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September 23, 1981     Journal Opinion
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September 23, 1981
 

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of the Smithsonian's Museum of is a leading advocate of the theory that annual seasonal migrations. The fossil this view, he says. Here, Hotton displays of a dinosaur thighbone The anatomical he says, is evidence that dinosaurs were and could easily have made the trips. dsville hirlee IVhen dinosaurs had wanderlust by THOMAS HARNEY Smithsonian News Service If Nicholas Hotton were rewriting the lyrics of that famous song from "Showboat," they might go something like this: "Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly . . . and dinosaurs gotta migrate." Dinosaurs gotta migrate? Yes, indeed, according to Hotton, who, as you might have guessed, is not a songwriter but a paleobi'ologist (that's a scientist who studies fossils) at the Smithsonian's Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. He also is one of the leading advocates of the theory that dinosaurs made annual seasonal migrations, com- parable to the long-distance treks undertaken, today by birds and whales. The possibility of dinosaur migrations hears directly on the mysteries of migrations as well as on the question of what sort of animal a dinosaur was and how it lived and behaved. All of which is a matter that is still very controversial today. But first, imagine this scene as painted by Hotton: a herd of enormous dinosaurs striding 2,000 miles, from present-day Montana nor- thward to well above the Arctic Circle. The time is 70 million to 75 million years ago, a period that scientists call the late Cretaceous Era. The herd is made up of two-footed, plant- eating hadrosaurs--a group of dinosaurs that flourished in North America in great numbers and many forms during this period. Towering 10 to 20 feet above the ground and weighing as much as 6,000 pounds, the A scientist at the Smithsonian's Museum of might have looked 70 million years ago as they Natural History believes that dinosaurs made drifted north from present-day Montana to the annual migrations. In this scene, an artist has Arctic Circle. re-created how a herd of duck-billed dinosaurs Smithsqnian News Service Illustration by Joseph dacobs elephant-sized creatures stood erect, with duck-like beaks and bizarre, helmet-like crests covering the tops of their heads. (Small wonder they are also called "duckbill dinosaurs.") With their beaksl the hadrosaurs browsed on needles, twigs, fruits and seeds of the conifers and other trees that covered vast areas of continental North America. As they foraged, they moved steadily northward, their powerful legs taking them 10 to 20 miles a day. Now, before you accuse Hotton of having an overly vivid imagination, make no mistake. The latest fossil evidence firmly supports Hotton's contention that these awesome journeys actually took place. Indeed, scientists first were tipped off to the possibility of annual Arctic migrations about eight years ago, Hotton says, when fossil remains of hadrosaurs were discovered in the Yukon Territory almost as far north as 70 degrees latitude, well above the Arctic Circle. Plentiful remains of the same animals had been found earlier in Western North America. There is a good reason to doubt that hadrosaurs could have lived near the Arctic Circle year-round, Hotton says. Scientists have recon- structed whtbe climate was like during tffe late Cretaceous Era, and while it was warm and temperate that far north in the spring, summer and fall, the winters were cer- tainly dark and cold. Under such inhospitable conditions, it seems all the more likely that the many fossils unearthed in the far north, from 60 degrees to 70 degrees latitude, reflect summer occupancy only. To Hotton, the likelihood of these vast migrations gets to the heart of the dinosaur controversy, which centers around the newly espoused popular theory that dinosaurs were warm-blooded animals, like mammals or birds living today. Hotton disagrees. In a recent scientific publication, he argues that dinosaurs were unique. They not only had an exotically different appearance from today's mammals and birds, but they also had a completely different internal physiology, he says. Hotton believes that dinosaurs, over a period of some 100 million years, evolved a distinctive way to control the temperature of their bodies. In his view, this thermal mechanism deter- mined the unique character and history of these prehistoric beasts.including (please turn to page 3A) THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 9,100 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont i i J more (by popular demand) -E-E - E w to have a cheese tasting... Small, individual knives that offer a variety of flavors, until about 30 minutes before from beer to wine. Of course, and Forks for serving sliced from mild to sharp, serving time. wine is the traditional a cheese cheese a Getting it together How to taste such a Sharp knives for cutting Purchase the cheese five Advise yourgueststhatthey fits all cheese days before you plantoserve, should taste from mild to from Wooden picks for cheese cubes That way the cheese will be medium to sharp. If your Paper or ceramic labels for fresh, but yet it won't have assortment includes Colby, cheese cheese time to ripen further before Swiss and an aged Cheddar, Bread and-or crackers are and necessary not only because It's they are go-togethers with in your cheese but also because they hold a "clear the palate" between cheese different varieites. you serveit, then point out that Colby is Depending upon your sampled first because it's the facilities -- much space or mildest of the three, while little -- you may want to have nutlike Swiss comes next and each type of cheese on a a sharp-aged Cheddar should separate board or tray. Or, be sampled last. How much cheese should you may want to arrange all of Note: If there are any lef- list you buy? If you're having ten them on a single large board, tover cheeses, cover carefully a people, plan on having five Whatever the case, it's smart with plastic wrap, pressing it any meal pounds of cheese, divided, to label each variety. Your as close as possible to the a check say, into three varieties, friends will want to know what cheese. Refrigerate if you're of Select three pounds of the they're tasting, so they can planning to use it shortly. If go most familiar or popular variety, then select a pound each of two lesser known types. Your purpose, after all, m to have a casual get- together so one of the cheeses should be familiar. But, yon also want to introduce your friends to other types, which is the reason for the lesser known kinds. Select cheeses purchase the kinds they like. not, overwrap with freezer For variety'ssake, sliceone paper, freeze and use for cheese, cut another kind in cooking. cubes and leave one cheese Serve some beverages whole so your guests can cut it Have your guests' favorite themselves. Slicing and beverages on hand to go along cubing may be done in ad- with the cheeses, fruits, bread vance if you cover the slices and crackers. Cool drinks will and cubes carefully with taste best. Your friends' plastic wrap to prevent it from preferences may range from drying out. Keep refrigerated apple cider to soft drinks, beverage to accompany cheese. Some suggestions on selecting and serving wine follow, and the chart gives ' good taste combinations. Classes of wine Wines are often categorized to describe the general character or the use of the wine. Appetizer wines are those usually preferred before a meal, and in most cases, are dry wines, such as Sherry or Vermouth. Among the groups rapidly gaining popularity are the wines flavored with fruit essences, prepared with fruit or a combination of it. They carry a descriptive name such as strawberry, cherry or cinnamen-apple wine,'and Can be enjoyed before, after or between meals. Red, white or rose wines are very popular at the dinner table. Red wines are usually dry, tart to sweet and full-bodied. Rose wines (#ease turn to page 10A) and seats are a Practical ensemble, choose to Use-options can affect materials. For a formal result, work with a fancy hardwood plywood like walnut or mahogany or birch. If, for example, the project will be used in a child's room where it might be abused, a paintable plywood like pine or top-grade fir and a table surface veneered with a plastic laminate make sense. THE TABLE Start by cutting the top to exact size and then covering its edges with matching wood strips that are rabbeted as shown in the detail drawing. It's wise to cut these strips longer than necessary; trim them to exact size as they are applied. Work with glue and a few 6d casing nails. Next -- cut the parts (No. 3 and 4) for the top crosspiece and accurately mark its location on the underside of the table top. Make the at- tachment with glue and a few 6d casing nails. The glue does the job; nails are used merely to keep the pieces positioned. Cut the parts for the pedestals to the sizes listed in the bill of materials and put them together as separate assemblies. Careful work is required here since the miter cuts must he* exact. Testing cuts on scrap stock before cutting good material makes seine. Assemble the parts with glue and 4d finishing nails, setting the nails only as deep as necessary so they can he hidden with wood dough. The pedestals are then at- tached to the top crosspiece with glue and 6d finishing nls. The final step is to make the bottom crosspiece. Attach it' with glue and 6d finishing nails. THE SEATS These are simple boxes, but call for careful work because of the miter joints. Cut all sides and the corner blocks to size. Begin assembly by using glue and 4d casing nails to attach the corner blocks to opposite sides of the seat. Then add the remaining two sides, using glue and 6d finishing nails for the at- tachment. Cut the top pieces to size and (please turn to page 9A) Cheese additions / See a "Color-Me" of the above picture on page 10. A new edition Cheese can be used in and main dish pie, often called hundreds of foods from A to Z. qulche. Or, if you prefer, from ap- . Sharp., snappy cns.hge  petizers to Zucchini, including/the noq,tor appeuzers. "-d cheese soup, sandwiches, cake simplest, you can top assorm crackers with slices, rounds or cubes of cheese; or just fur- nish the ingredients for a do-it- yourself tidbit. Tiny skewers with cheese and colorful vegetables or fruit don't entail much work but are an at- ( #ease turn to page 5A) _ " FIREWOOD & TREE SERVICE Mixed llardwood $70. cord. Cut, split, delivered. Bob Holly: call 222-4566 before 8:00 a.m., after 5:00 Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 Tuffany type lamps and old paintings WANTED-TOP PRICES PAID ILL&GI ,,. ,,o,, ,,,.,,,, TIADI00R ,.,.,,.,.v, :t. lit. 302 a It. $ __ ' $5.00 OFF ANY PAIR OF BOOTS Fairlee General Store September 18 through September 27 CHICKEN PIE SUPPER Bradford Congregational Church Thurs., Oct. 1 5:30-on Adults - $4 -- Children - $2.25 (under 12) Followed By "FOLLOW THE FIRE" Family Concert at 8 P.M. HOUSE FOR SALE MODERNIZED OLD LARGE ROOMS--4 bedrooms & bath up, 5 & shower down. small barn, care-free lot, village services, 1 block from stores. $45,000. Owner will hold 1st Mortgage.. Bradford 222-4486. APPLES g OLDER INDIAN CORN MILL APPLE STAND Route 10603-787-64,15 Haverhill, N.H. (Near bridge to Newbury) Open Daily: 11 AM4 PM -- Sun.: 12 - 6 PM SCENIC AIRPLANE OR GLIDER RIDES Offer Expires October 31, 1981 One coupon "per person please POST MILLS AIRPORT HAPPY AW'/#V00'RM00 RAY & M.ROt 81LMAN of the Smithsonian's Museum of is a leading advocate of the theory that annual seasonal migrations. The fossil this view, he says. Here, Hotton displays of a dinosaur thighbone The anatomical he says, is evidence that dinosaurs were and could easily have made the trips. dsville hirlee IVhen dinosaurs had wanderlust by THOMAS HARNEY Smithsonian News Service If Nicholas Hotton were rewriting the lyrics of that famous song from "Showboat," they might go something like this: "Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly . . . and dinosaurs gotta migrate." Dinosaurs gotta migrate? Yes, indeed, according to Hotton, who, as you might have guessed, is not a songwriter but a paleobi'ologist (that's a scientist who studies fossils) at the Smithsonian's Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. He also is one of the leading advocates of the theory that dinosaurs made annual seasonal migrations, com- parable to the long-distance treks undertaken, today by birds and whales. The possibility of dinosaur migrations hears directly on the mysteries of migrations as well as on the question of what sort of animal a dinosaur was and how it lived and behaved. All of which is a matter that is still very controversial today. But first, imagine this scene as painted by Hotton: a herd of enormous dinosaurs striding 2,000 miles, from present-day Montana nor- thward to well above the Arctic Circle. The time is 70 million to 75 million years ago, a period that scientists call the late Cretaceous Era. The herd is made up of two-footed, plant- eating hadrosaurs--a group of dinosaurs that flourished in North America in great numbers and many forms during this period. Towering 10 to 20 feet above the ground and weighing as much as 6,000 pounds, the A scientist at the Smithsonian's Museum of might have looked 70 million years ago as they Natural History believes that dinosaurs made drifted north from present-day Montana to the annual migrations. In this scene, an artist has Arctic Circle. re-created how a herd of duck-billed dinosaurs Smithsqnian News Service Illustration by Joseph dacobs elephant-sized creatures stood erect, with duck-like beaks and bizarre, helmet-like crests covering the tops of their heads. (Small wonder they are also called "duckbill dinosaurs.") With their beaksl the hadrosaurs browsed on needles, twigs, fruits and seeds of the conifers and other trees that covered vast areas of continental North America. As they foraged, they moved steadily northward, their powerful legs taking them 10 to 20 miles a day. Now, before you accuse Hotton of having an overly vivid imagination, make no mistake. The latest fossil evidence firmly supports Hotton's contention that these awesome journeys actually took place. Indeed, scientists first were tipped off to the possibility of annual Arctic migrations about eight years ago, Hotton says, when fossil remains of hadrosaurs were discovered in the Yukon Territory almost as far north as 70 degrees latitude, well above the Arctic Circle. Plentiful remains of the same animals had been found earlier in Western North America. There is a good reason to doubt that hadrosaurs could have lived near the Arctic Circle year-round, Hotton says. Scientists have recon- structed whtbe climate was like during tffe late Cretaceous Era, and while it was warm and temperate that far north in the spring, summer and fall, the winters were cer- tainly dark and cold. Under such inhospitable conditions, it seems all the more likely that the many fossils unearthed in the far north, from 60 degrees to 70 degrees latitude, reflect summer occupancy only. To Hotton, the likelihood of these vast migrations gets to the heart of the dinosaur controversy, which centers around the newly espoused popular theory that dinosaurs were warm-blooded animals, like mammals or birds living today. Hotton disagrees. In a recent scientific publication, he argues that dinosaurs were unique. They not only had an exotically different appearance from today's mammals and birds, but they also had a completely different internal physiology, he says. Hotton believes that dinosaurs, over a period of some 100 million years, evolved a distinctive way to control the temperature of their bodies. In his view, this thermal mechanism deter- mined the unique character and history of these prehistoric beasts.including (please turn to page 3A) THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 9,100 .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont i i J more (by popular demand) -E-E - E w to have a cheese tasting... Small, individual knives that offer a variety of flavors, until about 30 minutes before from beer to wine. Of course, and Forks for serving sliced from mild to sharp, serving time. wine is the traditional a cheese cheese a Getting it together How to taste such a Sharp knives for cutting Purchase the cheese five Advise yourgueststhatthey fits all cheese days before you plantoserve, should taste from mild to from Wooden picks for cheese cubes That way the cheese will be medium to sharp. If your Paper or ceramic labels for fresh, but yet it won't have assortment includes Colby, cheese cheese time to ripen further before Swiss and an aged Cheddar, Bread and-or crackers are and necessary not only because It's they are go-togethers with in your cheese but also because they hold a "clear the palate" between cheese different varieites. you serveit, then point out that Colby is Depending upon your sampled first because it's the facilities -- much space or mildest of the three, while little -- you may want to have nutlike Swiss comes next and each type of cheese on a a sharp-aged Cheddar should separate board or tray. Or, be sampled last. How much cheese should you may want to arrange all of Note: If there are any lef- list you buy? If you're having ten them on a single large board, tover cheeses, cover carefully a people, plan on having five Whatever the case, it's smart with plastic wrap, pressing it any meal pounds of cheese, divided, to label each variety. Your as close as possible to the a check say, into three varieties, friends will want to know what cheese. Refrigerate if you're of Select three pounds of the they're tasting, so they can planning to use it shortly. If go most familiar or popular variety, then select a pound each of two lesser known types. Your purpose, after all, m to have a casual get- together so one of the cheeses should be familiar. But, yon also want to introduce your friends to other types, which is the reason for the lesser known kinds. Select cheeses purchase the kinds they like. not, overwrap with freezer For variety'ssake, sliceone paper, freeze and use for cheese, cut another kind in cooking. cubes and leave one cheese Serve some beverages whole so your guests can cut it Have your guests' favorite themselves. Slicing and beverages on hand to go along cubing may be done in ad- with the cheeses, fruits, bread vance if you cover the slices and crackers. Cool drinks will and cubes carefully with taste best. Your friends' plastic wrap to prevent it from preferences may range from drying out. Keep refrigerated apple cider to soft drinks, beverage to accompany cheese. Some suggestions on selecting and serving wine follow, and the chart gives ' good taste combinations. Classes of wine Wines are often categorized to describe the general character or the use of the wine. Appetizer wines are those usually preferred before a meal, and in most cases, are dry wines, such as Sherry or Vermouth. Among the groups rapidly gaining popularity are the wines flavored with fruit essences, prepared with fruit or a combination of it. They carry a descriptive name such as strawberry, cherry or cinnamen-apple wine,'and Can be enjoyed before, after or between meals. Red, white or rose wines are very popular at the dinner table. Red wines are usually dry, tart to sweet and full-bodied. Rose wines (#ease turn to page 10A) and seats are a Practical ensemble, choose to Use-options can affect materials. For a formal result, work with a fancy hardwood plywood like walnut or mahogany or birch. If, for example, the project will be used in a child's room where it might be abused, a paintable plywood like pine or top-grade fir and a table surface veneered with a plastic laminate make sense. THE TABLE Start by cutting the top to exact size and then covering its edges with matching wood strips that are rabbeted as shown in the detail drawing. It's wise to cut these strips longer than necessary; trim them to exact size as they are applied. Work with glue and a few 6d casing nails. Next -- cut the parts (No. 3 and 4) for the top crosspiece and accurately mark its location on the underside of the table top. Make the at- tachment with glue and a few 6d casing nails. The glue does the job; nails are used merely to keep the pieces positioned. Cut the parts for the pedestals to the sizes listed in the bill of materials and put them together as separate assemblies. Careful work is required here since the miter cuts must he* exact. Testing cuts on scrap stock before cutting good material makes seine. Assemble the parts with glue and 4d finishing nails, setting the nails only as deep as necessary so they can he hidden with wood dough. The pedestals are then at- tached to the top crosspiece with glue and 6d finishing nls. The final step is to make the bottom crosspiece. Attach it' with glue and 6d finishing nails. THE SEATS These are simple boxes, but call for careful work because of the miter joints. Cut all sides and the corner blocks to size. Begin assembly by using glue and 4d casing nails to attach the corner blocks to opposite sides of the seat. Then add the remaining two sides, using glue and 6d finishing nails for the at- tachment. Cut the top pieces to size and (please turn to page 9A) Cheese additions / See a "Color-Me" of the above picture on page 10. A new edition Cheese can be used in and main dish pie, often called hundreds of foods from A to Z. qulche. Or, if you prefer, from ap- . Sharp., snappy cns.hge  petizers to Zucchini, including/the noq,tor appeuzers. "-d cheese soup, sandwiches, cake simplest, you can top assorm crackers with slices, rounds or cubes of cheese; or just fur- nish the ingredients for a do-it- yourself tidbit. Tiny skewers with cheese and colorful vegetables or fruit don't entail much work but are an at- ( #ease turn to page 5A) _ " FIREWOOD & TREE SERVICE Mixed llardwood $70. cord. Cut, split, delivered. Bob Holly: call 222-4566 before 8:00 a.m., after 5:00 Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 Tuffany type lamps and old paintings WANTED-TOP PRICES PAID ILL&GI ,,. ,,o,, ,,,.,,,, TIADI00R ,.,.,,.,.v, :t. lit. 302 a It. $ __ ' $5.00 OFF ANY PAIR OF BOOTS Fairlee General Store September 18 through September 27 CHICKEN PIE SUPPER Bradford Congregational Church Thurs., Oct. 1 5:30-on Adults - $4 -- Children - $2.25 (under 12) Followed By "FOLLOW THE FIRE" Family Concert at 8 P.M. HOUSE FOR SALE MODERNIZED OLD LARGE ROOMS--4 bedrooms & bath up, 5 & shower down. small barn, care-free lot, village services, 1 block from stores. $45,000. Owner will hold 1st Mortgage.. Bradford 222-4486. APPLES g OLDER INDIAN CORN MILL APPLE STAND Route 10603-787-64,15 Haverhill, N.H. (Near bridge to Newbury) Open Daily: 11 AM4 PM -- Sun.: 12 - 6 PM SCENIC AIRPLANE OR GLIDER RIDES Offer Expires October 31, 1981 One coupon "per person please POST MILLS AIRPORT HAPPY AW'/#V00'RM00 RAY & M.ROt 81LMAN