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Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
October 6, 1982     Journal Opinion
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October 6, 1982
 

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October 6, 1982,The Journal Opinion-Page 5 Bradford/Thetford Lions Club Fair Wood sculpturing at the fair. A Contra Dance couple have a bite to eat. i !: :ii::i::!i Sister and brother share a Saturday afternoon drive at the fair. .J Young speedsters take their turn at the wheel. Contra Dancers going through their paces. Close.up of Herbie Gray, owner of the tract of land the fair was erected on. Crowd pleasers in the old-fashion way. Fried dough may be a new treat for this youngster. Hundreds watched as the demolition derby got under way. .... ..... Everyone wants to look at the Army National Guard tank from Bradford. Demolition Derby winner Duane Manson with his son after a victorious ,'search and destroy" mission. The mid-way in Fairlee. Demolition Derby Winners lst--Duane Mansur, Canaan, N.H. ($250.00). 2nd--Jim Heyden, East Randolph, Vt. ($125.00). 3rd--Larry Farnham, Fairlee, Vt. ($75.00). Illll A different kind of race. The demolition boys brought their worst "best" cars and tried to take the big money home with them. Sportsmen congratulate each other alter mey pummelled their to destruction. Jim Heyden, driving ear number 8, pounded Dune Mausur, hum 44, into the corner unsuccessfully, as Mansur edged his way out of the corner to finally quiet the engine of Heyden. It was an exciting finish. Fairlee Lion David Fuchs had the Job of announcing the demolition derby. Fuchs was also co.director of the fair. "k Fox .found (continued from page I Warnings and Confirmation While the agriculture department has issued war- nings of an outbreak, the health department is more cautious preferring to confirm "a risk of rabies in wild animals throughout the state," Extension animal pathologist for the University of Vermont Dr. Jim Wad- sworth says, "The greatest obstacle to the control of rabies is public indifference." Wadsworth said the disease is commonly tansmitted between wild animals such as skunks, bats, and foxes, often infecting domestic animals like cattle, dogs, cats, sheep -- and even people. The disease causes effected animals to lose their natural fear of enemies, rabies attacks the nervous system driving rabid animals to bite at almost anything. The disease is usually transmitted by either a bite or through contact with a rabid animal's saliva. Vaccinations Urged Many towns in our region have stepped up their efforts to check dog registrations. Dogs are required by Vermont law to he registered by their owners, an up-to-date rabies vaccination is a prerequisite for registration. Health and agriculture officials are urging cat owners to bring their pets in for their regular vaccination also. Both animals should be vaccinated every two years. In addition, officials are now urging persons who come in contact with wild animals on a regular basis to check with their doctor about a rabies vaccine that is available for humans. Dr. Wadsworth said general symptoms of rabies in domestic animals can be recognized if the animal stops eating and drinking, seeks solitude, resents or resists handling or petting. These early symptoms usually generate into outright hostility. Cows effected with the disease will attack and pursue other animals and rabid horses will roll and appear to be in pain, said Dr. Wadsworth. Dr. Wadsworth said the disease is most easily tran- smitted by skunks who have the potential to carry the greatest amount of the rabies virus in their saliva. However, no skuuk or other animals besides the two fox in Eden have been confirmed as rabid in Vermont. There have been no reports of rabies in Nexv Hampshire. Nightclub (continued from page 1 wines, mixed drinks, and non- alcoholic beverages. Live Music But more importantly, said Clements, the nightspot will feature live music regularly The two owners plan to bring in a wide variety of artists to perform. "We're not looking for one type of music," said Loschiavo, "but bands that will appeal to different age groups." Town, village, and police officials in Bradford have all expressed some degree of hesitation in endorsing the idea of a nightspot serving alcohol in the village, par- ticularly in the wake of their experience with the now defunct King Arthur's nightclub. Bradford area State Police Corporal Robert Haradon and another officer met with town officials this summer to coordinate policies on handling incidents relating to alcohol abuse and bars. And, both the town selectmen and village trustees have indicated a low tolerance level for any future bar troubles in Bradford. Place to go But Clements and Loschiavo are quick to calm any uneasy feelings. "We're different people and there are things that we just aren't going to put up with,".said Clements. "We certainly aren't going to be afraid to throw anyone out. You can't run a business that isn't comfortable to be in or to bring people to. Anyone fighting will be out of here for a year, first time, no questiorLs asked. Our construction will be a lot different, with better lighting, and a bar situated where you can see what is going on." Says Loschiavo, "People here need a place to go for entertainment and to have a good time in a decent place.,. that's what we're doing here." INTERESTING FACT In some parts of Russia people used to roll around in the fields in the trope that this would encourage the crops to grow. October 6, 1982,The Journal Opinion-Page 5 Bradford/Thetford Lions Club Fair Wood sculpturing at the fair. A Contra Dance couple have a bite to eat. i !: :ii::i::!i Sister and brother share a Saturday afternoon drive at the fair. .J Young speedsters take their turn at the wheel. Contra Dancers going through their paces. Close.up of Herbie Gray, owner of the tract of land the fair was erected on. Crowd pleasers in the old-fashion way. Fried dough may be a new treat for this youngster. Hundreds watched as the demolition derby got under way. .... ..... Everyone wants to look at the Army National Guard tank from Bradford. Demolition Derby winner Duane Manson with his son after a victorious ,'search and destroy" mission. The mid-way in Fairlee. Demolition Derby Winners lst--Duane Mansur, Canaan, N.H. ($250.00). 2nd--Jim Heyden, East Randolph, Vt. ($125.00). 3rd--Larry Farnham, Fairlee, Vt. ($75.00). Illll A different kind of race. The demolition boys brought their worst "best" cars and tried to take the big money home with them. Sportsmen congratulate each other alter mey pummelled their to destruction. Jim Heyden, driving ear number 8, pounded Dune Mausur, hum 44, into the corner unsuccessfully, as Mansur edged his way out of the corner to finally quiet the engine of Heyden. It was an exciting finish. Fairlee Lion David Fuchs had the Job of announcing the demolition derby. Fuchs was also co.director of the fair. "k Fox .found (continued from page I Warnings and Confirmation While the agriculture department has issued war- nings of an outbreak, the health department is more cautious preferring to confirm "a risk of rabies in wild animals throughout the state," Extension animal pathologist for the University of Vermont Dr. Jim Wad- sworth says, "The greatest obstacle to the control of rabies is public indifference." Wadsworth said the disease is commonly tansmitted between wild animals such as skunks, bats, and foxes, often infecting domestic animals like cattle, dogs, cats, sheep -- and even people. The disease causes effected animals to lose their natural fear of enemies, rabies attacks the nervous system driving rabid animals to bite at almost anything. The disease is usually transmitted by either a bite or through contact with a rabid animal's saliva. Vaccinations Urged Many towns in our region have stepped up their efforts to check dog registrations. Dogs are required by Vermont law to he registered by their owners, an up-to-date rabies vaccination is a prerequisite for registration. Health and agriculture officials are urging cat owners to bring their pets in for their regular vaccination also. Both animals should be vaccinated every two years. In addition, officials are now urging persons who come in contact with wild animals on a regular basis to check with their doctor about a rabies vaccine that is available for humans. Dr. Wadsworth said general symptoms of rabies in domestic animals can be recognized if the animal stops eating and drinking, seeks solitude, resents or resists handling or petting. These early symptoms usually generate into outright hostility. Cows effected with the disease will attack and pursue other animals and rabid horses will roll and appear to be in pain, said Dr. Wadsworth. Dr. Wadsworth said the disease is most easily tran- smitted by skunks who have the potential to carry the greatest amount of the rabies virus in their saliva. However, no skuuk or other animals besides the two fox in Eden have been confirmed as rabid in Vermont. There have been no reports of rabies in Nexv Hampshire. Nightclub (continued from page 1 wines, mixed drinks, and non- alcoholic beverages. Live Music But more importantly, said Clements, the nightspot will feature live music regularly The two owners plan to bring in a wide variety of artists to perform. "We're not looking for one type of music," said Loschiavo, "but bands that will appeal to different age groups." Town, village, and police officials in Bradford have all expressed some degree of hesitation in endorsing the idea of a nightspot serving alcohol in the village, par- ticularly in the wake of their experience with the now defunct King Arthur's nightclub. Bradford area State Police Corporal Robert Haradon and another officer met with town officials this summer to coordinate policies on handling incidents relating to alcohol abuse and bars. And, both the town selectmen and village trustees have indicated a low tolerance level for any future bar troubles in Bradford. Place to go But Clements and Loschiavo are quick to calm any uneasy feelings. "We're different people and there are things that we just aren't going to put up with,".said Clements. "We certainly aren't going to be afraid to throw anyone out. You can't run a business that isn't comfortable to be in or to bring people to. Anyone fighting will be out of here for a year, first time, no questiorLs asked. Our construction will be a lot different, with better lighting, and a bar situated where you can see what is going on." Says Loschiavo, "People here need a place to go for entertainment and to have a good time in a decent place.,. that's what we're doing here." INTERESTING FACT In some parts of Russia people used to roll around in the fields in the trope that this would encourage the crops to grow.