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Bradford , Vermont
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September 23, 1981     Journal Opinion
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September 23, 1981
 

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Page 4,The Journal Opinion-September 23, 1981 THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. . Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion I w.ok ,,,mm,., p,dm,bd b, O,.odfwd, Vo, m,,. ,,Ontto,, ,.m, : ?,J u. S., b. S.?.OO per yeer; $6.H for six moms; nt el Ite - $12.M per yeer  $1gu te s01 nemrm; emer cnnom , discNmt $LX. I hcemd cleso peSl peid et Bradford. Vermu! eso$1, pvblied by Nertbuot Puldislflq CempUTo Imc., 1 P.O. bx 378, Oredferd. i Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher ii v Bradford /  , Woodsville 02-222-528 !   603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper 00Editorial Organization administrative assistant to take care of the daily activities required to run a town. These activities include federal and state forms and responding to their inquiries; money management; grant administration; acting in behalf of the selectmen or trustees in their absence; purchasing agent; zoning administration; acting in behalf of the selectmen or trustees in their absence; purchasing agent; zoning administration; preparing financial reports; and a myriad of other clerical duties that  make government work. Bradford's administrative assistant is Susan Spaulding. She has acted in this capacity for the past four ,ears and has a proven track record and should continue to be a valuable employee in the future for both the town and the village. Our compliments go to the Bradford Organization is an important part of running any town efficiently. When the elected officials know what they will be facing at an up-coming meeting, they will be better prepared to make the right decisions that ultimately must follow. In years past, government was not quite so complicated, and the need for assistance from a manager was unnecessary. Today we live in a very complicated, cosmic society. It is not necessarily true that every dollar saved is a dollar earned, if in turn, we lose those same dollars and more through default in another area of government. Management is an important part of government. This is specifically where an ad- ministrator of a town of village earns his or her salary. Many area towns have opted Ior an administrator in one form or another. Such a town is Bradford. Both the town village , in an _ I Letters00to the Ed Press for.stron00 Thin00.one cords an Clean Ar Act TTeeEedrimo:nt Public Service dadit't;l caPn werl To the Editor: Board has just displayed a make it bigger yet, i As aft" from other arts of spectacular degree of en- over into more P . . . . . the country passes over wronmental shortstght m adlommg .towns, Vermont, we have benefited approving the 50 megawatt more ana more from the Clean Air Act B t it wood-burning plant for the acres, creating U . . will expire Sept. 30 and is cltyofBurhngton. sOre. costly ivOC being rewritten in the Senate Accoraing to newspape, r s mat reai!y Committee on Environment reports, the board s vermo m wants to and Public Works justification of this action is nould vermon Our Senator "Stafford is that"depending on the course kind of demand? chairman of that committee of events, there m a sub- What of the effect and stresses "the over- stantial risk that, without new of Vermont whelming silence" from any but those representing business and industry. He warns that Congress may be convinced to accept drastic weakening revisions. We need, personally and through our organizations, to let our Senators, Robert T. Stafford and Patrick J. Leahy and our Representative James M. Jeffords know that we consider clean healthful ......... barns Round air a priority. We should, also, alert our friends in other states to press their main reason for herd with 125milkers. awhile they kept sheep and congressional delegation to The old round barn and goats in the barn. At the provide us with a strong Clean the h)'use were sold to William present time the place is Air Act. and Donna Marshall of Fit- rented to Tom Hamon and his Gladys Lodge chburg, Massachusetts. They family. Dorset, Vt. had visions of rehabilitation the barn and establishing a Hastings barn, school on the place, but they found out that it would be too massive a project, there being Waterford was built in I903 for so much timber that would Winfield A. Hastings, To the Editor : have to be replaced. For (please turn to page 5) I was delighted to read on the front page of the Journal The building barns in a round shape was for efficiency iii feeding, milking, and cleaning. The central silo (or in some, a hay chute) acted as a central distribution point for the feed for the cattle, and there were no distant corners from which to drag hay. According to an article on round barns in Vermont Life, Summer 1971, one of the first round barns in the country was built by the Shakers in their community in Hancock, Massachusetts in 1824. During the 1890's the idea caught on in the Midwest, then spread to New England. Our Moore barn, East Barnet, 1899 The first round ham in Vermont was built in Barnet in 1899 for James Moore by Fred Quimby at a ct of less than $2000. It seems to have survived the rigors of time better than most of the other round barns in the area, even though it was built first. (More about the Moore A scenario or two capacity of the kind afforded this project, BED (Burlington Electric Department) will not be able to meet its demand in an efficient manner or may he unable to meet it at all." The only environmental con- siderations, apparently, in- volved the immediate en- vironment around the plan- t-possibility of air or water pollution, noise, traffic congestion, etc. The board sees no problems for the en- vironment beyond the plant site itself. In the above quote the word "demand" dominates. Whatever Burlington, Ver- mont's urban mushroom, demands it shall he given. Any Waterford, 1903 The round barn in "Button Up" for ener0000 savin00s There are times when information comes at you fast and furiously. When it is the kind of stuff you could just as well do without, you usually have only two options: digest it or ignore it. The trouble is that either of these can prove troublesome. Ignoring stuff always gives one a sense of uneasiness--perhaps the Yankee cocience just beneath the surface. Digesting such information leads wither to use (write a column) or, if that is inappropriate, to speculation. And speculation can get kind of scary at times. I've just gone through one of these "information" periods: did some reading, attended a couple of meetings, talked to some people. Result--I've got a head full of stuff, most of it in predictable disarray. Whether it can be put into some semblance of order is moot. What is clear is that a lot of Selectmen and Village Trustees for round barn and Century Farm chickens have been let loose. Luckily for most of us, they will theirwtoe4hceofanadrpa inanearlierarticle.) : not come home to roost in our time. When they do, " :      '       / !  : Somebody's going to have a messy crop to clean.  So just .what is this all about? Briefly, it concerns the The end of an era governor Meldrim Thomson, whom Loeb fiercely hacked throughout his years as governor and had helped Thomson get his start in state politics. Loeb was a political power of unequaled stature in the state, though his ethics were frequently questioned. Loeb was also a major force in maintaining the absence of a sales tax or state personal tax in New Hamp- shire. Hyde barn, Passumpslc, 1901 Very similar to the Moore barn and built by the same carpenter is the round barn built in Passumpsic for Hazes Hyde two years later, in 1901. The timber for the barn was cut from the surrounding hillsides by Mr. Hyde and sent down the slopes to his sawmill by way of wooden chutes. The sawmill used to be across the brook from the present buildings on a level part of the field. On one side of the barn, in fading paint, barely legible now, is the inscription, "1901 -- Mountain View Farm." George LaMothe bought the farm around 1950. Mrs. LaMothe told us that they used the original little milkhouse at first, but built larger one for a bulk tank in 1955. The barn had a stone foundation, with cement under the silo, but the rest of the floor was dirt. The ground floor was used for manure storage and they finally found it necessary to put in a complete cement floor -- or else have the spreader disappear out of sight in the mud. As in other round barns, the cows were kept on the first floor. The LaMothes started out with 12 cows, but soon had to put new planking in their stalls, which only lasted about three years. Each plank had to he ripped to a tapered shape, which took a lot of time and wasted a lot of lumber. With the way the stalls fanned out at the back, you would think the cows would have plenty of room, but the more space they had the more they moved around, and they were always stepping on each other and causing a lot of injuries and mastitis. Another disadvantage was that the silo, which was about 20 feet in diameter, was too wide for storing silage in, with so much surface open to the air at once, so the LaMothes finally built a separate silo. Any year that they needed extra space for hay storage they filled up the old silo with hay. In 1962 the LaMothes moved up the road a little ways and built a new house and farm buildings more adapted to modern equipment and methods. They now have a Colorado River, The Columbia River, something called the Ogalala aquifer, acid rain and what it may be doing to our soils as well as population shifts and the rearrangement of political clout that goes with it. What that has to do with the Connecticut River Valley is the source of my speculations out of which a few scenarios have sprouted. You may not reach the same conclusions and I don't think either of us will ever get to know whether or not these speculations or your con- clusions ever pan out. But our grandchildren are another matter. They will. First, why should we be at all concerned with the Colorado and Columbia Rivers? Both are entering critical periods in their histories. What happens to them may prefigure what happens to our rivers, including the Connecticut. To keep things simple let us see how the two are tied together and then concentrate on the Colorado for our speculations. The Colorado is 1400 miles long and every drop of its water is used up, so much so, that it no longer empties into the Gulf of California as it did years ago. Now it simply disappears into a wet spot south of the border. Its water does not satisfy the demands of the seven states in its basin and so they are looking to the Columbia. The Columbia does still empty into the Pacific Ocean, but every drop in it pushes some sort of turbine and also supports the salmon that are fought over by the Indians, who have unlimited fishing rights and everyone else who doesn't and wished he did. The Colorado Basin States would like to tap the Columbia The Northwestern States are going to see that they do not. The new wars of the West will not be over ranges and grazing rights fought out by cattlemen and sheepherders. They will involve those who think they have water and those who know they haven't. Out there, partner, water is serious business. The Colorado is a rather long river, some 1400 miles, and it yields about 14.8 million acre feet of water annually (an acre foot is 325,851 gallons) or 4,822,594,800,000 gallons; if you are impressed with large numbers. By comparison the Con- necticut is 410 miles long and provides roughly 13.5 million acre ft. Why an eastern river, less than a third the length of its western counterpart, should provide almost the same amount of water is due to one of those natural quirks that gives the eastern United States more than three times the rainfall of the west and creates the basis for the infighting that goes with too much thirst and not enoughwater. When it became clear that agriculture in the southwest could only be developed with outrageous quantities of water for irrigation, the Colorado seemed made for the job. Cutting through seven states and Mexico, flooding in the spring of most years, it seemed to provide enough for everybody. Therefore, during the thirties, a compact was drawn between the states of the Upper Basin (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico) and the Lower Basin (California, Arizona and Nevada). Each was to get 7.5 million acre feet of the seemingly abundant waters and Mexico 1.5 million. Lakes Mead and Powell were created to catch the spring run-off and put an end to down stream flooding. No one seemed to care that the 1950's showed higher than average precipitation (most Colorado water comes from the winter snow-pack) so 16.5 MAF were divided among the participants. Since the 1940's the river has seldom produced more than 14.5 million acre feet. The obvious difference has not been too much of a problem with Arizona unable touse her full share, a situation soon to change when the Granite Reef aquaduct goes into action. Phoenix and environs will then get some 3 million acre feet that California has been blithely "stealing" over the years. Ninety percent of the Colorado now goes for agricultural purposes. Some 3,400,000 acres of the Southwest are irrigated, the water being used and reused. As it passes through and over the soil it picks up. salt. Evaporation (remember this is a hot, arid area) tends to concentrate this salinity. By the time it crosses the border the river contains 1,500 parts per million of various salts. It is much too salty for plant use and its foul taste renders it undrinkable. Mexico finally got fed up and demanded that the water be desalinated before the border crossing. This is now done at federal (yours and mine) expense in a large scale desalin- zation plant on the river. Next time: " What this and more may mean to us here in the Northeast". Along with the passing of Man- chester Union Leader Publisher William Loeb, who died last Sunday, Sept. 13 of cancer in Burlington, Mass., passes the end of an era in New Hampshire politics. Though no one can justify Mr. Loeb's style of assigning blunt labels to those unlucky enough to become the subject of his one-sided, editorials, it can he said tlmt he ran his newspaper with an unquestioned regard for what he felt was just and right. The first amendment of the constitution should not defend those who only share our point of view. Loeb's power over the voters of New Hampshire was waning in recent years as witnessed by the defeat in the last two elections of former Political and journalistic ethics aside, it should be said in any epitaph that no one, from a base in New Hampshire, has ever wielded as much influence on the national level without actually being in a government office. To those sharing Loeb's particular brand of political ideology, be is an ally they will surely miss. i Congressman Judd Gregg reports The Clean Air Act Authorization for the Clean Air Act expires at the end of fiscal year 1981. The House and Senate consideration of the Act will be one of the most important and yet controversial environmental issues of the 97th Congress. Critics of the Act charge that it hinders industrial development and economic recovery; defenders state that it is the only means of ensuring acceptable air quality at a reasonable rate. Despite op- posing views, defenders and critics both want to modiiy the Act -- some making minor changes, others wanting to rethink the Act altogether. It is my position that the Clean Air Act during the past decade, has served as the primary vehicle for controlling and reducing air pollution. It is one of the country's most important public health laws and in its redrafted form it must maintain this status. The goal of clean air must not be abandoned. President Reagan, instead of submitting specific legislative language, has sent to Congress 11 broadly worded principles for revising the Clean Air Act. I disagree with a number of the President's positions. The following summary outlines some of the major areas of controversy between the Administration an proponents of a strong Clean Air Act tt will undoubtably be considered by the 97th Congress. National Ambient Air Quality Stan. dards-- The Clean Air Act presently Opinion, Sept. 9, that the newspaper plans a new weekly feature to be entitled, "Doing More with Less." The series will provide in- formation to readers on ways to conserve energy and thereby save money. i Nothing could be more appropriate at this time ! Vermont is about to launch a new Button-Up program for the month of October which will emphasize tightening up homes and other buildings in preparation for winter. The program is sponsored by various state agencies, businesses, etc., and has the enthusiastic support of Governor Snelling. It is hoped that the Button- Up program for energy saving requires ambient air quality standards to include a margin of safety for elderly, young, and health impaired persons. Congress must determine whether to require ambient air standards in the future to include a margin of safety to protect all people, or, to set standards that guard only agait "real health risks". Pollution from Mobile Sources-- Since trucks and cars are primary pollution contributors, the law requires new models to emit fewer pollutants each year using emission control devices. Questions which congress must now address are: should carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide and diesel emission standards be relaxed for automobiles and trucks; and should in- spectiou and maintenance programs be maintained or terminated? Deterioration of Existing Clean Air (Attainment Areas)-- In 90 percent of the country the air is already cleaner then the National Ambient Air Quality Standards require. In order to "prevent significant deterioration" (PSD) of these areas, should the Clean Air Act continue to require that relatively unpolluted air be safeguarded beyond national minimum requirements? If so, who should determine the different air ambient levels for first class air in wilderness and parklands, for second class air in more inhabited areas, and for third class air where industrial growth is spreading? {please turn to page 5) will become as popular and successful as Green-Up day in the spring. Vermont has already saved more heating oil and gasoline in the past few years than any other state in New England. Moreover, this saving took place during a period of strong economic growth and increase in annual income. But we can do much more. Many homes still need an energy audit and adequate weatherization. The Button-Up program will include state fairs, workshops, demonstrations, etc., and many towns will put on special community events. The ac- tivities will culminate during the week of October 10 to 17. Watch for more news about Button-Up programs. Margaret G. Watt Energy Coordinator for Fain'lee Task force on acid rain To the Editor: Did ye know that New Hampshire has a voluntary task force working toward educating the public and promoting legislative action to protect New Hampshire and the Northeast against the effects of Acid Rain? The New Hampshire Citizens' Task Force on Acid Rain, a non- profit organization, represents more than 100,000 individuals statewide who really care about the health, economics and quality of life in New Hampshire. Most recent to join our ranks has been the League of Women Voters. We are concerned about the increasing acidity in our lakes, ponds, and streams. New Hampshire, due to it's natural geology, has a low buffering capacity with which to offset the acid in our precipitation. We must act now before the effects are irreversible and need your help in support of our efforts. In addition to making congressional visits and contacts, we encourage public participation via our speakers bureau. We also have a pH monitoring program, to test for acid rain, which is ex- panding statewide. This year much of our focus centers around the Clean Air Act. We hope you will join us in our quest for clean air to insure the reauthorization of an ef- fective act. We are available to provide further information on Acid Rain or interviews. Joan A. Stevens N.H. Lung Assoc. "mining" of Because it is surely as any from the ground: off, no fertilizer "Burlington claimS depend on To start with, rise, due to other creasing demands wood, clear cut chipping will sued. To what degree? claims they will tons a year ! assessment puts over 31 cords an that the end of reasonable to Burlington can other town? so, with resultant poverishment, etc., not to effect on the Rather than course, Vermont adapting its social pattern to natural resourceS rebuilding its economy, while industrialization. It's time for a Public Service jurisdiction. At power matters from review. The PSB antedated Environmental been the other the PSB's scope been restricted matters: rates lines, etc. As sources the statewide impact of a new minimal: i.e. the Now even these, huge, cross-state Canada, go PSB should jurisdiction amend the statut that any new shall be of both GOLDEN History, in informs us what nment is. "If a man his wishes, he his trouble." B | Vermont Senate Notebook Scudder H. Parker Some thoughts on town "The trouble with party politics is that you have to work with so many people you don't agree with on many issues." "The trouble with party politics is that neither party really deals with the major issues facing our society." These two statements summarize many of the reasons people give as to why they do not get directly involved in the political process. There is an element of truth in both of them. If you go to your Democratic or Republican Town Caucus Tuesday evening, Sept. 22 at 7:30 p.m.; the chances are that you will be sitting with people you have found yourself in serious disagreement with in the past, or with whom you could have a good loud argument right now if nuclear power, tax cuts, highways or any of a dozen other issues came up. It may also be that no issues of substance come up at the caucus -- that you just elect officers and delegates to the County Committee meeting to be held next month, and then leave with polite good-byes. SO why should you put up with all that when you could stay home with your family, or when you feel you might be more effective working on the particular issue that is of the most immediate con- cern to you right now? The answer I'd like to offer is not a simple one. Perhaps it is more of a challenge to you than an answer. First, I believe it is the essence of good politics to sit down and try to co-operate with people you don't agree with on everything. If we stick with our single. issues and organize only around them, we may attain a certain degree of success. In the long run, however, single issue ac-" tivists tend to find themselves becoming isolated from and dismissed by people whose legitimate concerns they haven't the time to take seriously. If there are to be effective parties, they will grow out d ability to hear each other out, confidence that their heard and responded to disagreements within well as between them. facing us now is disagreements as opportuniti in depth and clarify the issues society, or whether we will them as embarassing should be hushed over in "harmony". - In other words, link between our with people we don't agree failure of our political parties with fresh and powerful new the problems we face. There more boring than a political pretends to be "for the really dare to hear what And it is your willingness mind, and then listen well long and hard that will whether the political process doesn't. This is not an for, abandon their special causes. vitation for people to begin way their concerns others at the level of commitments and goals. needs is not more simplistic solutions to our increasingly clear statements term principles on which we and the strategies we will use into practice. One final thought; one . ( ph.ase turn to page  Page 4,The Journal Opinion-September 23, 1981 THEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc. . Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion I w.ok ,,,mm,., p,dm,bd b, O,.odfwd, Vo, m,,. ,,Ontto,, ,.m, : ?,J u. S., b. S.?.OO per yeer; $6.H for six moms; nt el Ite - $12.M per yeer  $1gu te s01 nemrm; emer cnnom , discNmt $LX. I hcemd cleso peSl peid et Bradford. Vermu! eso$1, pvblied by Nertbuot Puldislflq CempUTo Imc., 1 P.O. bx 378, Oredferd. i Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher ii v Bradford /  , Woodsville 02-222-528 !   603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper 00Editorial Organization administrative assistant to take care of the daily activities required to run a town. These activities include federal and state forms and responding to their inquiries; money management; grant administration; acting in behalf of the selectmen or trustees in their absence; purchasing agent; zoning administration; acting in behalf of the selectmen or trustees in their absence; purchasing agent; zoning administration; preparing financial reports; and a myriad of other clerical duties that  make government work. Bradford's administrative assistant is Susan Spaulding. She has acted in this capacity for the past four ,ears and has a proven track record and should continue to be a valuable employee in the future for both the town and the village. Our compliments go to the Bradford Organization is an important part of running any town efficiently. When the elected officials know what they will be facing at an up-coming meeting, they will be better prepared to make the right decisions that ultimately must follow. In years past, government was not quite so complicated, and the need for assistance from a manager was unnecessary. Today we live in a very complicated, cosmic society. It is not necessarily true that every dollar saved is a dollar earned, if in turn, we lose those same dollars and more through default in another area of government. Management is an important part of government. This is specifically where an ad- ministrator of a town of village earns his or her salary. Many area towns have opted Ior an administrator in one form or another. Such a town is Bradford. Both the town village , in an _ I Letters00to the Ed Press for.stron00 Thin00.one cords an Clean Ar Act TTeeEedrimo:nt Public Service dadit't;l caPn werl To the Editor: Board has just displayed a make it bigger yet, i As aft" from other arts of spectacular degree of en- over into more P . . . . . the country passes over wronmental shortstght m adlommg .towns, Vermont, we have benefited approving the 50 megawatt more ana more from the Clean Air Act B t it wood-burning plant for the acres, creating U . . will expire Sept. 30 and is cltyofBurhngton. sOre. costly ivOC being rewritten in the Senate Accoraing to newspape, r s mat reai!y Committee on Environment reports, the board s vermo m wants to and Public Works justification of this action is nould vermon Our Senator "Stafford is that"depending on the course kind of demand? chairman of that committee of events, there m a sub- What of the effect and stresses "the over- stantial risk that, without new of Vermont whelming silence" from any but those representing business and industry. He warns that Congress may be convinced to accept drastic weakening revisions. We need, personally and through our organizations, to let our Senators, Robert T. Stafford and Patrick J. Leahy and our Representative James M. Jeffords know that we consider clean healthful ......... barns Round air a priority. We should, also, alert our friends in other states to press their main reason for herd with 125milkers. awhile they kept sheep and congressional delegation to The old round barn and goats in the barn. At the provide us with a strong Clean the h)'use were sold to William present time the place is Air Act. and Donna Marshall of Fit- rented to Tom Hamon and his Gladys Lodge chburg, Massachusetts. They family. Dorset, Vt. had visions of rehabilitation the barn and establishing a Hastings barn, school on the place, but they found out that it would be too massive a project, there being Waterford was built in I903 for so much timber that would Winfield A. Hastings, To the Editor : have to be replaced. For (please turn to page 5) I was delighted to read on the front page of the Journal The building barns in a round shape was for efficiency iii feeding, milking, and cleaning. The central silo (or in some, a hay chute) acted as a central distribution point for the feed for the cattle, and there were no distant corners from which to drag hay. According to an article on round barns in Vermont Life, Summer 1971, one of the first round barns in the country was built by the Shakers in their community in Hancock, Massachusetts in 1824. During the 1890's the idea caught on in the Midwest, then spread to New England. Our Moore barn, East Barnet, 1899 The first round ham in Vermont was built in Barnet in 1899 for James Moore by Fred Quimby at a ct of less than $2000. It seems to have survived the rigors of time better than most of the other round barns in the area, even though it was built first. (More about the Moore A scenario or two capacity of the kind afforded this project, BED (Burlington Electric Department) will not be able to meet its demand in an efficient manner or may he unable to meet it at all." The only environmental con- siderations, apparently, in- volved the immediate en- vironment around the plan- t-possibility of air or water pollution, noise, traffic congestion, etc. The board sees no problems for the en- vironment beyond the plant site itself. In the above quote the word "demand" dominates. Whatever Burlington, Ver- mont's urban mushroom, demands it shall he given. Any Waterford, 1903 The round barn in "Button Up" for ener0000 savin00s There are times when information comes at you fast and furiously. When it is the kind of stuff you could just as well do without, you usually have only two options: digest it or ignore it. The trouble is that either of these can prove troublesome. Ignoring stuff always gives one a sense of uneasiness--perhaps the Yankee cocience just beneath the surface. Digesting such information leads wither to use (write a column) or, if that is inappropriate, to speculation. And speculation can get kind of scary at times. I've just gone through one of these "information" periods: did some reading, attended a couple of meetings, talked to some people. Result--I've got a head full of stuff, most of it in predictable disarray. Whether it can be put into some semblance of order is moot. What is clear is that a lot of Selectmen and Village Trustees for round barn and Century Farm chickens have been let loose. Luckily for most of us, they will theirwtoe4hceofanadrpa inanearlierarticle.) : not come home to roost in our time. When they do, " :      '       / !  : Somebody's going to have a messy crop to clean.  So just .what is this all about? Briefly, it concerns the The end of an era governor Meldrim Thomson, whom Loeb fiercely hacked throughout his years as governor and had helped Thomson get his start in state politics. Loeb was a political power of unequaled stature in the state, though his ethics were frequently questioned. Loeb was also a major force in maintaining the absence of a sales tax or state personal tax in New Hamp- shire. Hyde barn, Passumpslc, 1901 Very similar to the Moore barn and built by the same carpenter is the round barn built in Passumpsic for Hazes Hyde two years later, in 1901. The timber for the barn was cut from the surrounding hillsides by Mr. Hyde and sent down the slopes to his sawmill by way of wooden chutes. The sawmill used to be across the brook from the present buildings on a level part of the field. On one side of the barn, in fading paint, barely legible now, is the inscription, "1901 -- Mountain View Farm." George LaMothe bought the farm around 1950. Mrs. LaMothe told us that they used the original little milkhouse at first, but built larger one for a bulk tank in 1955. The barn had a stone foundation, with cement under the silo, but the rest of the floor was dirt. The ground floor was used for manure storage and they finally found it necessary to put in a complete cement floor -- or else have the spreader disappear out of sight in the mud. As in other round barns, the cows were kept on the first floor. The LaMothes started out with 12 cows, but soon had to put new planking in their stalls, which only lasted about three years. Each plank had to he ripped to a tapered shape, which took a lot of time and wasted a lot of lumber. With the way the stalls fanned out at the back, you would think the cows would have plenty of room, but the more space they had the more they moved around, and they were always stepping on each other and causing a lot of injuries and mastitis. Another disadvantage was that the silo, which was about 20 feet in diameter, was too wide for storing silage in, with so much surface open to the air at once, so the LaMothes finally built a separate silo. Any year that they needed extra space for hay storage they filled up the old silo with hay. In 1962 the LaMothes moved up the road a little ways and built a new house and farm buildings more adapted to modern equipment and methods. They now have a Colorado River, The Columbia River, something called the Ogalala aquifer, acid rain and what it may be doing to our soils as well as population shifts and the rearrangement of political clout that goes with it. What that has to do with the Connecticut River Valley is the source of my speculations out of which a few scenarios have sprouted. You may not reach the same conclusions and I don't think either of us will ever get to know whether or not these speculations or your con- clusions ever pan out. But our grandchildren are another matter. They will. First, why should we be at all concerned with the Colorado and Columbia Rivers? Both are entering critical periods in their histories. What happens to them may prefigure what happens to our rivers, including the Connecticut. To keep things simple let us see how the two are tied together and then concentrate on the Colorado for our speculations. The Colorado is 1400 miles long and every drop of its water is used up, so much so, that it no longer empties into the Gulf of California as it did years ago. Now it simply disappears into a wet spot south of the border. Its water does not satisfy the demands of the seven states in its basin and so they are looking to the Columbia. The Columbia does still empty into the Pacific Ocean, but every drop in it pushes some sort of turbine and also supports the salmon that are fought over by the Indians, who have unlimited fishing rights and everyone else who doesn't and wished he did. The Colorado Basin States would like to tap the Columbia The Northwestern States are going to see that they do not. The new wars of the West will not be over ranges and grazing rights fought out by cattlemen and sheepherders. They will involve those who think they have water and those who know they haven't. Out there, partner, water is serious business. The Colorado is a rather long river, some 1400 miles, and it yields about 14.8 million acre feet of water annually (an acre foot is 325,851 gallons) or 4,822,594,800,000 gallons; if you are impressed with large numbers. By comparison the Con- necticut is 410 miles long and provides roughly 13.5 million acre ft. Why an eastern river, less than a third the length of its western counterpart, should provide almost the same amount of water is due to one of those natural quirks that gives the eastern United States more than three times the rainfall of the west and creates the basis for the infighting that goes with too much thirst and not enoughwater. When it became clear that agriculture in the southwest could only be developed with outrageous quantities of water for irrigation, the Colorado seemed made for the job. Cutting through seven states and Mexico, flooding in the spring of most years, it seemed to provide enough for everybody. Therefore, during the thirties, a compact was drawn between the states of the Upper Basin (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico) and the Lower Basin (California, Arizona and Nevada). Each was to get 7.5 million acre feet of the seemingly abundant waters and Mexico 1.5 million. Lakes Mead and Powell were created to catch the spring run-off and put an end to down stream flooding. No one seemed to care that the 1950's showed higher than average precipitation (most Colorado water comes from the winter snow-pack) so 16.5 MAF were divided among the participants. Since the 1940's the river has seldom produced more than 14.5 million acre feet. The obvious difference has not been too much of a problem with Arizona unable touse her full share, a situation soon to change when the Granite Reef aquaduct goes into action. Phoenix and environs will then get some 3 million acre feet that California has been blithely "stealing" over the years. Ninety percent of the Colorado now goes for agricultural purposes. Some 3,400,000 acres of the Southwest are irrigated, the water being used and reused. As it passes through and over the soil it picks up. salt. Evaporation (remember this is a hot, arid area) tends to concentrate this salinity. By the time it crosses the border the river contains 1,500 parts per million of various salts. It is much too salty for plant use and its foul taste renders it undrinkable. Mexico finally got fed up and demanded that the water be desalinated before the border crossing. This is now done at federal (yours and mine) expense in a large scale desalin- zation plant on the river. Next time: " What this and more may mean to us here in the Northeast". Along with the passing of Man- chester Union Leader Publisher William Loeb, who died last Sunday, Sept. 13 of cancer in Burlington, Mass., passes the end of an era in New Hampshire politics. Though no one can justify Mr. Loeb's style of assigning blunt labels to those unlucky enough to become the subject of his one-sided, editorials, it can he said tlmt he ran his newspaper with an unquestioned regard for what he felt was just and right. The first amendment of the constitution should not defend those who only share our point of view. Loeb's power over the voters of New Hampshire was waning in recent years as witnessed by the defeat in the last two elections of former Political and journalistic ethics aside, it should be said in any epitaph that no one, from a base in New Hampshire, has ever wielded as much influence on the national level without actually being in a government office. To those sharing Loeb's particular brand of political ideology, be is an ally they will surely miss. i Congressman Judd Gregg reports The Clean Air Act Authorization for the Clean Air Act expires at the end of fiscal year 1981. The House and Senate consideration of the Act will be one of the most important and yet controversial environmental issues of the 97th Congress. Critics of the Act charge that it hinders industrial development and economic recovery; defenders state that it is the only means of ensuring acceptable air quality at a reasonable rate. Despite op- posing views, defenders and critics both want to modiiy the Act -- some making minor changes, others wanting to rethink the Act altogether. It is my position that the Clean Air Act during the past decade, has served as the primary vehicle for controlling and reducing air pollution. It is one of the country's most important public health laws and in its redrafted form it must maintain this status. The goal of clean air must not be abandoned. President Reagan, instead of submitting specific legislative language, has sent to Congress 11 broadly worded principles for revising the Clean Air Act. I disagree with a number of the President's positions. The following summary outlines some of the major areas of controversy between the Administration an proponents of a strong Clean Air Act tt will undoubtably be considered by the 97th Congress. National Ambient Air Quality Stan. dards-- The Clean Air Act presently Opinion, Sept. 9, that the newspaper plans a new weekly feature to be entitled, "Doing More with Less." The series will provide in- formation to readers on ways to conserve energy and thereby save money. i Nothing could be more appropriate at this time ! Vermont is about to launch a new Button-Up program for the month of October which will emphasize tightening up homes and other buildings in preparation for winter. The program is sponsored by various state agencies, businesses, etc., and has the enthusiastic support of Governor Snelling. It is hoped that the Button- Up program for energy saving requires ambient air quality standards to include a margin of safety for elderly, young, and health impaired persons. Congress must determine whether to require ambient air standards in the future to include a margin of safety to protect all people, or, to set standards that guard only agait "real health risks". Pollution from Mobile Sources-- Since trucks and cars are primary pollution contributors, the law requires new models to emit fewer pollutants each year using emission control devices. Questions which congress must now address are: should carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide and diesel emission standards be relaxed for automobiles and trucks; and should in- spectiou and maintenance programs be maintained or terminated? Deterioration of Existing Clean Air (Attainment Areas)-- In 90 percent of the country the air is already cleaner then the National Ambient Air Quality Standards require. In order to "prevent significant deterioration" (PSD) of these areas, should the Clean Air Act continue to require that relatively unpolluted air be safeguarded beyond national minimum requirements? If so, who should determine the different air ambient levels for first class air in wilderness and parklands, for second class air in more inhabited areas, and for third class air where industrial growth is spreading? {please turn to page 5) will become as popular and successful as Green-Up day in the spring. Vermont has already saved more heating oil and gasoline in the past few years than any other state in New England. Moreover, this saving took place during a period of strong economic growth and increase in annual income. But we can do much more. Many homes still need an energy audit and adequate weatherization. The Button-Up program will include state fairs, workshops, demonstrations, etc., and many towns will put on special community events. The ac- tivities will culminate during the week of October 10 to 17. Watch for more news about Button-Up programs. Margaret G. Watt Energy Coordinator for Fain'lee Task force on acid rain To the Editor: Did ye know that New Hampshire has a voluntary task force working toward educating the public and promoting legislative action to protect New Hampshire and the Northeast against the effects of Acid Rain? The New Hampshire Citizens' Task Force on Acid Rain, a non- profit organization, represents more than 100,000 individuals statewide who really care about the health, economics and quality of life in New Hampshire. Most recent to join our ranks has been the League of Women Voters. We are concerned about the increasing acidity in our lakes, ponds, and streams. New Hampshire, due to it's natural geology, has a low buffering capacity with which to offset the acid in our precipitation. We must act now before the effects are irreversible and need your help in support of our efforts. In addition to making congressional visits and contacts, we encourage public participation via our speakers bureau. We also have a pH monitoring program, to test for acid rain, which is ex- panding statewide. This year much of our focus centers around the Clean Air Act. We hope you will join us in our quest for clean air to insure the reauthorization of an ef- fective act. We are available to provide further information on Acid Rain or interviews. Joan A. Stevens N.H. Lung Assoc. "mining" of Because it is surely as any from the ground: off, no fertilizer "Burlington claimS depend on To start with, rise, due to other creasing demands wood, clear cut chipping will sued. To what degree? claims they will tons a year ! assessment puts over 31 cords an that the end of reasonable to Burlington can other town? so, with resultant poverishment, etc., not to effect on the Rather than course, Vermont adapting its social pattern to natural resourceS rebuilding its economy, while industrialization. It's time for a Public Service jurisdiction. At power matters from review. The PSB antedated Environmental been the other the PSB's scope been restricted matters: rates lines, etc. As sources the statewide impact of a new minimal: i.e. the Now even these, huge, cross-state Canada, go PSB should jurisdiction amend the statut that any new shall be of both GOLDEN History, in informs us what nment is. "If a man his wishes, he his trouble." B | Vermont Senate Notebook Scudder H. Parker Some thoughts on town "The trouble with party politics is that you have to work with so many people you don't agree with on many issues." "The trouble with party politics is that neither party really deals with the major issues facing our society." These two statements summarize many of the reasons people give as to why they do not get directly involved in the political process. There is an element of truth in both of them. If you go to your Democratic or Republican Town Caucus Tuesday evening, Sept. 22 at 7:30 p.m.; the chances are that you will be sitting with people you have found yourself in serious disagreement with in the past, or with whom you could have a good loud argument right now if nuclear power, tax cuts, highways or any of a dozen other issues came up. It may also be that no issues of substance come up at the caucus -- that you just elect officers and delegates to the County Committee meeting to be held next month, and then leave with polite good-byes. SO why should you put up with all that when you could stay home with your family, or when you feel you might be more effective working on the particular issue that is of the most immediate con- cern to you right now? The answer I'd like to offer is not a simple one. Perhaps it is more of a challenge to you than an answer. First, I believe it is the essence of good politics to sit down and try to co-operate with people you don't agree with on everything. If we stick with our single. issues and organize only around them, we may attain a certain degree of success. In the long run, however, single issue ac-" tivists tend to find themselves becoming isolated from and dismissed by people whose legitimate concerns they haven't the time to take seriously. If there are to be effective parties, they will grow out d ability to hear each other out, confidence that their heard and responded to disagreements within well as between them. facing us now is disagreements as opportuniti in depth and clarify the issues society, or whether we will them as embarassing should be hushed over in "harmony". - In other words, link between our with people we don't agree failure of our political parties with fresh and powerful new the problems we face. There more boring than a political pretends to be "for the really dare to hear what And it is your willingness mind, and then listen well long and hard that will whether the political process doesn't. This is not an for, abandon their special causes. vitation for people to begin way their concerns others at the level of commitments and goals. needs is not more simplistic solutions to our increasingly clear statements term principles on which we and the strategies we will use into practice. One final thought; one . ( ph.ase turn to page