill property taxes go to the Haverhill Cooperative School District. 25 percent goes to the Town of Haverhill, about six percent presently goes to the county, according to town officials. How this will change as a result of a 25 percent county tax increase will be determined by the budget state in the next few weeks. Final Vote The final vote on the budget before the county's legislative delegation, taken last Monday at the delegation's meeting held in the Grafton County Courthouse, was 16 to six. Six othei" county legislators chose not to attend the meeting. Reported to have voted against the budget were: Nelson Chamberlin, R- Bath; Anthony Pepitone, R&D- Bethlehem; John Hammond, R- Canaan; Mary Chambers, D- Hanover: Michael King, D- Hanover; and Lorine Walter, R&D- Lebanon. Local students accepted to Vermont Technical CoHere RANDOLPH-- David Melahn has been accepted to Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center, Vt. for the 1982-1983 academic year. David, who will" be enrolled in the Electrical & Electronics Engineering program at Vermont Technical College is the son of John and Priscilla Melahn. David graduated from Oxbow High School in June 1982. Glen Larkham has also been accepted to Vermont Technical College forthe 1982- 1983 academic year. Glen, who will be enrolled'in the Dairy Farm Management program at Vermont Technical College is the son of Everal and Cynthia Larkham. Glen graduated from Oxbow High School in June 1982. Making bricks Wilfred Lamarre has described how "they used to make bricks: The basic raw materials were clay and sand, both of which were plentiful at the brickyard site. In those days the hard blue clay had to be cut or chopped out of the claybank hy hand with a mattock, then shoveled into a wheelbarrow (later a two- wheeled horse-drawn cart) and wheeled along a trestle onto the ground, slide out the Block (Mt. cover (the removable bottom ments). Wilfred of the mold), and lift the mold when Dick away from the bricks. He bad ready to construct to flip the full mold just right and theater building or it would hit his legs or land what the price of on his feet. would be, and theY Both the striker and the thousand- or $6.25 mold carrier worked barefoot, A thousand was because these were such wet they could deliver ia jobs. The striker protected his and it took them clothes with a big rubber hour with two apron, and a man, horse The mold carriers used to to take them to run as fast as they could with struction site and each load of bricks, to meet a -- all for 25 cents a quota of 10,000 bricks each day times change l from each brick machine's Wilfred crew (5 or 6 men). In the early he was a small boy, years around 1900 they worked his cousin who from 6 in the morning to 6 at ster, hauling bri night, with a break at noon- Haverhill for time, but later their hours library there were shorter. They had a large quantitiesof shower in the woods for sold to washing off the sticky clay struction Company before going back to the to the freight boardinghouse or to their shipment to homes. Brickmaking was Massachusetts. At hard, heavy, wet work, and the road from sometimes cold work, as when bridge turned they started the season the People's Market first of May, and there was steep hill, and a sometimes ice in the tub which the horses they had to break before they bricks. The could dip the molds. The loaded into brickmaking season ran until teamster about the end of September. two in each hand, 1 the boxcar- Drying the bricks either catch then In good drying weather, on his toes. Someti bricks were left in the yard for throwing the about a day. While there they show off a little were smoothed by striking bricks in midair. with a "spanker", and were job that flipped onto their sides, six at mitts to cover a time, with a long handled hands, or they implement called a"turner". After the bricks were dry 'enough to hold their shape firmly they were "hicked" (also spelled haked), or stacked in the drying shed, arranged to let air circulate among them, and left there for about a week. Most of the Russian workers couldn't understand English, but if Mr. Lamarre told them, "Hicking", they would go at moving the bricks into the drying shed. If the bricks got rained on before they were thoroughly dry, each raindrop would make a little dimple in the brick. Wilfred says that his father used to watch the sky over Blue Mountain, and if he saw a storm approaching they would hick the bricks in the yard -- but if they didn't have Later yea Eustache Latna skilled had very li education, so he on his firsl bookkeeping management. in 1906 the of the and eventually ownership of although he operator of the it closed in 1922: World War I following it times at the one thing, it labor. Also, getting too stony, to haul sand ( Please Page 4-The Journal Opinion-September 1, 1982 IIII mlml ii I i , ,,= ,m i n iii )RTH EAST PUBLISHi NG COMPANY. Inc. .. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly nowslmpor imbRskod in sredfordo Vooment. SebKrlpfien rites - Vormont ind New Sempshire - $9.00 per year; $6,00 for six mens; out of stohl $12.00 pe your end $7.00 for sis months; Senior citizen dilcHnt $2.00, SocHd cleso postgto peid ut Iredford, Vermont 05033. PubUskod by NortbNst Publishing Compony, Inc., P.0, |ox 3;8, Sradford. , Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher v x Bradford .  Woodsville 02-222-5281  603-7,17-2016 An Independent Newspaper _ i ,,, i, i nlJ i,i i, '"  I 00d,,or,a, l _.J Grafton County employees work for their salaries The Grafton County budget for 1983, as passed by the county's full legislative delegation last week calls for a 6.3 percent budget increase from that of the current year. In holding the budget down from an initial budget recommendation that called for a budget increase of about 14 percent, the legislators backed in their final vote a recommendation from the delegation's Executive Committee that called for the elimination of an increase in salaries and benefits for county employees. The idea behind eliminating the salary increase was an outwardly sound idea in principle. It was an alternative to slicing individual item budgets for county-supported agencies and exiees,Be,'.ause the county will be receiving less financial help from the stateamt federallevels, county officials have found that 1983 is a year in which a relatively small 6.3 percent budget increase can ultimately be translated into a 25 percent increase in the amount of county taxes needed to he raised. This is why many legislators may have been so reluctant to compromise on the issue of a county salary in- crease. This is an election year, which is an unfortunate time to ask a can- didate for the legislature to support a salary increase for government employees which can be translated directly to a slight tax increase -- particularly with the party primary tions just two weeks away. The delegation last Monday defeated at least three measures aimed at offering county employees a four-percent salary increase; or, in absence of a pay increase, a merit bonus system at a cost of about $60,000. In defending the smaller pay increase, Rep. Mary Chambers, D- Hanover, said, "This small amount of money is to say to the employees that we appreciate what they've done... we were elected to take on questions like this and we have to do our job," Ms. Chambers had a point. County employees who must operate and maintain the agencies and services covered under the county budget may. find their roles more challenging and difficult in 1983 as they adjust to their new budgets, many which include increases but lncreases,m0re -likely chase in ration than anything else. County employees operate the county nursing home, they administer programs for the disabled and elderly, they administer welfare services to the growing number of individuals unable to find a place for themselves as our economy worsens, they operate a crowded county court system, they are charged with maintaining an aging correctional center, and for the most part, they work diligently for their salaries. We hope these workers who serve Grafton County can maintain their morale and level of commitment to their jobs in the wake of the county legislative delegation's decision to hold their wages at the present level. * Hydro-power in Piermont (continued from page I) of materials yet to be purchased. "One of the important factors that has helped us to keep our costs so low," Evans said, "is that Don has done all of the government forms, completing and reviewing legal documents, main- taining contact and liaison with lawyers and ac- countants, and responding to the questions of others interested in hydro plants. planning as well as a lot of hard work on the part of everyone," Evans said. Letters to the Edit , , Brin00 back Frank Keene Tothe Editor: The officials must be two months ago Beedecaused I was a bit shocked to read sleeping, or not doing their a big fight, because he the article in the Journal job, because most of the time couldn't have his own way. Opinion on August 25, 1982, they miss what's going on. If Beede is a sore loser and a about Danny Beede and Frank the officials don't know what's troublemaker. We don't need Keene. going on or they don't want to people like him to ruin our fun I can't understand how the know what's going on, then at theraces. officials did not see.Beede hit they shouldn't be there. Bring Frank Keene back to Keene, whenallthe]Panssawit I think it's very unfair for Bear Ridge, he's a hell of a happen, when they were on the Beede to say Frank Keene was good driver. way to the pits, from the "being a big baby about the YvonneAyola track, whole thing," when just about Bradford, Vt. Endorses Scudder Parker TotheEditor: Vermont Senate, Mr. Parker Committee which meets The Vermont Primary is has shown vigorous, effective between legislative sessionsto only a few weeks away and all leadership. His ability to pull hear testimony and recom- voters should be alert to the people together and provide mend action on energy candidates and the issues easily understood ex- matters. He has served on the which they represent when planations of the current Task Force on the Environ- choosing candidates for the issues has resulted in a con- menu of the Eastern Regional General Election in structive response to Conference of the Council of November. problems. This has made an State Governments which has Scudder Parker has shared important contribution to the worked actively for clean air the honor of representing the area in the past two years. He legislation at the Federal level newly reapportioned believes that constituent to combat acid rain. Caledonia Senatorial District service is a vital part of being Mr. Parker resides with his during the past two years and a state legislator and spends wife and two daughters in has announced his candidacy several hours a week East St. Johnsbury, where for for a second term. The newly throughout the year helping the past 13 years he has been reapportioned District corn constituents with their minister of the Third sists of all of Caledonia dealings with the state. Congregational Church and County, the town of Wolcott in While a first term Senator, the Lower Waterford Lamoille County and the he served on the Senate Congregational Church. towns of Newbury, Topsham, Energy and Natural Resource Alice H. Howe and Bradford in Orange Committee and as clerk of the Member of C.O.V.E. County. Senate Education Committee. (Coalition of Vermont Elders) During his first term in the He serves on the Joint Energy St. Johnsbury Consideration for Chamberlain To the Editor: Delegation where the budget percent increase proposal Earlier I had written a letter was finally adopted the offered by Representative supporting Nelson Cham- County Budget was increased Waiters of Lebanon. For- berlain in his quest for a seat by $52,801 on the tie-breaking tunately for the taxpayer, in the House of Represen- votes of Chairman Paul these were all defeated. tatives from the Haverhill- LaMott. It was LaMott who I still feel that Nelson Bath-Piermont District. At also proposed another in- Chamberlain warrants your that time I suggested if the crease in the budget of $60,000 consideration on September taxpayer is interested in" to fund a bonus for County 14. holding down expenditures employees. He proposed an Fred W. Snell Nelson would do a good job. increase in salary for elected Rep. Grafton District 4 At the meeting of the County officials and voted for the 4 Lisbon, N.H. Urges support of Cattani To the Editor : candidacy. He is honest, in- State of Vermont needs men Ourfriend, LouisJ. Cattani. telligent, industrious, likeLouCattani. is a candidate for the office of dedicated, and well qualified Mnriel R. Stimpson Orange County State's for the office. Charles H. Stimpson, Jr. Attorney. We strongly urge all To achieve the best Bradford, Vermont voters to support him in his government possible, the Cigarette smokin00 and To the Editor : cancer has increased at an Regarding the recent article alarming rate due to the in- in the Journal Opinion on crease in smoking by women. teacher smoking, the latest The lesson to be learned medical report says that from this report is very ap- t00,000 die each year from parent, don't smoke and lung cancer mostly due to anyone who does must have a cigarette smoking. The death back hone like a piece of wet rate among women with lung spaghetti. or/ricer The report also stated that it cost the taxpayer billions of dollars to care for the smoke addict in the final stages of lung cancer because very few can afford the extended and expensive medical treatment. M. Nevins Etowah, N.C, , New faculty members be00in (continued from page 1) studied abroad in Rouen. athletics. laude) from Norwich University. Her previous experience includes teaching physical education in the Montpelier schools, water safety instruction in a com- munity recreation program, elementary and college gymnastics instructor, and collegiate ski instructor Taft is a free-style skier, was captain of her college gymnastics team, is ex- perienced in field hockey and soccer competition, and has participated in dramatics activities at the college level Lesley Rowe of Middletown, Conn., has accepted the French teaching position, which was recently expanded to include grades seven and eight. She holds a B.A. and M.A. in French language and literature from the University of Connecticut. and . School delayed The Lamarre Brickyard At the turn of the century and dumped into the "bed". time to move them hill This was a wooden-sided the storm broke, they there was a large and busy brickyard at the foot of Mt. Gardner (the present Charles Bristol place), in the Town of Bath, across the covered bridge from Woodsville. The brickyard was established and run for about 25 years by Eustache Lamarre, who had come from Canada and had worked at other brickyards in the area, Martin Gibson's in East Ryegate and Whitcher's on Mill Street in Woodsville (probably Ira Whitcher's). Mr. Lamarre started the brickyard around 1896. He and his growing family lived in various houses nearby, in- cluding the upstairs of the Abbott house, which happens to be the present home of Wilfred and Margaret Lamarre (Eustache's son and daughter-in-law). Wilfred says that in those days his father used to complain that the house was so cold that the water would freeze in the teakettle. Later Eustache and his family lived in a house on the riverbank -- which was so undermined by the currents of the river that there was i chain around the house to keep it from falling in. Eventually the washout became so serious that two houses there were moved to safer locations nearby. After renting various places, Eustache built the house that is now Charles Bristol's. Wilfred remembers the family telling about one time before he was born, when his older brother Eugene took their baby sister Lena up the hill in her carriage, then let it roll all the way down the hill by itself. It scared them all to death, but Lena was none the worse for the experience. Eustache brought four of his brothers down from Canada to help run the brickyard. They were Augustin, Justinin (known as Lawrence), Auricle and Emile. Augustin was known in the family as "Uncle Cook", because he always worked in the brickyard's boar- dinghouse as the cook. In 1918 the boardinghouse was sold and moved to its present T  - 1-1cation beyond Wilfred's at []l [ [ house, where it was the home J--'-  of Sternie Graham, and now He is an ac- the vacation home of the Sraders. At its height, the brickyard employed 25 men. Most of them were French- Canadians. Eustache liked to have them as workers because they could not speak English, therefore didn't waste a lot of time talking to other people in the village and show up late for work -- or not at all. Edwin Chamberlin. tells about when he was a little boy, standing out in his dooryard and watching the groups of men walking by on the road after coming down from Canada on the train. After the beginning of World War I it was hard to get men from Canada, so Mr. Lamarre brought in workers from Berlin, N.H., many of them Russians (exiles from the Russian Revolution) and Polanders (Polish). Some of the names in the old timebook are Alia Shestak, Wajill Lanian, Frank Bedavich, John Soucapau, Sava Carolich, Adam Lapin, Vickolay Shostick, Steve Mesolocisky and Andrey Urinck. Some of them used to read Russian- language newspapers, probably sent here for them by relatives in Berlin. For awhile there was an Egyptian, Warele Shrami, who lived at the boar- dinghouse, but when Uncle Cook was away, he and the others ate their meals at the Lamarres' house, and Wilfred's stepmother cooked for them. After each meal, Warele would express his appreciation by coming around the table to Mrs. Lamarre and kissing her hand. This caused her con- siderable embarrassment, it not being a local custom, but even if she disappeared into the kitchen he would follow her and kiss her hand. semicircle where the clay was mixed with water and left to soak for a day to soften the hard chunks. Next, two shovelsfull of clay per shovelfull of sand, along with the necessary amount of water, were mixed in the "brick machine." This was a large hopper with revolving blades, propelled by a horse turning a sweep in a circle around the machine and the bed. (This is why the bed was semicicular.) Therd were three brick machines, and when times were busy, all three were going at once. The horses had to be swapped and rested fairly often, as they would get dizzy, going around and around in circles. The bricks were formed in wooden molds, usually made of cherry wood, and each would hold six bricks. The mold was dipped in a tub of water so the bricks would slide out of it more easily -- making "waterstruck" bricks, as opposed to "sandstruck" bricks which have come from a mold dipped in sand. Waterstruck bricks were more desirable, but harder to make and therefore more expensive. A skilled brickmaker or "striker" would push the mold under the blades of the brick machine by means of a lever, then step on a treadle which would press the clay mixture into the mold and scrape off the surplus. Next in the production line was the mold carrier, who loaded three full molds on a two-wheeled cart and wheeled them away to the yard. On the way he had to watch out not to get run into by the horse that was powering the machine. Wilfred says that some of the horses were pretty good and would slow down if they saw the brick carrier coming out, but others wouldn't pay any attention. Also, if the brick machine hit a stone, some of the horses would stop, while others would keep going and force the sweep pole and break it. The yard was a fiat area of ground about 40 feet wide and perfectly smooth, where the bricks were first dried. The mold carrier would slide the mold off the cart and flip it pull a lightweight the remainder. started blowing drying shed, they panels on the sides place that the leaking through steady drip on one make a hole brick. After the burned (baked or didn't have to worrY rain anymore. Burning the The kiln for bricks was a long with a series of arches along the Behind each bricks to be fired were in such a way as long, narrow opening was bricks, down the draft, against it was a metal door with Wilfred has one doors, which found on the site brickyard. Firewood was through the arch replenished as it the arches with a pole 12 to 15 feet pushed quickly, pole caught fire tremendous heat. beginning, as the the last of their could see the steam them. The more out, the hotter they the more draft was ( and the more needed in the fires. kilns had burned for4 days, the loose roof of the off -- otherwise have burned from the The complete firing time was days, and a batch was fired were enough to fill ! sometimes only season, but three business was Selling Eustache b bricks were used the area, inclUC Woodsville High building, the (Hovey's), and engineering and can do a Their two teen-age sons, of a serxes of annUal School lot of, ff not most of, the Andrew and Peter, have Meetings in July, said Munn. electrical work. This has worked all summer doing Walls(tom has predicted the been a substantial saving all the necessary "odd sprayed insulation in the to the whole venture." jobs." school's gymnasium may take Smith is a broadcast "We havecompletedthis slightly longer to dry than engineer employed at the project with an eye to long- most of the other sections of broadcast tower on Mr. term investment. But the school building. Ascutney. because it is a high risk Munn said Monday morning Evans handles all of the venture we recognized the that the insulation project is paper work which includes need for good, thorough part of a $35,000 energy (continued from page l) project approved by Fairlee voters as a line item at their annual School Meeting. Munn said workers have installed storm windows on the outside of the building in addition to the insulation measures. The school also was treated to a new coat of paint this summer and Munn said the school will be in fine shape for the 87 or so students expected to attend the school this fall. Enrollment is expected to increase only slightly com- pared to an enrollment figure of 85 students attending the school last year. "We've also done a lot of work to the playground over the summer which has turned out pretty well," Munn added. The Fairlee principal said that no new major staffing cha-ges have occurred at the school since last year and that all of last year's teachers would be returning. "Actually, the insulation isn't the only thing that made us wait," said Munn about the opening day delay, "we've still got a lot of blackboards to put back up and the con- struction company doing the work still needs some time to get things cleaned up." School officials say the five ., days lost during the delay will %:.  most likely have to be made  up by adding those days to the rest of the school calendar, Eastman Brook Hydro Dam upstream. France. Her work experience in- cludes teaching French at the college and high school level, serving as assistant director of the University of Con- necticut Junior Year in France program, and director of a high school chorus. In addition to a strong French background, she is certified as a teacher of mathematics, has some knowledge of German, and is experienced in amateur dramatics. Guidance Serving as school counselor will be Brian Garrigan. He holds a B.A. degree (cum laude) from Salem State College < Mass.) and M.Ed. in Counseling from Northeastern University. He has experience as a secondary school counselor, college resident director, counselor m a group home, and playground supervisor. He has been active in com- munity affairs, attended several conferences in order to maintain professional skills, and is active in complished brass musician, and ha been very active in student government ac- tivities. New Principal The principal, Dr. Douglas Harris, holds degrees from California State College (A.), West Virginia University, and Kent State (Ph.D: in Special Education Administration). He brings to BMU a broad background as an English teacher, librarian, curriculum consultant, college instructor, and evaluation specialist, with a special emphasis on programs for talented and gifted education. Other in- terests and activities have included professional baseball, writing, volunteer fireman, religious instructor, civic organizations, and sports officiating. Dr. Harris will be con- centrating on increased parent involvement in the school, a five-year plan for curriculum revision, revised discipline codes, and effective staff evaluation. 4 Approve county (continued from page t ) will have to raise. To give an idea of hew county taxes have effected individual towns in the past, this is how taxes in the town of Haverhill were broken down this year: 69 percent of Haverhill property taxes go to the Haverhill Cooperative School District. 25 percent goes to the Town of Haverhill, about six percent presently goes to the county, according to town officials. How this will change as a result of a 25 percent county tax increase will be determined by the budget state in the next few weeks. Final Vote The final vote on the budget before the county's legislative delegation, taken last Monday at the delegation's meeting held in the Grafton County Courthouse, was 16 to six. Six othei" county legislators chose not to attend the meeting. Reported to have voted against the budget were: Nelson Chamberlin, R- Bath; Anthony Pepitone, R&D- Bethlehem; John Hammond, R- Canaan; Mary Chambers, D- Hanover: Michael King, D- Hanover; and Lorine Walter, R&D- Lebanon. Local students accepted to Vermont Technical CoHere RANDOLPH-- David Melahn has been accepted to Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center, Vt. for the 1982-1983 academic year. David, who will" be enrolled in the Electrical & Electronics Engineering program at Vermont Technical College is the son of John and Priscilla Melahn. David graduated from Oxbow High School in June 1982. Glen Larkham has also been accepted to Vermont Technical College forthe 1982- 1983 academic year. Glen, who will be enrolled'in the Dairy Farm Management program at Vermont Technical College is the son of Everal and Cynthia Larkham. Glen graduated from Oxbow High School in June 1982. Making bricks Wilfred Lamarre has described how "they used to make bricks: The basic raw materials were clay and sand, both of which were plentiful at the brickyard site. In those days the hard blue clay had to be cut or chopped out of the claybank hy hand with a mattock, then shoveled into a wheelbarrow (later a two- wheeled horse-drawn cart) and wheeled along a trestle onto the ground, slide out the Block (Mt. cover (the removable bottom ments). Wilfred of the mold), and lift the mold when Dick away from the bricks. He bad ready to construct to flip the full mold just right and theater building or it would hit his legs or land what the price of on his feet. would be, and theY Both the striker and the thousand- or $6.25 mold carrier worked barefoot, A thousand was because these were such wet they could deliver ia jobs. The striker protected his and it took them clothes with a big rubber hour with two apron, and a man, horse The mold carriers used to to take them to run as fast as they could with struction site and each load of bricks, to meet a -- all for 25 cents a quota of 10,000 bricks each day times change l from each brick machine's Wilfred crew (5 or 6 men). In the early he was a small boy, years around 1900 they worked his cousin who from 6 in the morning to 6 at ster, hauling bri night, with a break at noon- Haverhill for time, but later their hours library there were shorter. They had a large quantitiesof shower in the woods for sold to washing off the sticky clay struction Company before going back to the to the freight boardinghouse or to their shipment to homes. Brickmaking was Massachusetts. At hard, heavy, wet work, and the road from sometimes cold work, as when bridge turned they started the season the People's Market first of May, and there was steep hill, and a sometimes ice in the tub which the horses they had to break before they bricks. The could dip the molds. The loaded into brickmaking season ran until teamster about the end of September. two in each hand, 1 the boxcar- Drying the bricks either catch then In good drying weather, on his toes. Someti bricks were left in the yard for throwing the about a day. While there they show off a little were smoothed by striking bricks in midair. with a "spanker", and were job that flipped onto their sides, six at mitts to cover a time, with a long handled hands, or they implement called a"turner". After the bricks were dry 'enough to hold their shape firmly they were "hicked" (also spelled haked), or stacked in the drying shed, arranged to let air circulate among them, and left there for about a week. Most of the Russian workers couldn't understand English, but if Mr. Lamarre told them, "Hicking", they would go at moving the bricks into the drying shed. If the bricks got rained on before they were thoroughly dry, each raindrop would make a little dimple in the brick. Wilfred says that his father used to watch the sky over Blue Mountain, and if he saw a storm approaching they would hick the bricks in the yard -- but if they didn't have Later yea Eustache Latna skilled had very li education, so he on his firsl bookkeeping management. in 1906 the of the and eventually ownership of although he operator of the it closed in 1922: World War I following it times at the one thing, it labor. Also, getting too stony, to haul sand ( Please