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September 23, 1981     Journal Opinion
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: September 23, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 Marceila Hoffman nmi 764-5795 i David Sauher, Election of officers for the Corm., sur- Pilgrim Youth Fellowship Daniel, of here will be held at the next witha visit, meeting. At this week's and all week t spent the week daughter in | l'laywood spent I in Boston this Raymond Pearle and N.Y., and Mrs. Recently the the 25th Mr. and Mrs. at the rs. Theodore Mr. and Mrs. Conn. [ Smith at the Scottish meeting there was some Bible Study and some discussion of ideas for the group. It was planned to have a film dealing with the problems of youth and their questions. Mrs. David Waters who is a candidate for ordination will go before the Ecclesiasticil Council of Grafton-Orange of the United Congregational Church of Christ on Sept. 27. The meeting will take place in the Bethany Congregational Church in Pike where she is the pastor. She will be judged as to her fitness to he ordained to Christian ministry. The service will convene at 3 p.m. United Churches of Christ in the Grafton-Orange area are invited to send four representatives. Gertrude Hedge 439-5422 ttrice Linton, in Bradford on Thursday. visiting her Frederick and Frank Miller and are installing solar heat for Colby. She the store. y. Michael Emerson spent the Mrs. Richard weekend with his parents, Mr. were in and Mrs. Ralph Emerson to officiate from his studies at Vermont Tech College, Randolph. Carl King, of Bert Johnson, Jr. was in the weekend Burlington one day this past Mrs. Duncan week on business. Albert Downing, Jr. en- has corn- tertained on Saturday evening of his home with an annual corn roast. George Hedge visited his Paul Hedge brother Ralph in Fairlee on sister and Sunday. Renwick Frost is helping to attended build his grandson's barn on !Weekend in E. their farm. play being Beatrice Emerson, Groton visited at the home of Mr. and ins'surgical Mrs. Ralph Emerson on Vermont Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Tim Claflin and William are the parents of a daughter attended the born on Sunday at the mental health Woodsville Hospital. WORK--(I-r) Resident engineer an Assistant Supervisor for Charwfll Inc., and Environmental Engineer's Willey stand in front of the main Woodsville sewer plant. Hospice of the Upper Valley Supportin00 control and self.respect in the midst of the crisis of illness and death by BOB ROSS LEBANON--It's not often that friends, neighbors and relatives can work hand-in- hand with health care professionals to ease the emotional crisis of illness and death. But they can and do through Hospice of the Upper Valley. While medical progress has been phenomenal in the last 35 years -- greater than all past history -- medical care, as possibly it must, seems in- creasingly concerned with curing disease rather than caring for patients. The situation is reinforced by the policy of third-party (health insurance) payers to reim- burse patients only for "skilled" services (i.e. -- physicians, laboratory tests, X-rays, medication, etc.). But Hospice believes there must be a balance. Human interaction and accompanying social, psychological and spiritual aspects often are not even considered in the total medical treatment plan. The limitations of this approach to medical care become pain- fully apparent in the case of a dying patient for whom cure no longer is an option. Today, Hospice makes the difference by accenting the elements of caring and con- cern for patient and family... both of whom can feel terribly alone at such times. Through self-evaluation and self-education, Hospice members, professional and volunteers alike, have come to a better understanding of patient and family needs. They have developed an awareness of health care and the many supportive resources already available; then they fill in the gaps. Avoiding duplication, they work closely with medical and nursing staffs as well as community agencies toward the total care and concern of both patient and family. For the past two years, Hospice of the Upper Valley has been providing such service to 84 families in some 13 towns in Vemmntmnd New Hampshire . . . a fact that clearly indicates the need for this kind of support in the Upper Valley. And that support has extended east and west from Canaan to Wood- stock, and north and south from Bradford and Orford to Windsor and Plainfield. In addition, inquiries come from local people visiting a dying friend or relative in another state, and not knowing how to act or what to say. Hospice also aids out-of-staters faced by tragedy in the Upper Valley. Two part-time staff members; a registered nurse and a social worker, assess each inquiry to determine if Hospice can help, initiate personal contact, then coordinate and guide volun- teers in a caring program. They also communicate directly with other professionals to help coor- dinate care, organize the overall Hospice program, and serve as patient advocates within the health care system -- all without charge to either patient or family ! Because Hospice services are free, the organization exists solely through the financial support of in- dividuals within the Upper Valley community. An annual fund appeal will begin im- mediately after its .annual meeting and program, Sept. 23. The two Hospice staff members continually update volunteers on developments within the health care field, and conduct extens'ie com- munity education programs. The latter includes bi-monthly volunteer education programs opne to the public; talks and workshops for schools, churches and any interested community group; a periodic newsletter for anyone with interest in Hospice; and a library of books and audio tapes that are available to the public Hospice believes the people in every community should have access to information on current medical thinking and funeral practices, as well as possible options. It believes, too, that everyone should be able to know what to expect In the case of crisis or tragedy and reflect on what they might want for themselves. GOSHEN CHURCH ANNUAL MEETING, AUGUST 23, 1981-- Kneeling, left to right: Robert E. Fatheriey, Treasurer and Historian steven Tucker, Com- mitteeman, James Gray, and John Fatherley. Standing are, left to right: Howard Webster, Committeeman; Margaret Webster, Emeline Fatherley, Alyce Ronzo, Lloyd Rogers, Robert Chipman, Orville Tucker, Committeeman; and Bill Poley. Vt. sheep program GRAFTON, VT.-- The Ver- mont Sheep Project will hold an introductory meeting for all existing and potential participants in Objective Three of the Sheep Project. Objective Three is open to any Vermont sheep producer who would like to upgrade his or her awareness and un- derstanding of sheep production and management. Producers will participate in seminars, workshops and demonstrations throughout the year dealing with sheep selection, nutrition, reproduction, health and management. Anyone interested in joining the program should respond to Becky Pearson, Coordinator, Vermont Sheep Project, Grafton, Vermont, 05146, before Oct. 1, with a registration fee of $10 for the year. Please indicate which of the introductory meetings you will attend. 1. Oct. 8, 1981 -- 6:00 p.m. Conference room of the Econo-Lodge Motel, 76 Wiliiston Road JBurlington, 2. Oct. 13, 19B1- 6:00 p.m. Project Headquarters, Grafton Village Garage, Grafton. Vt. THE SECOND CHILD- When a couple finds them- selves about to be parents, interesting things happen. They become proud, and anxious . . . full of hopes, fears, and dreams. The nursery needs to be prepared, child preparation classes attended, a doctor and hospital chosen. Grand- parents too, become involved in the excitement, activity and concern. One's whole concept changes from being a pair to being a family. That little life contained within has as perhaps its first social act, the power of making one a mother, or a father . . . the awe, and the responsibility. We study Dr. Speck, ask advice of relatives and friends to make sure that baby is growing properly and that we are doing everything just right. All the little mementos of growing are carefully saved. When the second baby arrives, it's not that parents don't care. There just isn't as much time for all that pam- pering and worrying. (And we've found that it's not really necessary; in fact, may not even be helpful.) "Button Up" Vermont's biggest energ,; conservation campaign In addition, a mini-grant competition has been an- nounced offering money to communities or non-profit groups proposing activities for Button Up week, which begins Oct. 10 and ends with Button Up Day on Oct. 17. Over 40 communities and groups have already planned Button Up activities. More are being added to the list daily, says Owen. I Other county chairpersons for Button Up include: Roger Desautels, Addison County; State Senator Scudder Parker, Caledonia County; Judy Lium, Essex County; John Finn, Franklin-Grand Isle Counties; Rep. William Farrell, Orleans County; State Senator Peter Smith, Washington County; Rep. Mary Ashcroft, Windham County; and State Senator Peter Welch, Windsor County. Lamoille'and Orange counties have commitees to organize Button Up activities. One noteworthy aspect of Button Up is its diverse sponsorship. For the first time, numerous public and private interests have joined hands to promote energy conservation. Represented on the state Button Up Com- mittee are: the five Com- munity Action Agencies, Public Service Department, State Energy Office, Residential Conservation Corporation, UVM Extension bus routes this -1'he second bus will start at will Atwell and proceed to Bate's, two main then to Buffalo Road (stop) to will begin East Side Road (stop) and at 7:30 a.m. then to the school arriving about 8:10. Will start at Newburv man dies in accident and NEWBURY--rA Newbury man his family's home in Newbury Bridge apparently died of hyper- in this thermia after climbing into a MONTPELIER--The Button Up campaign for energy conservation has drawn together many diverse groups, political leaders and communities to become the state's largest-ever effprt to inform Vermonters that conservation saves money and increases personal comfort. The Button Up concept originated in the Northeast Kingdom in May, spread through the halls of Mont- pelier and has since won support in every corner of the state according to Christopher Owen at the state energy office. The list of county chairpersons for Button Up is headed by former Governer Philip H. Hoff in Chittenden County. Service, the Memphremagog Group of Newport, the State Office on Aging and the Abenaki Self-Help Association. Many businesses, corporations and utilities have assisted the Button Up effort, I ObRua00es 1 Columbo Tassinari was born in CORINTH--Colombo one son Carl Tassinari of Tassinari, 74 of Pike Hill in Somerville, Mass.; 3 Corinth, Vt. died Saturday, daughters, Lois Tassinari of Sept. 19, at the Medical Center Somerville, Mass.; Mrs. Janet Hospital of Vermont in Denavan of Norwell, Mass.; Burlington. He was born in and Ruth Tassinari of Med- Plymouth, Mass. Sept. 26, 1906 ford, Mass.; three grand- the son of Frederick and children; one sister Noeme Theresa (Govoni)Tassinari. Montale of Wellesley, Mass.; As a young lad, he moved three brothers Frank of back to Italy where he at- Wellesley, Mass., Angelo and tended schools. After his Nando both of Bologna, Italy; schooling his parents moved several nieces and nephews. to Wellesley, Mass. where he A Mass of Christian Burial worked for the Town of was celebrated Monday, Sept. Wellesley for several years. 21, at 2:00 p.m. at Our Lady of On June 20, 1937 in Perpetual Help Church in Charlestown, Mass. he Bradford with Father Cannon married Louise Ghisellini of CSSR officiating. Charleston. In 1969 they Interment took place in the moved to Pike Hill in Corinth family lot in Sawyer where they had since made Cemetery, Bradford. The Hale their home. Funeral Home of Bradford form Vermonters that energy conservation can save them money and make their homes and offices more comfortable. Conservation can also strengthen Vermont's economy because it stems the flow of money spent on im- portedenergy. Button Up is acting as a catalyst for many com- munities to initiate energy conservation activities. For example, Morrisville will host an energy fair on Button Up Day with contests for wood stacking and coal shovelling. Middlebury will offer in- struction on making energy- saving window quilts. The Dover Town Energy Com- mittee is planning to weatherize a local public building. In all corners of the state, similar activities are being planned. Another Button Up activity is the entry of Newport into the International Energy Days Competition. This event, organized by the Northeast International Committee on Energy, matches Newport against communities in other New England States and Eastern Canadian Provinces. Last year Middlebury won grand prize. He is survived by his wife was in charge of Louise Tassinari of Corinth, arrangements. Servic00 held for Erwin Welch NEWBURY--Erwin I. Welch, N. Haverhill, and Mrs. Alice 23, died at his home here Perry, Newbury; a niece, Tuesday. Angela Perry and two Born in St. Johnsbury, Dec. nephews, Nicholas Perry and The Button Up Committee has announced a grant competition for communities and non-profit groups. Five grants of $100 each will be awarded to those submitting the best proposals for Button Other Button Up activities include: --The printing of 3,000 teachers' packets by the Public Service Department to encourage energy education in schools; --Television and radio public service announcements promoting awareness of Button Up; --The publishing of a newsletter, "Button Up Times," listing activities and appointments; --The printing of a free booklet for homeowners on do- it-yourself home weatherization. This booklet will be available in October. Persons who want more information about Button Up can call Margaret Nicely in Newport at 334-7316 or Christopher Owen in Mont- pellet at 828-2393. Information is also available by calling your local Community Action Agency and asking for the Button Up coordinator. too. Up activities by Sept. 25. A The many sponsors are decision will be announced organizing Button Up to in- Oct. 2. DIAMONDS WATCHES We Repair ACCUTI)N. TIMEX. and All Makes. Ssroads, bathtub full of water that was Hut-"too hot", according to and autopsy reports by state Route 25 Medical Examiner Eleanor tnd on to McQuillen released Wed- and then nesday, Sept. 16. arriving at The body of Erwin Welch' 23, was found in the bathtub of by his sister at about 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday Sept. 15. McQuillen reported that Welch's death resulted from a sharp increase in body tem- perature. Welch was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kendall and Shirley (Barnes) Welch of Newbury. etiITEl DATSUN, INC. NEW ARRIVAL Mr. and Mrs. Donald Locke of Bath are the parents of a new baby girl born on August 31 at Cottage Hospital. 24 HOUR EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE Orut/e County ,'gontol Ilooltb HASKELL JEWIE, LERS Littloton, NH 03561 __ _L) 444-3351 Parents are much more confident. It's not a change of role, just an addition. After all, we're old pros new; we've been through it once before. Most parents comment that their second children are more relaxed. First children enjoy the advantages of primacy. They are the only-one for a period of time as their siblings never are. Studies show that the first or only child is more likely to achieve social and financial recognition and success. (Me may also show more pressure induced anxiety.) Thoughts on this subject were occasioned by my four- year old's spending a week in Pennsylvania with her cousin. Suddenly little toddler "side- kick" becomes the whole show. She misses playing with big sister, but enjoys the unriveled access to Mama. If there's any moral to this, perhaps it is to treat our first born a bit more lightly, and occassionally arrange to give the next one (or ones) the whole stage. 22, 1957, he was son of Kendall Kendall Welch III. and Shirley (Barnes) Welch. His funeral service was held He had attended the upper Friday at 2 p.m. in the Valley Training Center in Newbury Congregational Lebanon, N.H.; the Oxbow Church of which he was a Vocational School and the member. Orange County Life Skills Burial was held in the Program, both in Bradford. Groton Village Cemetery. Besides his parents, he Arrangements were under the leaves two brothers, Kendall direction of the Ricker Welch IT, W. Fairlee and Funeral Home, Birch Lane of Martin Welch, Newbury; two WoodsviUe. sisters, Mrs. Winifred Patten, Laura M. Houston was 97 .years old STRAFFORD-- Laura M. New Hampshire and Houston died Friday, Sept. 18, Massachusetts. at a nursing home in Bald- Survivors irglude several winville, Mass. She was born nieces and nephews, including Feb. 26, 1884 in Stratford, Emma N, Carroll of Windsor daughter of Charles and and Charles W. Clark of Lyme Emma (Rowell) Houston. Center. Graveside services She grew up and attended were held Tuesday, Sept. 22 in school in Stratford, and was the Strafford Cemetery. employed in state hospitals in CarroU Jerome dies at 73 S. RYEGA'I--Carroll lrvin Corm, and retired in 19'71 after Next week in this column ,Merome, 73, formerly a 23 years of employment by the we'll discuss something resident of the Wolcott and Pratt-WhitneyCo. practical: do-it-yourself Craftsbury area, died Men- An avid hunter and suggestions for a preschool day, Sept. 14, in Central fisherman, he also maintained playground. If there is something you enjoy making or doing with your children; write to the Journal Opinion and share it with your neighbors in this column. Vermont Hospital, Berlin. a hobby shop where he built Born in Greensboro, Aug. novelties including artificial 17, 1908, he was son of William flowers which were sold George and Hattie M. throughout the United States (Marden) Jerome. and Canada. He had resided in Bristol, I Illlll Illll I I I No Need to Rush Over... USE TNI$ NAIIDY WANT AD DO-IT-YOItRSiLF KIT; i ========================================================= .:::..=::,.-:::::: . . To place your Ad... To find your Ad... Just pick the classification from this directory and moil your Classified Ad with your check for the proper amount to: JOURNAL OPIN ION P.O. Box 378 Bradford, Vermont 05033 ============================================================..:=::c:=::. CLASL,FIED ADVERTISING RATES $3 00 for 20 words per week 10 cents for each oddilionol word over 20 $1.00 for each additional week od is to run (up to 8 weeks) A $! .00 billing charge will be added to each classified that we bill Put. PLEASE CHECK CATEGORY YOU WISH TO HAVE YOUR CLASSIFIED LISTED UNDER ABSOLUTELY FREE LOST & FOUND PERSONALS CAR POOLS ANNOUNCEMENTS INSTRUCTION BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES SITUATIONS WANTED BOATS & ACCESSORIES COLLECTOR'S ITEMS RADIO & TV PETS COAL, FUEL & WOOD WANTED TO BUY LET'S SWAP GARAGE SALES ROOMS FOR RENT APARTMENT FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT HOUSE FOR SALE AUTOS & TRUCKS FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES SERVICES WANTED HELP WANTED MOTORCYCLES ======================================================================== PLEASE ENTER MY CLASSIFIED AD AS FOLLOWS: __._._-----,---- l 2 3 4 5 6 7 ,8. ________--- 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 25 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 3 t 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 START MY CLASSIFIED AD ON RUN MY CLASSIFIED AD TIMES. MY CHECK IN THE AMOUNT OF $ - _ ENCLOSED. TEL. ......................... : September 23, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 7 Marceila Hoffman nmi 764-5795 i David Sauher, Election of officers for the Corm., sur- Pilgrim Youth Fellowship Daniel, of here will be held at the next witha visit, meeting. At this week's and all week t spent the week daughter in | l'laywood spent I in Boston this Raymond Pearle and N.Y., and Mrs. Recently the the 25th Mr. and Mrs. at the rs. Theodore Mr. and Mrs. Conn. [ Smith at the Scottish meeting there was some Bible Study and some discussion of ideas for the group. It was planned to have a film dealing with the problems of youth and their questions. Mrs. David Waters who is a candidate for ordination will go before the Ecclesiasticil Council of Grafton-Orange of the United Congregational Church of Christ on Sept. 27. The meeting will take place in the Bethany Congregational Church in Pike where she is the pastor. She will be judged as to her fitness to he ordained to Christian ministry. The service will convene at 3 p.m. United Churches of Christ in the Grafton-Orange area are invited to send four representatives. Gertrude Hedge 439-5422 ttrice Linton, in Bradford on Thursday. visiting her Frederick and Frank Miller and are installing solar heat for Colby. She the store. y. Michael Emerson spent the Mrs. Richard weekend with his parents, Mr. were in and Mrs. Ralph Emerson to officiate from his studies at Vermont Tech College, Randolph. Carl King, of Bert Johnson, Jr. was in the weekend Burlington one day this past Mrs. Duncan week on business. Albert Downing, Jr. en- has corn- tertained on Saturday evening of his home with an annual corn roast. George Hedge visited his Paul Hedge brother Ralph in Fairlee on sister and Sunday. Renwick Frost is helping to attended build his grandson's barn on !Weekend in E. their farm. play being Beatrice Emerson, Groton visited at the home of Mr. and ins'surgical Mrs. Ralph Emerson on Vermont Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Tim Claflin and William are the parents of a daughter attended the born on Sunday at the mental health Woodsville Hospital. WORK--(I-r) Resident engineer an Assistant Supervisor for Charwfll Inc., and Environmental Engineer's Willey stand in front of the main Woodsville sewer plant. Hospice of the Upper Valley Supportin00 control and self.respect in the midst of the crisis of illness and death by BOB ROSS LEBANON--It's not often that friends, neighbors and relatives can work hand-in- hand with health care professionals to ease the emotional crisis of illness and death. But they can and do through Hospice of the Upper Valley. While medical progress has been phenomenal in the last 35 years -- greater than all past history -- medical care, as possibly it must, seems in- creasingly concerned with curing disease rather than caring for patients. The situation is reinforced by the policy of third-party (health insurance) payers to reim- burse patients only for "skilled" services (i.e. -- physicians, laboratory tests, X-rays, medication, etc.). But Hospice believes there must be a balance. Human interaction and accompanying social, psychological and spiritual aspects often are not even considered in the total medical treatment plan. The limitations of this approach to medical care become pain- fully apparent in the case of a dying patient for whom cure no longer is an option. Today, Hospice makes the difference by accenting the elements of caring and con- cern for patient and family... both of whom can feel terribly alone at such times. Through self-evaluation and self-education, Hospice members, professional and volunteers alike, have come to a better understanding of patient and family needs. They have developed an awareness of health care and the many supportive resources already available; then they fill in the gaps. Avoiding duplication, they work closely with medical and nursing staffs as well as community agencies toward the total care and concern of both patient and family. For the past two years, Hospice of the Upper Valley has been providing such service to 84 families in some 13 towns in Vemmntmnd New Hampshire . . . a fact that clearly indicates the need for this kind of support in the Upper Valley. And that support has extended east and west from Canaan to Wood- stock, and north and south from Bradford and Orford to Windsor and Plainfield. In addition, inquiries come from local people visiting a dying friend or relative in another state, and not knowing how to act or what to say. Hospice also aids out-of-staters faced by tragedy in the Upper Valley. Two part-time staff members; a registered nurse and a social worker, assess each inquiry to determine if Hospice can help, initiate personal contact, then coordinate and guide volun- teers in a caring program. They also communicate directly with other professionals to help coor- dinate care, organize the overall Hospice program, and serve as patient advocates within the health care system -- all without charge to either patient or family ! Because Hospice services are free, the organization exists solely through the financial support of in- dividuals within the Upper Valley community. An annual fund appeal will begin im- mediately after its .annual meeting and program, Sept. 23. The two Hospice staff members continually update volunteers on developments within the health care field, and conduct extens'ie com- munity education programs. The latter includes bi-monthly volunteer education programs opne to the public; talks and workshops for schools, churches and any interested community group; a periodic newsletter for anyone with interest in Hospice; and a library of books and audio tapes that are available to the public Hospice believes the people in every community should have access to information on current medical thinking and funeral practices, as well as possible options. It believes, too, that everyone should be able to know what to expect In the case of crisis or tragedy and reflect on what they might want for themselves. GOSHEN CHURCH ANNUAL MEETING, AUGUST 23, 1981-- Kneeling, left to right: Robert E. Fatheriey, Treasurer and Historian steven Tucker, Com- mitteeman, James Gray, and John Fatherley. Standing are, left to right: Howard Webster, Committeeman; Margaret Webster, Emeline Fatherley, Alyce Ronzo, Lloyd Rogers, Robert Chipman, Orville Tucker, Committeeman; and Bill Poley. Vt. sheep program GRAFTON, VT.-- The Ver- mont Sheep Project will hold an introductory meeting for all existing and potential participants in Objective Three of the Sheep Project. Objective Three is open to any Vermont sheep producer who would like to upgrade his or her awareness and un- derstanding of sheep production and management. Producers will participate in seminars, workshops and demonstrations throughout the year dealing with sheep selection, nutrition, reproduction, health and management. Anyone interested in joining the program should respond to Becky Pearson, Coordinator, Vermont Sheep Project, Grafton, Vermont, 05146, before Oct. 1, with a registration fee of $10 for the year. Please indicate which of the introductory meetings you will attend. 1. Oct. 8, 1981 -- 6:00 p.m. Conference room of the Econo-Lodge Motel, 76 Wiliiston Road JBurlington, 2. Oct. 13, 19B1- 6:00 p.m. Project Headquarters, Grafton Village Garage, Grafton. Vt. THE SECOND CHILD- When a couple finds them- selves about to be parents, interesting things happen. They become proud, and anxious . . . full of hopes, fears, and dreams. The nursery needs to be prepared, child preparation classes attended, a doctor and hospital chosen. Grand- parents too, become involved in the excitement, activity and concern. One's whole concept changes from being a pair to being a family. That little life contained within has as perhaps its first social act, the power of making one a mother, or a father . . . the awe, and the responsibility. We study Dr. Speck, ask advice of relatives and friends to make sure that baby is growing properly and that we are doing everything just right. All the little mementos of growing are carefully saved. When the second baby arrives, it's not that parents don't care. There just isn't as much time for all that pam- pering and worrying. (And we've found that it's not really necessary; in fact, may not even be helpful.) "Button Up" Vermont's biggest energ,; conservation campaign In addition, a mini-grant competition has been an- nounced offering money to communities or non-profit groups proposing activities for Button Up week, which begins Oct. 10 and ends with Button Up Day on Oct. 17. Over 40 communities and groups have already planned Button Up activities. More are being added to the list daily, says Owen. I Other county chairpersons for Button Up include: Roger Desautels, Addison County; State Senator Scudder Parker, Caledonia County; Judy Lium, Essex County; John Finn, Franklin-Grand Isle Counties; Rep. William Farrell, Orleans County; State Senator Peter Smith, Washington County; Rep. Mary Ashcroft, Windham County; and State Senator Peter Welch, Windsor County. Lamoille'and Orange counties have commitees to organize Button Up activities. One noteworthy aspect of Button Up is its diverse sponsorship. For the first time, numerous public and private interests have joined hands to promote energy conservation. Represented on the state Button Up Com- mittee are: the five Com- munity Action Agencies, Public Service Department, State Energy Office, Residential Conservation Corporation, UVM Extension bus routes this -1'he second bus will start at will Atwell and proceed to Bate's, two main then to Buffalo Road (stop) to will begin East Side Road (stop) and at 7:30 a.m. then to the school arriving about 8:10. Will start at Newburv man dies in accident and NEWBURY--rA Newbury man his family's home in Newbury Bridge apparently died of hyper- in this thermia after climbing into a MONTPELIER--The Button Up campaign for energy conservation has drawn together many diverse groups, political leaders and communities to become the state's largest-ever effprt to inform Vermonters that conservation saves money and increases personal comfort. The Button Up concept originated in the Northeast Kingdom in May, spread through the halls of Mont- pelier and has since won support in every corner of the state according to Christopher Owen at the state energy office. The list of county chairpersons for Button Up is headed by former Governer Philip H. Hoff in Chittenden County. Service, the Memphremagog Group of Newport, the State Office on Aging and the Abenaki Self-Help Association. Many businesses, corporations and utilities have assisted the Button Up effort, I ObRua00es 1 Columbo Tassinari was born in CORINTH--Colombo one son Carl Tassinari of Tassinari, 74 of Pike Hill in Somerville, Mass.; 3 Corinth, Vt. died Saturday, daughters, Lois Tassinari of Sept. 19, at the Medical Center Somerville, Mass.; Mrs. Janet Hospital of Vermont in Denavan of Norwell, Mass.; Burlington. He was born in and Ruth Tassinari of Med- Plymouth, Mass. Sept. 26, 1906 ford, Mass.; three grand- the son of Frederick and children; one sister Noeme Theresa (Govoni)Tassinari. Montale of Wellesley, Mass.; As a young lad, he moved three brothers Frank of back to Italy where he at- Wellesley, Mass., Angelo and tended schools. After his Nando both of Bologna, Italy; schooling his parents moved several nieces and nephews. to Wellesley, Mass. where he A Mass of Christian Burial worked for the Town of was celebrated Monday, Sept. Wellesley for several years. 21, at 2:00 p.m. at Our Lady of On June 20, 1937 in Perpetual Help Church in Charlestown, Mass. he Bradford with Father Cannon married Louise Ghisellini of CSSR officiating. Charleston. In 1969 they Interment took place in the moved to Pike Hill in Corinth family lot in Sawyer where they had since made Cemetery, Bradford. The Hale their home. Funeral Home of Bradford form Vermonters that energy conservation can save them money and make their homes and offices more comfortable. Conservation can also strengthen Vermont's economy because it stems the flow of money spent on im- portedenergy. Button Up is acting as a catalyst for many com- munities to initiate energy conservation activities. For example, Morrisville will host an energy fair on Button Up Day with contests for wood stacking and coal shovelling. Middlebury will offer in- struction on making energy- saving window quilts. The Dover Town Energy Com- mittee is planning to weatherize a local public building. In all corners of the state, similar activities are being planned. Another Button Up activity is the entry of Newport into the International Energy Days Competition. This event, organized by the Northeast International Committee on Energy, matches Newport against communities in other New England States and Eastern Canadian Provinces. Last year Middlebury won grand prize. He is survived by his wife was in charge of Louise Tassinari of Corinth, arrangements. Servic00 held for Erwin Welch NEWBURY--Erwin I. Welch, N. Haverhill, and Mrs. Alice 23, died at his home here Perry, Newbury; a niece, Tuesday. Angela Perry and two Born in St. Johnsbury, Dec. nephews, Nicholas Perry and The Button Up Committee has announced a grant competition for communities and non-profit groups. Five grants of $100 each will be awarded to those submitting the best proposals for Button Other Button Up activities include: --The printing of 3,000 teachers' packets by the Public Service Department to encourage energy education in schools; --Television and radio public service announcements promoting awareness of Button Up; --The publishing of a newsletter, "Button Up Times," listing activities and appointments; --The printing of a free booklet for homeowners on do- it-yourself home weatherization. This booklet will be available in October. Persons who want more information about Button Up can call Margaret Nicely in Newport at 334-7316 or Christopher Owen in Mont- pellet at 828-2393. Information is also available by calling your local Community Action Agency and asking for the Button Up coordinator. too. Up activities by Sept. 25. A The many sponsors are decision will be announced organizing Button Up to in- Oct. 2. DIAMONDS WATCHES We Repair ACCUTI)N. TIMEX. and All Makes. Ssroads, bathtub full of water that was Hut-"too hot", according to and autopsy reports by state Route 25 Medical Examiner Eleanor tnd on to McQuillen released Wed- and then nesday, Sept. 16. arriving at The body of Erwin Welch' 23, was found in the bathtub of by his sister at about 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday Sept. 15. McQuillen reported that Welch's death resulted from a sharp increase in body tem- perature. Welch was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kendall and Shirley (Barnes) Welch of Newbury. etiITEl DATSUN, INC. NEW ARRIVAL Mr. and Mrs. Donald Locke of Bath are the parents of a new baby girl born on August 31 at Cottage Hospital. 24 HOUR EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE Orut/e County ,'gontol Ilooltb HASKELL JEWIE, LERS Littloton, NH 03561 __ _L) 444-3351 Parents are much more confident. It's not a change of role, just an addition. After all, we're old pros new; we've been through it once before. Most parents comment that their second children are more relaxed. First children enjoy the advantages of primacy. They are the only-one for a period of time as their siblings never are. Studies show that the first or only child is more likely to achieve social and financial recognition and success. (Me may also show more pressure induced anxiety.) Thoughts on this subject were occasioned by my four- year old's spending a week in Pennsylvania with her cousin. Suddenly little toddler "side- kick" becomes the whole show. She misses playing with big sister, but enjoys the unriveled access to Mama. If there's any moral to this, perhaps it is to treat our first born a bit more lightly, and occassionally arrange to give the next one (or ones) the whole stage. 22, 1957, he was son of Kendall Kendall Welch III. and Shirley (Barnes) Welch. His funeral service was held He had attended the upper Friday at 2 p.m. in the Valley Training Center in Newbury Congregational Lebanon, N.H.; the Oxbow Church of which he was a Vocational School and the member. Orange County Life Skills Burial was held in the Program, both in Bradford. Groton Village Cemetery. Besides his parents, he Arrangements were under the leaves two brothers, Kendall direction of the Ricker Welch IT, W. Fairlee and Funeral Home, Birch Lane of Martin Welch, Newbury; two WoodsviUe. sisters, Mrs. Winifred Patten, Laura M. Houston was 97 .years old STRAFFORD-- Laura M. New Hampshire and Houston died Friday, Sept. 18, Massachusetts. at a nursing home in Bald- Survivors irglude several winville, Mass. She was born nieces and nephews, including Feb. 26, 1884 in Stratford, Emma N, Carroll of Windsor daughter of Charles and and Charles W. Clark of Lyme Emma (Rowell) Houston. Center. Graveside services She grew up and attended were held Tuesday, Sept. 22 in school in Stratford, and was the Strafford Cemetery. employed in state hospitals in CarroU Jerome dies at 73 S. RYEGA'I--Carroll lrvin Corm, and retired in 19'71 after Next week in this column ,Merome, 73, formerly a 23 years of employment by the we'll discuss something resident of the Wolcott and Pratt-WhitneyCo. practical: do-it-yourself Craftsbury area, died Men- An avid hunter and suggestions for a preschool day, Sept. 14, in Central fisherman, he also maintained playground. If there is something you enjoy making or doing with your children; write to the Journal Opinion and share it with your neighbors in this column. Vermont Hospital, Berlin. a hobby shop where he built Born in Greensboro, Aug. novelties including artificial 17, 1908, he was son of William flowers which were sold George and Hattie M. throughout the United States (Marden) Jerome. and Canada. He had resided in Bristol, I Illlll Illll I I I No Need to Rush Over... USE TNI$ NAIIDY WANT AD DO-IT-YOItRSiLF KIT; i ========================================================= .:::..=::,.-:::::: . . To place your Ad... To find your Ad... Just pick the classification from this directory and moil your Classified Ad with your check for the proper amount to: JOURNAL OPIN ION P.O. Box 378 Bradford, Vermont 05033 ============================================================..:=::c:=::. CLASL,FIED ADVERTISING RATES $3 00 for 20 words per week 10 cents for each oddilionol word over 20 $1.00 for each additional week od is to run (up to 8 weeks) A $! .00 billing charge will be added to each classified that we bill Put. 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