"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
September 1, 1982     Journal Opinion
PAGE 5     (5 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 5     (5 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
September 1, 1982
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




September 1, 1982-The Journal Opinkm.Page 5 ermont's race.for Lt. Governor tors Note: This feature presents political statements submitted by Vermont candidates for the Positions of Governor and Lt. Governor to the Vermont eekJY Publishers Association. The candidates were ed by th6 group to respond to the question: "Why are you the person who should hold the office you f Sek?" Some candidates are missing, but spokesman or the Vermont Weekly Publishers said that each Candidate's office was contacted at least twice. Each Candidate was asked to write their own material for the rather than sending professionally written Nancy Fean Stembach, ' Liberty Union a candidate for the office of lieutenant governor in the t of Vermont I intend to exercise the franchme of all the of Vermont--the right to run for political office. As a a realize that with limited time and money d not be a possibility in either of the other political equal importance is the opportunity to run for a party whose platform has always been one of 1970 when it opposed the Vietnam War. Mem- in the Liberty Union Party is open to all and decisions at by consensus. The consensus has always been tlie way to peace. is a democratic economy. Production for in the peaceful conduct of their lives and to the rest of the world where it should be to be good. have showed the way to such voting for a nuclear freeze. I would consider to serve them governor, one of my main concerns would participation in and access to the process This might mean convening the legislature at raore accessible to the public, as well as encouraging active participation of school-age citizens. Tom Rvan, Democrat decision to run for public office stems from a growing for the economic and social disruption taking place As I see it, the state of the economy is the issue in this election. A strong economy is to create and maintain worthwhile jobs for provide decent and affordable housing for our save the family farm, maintain social security t, kep inflation under control, provide quality insure that all areas of the state share in the s of future growth. has been in business, in banking, in development, in community service, and in revitalization. This experience has yielded solid each of these areas. to use this economic understanding and experience Vermont respond to shifting national forces in a will benefit the state and its people. This response forming a planning partnership with groups in to insure that growth is channelled in a way local needs and desires. I would be a strong e for bringing about that investment, both public and ' to achieve local economic goals. purpose of these efforts would be to help create opportunities. The office of the lieutenant can be used to "open doors" to business leaders. It to use the office to assist our development in bringing about the location and expansion of businesses in the state. through Act 250, has demonstrated the ad- of constructive long-range planning with emphasis and self-sufficiency. I believe that the time to bring all concerned citizens into the planning as the surest means of assuring a strong and viable Peter Smith, Republican Vermont needs a lieutenant governor who can be effective working in the Legislature, with the governor, and with the people of the state. As state senator, I held 25 community meetings in order to hear citizen concerns. As a result of these meetings, I sponsored legislation deregulating day care and returning to state employees and teachers over $500,000 wrongfully taken from them by the state. Because they are so effective, I will continue the practice of holding community meetings if elected lieutenant governor. In the Legislature, no one gets things done alone. The lieutenant governor should he a coalition-builder, working with senators and House leaders alike to focus on bills which are important to Vermont. My legislative priorities include: tougher drunk driving laws, strengthening job training, stopping the increase in health care costs, and finding a fairer approach to electric billing than seasonal rates. As state senator, I was able to see much of my own legislation passed into law, including bills to guarantee student loans and provide scholarship money to adults who can only attend college part-time. I am particularly proud of my role in helping to pass the new State Aid to Education law, which gives 23 million dollars to local communities to use for funding educational programs or local property tax relief. I believe that my extensive experience in education (president and founder of the Community College of Ver- mont), my years of service in local government, my career as a small businessman, and my service as a state senator will help me be effective as ,Vermont's next lieutenant governor. Chester Scott Jr., Republican Vermont faces major challenges and opportunities in the next several years as we adjust to the change in relationships between Federal, State and Local government under the new Federalism. In addition we have to address the problems inherent in the current recessionary period. All this in ad- dition to the ongoing challenges of landfill pollution, acid rain and solving our energy problems. These solutions are going to take all the experience, all the knowledge, and all the ef- forts we can muster in the private and public sector. As we look at the constitutional offices of the State we are indeed fortunate to have one of the strongest most experienced teams in our history with Governor Snelling, Emery Hebard, Treasurer, Jim Douglas, Secretary of State and Alex Acebo, Auditor of Accounts. Three of these men have worked their way up through the Legislative Branch of State Government. How you are to choose the person for theAgcond highest state office andyou have a clear choicb. My candidacy for Lt. Gov. offers the most experienced person for the job. I am the only candidate for Lt. Governor who has: Served in local government for over a dozen years, first as a lister then as a selectman for the past 12 years, served as a member of the House of Representatives, served 6 years in the Senate, worked for 18 years on the financial management team of a major Vermont Corporation, chaired and been a member of the Joint House and Senate Committee on Energy, served on the Appropriations committee of the Legislature and gone through the hearings on the State Budget, served on the Senate General Affairs, Education, Energy and Natural Resources Committees, was chosen by the Senate leadership to serve on the State Colleges Board of Trustees to help restore financial integrity of the system. It is not that as an individual I see myself, as better than anyone else. but to the contrary, an average hard working person who has been given an opportunity to serve and grow in knowledge by the voters in my town and county. It is this investment by the voters that I will bring to work for Ver- monters in the Lt. Governor's office. Orange County State's Attorney race Editor's Note: The race for Orange County State's Attorney this year is unique in that the race is likely to be decided during the Sept. 14 primary election. Both incumbent James McKnight and challenger Louis Cattani are running on the Republican ticket. Both men have been campaigning hard for the primary knowing that a win for the Republican nomination will virtually assure election without opposition from a Democratic candidate in November. Cattani, Republican River Cattani said he bad never J. Cattani has lost a DWI trial while he was James McKni00ht, Republican CHELSEA Orange County State's Attorney James D. that he is a can- Deputy State's Attorney in McKnight has formally an- of Orange Caledonia County. He also nounced that he is seeking re- ,torney. says he believes "there is a election to a second term. He said Cattani, special need for firm and has heId this office since the people of consistent prosecution" of nty vigorous, juvenile offenders. Cattani effective en- said he supports the state's of the criminal new juvenile diversion state." Cattani program. State's "In my opinion, diversion Y deters juvenile delinquents 1980, from becoming adult Wells River and criminals," he said. soon af- After resigning as Deputy State' Attorney in March of )loyment as 1980, Cattani opened a private Attorney, I law practice in St. Johnsbury jury trials to before moving to Wells River these were 11 in November of 1980. Cattani, 34, has been a Iobtained resident of Vermont since in all 11 of 1973. He received his un- Cattani. dergraduate education at mi Wagner College on Staten Island in New York. He received his law degree, cum laude, from Vermont Law School in 1977, graduating sixth in his class. He is married to the former Jonnie Crawford, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold and Helen Crawford of South Royalton. Jonnie own. and manages a store in Wood- sville. Cattani is a member of the Woodsville-Wells River Rotary Club. Cattani says he has attended out-of-state seminars and courses in trial techniques, advanced criminal trial tactics, and vehicular homocide that have increased his skills as a prosecutor. "I intend to bring a new measure of professionalism and ability to the office of Orange County State's Attorney," said Cattani. February, 1979. In making his an- nouncement. McKnight cited on-the-job experience as one part of a sound foundation for serving a second term. The cases he has handled have ranged from traffic offenses to first degree murder. By representing the State in these cases, he noted, "one learns to make decisions, work with police, witnesses and victims. and effectively prosecute offenders. In' this process. I have built relationships and worked with people whose knowledge and assistance would be helpful in a second term." The second part of the James MeKnight Madeline(Smith) Fortier S Humphrey attends realtors meeting dws after Ion00 illness BRADFORD-- Jerry J. N. HAVERHILL Madeline  Ingerson, of Woedsville; eight Humphrey, broker for Cen- (Smith) Fortier, 64, died grandchildren; two great- tury 21 Valley Associates of Sunday, August 22 at the grandchildren; two brothers, Bradford, recently attended Cottage Hospital in Woodsville Carl Smith of Granby, Conn., the Summer Management following a long illness. Obituaries .' 1? a setting other than juvenile and L yle Smith of Man-Ed ard R Ch 75 Fair in Portsmouth, N.H., She was born on March 20, chester; two sisters, Alice W asson, , sponsored by the Regional 1918, in Lyman. Bigelow of N. Haverhill 'and Office of Century 21 of New Before her illness she was Bernice Boomhower of h d lh, d m Pierln England, Inc. employed at Forrest Hills, Woodsville; several nieces a e ont Owners and managers from Ames and the First National and nephews. PIERMONT Edward R. and Boy Scouts of America in 150 Century 21 offices in four stores, all in N. Haverhill. Funeral services were held Chasson, 75, died Saturday, Lynn, Mass. He was on the New England states attended She is survived by her at the Ricker Funeral Home, August 21 at the Glover town advisory board in [he full day conference to hear husband, FredEFortierofN. Birch Lane, Woodsville. The Memorial Hospital in Nahant, Mass., and was the and share management Haverhill; a son, Senior Rev. Edwin Milne officiated. Needham, Mass., after a past vice president of Lake techniques highlighted by real Master Sgt. Floyd E. Fortier, Burial was in Ladd Street sudden illness. Armington Assn., Piermont. estate expert, Dexter USAF, of Rantoul, I11.; a Cemetery in Haverhill. He was born in Lakeport He is survived by his wife, Mayworm of Michigan. In daughter, Mona Jean and was a manager for the Esther D. Chasson of Green addition, numerous round- New England Telephone Valley; and one son, Timothy on Millica Ig4LSU'I" Company before retiring in ChassonofGrinnell, lowa. Creative Financing and anor n Graveside services were Working with Investors were conducted. Mr. Chasson moved from held in th! Glencliff Cemetery lied in Wentworth Piermont four years ago to inGlencliff. New Regional educational V Green Valley, Ariz., and was Those who wish may make programs for second half 1982 were unveiled and a panel WABAN, Mass.-- Mrs. and of the Woman's Club. spending the summer in contributions in his memory to Needham, Mass. the Leukemia Fund, in care of discussion with represen- Eleanor Millican died in her She is survived by three He was a member of the the Dartmouth-Hitchcock tatives from several lending sleep Saturday, August 29, at sons: Charles F. of Lexington, Rotary Clubs of Lancaster, Medical Center, Hanover, institutions was presented, the Brae Burn Nursing home Mass., John R. of Hudson, Fla. Laconia and Lynn, Mass. He N.H. 03755. in Waban, Mass., after a long and Andrew M. Jr. of Sebring, belonged to North Star Lodge, The Ricker Funeral Home illness. Fla.; two daughters: HelenC. F&AM of Lancaster and was in Woodsviile is in charge of She was 97 years of age. She Dassey of Arlington, Mass., involved in Bay Shore Council arrangements. was born in Moncton, New and Alice Mr. (Mrs. Leland Brunswick, Canada. Libbey) of Wentworth; many k Over the River The widow of Andrew grandchildren and several (continuedfrompage4) Millican who died some 26 great grandchildren. DO ald C Farley 88; ville from a location near years ago, Mrs. Millican lived Funeral services were held n , , Grafton Motors, excavating in Wentworth for 46 years. She mid-week in Arlington, Mass., part of the area that later attended the Congregational with the Saville Funeral Home was eauca'or,u t musician become the new route through Church here and was a in charge. Woodsville. member of the Ladies' Aid Another problem in the ' STRAFFORD Donald C. an organist, choir director, later years was that other eth E R berts 71 Farley, 88, died Sunday, director of Christian Ke August 22 at his home. He was education and teacher of mechanized,brickyards withwere electricbeing  O 9 ; born on March 23, 1894, in Humanities, holding positions motors for the brick machine lived in C h Vt Montevideo, Miss., the son of in three capacities in St. Paul, replacing the horses turning e ca, . the,Rev, and Mrs. S.S. Farley. Minn., Souix City, Iowa, and the sweeps. This moder- He graduated from Hut- Canton, Ohio, and at nization would have been WARREN-- Kenneth E. Besides his widow, heleaves chinson (Minn.) High School retirement in 1965 at Berea more of an investment than Roberts, 71, of Warren, N.H., a daughter, Mrs. Frank C. in 1912, from the Hamline College in Kentucky. was possible or practical at died Aug. 15 in Sceva Speare (Jeanette) Wiggin, Tilton, University in 1916 and the Mr. Farley and his wife this hrickyardat that time. Hospital in Plymouth, N.H., N.H.; four sisters, Mrs. Lloyd Westminster Choir College in made their home with their During the last years, after several months of (Mila)Rogers, W. Newbory; 1954. son Russell in Strafford. Eustache used to work illness. Mrs. Franklin (Myrtle) In 1921 he married his He is survived by his wife, a daytimes in the brickyard He was born April 19, 1911, Burbank, Chelsea; Mrs. college sweetheart, Helen sister, three sons and ten here, then sometimes work all in Warren, Ariz., when it was .Clifford (Jeanette) Scofield, Beth Wood and they grandchildren. night supervising the kilns at still a territory, son of Elmer Cheshire, Conn., and Mrs. celebrated their 61st wedding A memorial service was Dwight Stone's brickyard C. and Alma (St. John) Alma Turner, Umatilla, Fla.; anniversary in 1978. held at the United Church of above Wells River (near Roberts. As an infant, he five brothers, John H. Egley, After a brief service with Stratford. Burial was in the where Otis Guay now lives, came with his parents and Mount Dora, Fla.; L. Karl the Army Chemical Warfare StraffordCemetery. near Warner's Gallery and the brother to Chelsea where he Roberts, Monkton; Robert Service in 1918, he taught In lieu of flowers, memorial highway garage). Wilfred spent hischildhood. Roberts, Boynton Beach, chemistry at South Dakota contributions may be made to says those long hours of work He married Ethel Avery of Fla.; Bruce Roberts, Hen- State College. the United Church. of Straf- probably were one cause of Warren, N.H., Oct. 2, 1936. dersonville, Tenn., and Mr. Farley had a lifelong ford, or to the Union Church of the ruin of his father's health. They had spent their married William Roberts, Chelsea, as association with music, youth Berea, Kentucky, 40403. He finally closed the life there, where he was welLas nieces and nephews, and the Protestant church as brickyard in 1922. employed in a sawmill. His funeral service was held in the Mayhow Funeral Home in Plymouth, N.H., with burial Goshen Church Annual inWarren, N.H. BACK YO Among those attending were Meeting held 2q Mrs. Franklin Burbank, SCHOOl --__ Chelsea; Mrs. Richard Campbell, Montpelier: Karl BRADFORD-- The 147th It was suggested by Robert Roberts and Mrs Robert Annual Meeting of the Goshen Fatherley that agathering be White, Monkton; Richard CLOTHES Church was held Sunday, planned for next summer to be Roberts, Colchester; Mrs. August 29, at 3:00 p.m. in the an "Old Home Day" at the William Marquis, Cornwall; historic meetinghouse on Church, when longtime Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Rogers Goshen Road in Bradford. members now living outside and Steven Rogers, W. t:nn The meeting was called to the community, could plan to Newbury; Ted and Bud II lldCllll order by Howard Webster, come to Goshen for this Rogers, Bradford; Mr. and committeeman. Lloyd Rogers special program, as well as Mrs. Burton Pike, Newbury; 61RLS   of W. Newbury was elected local parishioners, who share Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roberts, moderator. Reports of the an interest in the historic Boynton Beach, Fla.; Mr. and clerk and the treasurer were landmark. Alyce Ronxo, Mrs. Clifford Scofield, BOYS followed by election of three Margaret Webster and Cheshire, Conn.;Mr. and Mrs. { committeemen. They are: Emeline Fatherley were William Roberts of Chelsea Lloyd Rogers, Orville Tucker, named as the committee for and Gary Dodge, Rochester, ,, and Howard Webster. Robert this event. N.Y. E. Fatherley was re-elected as New members who joined $I8 4-14 treasurer and Emeline W. the Goshen Church are: Doris NAME IIRANO$ 0U Fatherley was elected clerk. A. French of Piermont, N.H., A discussion followed Sheryl Tucker of E. Corinth, Lou/$e A. Ha//, 84, gN0W9 concerning the continuing Stephen W. Clark, Mr. and maintenance and repair of the Mrs. Howard Hatch, Mr. and /nterned/n O/ford TRUST property. 00ay. e will arrange for additional Rubenfeld, and Dale Gilson, SUNCITY, CALIF.-- Louise Ttlth- Tex drainage work to he done all of Bradford. A. Hail, 64, of Sun City, Calif. along the northeast side of the The date of Sunday, August died there August 14. *Billy property, as well as roof 28, 1983 at 3 p.m., was set for She was born in Springfield, the Kid repair around the steeple next years' Annual Meeting of Mass., March 31, 1894. She is area. theGoshen Church. survived by two daughters- Mrs. Bernice R. Drnec and  4 Levis ,, Mrs. Thelma R. Wohlstrom MASONIC LODGE NEWS by GEORGE DURGIN I1 I BRADFORD--Charity Lodge their-power to make this a 43 A.F. & A.M. wishes to notify meal to be remembered. all brothers that plans are Visitation ceremonies are to being formulated for a busy follow the supper. Charity "ensuing year." Lodge 43 is hoping for a good It is hoped that many will turn out to welcome District get into the swing and have a Deputy Grand Master Kendall "ledge night" each month. H. Odell. The next regular meeting is Brothers, it is hoped, will be to be held in Bradford Masonic honored at this time with a Apartments on Monday night, visit and address by Sept. 13. This is to he followed M,W.G.M. Brother Edward R. on Sept. 21 by one of the out- Eurich. W.M. Cecil Lanpher standing events of the urges all brothers to attend fraternal year. This is the the regular meeting on the night when Charity Lodge 43 l.th of September and for A.F. and A.M. will he host for special meeting on the 21st of the District Meeting. September. You will enjoy The event starts with the them both if you attend, so serving of a fine supper at 6:30 why not mark your calendar p.m. Bill and his gals from the and be there for both Eastern Star will do all in meetings. "foundation" he said is forma] court "By dealing suc-  ,,J J,-m--,q-m-,. ,, , educational training he cessfuily with juvenile of- received during his first term. fenders, ' McKnight believes, This has included instruction "'we can decrease the number in arson prosecution at the who become repeat of- F.B.I. Academy, several fenders." D.W.I. seminars, par- McKnight is a member of ticipation in a child abuse the National District Attor- seminar, and training in trial ney's Association and is now advocacy at the Harvard Law serving as a director and School. secretary of the Vermont McKnight thinks one of the State's Attorney's significant accomplishments Association. of his first term is the He' is married to Susan establishment of the Orange McKnight who teaches social County DiversionProgramfor studies at Union 32 High first-time juvenile offenders. School  and is currently doing graduate work at Dartmouth College. QUOTE "Courage is that which lies Wednesday, Sept, 1 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m. WEST FAIRLEE: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. WELL RIVER: BMU School Board, 7:30 p.m. WARREN: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. z BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p,m. Monday, Sept. 6 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00p.m. Tuesday, Sept. WOODSVILLE: Precinct Commisaioners, 7:00 p.m. GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 8 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30p.m. HAVERHILL: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. He worked with Senator Allen Avery and a group of Orange County citizens to set up the program which is now func- tioning and receiving cases. The program seeks to provide restitution to victims and to half way between rashness hold a young offender ac- and cowardice." countable to the community m Cervantes and one son George A. Red- ding, all of California; six USE YOU CH {/NT grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Interment took place in the Orford Street Cemetery, Orford, N.H. The Hale Funeral Home of Bradford, Vt, was in charge of Woodsville, N.H. St. Jolmsbury, Vt. arrangements. Win a FREE Pair of tickets to the BILL MONROE CONCERT in t. Johnsbury Any new subscription received at the Journal Opinion office by Thursday, September 2 at 12 Noon will be eligible for a drawing of 2 tickets to this fabulous concert by the "Father of Bluegrass Music", Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass BOys. This concert is IX'Obably the only appearance of Bill Monroe in New England. Any new subscriptiov received by the JO, eider by phone, mail, or hand-delivered between now and Thursday Noon will be put into a hat and a lucky winner of two ticket will be drawn. Subscription to the Jom, nal Opinion is $9.00 per year in Vermmt and New Hampshire ($7.00 for senior c) and $11.00 out of state. Concert to be held at Fuller Hail, St. Johnsbury Academy, Main Stre St, Johnsbury, Vermont on Friday, Septmntm. $ at 8 p.m. Value of tickets is $14. HURRY1 Concert is this Friday evening. September 1, 1982-The Journal Opinkm.Page 5 ermont's race.for Lt. Governor tors Note: This feature presents political statements submitted by Vermont candidates for the Positions of Governor and Lt. Governor to the Vermont eekJY Publishers Association. The candidates were ed by th6 group to respond to the question: "Why are you the person who should hold the office you f Sek?" Some candidates are missing, but spokesman or the Vermont Weekly Publishers said that each Candidate's office was contacted at least twice. Each Candidate was asked to write their own material for the rather than sending professionally written Nancy Fean Stembach, ' Liberty Union a candidate for the office of lieutenant governor in the t of Vermont I intend to exercise the franchme of all the of Vermont--the right to run for political office. As a a realize that with limited time and money d not be a possibility in either of the other political equal importance is the opportunity to run for a party whose platform has always been one of 1970 when it opposed the Vietnam War. Mem- in the Liberty Union Party is open to all and decisions at by consensus. The consensus has always been tlie way to peace. is a democratic economy. Production for in the peaceful conduct of their lives and to the rest of the world where it should be to be good. have showed the way to such voting for a nuclear freeze. I would consider to serve them governor, one of my main concerns would participation in and access to the process This might mean convening the legislature at raore accessible to the public, as well as encouraging active participation of school-age citizens. Tom Rvan, Democrat decision to run for public office stems from a growing for the economic and social disruption taking place As I see it, the state of the economy is the issue in this election. A strong economy is to create and maintain worthwhile jobs for provide decent and affordable housing for our save the family farm, maintain social security t, kep inflation under control, provide quality insure that all areas of the state share in the s of future growth. has been in business, in banking, in development, in community service, and in revitalization. This experience has yielded solid each of these areas. to use this economic understanding and experience Vermont respond to shifting national forces in a will benefit the state and its people. This response forming a planning partnership with groups in to insure that growth is channelled in a way local needs and desires. I would be a strong e for bringing about that investment, both public and ' to achieve local economic goals. purpose of these efforts would be to help create opportunities. The office of the lieutenant can be used to "open doors" to business leaders. It to use the office to assist our development in bringing about the location and expansion of businesses in the state. through Act 250, has demonstrated the ad- of constructive long-range planning with emphasis and self-sufficiency. I believe that the time to bring all concerned citizens into the planning as the surest means of assuring a strong and viable Peter Smith, Republican Vermont needs a lieutenant governor who can be effective working in the Legislature, with the governor, and with the people of the state. As state senator, I held 25 community meetings in order to hear citizen concerns. As a result of these meetings, I sponsored legislation deregulating day care and returning to state employees and teachers over $500,000 wrongfully taken from them by the state. Because they are so effective, I will continue the practice of holding community meetings if elected lieutenant governor. In the Legislature, no one gets things done alone. The lieutenant governor should he a coalition-builder, working with senators and House leaders alike to focus on bills which are important to Vermont. My legislative priorities include: tougher drunk driving laws, strengthening job training, stopping the increase in health care costs, and finding a fairer approach to electric billing than seasonal rates. As state senator, I was able to see much of my own legislation passed into law, including bills to guarantee student loans and provide scholarship money to adults who can only attend college part-time. I am particularly proud of my role in helping to pass the new State Aid to Education law, which gives 23 million dollars to local communities to use for funding educational programs or local property tax relief. I believe that my extensive experience in education (president and founder of the Community College of Ver- mont), my years of service in local government, my career as a small businessman, and my service as a state senator will help me be effective as ,Vermont's next lieutenant governor. Chester Scott Jr., Republican Vermont faces major challenges and opportunities in the next several years as we adjust to the change in relationships between Federal, State and Local government under the new Federalism. In addition we have to address the problems inherent in the current recessionary period. All this in ad- dition to the ongoing challenges of landfill pollution, acid rain and solving our energy problems. These solutions are going to take all the experience, all the knowledge, and all the ef- forts we can muster in the private and public sector. As we look at the constitutional offices of the State we are indeed fortunate to have one of the strongest most experienced teams in our history with Governor Snelling, Emery Hebard, Treasurer, Jim Douglas, Secretary of State and Alex Acebo, Auditor of Accounts. Three of these men have worked their way up through the Legislative Branch of State Government. How you are to choose the person for theAgcond highest state office andyou have a clear choicb. My candidacy for Lt. Gov. offers the most experienced person for the job. I am the only candidate for Lt. Governor who has: Served in local government for over a dozen years, first as a lister then as a selectman for the past 12 years, served as a member of the House of Representatives, served 6 years in the Senate, worked for 18 years on the financial management team of a major Vermont Corporation, chaired and been a member of the Joint House and Senate Committee on Energy, served on the Appropriations committee of the Legislature and gone through the hearings on the State Budget, served on the Senate General Affairs, Education, Energy and Natural Resources Committees, was chosen by the Senate leadership to serve on the State Colleges Board of Trustees to help restore financial integrity of the system. It is not that as an individual I see myself, as better than anyone else. but to the contrary, an average hard working person who has been given an opportunity to serve and grow in knowledge by the voters in my town and county. It is this investment by the voters that I will bring to work for Ver- monters in the Lt. Governor's office. Orange County State's Attorney race Editor's Note: The race for Orange County State's Attorney this year is unique in that the race is likely to be decided during the Sept. 14 primary election. Both incumbent James McKnight and challenger Louis Cattani are running on the Republican ticket. Both men have been campaigning hard for the primary knowing that a win for the Republican nomination will virtually assure election without opposition from a Democratic candidate in November. Cattani, Republican River Cattani said he bad never J. Cattani has lost a DWI trial while he was James McKni00ht, Republican CHELSEA Orange County State's Attorney James D. that he is a can- Deputy State's Attorney in McKnight has formally an- of Orange Caledonia County. He also nounced that he is seeking re- ,torney. says he believes "there is a election to a second term. He said Cattani, special need for firm and has heId this office since the people of consistent prosecution" of nty vigorous, juvenile offenders. Cattani effective en- said he supports the state's of the criminal new juvenile diversion state." Cattani program. State's "In my opinion, diversion Y deters juvenile delinquents 1980, from becoming adult Wells River and criminals," he said. soon af- After resigning as Deputy State' Attorney in March of )loyment as 1980, Cattani opened a private Attorney, I law practice in St. Johnsbury jury trials to before moving to Wells River these were 11 in November of 1980. Cattani, 34, has been a Iobtained resident of Vermont since in all 11 of 1973. He received his un- Cattani. dergraduate education at mi Wagner College on Staten Island in New York. He received his law degree, cum laude, from Vermont Law School in 1977, graduating sixth in his class. He is married to the former Jonnie Crawford, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold and Helen Crawford of South Royalton. Jonnie own. and manages a store in Wood- sville. Cattani is a member of the Woodsville-Wells River Rotary Club. Cattani says he has attended out-of-state seminars and courses in trial techniques, advanced criminal trial tactics, and vehicular homocide that have increased his skills as a prosecutor. "I intend to bring a new measure of professionalism and ability to the office of Orange County State's Attorney," said Cattani. February, 1979. In making his an- nouncement. McKnight cited on-the-job experience as one part of a sound foundation for serving a second term. The cases he has handled have ranged from traffic offenses to first degree murder. By representing the State in these cases, he noted, "one learns to make decisions, work with police, witnesses and victims. and effectively prosecute offenders. In' this process. I have built relationships and worked with people whose knowledge and assistance would be helpful in a second term." The second part of the James MeKnight Madeline(Smith) Fortier S Humphrey attends realtors meeting dws after Ion00 illness BRADFORD-- Jerry J. N. HAVERHILL Madeline  Ingerson, of Woedsville; eight Humphrey, broker for Cen- (Smith) Fortier, 64, died grandchildren; two great- tury 21 Valley Associates of Sunday, August 22 at the grandchildren; two brothers, Bradford, recently attended Cottage Hospital in Woodsville Carl Smith of Granby, Conn., the Summer Management following a long illness. Obituaries .' 1? a setting other than juvenile and L yle Smith of Man-Ed ard R Ch 75 Fair in Portsmouth, N.H., She was born on March 20, chester; two sisters, Alice W asson, , sponsored by the Regional 1918, in Lyman. Bigelow of N. Haverhill 'and Office of Century 21 of New Before her illness she was Bernice Boomhower of h d lh, d m Pierln England, Inc. employed at Forrest Hills, Woodsville; several nieces a e ont Owners and managers from Ames and the First National and nephews. PIERMONT Edward R. and Boy Scouts of America in 150 Century 21 offices in four stores, all in N. Haverhill. Funeral services were held Chasson, 75, died Saturday, Lynn, Mass. He was on the New England states attended She is survived by her at the Ricker Funeral Home, August 21 at the Glover town advisory board in [he full day conference to hear husband, FredEFortierofN. Birch Lane, Woodsville. The Memorial Hospital in Nahant, Mass., and was the and share management Haverhill; a son, Senior Rev. Edwin Milne officiated. Needham, Mass., after a past vice president of Lake techniques highlighted by real Master Sgt. Floyd E. Fortier, Burial was in Ladd Street sudden illness. Armington Assn., Piermont. estate expert, Dexter USAF, of Rantoul, I11.; a Cemetery in Haverhill. He was born in Lakeport He is survived by his wife, Mayworm of Michigan. In daughter, Mona Jean and was a manager for the Esther D. Chasson of Green addition, numerous round- New England Telephone Valley; and one son, Timothy on Millica Ig4LSU'I" Company before retiring in ChassonofGrinnell, lowa. Creative Financing and anor n Graveside services were Working with Investors were conducted. Mr. Chasson moved from held in th! Glencliff Cemetery li ed in Wentworth Piermont four years ago to inGlencliff. New Regional educational V Green Valley, Ariz., and was Those who wish may make programs for second half 1982 were unveiled and a panel WABAN, Mass.-- Mrs. and of the Woman's Club. spending the summer in contributions in his memory to Needham, Mass. the Leukemia Fund, in care of discussion with represen- Eleanor Millican died in her She is survived by three He was a member of the the Dartmouth-Hitchcock tatives from several lending sleep Saturday, August 29, at sons: Charles F. of Lexington, Rotary Clubs of Lancaster, Medical Center, Hanover, institutions was presented, the Brae Burn Nursing home Mass., John R. of Hudson, Fla. Laconia and Lynn, Mass. He N.H. 03755. in Waban, Mass., after a long and Andrew M. Jr. of Sebring, belonged to North Star Lodge, The Ricker Funeral Home illness. Fla.; two daughters: HelenC. F&AM of Lancaster and was in Woodsviile is in charge of She was 97 years of age. She Dassey of Arlington, Mass., involved in Bay Shore Council arrangements. was born in Moncton, New and Alice Mr. (Mrs. Leland Brunswick, Canada. Libbey) of Wentworth; many k Over the River The widow of Andrew grandchildren and several (continuedfrompage4) Millican who died some 26 great grandchildren. DO ald C Farley 88; ville from a location near years ago, Mrs. Millican lived Funeral services were held n , , Grafton Motors, excavating in Wentworth for 46 years. She mid-week in Arlington, Mass., part of the area that later attended the Congregational with the Saville Funeral Home was eauca'or,u t musician become the new route through Church here and was a in charge. Woodsville. member of the Ladies' Aid Another problem in the ' STRAFFORD Donald C. an organist, choir director, later years was that other eth E R berts 71 Farley, 88, died Sunday, director of Christian Ke August 22 at his home. He was education and teacher of mechanized,brickyards withwere electricbeing  O 9 ; born on March 23, 1894, in Humanities, holding positions motors for the brick machine lived in C h Vt Montevideo, Miss., the son of in three capacities in St. Paul, replacing the horses turning e ca, . the,Rev, and Mrs. S.S. Farley. Minn., Souix City, Iowa, and the sweeps. This moder- He graduated from Hut- Canton, Ohio, and at nization would have been WARREN-- Kenneth E. Besides his widow, heleaves chinson (Minn.) High School retirement in 1965 at Berea more of an investment than Roberts, 71, of Warren, N.H., a daughter, Mrs. Frank C. in 1912, from the Hamline College in Kentucky. was possible or practical at died Aug. 15 in Sceva Speare (Jeanette) Wiggin, Tilton, University in 1916 and the Mr. Farley and his wife this hrickyardat that time. Hospital in Plymouth, N.H., N.H.; four sisters, Mrs. Lloyd Westminster Choir College in made their home with their During the last years, after several months of (Mila)Rogers, W. Newbory; 1954. son Russell in Strafford. Eustache used to work illness. Mrs. Franklin (Myrtle) In 1921 he married his He is survived by his wife, a daytimes in the brickyard He was born April 19, 1911, Burbank, Chelsea; Mrs. college sweetheart, Helen sister, three sons and ten here, then sometimes work all in Warren, Ariz., when it was .Clifford (Jeanette) Scofield, Beth Wood and they grandchildren. night supervising the kilns at still a territory, son of Elmer Cheshire, Conn., and Mrs. celebrated their 61st wedding A memorial service was Dwight Stone's brickyard C. and Alma (St. John) Alma Turner, Umatilla, Fla.; anniversary in 1978. held at the United Church of above Wells River (near Roberts. As an infant, he five brothers, John H. Egley, After a brief service with Stratford. Burial was in the where Otis Guay now lives, came with his parents and Mount Dora, Fla.; L. Karl the Army Chemical Warfare StraffordCemetery. near Warner's Gallery and the brother to Chelsea where he Roberts, Monkton; Robert Service in 1918, he taught In lieu of flowers, memorial highway garage). Wilfred spent hischildhood. Roberts, Boynton Beach, chemistry at South Dakota contributions may be made to says those long hours of work He married Ethel Avery of Fla.; Bruce Roberts, Hen- State College. the United Church. of Straf- probably were one cause of Warren, N.H., Oct. 2, 1936. dersonville, Tenn., and Mr. Farley had a lifelong ford, or to the Union Church of the ruin of his father's health. They had spent their married William Roberts, Chelsea, as association with music, youth Berea, Kentucky, 40403. He finally closed the life there, where he was welLas nieces and nephews, and the Protestant church as brickyard in 1922. employed in a sawmill. His funeral service was held in the Mayhow Funeral Home in Plymouth, N.H., with burial Goshen Church Annual inWarren, N.H. BACK YO Among those attending were Meeting held 2q Mrs. Franklin Burbank, SCHOOl --__ Chelsea; Mrs. Richard Campbell, Montpelier: Karl BRADFORD-- The 147th It was suggested by Robert Roberts and Mrs Robert Annual Meeting of the Goshen Fatherley that agathering be White, Monkton; Richard CLOTHES Church was held Sunday, planned for next summer to be Roberts, Colchester; Mrs. August 29, at 3:00 p.m. in the an "Old Home Day" at the William Marquis, Cornwall; historic meetinghouse on Church, when longtime Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Rogers Goshen Road in Bradford. members now living outside and Steven Rogers, W. t:nn The meeting was called to the community, could plan to Newbury; Ted and Bud II lldCllll order by Howard Webster, come to Goshen for this Rogers, Bradford; Mr. and committeeman. Lloyd Rogers special program, as well as Mrs. Burton Pike, Newbury; 61RLS   of W. Newbury was elected local parishioners, who share Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roberts, moderator. Reports of the an interest in the historic Boynton Beach, Fla.; Mr. and clerk and the treasurer were landmark. Alyce Ronxo, Mrs. Clifford Scofield, BOYS followed by election of three Margaret Webster and Cheshire, Conn.;Mr. and Mrs. { committeemen. They are: Emeline Fatherley were William Roberts of Chelsea Lloyd Rogers, Orville Tucker, named as the committee for and Gary Dodge, Rochester, ,, and Howard Webster. Robert this event. N.Y. E. Fatherley was re-elected as New members who joined $I8 4-14 treasurer and Emeline W. the Goshen Church are: Doris NAME IIRANO$ 0U Fatherley was elected clerk. A. French of Piermont, N.H., A discussion followed Sheryl Tucker of E. Corinth, Lou/$e A. Ha//, 84, gN0W9 concerning the continuing Stephen W. Clark, Mr. and maintenance and repair of the Mrs. Howard Hatch, Mr. and /nterned/n O/ford TRUST property. 00ay. e will arrange for additional Rubenfeld, and Dale Gilson, SUNCITY, CALIF.-- Louise Ttlth- Tex drainage work to he done all of Bradford. A. Hail, 64, of Sun City, Calif. along the northeast side of the The date of Sunday, August died there August 14. *Billy property, as well as roof 28, 1983 at 3 p.m., was set for She was born in Springfield, the Kid repair around the steeple next years' Annual Meeting of Mass., March 31, 1894. She is area. theGoshen Church. survived by two daughters- Mrs. Bernice R. Drnec and  4 Levis ,, Mrs. Thelma R. Wohlstrom MASONIC LODGE NEWS by GEORGE DURGIN I1 I BRADFORD--Charity Lodge their-power to make this a 43 A.F. & A.M. wishes to notify meal to be remembered. all brothers that plans are Visitation ceremonies are to being formulated for a busy follow the supper. Charity "ensuing year." Lodge 43 is hoping for a good It is hoped that many will turn out to welcome District get into the swing and have a Deputy Grand Master Kendall "ledge night" each month. H. Odell. The next regular meeting is Brothers, it is hoped, will be to be held in Bradford Masonic honored at this time with a Apartments on Monday night, visit and address by Sept. 13. This is to he followed M,W.G.M. Brother Edward R. on Sept. 21 by one of the out- Eurich. W.M. Cecil Lanpher standing events of the urges all brothers to attend fraternal year. This is the the regular meeting on the night when Charity Lodge 43 l.th of September and for A.F. and A.M. will he host for special meeting on the 21st of the District Meeting. September. You will enjoy The event starts with the them both if you attend, so serving of a fine supper at 6:30 why not mark your calendar p.m. Bill and his gals from the and be there for both Eastern Star will do all in meetings. "foundation" he said is forma] court "By dealing suc-  ,,J J,-m--,q-m-,. ,, , educational training he cessfuily with juvenile of- received during his first term. fenders, ' McKnight believes, This has included instruction "'we can decrease the number in arson prosecution at the who become repeat of- F.B.I. Academy, several fenders." D.W.I. seminars, par- McKnight is a member of ticipation in a child abuse the National District Attor- seminar, and training in trial ney's Association and is now advocacy at the Harvard Law serving as a director and School. secretary of the Vermont McKnight thinks one of the State's Attorney's significant accomplishments Association. of his first term is the He' is married to Susan establishment of the Orange McKnight who teaches social County DiversionProgramfor studies at Union 32 High first-time juvenile offenders. School  and is currently doing graduate work at Dartmouth College. QUOTE "Courage is that which lies Wednesday, Sept, 1 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m. WEST FAIRLEE: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. WELL RIVER: BMU School Board, 7:30 p.m. WARREN: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. z BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00 p,m. Monday, Sept. 6 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00p.m. Tuesday, Sept. WOODSVILLE: Precinct Commisaioners, 7:00 p.m. GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 8 ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30p.m. HAVERHILL: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. He worked with Senator Allen Avery and a group of Orange County citizens to set up the program which is now func- tioning and receiving cases. The program seeks to provide restitution to victims and to half way between rashness hold a young offender ac- and cowardice." countable to the community m Cervantes and one son George A. Red- ding, all of California; six USE YOU CH {/NT grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Interment took place in the Orford Street Cemetery, Orford, N.H. The Hale Funeral Home of Bradford, Vt, was in charge of Woodsville, N.H. St. Jolmsbury, Vt. arrangements. Win a FREE Pair of tickets to the BILL MONROE CONCERT in t. Johnsbury Any new subscription received at the Journal Opinion office by Thursday, September 2 at 12 Noon will be eligible for a drawing of 2 tickets to this fabulous concert by the "Father of Bluegrass Music", Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass BOys. This concert is IX'Obably the only appearance of Bill Monroe in New England. Any new subscriptiov received by the JO, eider by phone, mail, or hand-delivered between now and Thursday Noon will be put into a hat and a lucky winner of two ticket will be drawn. Subscription to the Jom, nal Opinion is $9.00 per year in Vermmt and New Hampshire ($7.00 for senior c) and $11.00 out of state. Concert to be held at Fuller Hail, St. Johnsbury Academy, Main Stre St, Johnsbury, Vermont on Friday, Septmntm. $ at 8 p.m. Value of tickets is $14. HURRY1 Concert is this Friday evening.