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Bradford , Vermont
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October 6, 1982     Journal Opinion
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Page 4-The Journal Oplnlon-Oetober 6, IN2 i it i i i | DRTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal I10plnlon Wooklv nompeper pvldisked ie Ikedfotd, Vormut. Sekscdptin mtee Voraumt umd Now Itempoktre $*.00 per year; $/.00 for six menlks; eu! e! Meto $1|.00 po yHr eml ST.00 for six months; Senior chon dhceu 82.00. $ocond den pelmp imld at lrodfefll, Ven0umt OlOll. Pvbltskod by Nertkusl Publiobtl Counlmny, Inc., P.O. lo, 171, lme. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford 02-222-528 ! v u! b / .  Woodsville  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial Nuclear waste issue Without a doubt, the largest issue to have been reported in this newspaper over the past several weeks has been the discovery that large quantities of highly radioactive nuclear waste had been "secretly" transported in August, regularly with approval from the state, along Vermont's major highways, and possibly along Interstate 91 through the area towns of Newbury, Bradford, Fairlee, and Thetford, Aside from the obvious discomfort and uneasiness that comes and probably always should come when huge quantities of deadly material is being trucked through our immediate area, two distinctly disturbing facets of Vermont's nuclear yaste transportation issue of tter. The waste shipments in question are being conducted by a private firm called the Nuclear Assurance Cor- poration. The waste hauled through Vermont on a weekly basis, each Monday beginning in July, originated in Canada at a Chalk River, Ontario, nuclear power plant and was amazingly being transported via Vermont toward the final destination of a nuclear reprocessing plant in South Carolina. Initial arguments for playing down the issue had main- tained that ff Vermonters were going to light their homes with electricity, much of which is generated by a nuclear plant in Vernon, Vt., then they shouldn't yell when nuclear power's waste is trucked by their homes on the way to the dump. But considering the Canadian origin of the nuclear waste in question and its southern destination, the Vernon plant has little to do with the recent transportation issue. The waste shipments were routed through Vermont .because Michigan and Now York, which border Ontario, enacted their own restrictions aimed at keeping Chalk River's spent fuel rods off their highways, Meanwhile, much of Vernon's spent fuel from Vermont Yankee reportedly lies in waiting for a safe place to go. The second distinct and disturbing facet of the recent nuclear tran- sportation issue is the state's handling of the matter. Vermont Governor Richard Snelling called for a tem- porary ban on the shipments Sept. 3 not because he was alarmed by the seriousness of having someone else's deadly waste carted around in huge fluantities on Vermont's Interstates, but because he was alarmed that the shipments were no longer secret and that all of Vermont seemed to be talking about them. Town and emergency officials were never officially notified by the Governor or the state's Tran- sportation Department that nuclear shipments were to be passing through their communities, many which had passed local bans on such activity. In TransportatiOn Secretary Tom Evslin's much publicized letter to town officials dated August 23, asking "preferred routes for the tran- sportation of highly radioactive materials," the rnage was not only written over a month after the shipments actually began, but nowhere in the letter did Evslin mention that shipments were in progress, or in fact, if shipments were planned to take place at any time. Vermont should he responsible for its own nuclear waste. It should not, however, be responsible for deadly garbage from Chalk River, Ontario. This is why the Governor is so far off the mark in his defense of the federal government's policy of secrecy surrounding the shipment of nuclear waste. It is this secrecy that is largely responsible for the relatively muted general public concern over the urgent subject of the safe disposal of nuclear waste. Ton often, government is quick to support the construction and development of nuclear power plants but leas than willing to face up to nuclear power's obvious and largely unsolved problem of highly radioactive and dangerous nuclear waste that stays deadly for decades. Helping to keep secret that dangerous waste from nuclear power plants must and is being transported, in trucks and on highways where accidents can occur, does not foster an adequate understanding of a very real and dangerous'dilemma. Three Inventors George IV. Morse inventor of the metalic cartridge case George Morse was a cup of strong tea after the became the inventor and first grandson of Stephen Morse. tavernkeeper on Morse Hill on the old Coventry Road bet- ween Center Haverhill and East Haverhill, and son of Rev. Bryan Morse, preacher at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Haverhill. George Morse was educated at Haverhill Academy, and at that time was already showing ex- ceptional mechanical and inventive skill. Bittinger's History of Haverhill tells us: "At the age of eighteen he invented a gun with a 'magazine lock,' by which the gun could be fired sixty times without priming. He is the real inventor of the 'metallic cartridge case' which alone has made breech-loading small arms a success, but unfortunately on account of the imperfect manner in which his lawyer drew his patent, he lost his claim to being the first inventor of the 'metallic cartridge/ "Mr. Morse, however, conscious of the great wrong which had been done him in being denied priority of in- vention by which others have probably amassed fortunes, brought his claim before Congress and petitioned that body that some compensation might be granted him for the use of his invention in the arms of the government service. The matter was considered in 1884, and the committee to whom Mr. Morse's claim was referred, after giving the matter the most careful consideration, aided by an expert from the and by officers closed the report on the matter with the recom- mendation that the claim be allowed. Accordingly, a bill was introduced appropriating $25,000. Brig.-Gen. Benet, chief of ordnance to whom the report of the committee was referred used this language: " 'In my opinion Mr. Morse fairly and justly deserves this much at the hands of Congress, and I strongly recommend the passage of the bill." "And this recom- mendation of the chief of ordnance was concurred in by the Secretary of War, Hon. Robert T. Lincoln. The 'metallic cartridge' was in- vented in 1856." Palmer's artificial leg When Benjamin F. Palmer of Bradford was a boy in his late teens, he worked in Oliver Hardy's tannery in the north end of the village. One day when he was in charge of the grinding of bark. his foot somehow became caught in the machinery and was terribly crushed and torn. Benjamin was taken to the leading surgeon of the area at that time, Dr. Anson Brackett of Haverhill. who determined that the leg was injured beyond help and would have to be amputated. This was a particularly critical operation, due to the weakened condition of the patient. This was sometime around 1830. in the days before methods of surgical anesthesia had been discovered, and the only known relief for the ex- cruciating pain of surgery was whiskey or the like, However, Dr. Brackett would allow no stimulants to be used by his patient -- but he did consent that Benjamin might have a operation. Benjamin recovered from the amputation, but his loss inspired him to put his ingenuity to work to find some wily for an amputee to walk more easily than it was then possible to do. The result was his invention of the cork leg. The first cork leg he wore himself, and the second was made for Nancy Johnson of Newbury. She had become a cripple in early life. an unhealing sore on her right foot making its amputation necessary. In spite of spen- ding most of her early years in the sickbed, she became an outstanding scholar, a teacher, the preceptress of Newbury High School in 1844, a world traveler and writer. Haskins' History of Bradford tells of an incident in Benjamin Palmer's attempt to promote the manufacture and sale of his artificial leg: "It is related that he tried to interest some physicians in his new invention, but they only sneered at him. Finally, he asked if he might call upon them with half a dozen men, that they might determine which man wore a cork leg. They consented, and it was not until they had guessed two or three who were traveling about on natural legs that they discovered that the man whom they wanted was Palmer himself." His invention proved so superior to any other artificial leg in use at that time that it made Benjamin Palmer well- known in this country and in Europe, and brought him a tidy fortune. Other sources: History of Newbury, Wells: History of Haverhill. Whitcher. Joseph Wlllard's dynamite In the early 1800's, Israel Willard and his brother Manasseh manufactured chairs in a little shop attached to Israel's house on Roaring Brook (present home of Mrs. Thomas Hahn). Manasseh's son Joseph moved to the Midwest, and Robbie Giison scholarship fund established NEWBURY-- The Newbury Athletic Council has voted to establish a scholarship fund to honor Robbie Gilson who was an active member of the sports programs run by the Council -- from swimming and soccer to basketball and skiing. The first scholarship will be awarded to a 1986 graduating senior from Newbury who has shown the best evidence d sportsmanship throughout his or her high school career. 1986 is the year Robbie would have graduated. The scholarship will be awarded to a Newbury senior each year thereafter. The Athletic Council has started the fund with a $100 donation. All donations may be sent to The Robbie Gilson Scholar- ship Fund, in care of Peg Haviland, Newbury Athletic Council, W. Newlmry, Vt. QUOTE is within our- Robert Browning American manufacturer of dynamite, which he called "Hercules powder" and patented in 1874. (Alfred Nobel, of Nobel Prize fame, also invented dynamite in Sweden at about the same time. ) Source: History of Bradford. Haskins. LUNCH MFA00 WENTW()RTH SCHOOL MENUS Week of Oct. 6-13 Wednesday-- Tacos, French Fries, Orange or Grape fruit juice, Cherry Cake, Milk. Thursday-- Chicken Noodle Soup, Carrot Sticks, Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches, Apples, Milk. Friday-- Shepherd's Pie, Green Beans, Applesauce, Bread and Butter, Milk. Monday No School. Tuesday Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, Corn, Chocolate Pudding Cake, Whipped Topping, Bread and Butter, Milk. Wednesday-- Sloppy Joes, French Fries, Peas, Peaches, Milk. BLUE MOUNTAIN UNION SCHOOL Week of October 6-13 Wednesday-- Corn Chowder. Bologna Sandwich. Applesauce Bars, Milk. Thursday-- Sloppy Jocs, Toss Salad, Cookies, Milk. Friday-- Clam Rolls, Potato Stix, Green Beans, Fresh Fruit, Milk. Monday Tuna Pea Wiggle, Cherry Cobbler, Milk. Tuesday-- Pizza, Green Beans, Pudding, Milk. Wednesday-- Grinders, Potato Chips, Fresh Fruit, Milk. For the Week of Oct. 11-15 WOODSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Monday-- Pork Gravy on Mashed Potato, Green Beans, Rolls, Fruit Cocktail, Milk. Tuesday-- Spaghetti Meatsauce, Rolls, Wax Beans, Applesauce, Milk. Wednesday-- Turkey Pie, Pickles, Peaches, Milk. Thursday-- Pizza, Whole Kernel Corn, Pears, Milk. Friday-- Vegetable Beef Soup, Peanut Butter Sand- wich, Saltine, Fruit Cocktail, Milk. JAMES R. MORRILL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Monday Farmer Jones Special, Carrots, Brownies, Milk. Tuesday-- Pizza, Tossed Salad, Apples, Milk. Wednesday-- Vegetable Beef Soup, Crackers, Pickles, Gingerbread, Milk. Thursday-- Tuna Filled Rolls or Peanut Butter, Rolls, Peas, Pineapple, Milk. Friday-- Roast Turkey, Mashed Potato. Green Beans, Cranberry Sauce, Pumpkin Custard, Milk. HAVERHILL ACADEMY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL Monday Ravioli with Meat Sauce, Cheese Chunks, Rolls & Butter, Whole Corn, Chocolate Cake & Frosting, Milk. Tuesday-- Ham Patty, Mashed Poatotes, Spinach, Jello & Topping, Milk. Wednesday-- Pizza, Green Beans, Applesauce, Milk. Thursday--- Chinese Pie, i n Heav00 a00enda .for North Country EXEC[YIIVE COUNCALOR Raymond S. Burton, (R-NI.) r I ! i i in Governor Gallen and the five member Executive Council took marly three hem's to vote through some 200 items at our Sept. 22 meeting. Just under one half of those items dealt in a specific way with our northern district. This is unusual because usually only about one4ifth of the agenda items deal with our district here in the of New Hampshire, This Attorneys William Briggs of Wmteield and Randall Cooper  Madison are now under contract under lISA 161:9 for legal representation for social workers. Over $650,000 was approved in contracts with social service agencies to deliver social programs in the areas of the elderly, family planning, mental health, day care, nution services, alcohol and drug abuse assUitane. The Council also accepted the Bierial RecReomPmrt of the New Hampshire Real Estate iion. Anyone desiring a copy please call or write Ray Burton, Councilor RFD No. 1 Woedaville 03785 (tel. 603-747- 3662). $424,609 to 19 institutions One for energy conservation measure grants. Wednesday, O. WARREN: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. WELLS RIVER: BMU School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2: 00 p.m. Monday, Oct. u COLUMBUS DAY Tuesday. Oct. IZ NEWBURY: School Board, 7:30 p.m, Wednesday, Oct. 13 HAVERHILL: School Board, 7:20p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. BRADFORD: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Mashed Poatoes, Rolls & Butter, White Cake & Frosting, Milk. Friday--* Grinders, Cheese, Pickles, Chips, Cookies, Milk. WOODSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL Monday-- Turkey in Gravy, Stuffing, Biscuits, Peas, Cranberry Sauce, Congo Bars, Milk. Tuesday-- Hamburgers, Potato Chips, Corn, Apple Crisp, Milk. Wednesday-- Macaroni, Beef Tomato Casserole, Broccoli, Butterscotch Pudding, Milk. Thursday-- Sliced Turkey, Macaroni Salad, Green Beans, Gingerbread-Topping, Milk. Friday-- Fishwich, Potato Chips, Tossed Salad, Midnite Velvet Cake, Milk. ALL MENUS SUBJECT TO CHANGE Letters to the Ed The new hydro electric plant To the Editor: fact, that the generatins It is not surprising that equipment for the plant is electric rates continue to being made in Germany; increase. The article mentions something unthinkable 1( that the cost of the 1500 kw years ago. The new subway plant will be $3,500,000. That cars for the New York transit comes out to $2300 per kw of system are being made in generating main reason for unemployment American auto 10 dustry; greedy high The only installed capacity. Years ago, Canada and much of the new the new hydro a steam electric plant could be equipment for the the fuel will built for $90 a kilowatt; Washington, D.C. transit air polluting and recently a large nuclear system is being made in Italy. torionists will electric plant was built for less This once again is I0,000 barrels than $1000 a kilowatt, irrefutable proof that the costing over One thing that should bother American worker is pricing annum. the average American is the himself out of a job. That is the Remember the Uniled Nations To theEditor: these enable continuance of sharing world In autumn, leaves flame in our free society, while also developing peace, glorious colors and fall off, guiding nationalpolicy, planet habitable. ending the photosynthesis However we vote (or fail Let all honor process in which life depen- to), the greater world exists-- public meetings, ds but not before new buds it won't "go away." We are a schools, churcheS, have formed that will re-start small part in population and and letters in the this life-giving function, come geography, though large in spring, economics and power to "Spirit of Then comes United Nations destroy, nations, all Day, October 24, 37thbirthday Let us be large-- not in all to support the of this WW If-born effort for monopolizing world resour- and share togetherness so essential in cos, imposing our will or for destroying but today's complex, destroying all in nuclear happiness and technological society, war-- but large in un- In USA comes now a third derstanding, adaptability and event: our national elections, restraint, in fully supporting. Like the buds on the trees, the UN in resolving conflicts, The nuc/ear arms freeze To the Editor: "KGB Said Pushing Arms Freeze" read the headlines in the papers Sept. 21st, when the news was released about Russian spies involvement in that so-called "grass-roots" nuclear arms freeze our state of Vermont was duped into this past year. With the whole country talking about the feature story in the October issue of the Readers Digest, which to rescind the culminates a series of prior those individual revelations from other passed the sources on the same subject, on the need to rectify the action Day taken in Vermont on the With nuclear freeze now becomes ruing up Nov. paramount ff our state is to' need to aid the retain its good name. Vermont citizens I would like to urge all their mistake as veteran and other patriotic possible is organizations in Vermont to circulate petitions right away The.flat.rate tax and housin00 (c) Public Research, Syndicated, 1982 by RICHARD R. MUTH Dr. Muth is a professor of economics at Stanford University and an authority on the housing industry. In recent weeks there has been con- siderable discussion about substituting a flat-rate tax for our current personal in- come tax, and several bills which would do so have been introduced into the Congress. The flat-rate tax, under most proposals, would retain or even increase the personal exemption in the current federal income tax. It would abolish most or all deduc- tions, however. The current system of taxing additional income at ever- increasing rates would be replaced by a constant rate of tax throughout the income range. Though new to many, the flat-rate tax is really a rather old idea. Nobel prize winning economist Milton Friedman suggested it in his book Capitalism and Freedom twenty years ago. Moreover, until inflation lifted Americans into progressively higher tax brackets in the seventies, the federal income tax was in effect a fiat-rate tax throughout all but the very highest income levels. This was because as the taxpayer's before-tax in- come rose so did his total deductions, offsetting the higher tax rate applicable to his additional income. Among the most important of these deductions are those for mortgage interest and property taxes paid. Not only do these reduce the degree of progression in the personal income tax, but they reduce substantially the cost of living in an owned home. Under the personal income tax in this country, the taxpayer need not report the imputed rental value of his home as in- come. He can, however, deduct mortgage interest and property taxes paid from his taxable income. Together, interest and property taxes amount to about three- quarters of the cost of living in an owned home. Thus, if a taxpayer pays 20 cents additional tax for each additional dollar of income, he pays only 85 cents per dollar of his housing costs after taX. Since the level of taxes is fixed ultimately by the level of government expenditures, lower taxes for homeowners mean higher taxes for ren- ters. The personal tax treatment of income from owner-occupied housing is often justified by the social benefits of homeownership. The tax advantage, however, is a very inefficient way of in- ducing more households to become homeowners. Most studies suggest that the sizeable tax advantages of owning one's home have led only about 4 percent of the nations households to become homeowners, increasing the extent of homeownership from 62 to percent. Data contained in Congressional Budget Office dicate that roughly $50 billiO revenue is lost way income The tax subsidy is thus of the $15,000 per year for each household induced to homeowners. Most of the subsidY" $1,000 per year per those who would have been without the tax effective ways could homeownership. Another effect of the treatment of homeownership draws capital away from the sector of the economy. prising to many is the fact our country's fixed capital stock form of residential real estate. estimated that, because of vantage, the capital 0wner-occupied house is almoSt greater than it would non-residential capital stock percent smaller. The tax owner housing thus runs currnt Administration's increasing investment in the sector of the economy. If a poll were taken economists would almost port eliminating the current of income from To attempt to do so, however, ! counter strong opposition. If vantage were removed, the houses would fall, in effect on the wealth of existing Clearly, there is little adopting a flat-rate tax detrimental to the electorate. Nor would economic advantage to rules for existing housing. For way in which the in existing houses could put to other uses. Changing the rules could, reduce the amount of future owner houses and increase the t new investment To do so, however, would stll in the absence of a radical personal income tax. The offers such an opportunity. could provide the of simplicity for the among taxpayers and economy as a whole. base to include the imputqd: owner housing bgilt after would be an m rate CONCERT IN THETFORD THETFORD-- There will be a concert featuring the music of HISTORICAL SOCIETY E. TOPSHAM Sam Moffat, Sa, Rizetta, and FAIRLEE-- There will be a a Rummage R.P. Hale on hammer meeting of the Fairlee sham at the dulcimer and harpsichord Historical Society on Tuesday, Oct. 2 to Oct. 9 f Monday, Oct. 11at the Grange Oct. 13, at the Fairlee Town to 5:00 p.m. Hall in Thetford Hill starting Hall starting atT:30 p.m. The there will he a at 7:30 p.m. There will be a scheduled program will be ou 10:00 to $3.00 admission charge for local history and refresh- Rummage adults; with a $3.00 charge for ments will be served. Guests sponsored children, are welcome. Page 4-The Journal Oplnlon-Oetober 6, IN2 i it i i i | DRTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal I10plnlon Wooklv nompeper pvldisked ie Ikedfotd, Vormut. Sekscdptin mtee Voraumt umd Now Itempoktre $*.00 per year; $/.00 for six menlks; eu! e! Meto $1|.00 po yHr eml ST.00 for six months; Senior chon dhceu 82.00. $ocond den pelmp imld at lrodfefll, Ven0umt OlOll. Pvbltskod by Nertkusl Publiobtl Counlmny, Inc., P.O. lo, 171, lme. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford 02-222-528 ! v u! b / .  Woodsville  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper Editorial Nuclear waste issue Without a doubt, the largest issue to have been reported in this newspaper over the past several weeks has been the discovery that large quantities of highly radioactive nuclear waste had been "secretly" transported in August, regularly with approval from the state, along Vermont's major highways, and possibly along Interstate 91 through the area towns of Newbury, Bradford, Fairlee, and Thetford, Aside from the obvious discomfort and uneasiness that comes and probably always should come when huge quantities of deadly material is being trucked through our immediate area, two distinctly disturbing facets of Vermont's nuclear yaste transportation issue of tter. The waste shipments in question are being conducted by a private firm called the Nuclear Assurance Cor- poration. The waste hauled through Vermont on a weekly basis, each Monday beginning in July, originated in Canada at a Chalk River, Ontario, nuclear power plant and was amazingly being transported via Vermont toward the final destination of a nuclear reprocessing plant in South Carolina. Initial arguments for playing down the issue had main- tained that ff Vermonters were going to light their homes with electricity, much of which is generated by a nuclear plant in Vernon, Vt., then they shouldn't yell when nuclear power's waste is trucked by their homes on the way to the dump. But considering the Canadian origin of the nuclear waste in question and its southern destination, the Vernon plant has little to do with the recent transportation issue. The waste shipments were routed through Vermont .because Michigan and Now York, which border Ontario, enacted their own restrictions aimed at keeping Chalk River's spent fuel rods off their highways, Meanwhile, much of Vernon's spent fuel from Vermont Yankee reportedly lies in waiting for a safe place to go. The second distinct and disturbing facet of the recent nuclear tran- sportation issue is the state's handling of the matter. Vermont Governor Richard Snelling called for a tem- porary ban on the shipments Sept. 3 not because he was alarmed by the seriousness of having someone else's deadly waste carted around in huge fluantities on Vermont's Interstates, but because he was alarmed that the shipments were no longer secret and that all of Vermont seemed to be talking about them. Town and emergency officials were never officially notified by the Governor or the state's Tran- sportation Department that nuclear shipments were to be passing through their communities, many which had passed local bans on such activity. In TransportatiOn Secretary Tom Evslin's much publicized letter to town officials dated August 23, asking "preferred routes for the tran- sportation of highly radioactive materials," the rnage was not only written over a month after the shipments actually began, but nowhere in the letter did Evslin mention that shipments were in progress, or in fact, if shipments were planned to take place at any time. Vermont should he responsible for its own nuclear waste. It should not, however, be responsible for deadly garbage from Chalk River, Ontario. This is why the Governor is so far off the mark in his defense of the federal government's policy of secrecy surrounding the shipment of nuclear waste. It is this secrecy that is largely responsible for the relatively muted general public concern over the urgent subject of the safe disposal of nuclear waste. Ton often, government is quick to support the construction and development of nuclear power plants but leas than willing to face up to nuclear power's obvious and largely unsolved problem of highly radioactive and dangerous nuclear waste that stays deadly for decades. Helping to keep secret that dangerous waste from nuclear power plants must and is being transported, in trucks and on highways where accidents can occur, does not foster an adequate understanding of a very real and dangerous'dilemma. Three Inventors George IV. Morse inventor of the metalic cartridge case George Morse was a cup of strong tea after the became the inventor and first grandson of Stephen Morse. tavernkeeper on Morse Hill on the old Coventry Road bet- ween Center Haverhill and East Haverhill, and son of Rev. Bryan Morse, preacher at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Haverhill. George Morse was educated at Haverhill Academy, and at that time was already showing ex- ceptional mechanical and inventive skill. Bittinger's History of Haverhill tells us: "At the age of eighteen he invented a gun with a 'magazine lock,' by which the gun could be fired sixty times without priming. He is the real inventor of the 'metallic cartridge case' which alone has made breech-loading small arms a success, but unfortunately on account of the imperfect manner in which his lawyer drew his patent, he lost his claim to being the first inventor of the 'metallic cartridge/ "Mr. Morse, however, conscious of the great wrong which had been done him in being denied priority of in- vention by which others have probably amassed fortunes, brought his claim before Congress and petitioned that body that some compensation might be granted him for the use of his invention in the arms of the government service. The matter was considered in 1884, and the committee to whom Mr. Morse's claim was referred, after giving the matter the most careful consideration, aided by an expert from the and by officers closed the report on the matter with the recom- mendation that the claim be allowed. Accordingly, a bill was introduced appropriating $25,000. Brig.-Gen. Benet, chief of ordnance to whom the report of the committee was referred used this language: " 'In my opinion Mr. Morse fairly and justly deserves this much at the hands of Congress, and I strongly recommend the passage of the bill." "And this recom- mendation of the chief of ordnance was concurred in by the Secretary of War, Hon. Robert T. Lincoln. The 'metallic cartridge' was in- vented in 1856." Palmer's artificial leg When Benjamin F. Palmer of Bradford was a boy in his late teens, he worked in Oliver Hardy's tannery in the north end of the village. One day when he was in charge of the grinding of bark. his foot somehow became caught in the machinery and was terribly crushed and torn. Benjamin was taken to the leading surgeon of the area at that time, Dr. Anson Brackett of Haverhill. who determined that the leg was injured beyond help and would have to be amputated. This was a particularly critical operation, due to the weakened condition of the patient. This was sometime around 1830. in the days before methods of surgical anesthesia had been discovered, and the only known relief for the ex- cruciating pain of surgery was whiskey or the like, However, Dr. Brackett would allow no stimulants to be used by his patient -- but he did consent that Benjamin might have a operation. Benjamin recovered from the amputation, but his loss inspired him to put his ingenuity to work to find some wily for an amputee to walk more easily than it was then possible to do. The result was his invention of the cork leg. The first cork leg he wore himself, and the second was made for Nancy Johnson of Newbury. She had become a cripple in early life. an unhealing sore on her right foot making its amputation necessary. In spite of spen- ding most of her early years in the sickbed, she became an outstanding scholar, a teacher, the preceptress of Newbury High School in 1844, a world traveler and writer. Haskins' History of Bradford tells of an incident in Benjamin Palmer's attempt to promote the manufacture and sale of his artificial leg: "It is related that he tried to interest some physicians in his new invention, but they only sneered at him. Finally, he asked if he might call upon them with half a dozen men, that they might determine which man wore a cork leg. They consented, and it was not until they had guessed two or three who were traveling about on natural legs that they discovered that the man whom they wanted was Palmer himself." His invention proved so superior to any other artificial leg in use at that time that it made Benjamin Palmer well- known in this country and in Europe, and brought him a tidy fortune. Other sources: History of Newbury, Wells: History of Haverhill. Whitcher. Joseph Wlllard's dynamite In the early 1800's, Israel Willard and his brother Manasseh manufactured chairs in a little shop attached to Israel's house on Roaring Brook (present home of Mrs. Thomas Hahn). Manasseh's son Joseph moved to the Midwest, and Robbie Giison scholarship fund established NEWBURY-- The Newbury Athletic Council has voted to establish a scholarship fund to honor Robbie Gilson who was an active member of the sports programs run by the Council -- from swimming and soccer to basketball and skiing. The first scholarship will be awarded to a 1986 graduating senior from Newbury who has shown the best evidence d sportsmanship throughout his or her high school career. 1986 is the year Robbie would have graduated. The scholarship will be awarded to a Newbury senior each year thereafter. The Athletic Council has started the fund with a $100 donation. All donations may be sent to The Robbie Gilson Scholar- ship Fund, in care of Peg Haviland, Newbury Athletic Council, W. Newlmry, Vt. QUOTE is within our- Robert Browning American manufacturer of dynamite, which he called "Hercules powder" and patented in 1874. (Alfred Nobel, of Nobel Prize fame, also invented dynamite in Sweden at about the same time. ) Source: History of Bradford. Haskins. LUNCH MFA00 WENTW()RTH SCHOOL MENUS Week of Oct. 6-13 Wednesday-- Tacos, French Fries, Orange or Grape fruit juice, Cherry Cake, Milk. Thursday-- Chicken Noodle Soup, Carrot Sticks, Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches, Apples, Milk. Friday-- Shepherd's Pie, Green Beans, Applesauce, Bread and Butter, Milk. Monday No School. Tuesday Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, Corn, Chocolate Pudding Cake, Whipped Topping, Bread and Butter, Milk. Wednesday-- Sloppy Joes, French Fries, Peas, Peaches, Milk. BLUE MOUNTAIN UNION SCHOOL Week of October 6-13 Wednesday-- Corn Chowder. Bologna Sandwich. Applesauce Bars, Milk. Thursday-- Sloppy Jocs, Toss Salad, Cookies, Milk. Friday-- Clam Rolls, Potato Stix, Green Beans, Fresh Fruit, Milk. Monday Tuna Pea Wiggle, Cherry Cobbler, Milk. Tuesday-- Pizza, Green Beans, Pudding, Milk. Wednesday-- Grinders, Potato Chips, Fresh Fruit, Milk. For the Week of Oct. 11-15 WOODSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Monday-- Pork Gravy on Mashed Potato, Green Beans, Rolls, Fruit Cocktail, Milk. Tuesday-- Spaghetti Meatsauce, Rolls, Wax Beans, Applesauce, Milk. Wednesday-- Turkey Pie, Pickles, Peaches, Milk. Thursday-- Pizza, Whole Kernel Corn, Pears, Milk. Friday-- Vegetable Beef Soup, Peanut Butter Sand- wich, Saltine, Fruit Cocktail, Milk. JAMES R. MORRILL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Monday Farmer Jones Special, Carrots, Brownies, Milk. Tuesday-- Pizza, Tossed Salad, Apples, Milk. Wednesday-- Vegetable Beef Soup, Crackers, Pickles, Gingerbread, Milk. Thursday-- Tuna Filled Rolls or Peanut Butter, Rolls, Peas, Pineapple, Milk. Friday-- Roast Turkey, Mashed Potato. Green Beans, Cranberry Sauce, Pumpkin Custard, Milk. HAVERHILL ACADEMY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL Monday Ravioli with Meat Sauce, Cheese Chunks, Rolls & Butter, Whole Corn, Chocolate Cake & Frosting, Milk. Tuesday-- Ham Patty, Mashed Poatotes, Spinach, Jello & Topping, Milk. Wednesday-- Pizza, Green Beans, Applesauce, Milk. Thursday--- Chinese Pie, i n Heav00 a00enda .for North Country EXEC[YIIVE COUNCALOR Raymond S. Burton, (R-NI.) r I ! i i in Governor Gallen and the five member Executive Council took marly three hem's to vote through some 200 items at our Sept. 22 meeting. Just under one half of those items dealt in a specific way with our northern district. This is unusual because usually only about one4ifth of the agenda items deal with our district here in the of New Hampshire, This Attorneys William Briggs of Wmteield and Randall Cooper  Madison are now under contract under lISA 161:9 for legal representation for social workers. Over $650,000 was approved in contracts with social service agencies to deliver social programs in the areas of the elderly, family planning, mental health, day care, nution services, alcohol and drug abuse assUitane. The Council also accepted the Bierial RecReomPmrt of the New Hampshire Real Estate iion. Anyone desiring a copy please call or write Ray Burton, Councilor RFD No. 1 Woedaville 03785 (tel. 603-747- 3662). $424,609 to 19 institutions One for energy conservation measure grants. Wednesday, O. WARREN: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. WELLS RIVER: BMU School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 BRADFORD: Oxbow School Board, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2: 00 p.m. Monday, Oct. u COLUMBUS DAY Tuesday. Oct. IZ NEWBURY: School Board, 7:30 p.m, Wednesday, Oct. 13 HAVERHILL: School Board, 7:20p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. BRADFORD: School Board, 7: 30 p.m. Mashed Poatoes, Rolls & Butter, White Cake & Frosting, Milk. Friday--* Grinders, Cheese, Pickles, Chips, Cookies, Milk. WOODSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL Monday-- Turkey in Gravy, Stuffing, Biscuits, Peas, Cranberry Sauce, Congo Bars, Milk. Tuesday-- Hamburgers, Potato Chips, Corn, Apple Crisp, Milk. Wednesday-- Macaroni, Beef Tomato Casserole, Broccoli, Butterscotch Pudding, Milk. Thursday-- Sliced Turkey, Macaroni Salad, Green Beans, Gingerbread-Topping, Milk. Friday-- Fishwich, Potato Chips, Tossed Salad, Midnite Velvet Cake, Milk. ALL MENUS SUBJECT TO CHANGE Letters to the Ed The new hydro electric plant To the Editor: fact, that the generatins It is not surprising that equipment for the plant is electric rates continue to being made in Germany; increase. The article mentions something unthinkable 1( that the cost of the 1500 kw years ago. The new subway plant will be $3,500,000. That cars for the New York transit comes out to $2300 per kw of system are being made in generating main reason for unemployment American auto 10 dustry; greedy high The only installed capacity. Years ago, Canada and much of the new the new hydro a steam electric plant could be equipment for the the fuel will built for $90 a kilowatt; Washington, D.C. transit air polluting and recently a large nuclear system is being made in Italy. torionists will electric plant was built for less This once again is I0,000 barrels than $1000 a kilowatt, irrefutable proof that the costing over One thing that should bother American worker is pricing annum. the average American is the himself out of a job. That is the Remember the Uniled Nations To theEditor: these enable continuance of sharing world In autumn, leaves flame in our free society, while also developing peace, glorious colors and fall off, guiding nationalpolicy, planet habitable. ending the photosynthesis However we vote (or fail Let all honor process in which life depen- to), the greater world exists-- public meetings, ds but not before new buds it won't "go away." We are a schools, churcheS, have formed that will re-start small part in population and and letters in the this life-giving function, come geography, though large in spring, economics and power to "Spirit of Then comes United Nations destroy, nations, all Day, October 24, 37thbirthday Let us be large-- not in all to support the of this WW If-born effort for monopolizing world resour- and share togetherness so essential in cos, imposing our will or for destroying but today's complex, destroying all in nuclear happiness and technological society, war-- but large in un- In USA comes now a third derstanding, adaptability and event: our national elections, restraint, in fully supporting. Like the buds on the trees, the UN in resolving conflicts, The nuc/ear arms freeze To the Editor: "KGB Said Pushing Arms Freeze" read the headlines in the papers Sept. 21st, when the news was released about Russian spies involvement in that so-called "grass-roots" nuclear arms freeze our state of Vermont was duped into this past year. With the whole country talking about the feature story in the October issue of the Readers Digest, which to rescind the culminates a series of prior those individual revelations from other passed the sources on the same subject, on the need to rectify the action Day taken in Vermont on the With nuclear freeze now becomes ruing up Nov. paramount ff our state is to' need to aid the retain its good name. Vermont citizens I would like to urge all their mistake as veteran and other patriotic possible is organizations in Vermont to circulate petitions right away The.flat.rate tax and housin00 (c) Public Research, Syndicated, 1982 by RICHARD R. MUTH Dr. Muth is a professor of economics at Stanford University and an authority on the housing industry. In recent weeks there has been con- siderable discussion about substituting a flat-rate tax for our current personal in- come tax, and several bills which would do so have been introduced into the Congress. The flat-rate tax, under most proposals, would retain or even increase the personal exemption in the current federal income tax. It would abolish most or all deduc- tions, however. The current system of taxing additional income at ever- increasing rates would be replaced by a constant rate of tax throughout the income range. Though new to many, the flat-rate tax is really a rather old idea. Nobel prize winning economist Milton Friedman suggested it in his book Capitalism and Freedom twenty years ago. Moreover, until inflation lifted Americans into progressively higher tax brackets in the seventies, the federal income tax was in effect a fiat-rate tax throughout all but the very highest income levels. This was because as the taxpayer's before-tax in- come rose so did his total deductions, offsetting the higher tax rate applicable to his additional income. Among the most important of these deductions are those for mortgage interest and property taxes paid. Not only do these reduce the degree of progression in the personal income tax, but they reduce substantially the cost of living in an owned home. Under the personal income tax in this country, the taxpayer need not report the imputed rental value of his home as in- come. He can, however, deduct mortgage interest and property taxes paid from his taxable income. Together, interest and property taxes amount to about three- quarters of the cost of living in an owned home. Thus, if a taxpayer pays 20 cents additional tax for each additional dollar of income, he pays only 85 cents per dollar of his housing costs after taX. Since the level of taxes is fixed ultimately by the level of government expenditures, lower taxes for homeowners mean higher taxes for ren- ters. The personal tax treatment of income from owner-occupied housing is often justified by the social benefits of homeownership. The tax advantage, however, is a very inefficient way of in- ducing more households to become homeowners. Most studies suggest that the sizeable tax advantages of owning one's home have led only about 4 percent of the nations households to become homeowners, increasing the extent of homeownership from 62 to percent. Data contained in Congressional Budget Office dicate that roughly $50 billiO revenue is lost way income The tax subsidy is thus of the $15,000 per year for each household induced to homeowners. Most of the subsidY" $1,000 per year per those who would have been without the tax effective ways could homeownership. Another effect of the treatment of homeownership draws capital away from the sector of the economy. prising to many is the fact our country's fixed capital stock form of residential real estate. estimated that, because of vantage, the capital 0wner-occupied house is almoSt greater than it would non-residential capital stock percent smaller. The tax owner housing thus runs currnt Administration's increasing investment in the sector of the economy. If a poll were taken economists would almost port eliminating the current of income from To attempt to do so, however, ! counter strong opposition. If vantage were removed, the houses would fall, in effect on the wealth of existing Clearly, there is little adopting a flat-rate tax detrimental to the electorate. Nor would economic advantage to rules for existing housing. For way in which the in existing houses could put to other uses. Changing the rules could, reduce the amount of future owner houses and increase the t new investment To do so, however, would stll in the absence of a radical personal income tax. The offers such an opportunity. could provide the of simplicity for the among taxpayers and economy as a whole. base to include the imputqd: owner housing bgilt after would be an m rate CONCERT IN THETFORD THETFORD-- There will be a concert featuring the music of HISTORICAL SOCIETY E. TOPSHAM Sam Moffat, Sa, Rizetta, and FAIRLEE-- There will be a a Rummage R.P. Hale on hammer meeting of the Fairlee sham at the dulcimer and harpsichord Historical Society on Tuesday, Oct. 2 to Oct. 9 f Monday, Oct. 11at the Grange Oct. 13, at the Fairlee Town to 5:00 p.m. Hall in Thetford Hill starting Hall starting atT:30 p.m. The there will he a at 7:30 p.m. There will be a scheduled program will be ou 10:00 to $3.00 admission charge for local history and refresh- Rummage adults; with a $3.00 charge for ments will be served. Guests sponsored children, are welcome.