"
Newspaper Archive of
Journal Opinion
Bradford , Vermont
Lyft
October 7, 1981     Journal Opinion
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 7, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Journal Opinion produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 4-The Journal Opinion-October 7, 1981 NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. Publisher of Journal M Opinion WooklT NeWtp, lpor Imblblmd hi qH'd, Vernont. $qpbaaPipltu nnal Vornog0t grad New Nompokko $9.00 pot yeer; $6.00 for six nodo; HI ef ste - $11.N per yeer mid $7.00 fw Ill mNtkl; hnior t|Hi discNnt $Le0. fmcead Im0 lwete lNd4 at lnulfedo YeuaNt 0$035. Puldhked bT Nmtkm*! Pildlsklq Cemlmmy, llc., P.O. |is $7e, lmaHenl. Robert F. Humlnski President & Publisher Bradford /  ; Woodsville 802-222-5281  .  603-747-2016 %, p, An Independent Newspaper I Editorial Hats off The Lyme selectmen, at their Sept. 23 meeting, announced an anonymous $1000 donation towards emergency firewood for town residents. The anonymous donor should be congratulated for providing a public service which is seen rarely in this day and age. The 1980's have been said to he an age of budget cutting, of "tightening our belts," and of financial con- servation on the part of our federal and state governments. Unfor- tunately, many of the elderly, the handicapped, and those unable to fend for themselves when the fiscal rug is pulled out from under our social programs, will be loft behind. It is this principle of neighbor- helping.neighbor that built our communities in the Upper Valley during the late 1700's and which followed throughout the 19th century. It is that same principle and spirit that can be seen in the Lyme firewood fund donation. The eight cords of wood that were provided in Lyme by the donation, in theory, are to he eventually replaced by those who must use the fuel in a time of financial crisis. The donation may be heating the homes of Lyme residents in need, for many years to come. Similar firewood funds would be an asset to any community in our area and could even be provided by local government if properly budgeted for. Perhaps the most important thing accomplished by the donation is the example set that someone still cares. Two old.time stock .farms Houghton's Pavilion Stock end to the room, airiness, and hundred years earlier. Farm conveniences of the barn for Sources: Julia Fifield, The showplace of the area a hundred years ago was the Pavilion Stock Farm, south of Orford village. It was built in 1878 and later nicknamed "Houghton's Folly." An article in the Man- chester Mirror and Farmer around that time tells us: "S. S. Houghton, a merchant of Boston (the Pavilion Store, 55 Tremont St.) is its owner; and, having a love for fine stock, he finds his recreation when away from business, in looking after the interests of this mammoth establishment. It is probably the most complete and extensive stock barn in the United States... The structure was com- menced in April, 1877, and was completed the following winter, at a cost of about $40,000 . . . The size is 240 by 200 feet (L-shaped, about 60 feet deep), and it has four floors, the upper apartment being a story and a half in height . . . (Over the main entrance) goes up a tower 150 feet high, in which is a large clock that strikes the hours, with a face on each of the four sides, and a bell weighing 1,268 pounds... As the article tells us, this enormous building housed quite a variety of animals and equipment: "The basement is now occupied by farm carriages and tools, calves, colts, swine, hens, roots, and ice-cellar... Connected with the pens are spacious yards where the stock can have access to the sun and room for exercise...The first story greets you with a magnificent reception room 21 by 36, with side rooms for ladies and gentlemen fitted up in style and with every modern convenience. You then step from this room into the carriage-room . . . through which carriages can drive in through one door and out at another. : . it can easily ac- commodate 200 horses with roomy apartments, and an eighth of them with sump- tuous box stalls. There is no stock, carriages, Pay, grain, help, and visitors... Ithas the capacity of 18 good-sized barns... It took one million feet of lumber to build it. There is not a post in sight in the first or second story. The support is wholly of iron trusses..." The specialty of Pavilion Stock Farm was the breeding and training of horses for harness racing. Mr. Houghton could enjoy this sport on his own racetrack, bordered with cedar trees, which can still be seen from the highway. The pride of the establishment was the stallion George Wilkes, Jr. Adjacent to the barn was the country home of the Houghtons, a portion of the house formerly occupied by the Story and Riley families, which the Houghtons drastically renovated and enlarged, Evidently Mrs. Houghton did not mind having horses as close neighbors, but her sensibilities were offended by the pungent aroma of cows -- so, soon after the huge barn was built, Mr. Houghton had to buy land in the Quintown section of Orford, out beyond Orfordville, and build a separate barn there for his cattle. An innovation in this region was his construction and use of a horizontal bin for ensilage storage -- a forerunner of trench silos. Eventually Mr. Houghton sold the farm to Joseph Saiadino. Sone years later, the enormous clock tower collapsed under the stress of its own weight. The building itself stood until destroyed by fire at 2 a.m. on July 26, 1930. The Saladinos built a new barn, also remodeled the former servants' quarters for their own residence. Today the place is owned partly by George Tullar and partly by Mrs. Clifford Fifield, She and her husband, who called the place "ields' Folly", populated the farm with sheep -- reminiscent of the flock of 116 sheep raised there by Alexander Riley a Alice Hodgson, Nellie Saladino, and the papers of Rosalind Ordway. Glendower Stock Farm There has always been a farm near the Vermont end of the Bedell Bridge. During the years of first settlement it was first farmed by Col. Remembrance Chamberlain (nephew of Richard Chum- berlin, the ferryman). Remembrance's wife was Elizabeth Elliott, widow of Haynes Johnson. When Haynes died in 1775, leaving her with three small children, it was at the beginning of the Revolution, and she was so afraid of the Indians and Tories that she returned to her hometown of Chester, N. H. until she came back to Newbury to marry Mr. Chamberlain. She came on a horse through the wilderness, her three small children riding with her, fording streams and sometimes compelled to lodge in the woods. Mr. Chamberlain farmed and kept tavern at his house near the bridge, his son Moody and grandson Ezra continuing the business until Ezra sold the farm. Eventually, in 1899, the Chamberlain farm and others nearby were combined as the Glendower Stock Farm, owned by a corporation of New York businessmen for the raising of hackney horses. Leon "Queenie" LaFrance, who lived at the Bedell Bridge toll house, when a child used to do chores at the Glendower Stock Farm for 25 cents a week. He said the farm was owned by a New York millionaire and he raised hackney horses, Morgans, which were shipped all over the world. Many of them went to Germany. Queenie described them as "those fancy-btePlzing horses they used with the carriages that had the driver on top." The horses were shipld out by (please turn to page 5) 1 Letters to the Editor Screaming P.agle patch of the CALEn - ' J 101st Airborne Division in t An open leer to the ci,e achieve the maximum World War II, who are not Wednesday,Oct. 7 possible from the many aware that we continue to be WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens Luncheon of New England/New York programs in progress and at active as an association. That Christ vestry, serving at noon. For reservations, . . the same time provide for the means they are unaware of Thursday, Oct. 8 To theEditor: written? It iswrittentorelate carryover to the states of our annual reunions, revisits BRADFORD: Champlain Valley Work NERBC's missions prior toits to training areas and hat- Program Open House, from 1:00 to4:00p.m, at My name is unimportant, an experience, to voice some extinction on l October. To the tlefields and our annual East Senior Center. my title is unimportant, and pride, and to challenge some very end these people memorial ceremony at our Friday, Oct. 9 the organization which I people, monument at Arlington BRADFORD: Senior Citizens Luncheon at represent is about to become I have been involved the last maintained their motivation. defunct, several months as the acting Many individuals outside National Cemetery. Can you Vocational Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. For Why then,, is this letter administrator of the New NERBC have commented help us locate old buddies cai1222-4782. England River Basins upon their professionalism living in your readership Saturday, Oct. I0 and purpose right to the wire. area? HANOVER: Exercise Lecture Series in Commission, affectionately When such devotion to duty is Would you therefore, please Auditorium at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock The Monarch known as NERBC, pronounced with a slash a fact it reaffirms one's faith include the following letter in starting at 8:00a.m. Includes medical clinic. in America and you realize your letter box? BRADFORD: Club Ivel Square Dance at the( Butte rf/y between B and C. This is a that nothing terminates, it The 101st Airborne Division School Cafeteria starting at 8:00 p.m. To the Editor: " rather complex Federal-State merely moves on to a different Association is looking for Connecticut Valley Swingers, Mrs. Wilson's third grade organization which has been means to the same end. former members who proudly S. STRAFFORD: Lords Acre Harvest Supper class from Bradford deeply involved in water And so does the challenge, wore the Screaming Eagle beginning at 5:00 p.m. at the Barret Hall. The ! Elementary School did some resource problems in New Governors, legislatures, and patch in World War II and in start at 7:00 p.m. Dinner: $4.50, Adults; $2.50, writing and wondered if you England-New York for the citizens; it is your turn. Vietnam. We have much news Sunday, Oct. II would print these in your past 14 years. As with many CDR. StephenL. Richmond to pass on of onr activities and FAIRLEE: Chicken Barbecue and Bake newspaper, others, this organization did Alternate Chairman of preparations for the 1982 station to benefit the Federated Church, startingi not compete in the Federal reunion in Chicago. We may Monday, Oct. 12 OUR MONARCH Budget and therefore is tar- have news about each corn- E. CORINTH: Cribbage Club at the Blake Under a leaf minated as of 1 October 1981. Riding on his leaf The termination is not ]01St Airborne pany or battery too. We urge basementstartingat7:00p.m. former troopers to join us Tuesday, Oct. 13 Munching the milk weed important, what is important on its way to growing big are four things : D/v/s/on reun/on while there is still time. FAIRLEE: Community Circlewillmeet Contact : George E. homeof Mrs. Irene Gulley. Next he "popped" his skin First: The New England To the editor : Koskimaki, 13914 Edmore BRADFORD : Meetin.g for the Valley and made a beautiful green Governors have by resolution Our numbers are dwindling Drive, Detroit, MI. 48205. at 8:00 p.m. downstairs at the Bradford nest created the New England-New fast and yet there are coun- Thank you for your efforts in FAIRLEE: Historical Society Lecture, at Resting and changing York Water Council which will tless numbers of ex- our behalf. Fairlee Town Hall. Speaker: J. Kevin ( r Happy Butterfly! take up where NERBC left off. paratroopers and glidermen George E. Kos!dmaki of the Wilbur Collection at the UVM Library. Second: The governors who proudly wore the Membership&Publicity Wednesday, Oct. 14 MY MONSTER through their representatives WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens Luncheon by Theresa King to this new Council and in Christ vestry, serving at noon. For reservations' My monster is funny. My response to the needs of their monter is blue, red, purple citizens have the opportunity, and green" I lve mY monster" and the chanenge' t develp Our  mEETI A good color the leg is purple, an effective Council which is the bodY is blue" It is funny but responsive t the real needs f River itisgood, the state, the area, and the region. A no nonsense Council ' 1 n 1 BUTTERFLIES that produces results. by Blllle JoTrojanowski Third: The citizens of New LXr""Sec ''Wenesday'IF'R "e en;)0;'m Oct7 Butterflies are really, England-New York have the really nice and beautiful, opportunity to annunciate ' NEWBURY: Village Trustees, 7:30 p.m. Our butterfly hatched and their needs, be it ground water A few scenarios continued w FAIRLEE: School Board, 7:30 p.m. flew away. aquifers, hydropower and the Thursday, Oct. 8 They fly really high into competing uses of their byROBERTA. MICHENFELDER CORINTH:SchoolBoard,7:30p.m. the sky. streams, disposal of dredge In setting the stage for these "few scenarios" we've been VERSHIRE: School Board, 7:30 p.m. Sometimes butterflies are big spoils that will be safe and looking at the growing problems of water management in Friday, Oct. 9 or small, allow continued use of our those areas that provide the country with a large part of its WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00: harbors, acid rain, safe off- food supply. Though we tend to think of Vermont and New Monday, Oct. 12 MONARCH BUTTERFLY shore development, enhan- Hampshire as agricultural states, each imports some 85 FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. by Suzanne Tomlinson cement of their coastal zones, percent of its food stocks. The remaining 15 percent covers a WOODSVILLE: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. It happened--an egg the loss of top soil, the effects rather narrow range of nutrition. After going through dairy N. HAVERHILL: Grafton County hatched intoa worm. of mineral mining on our products, apples, bramble fruits and maple syrup, one is Tuesday, Oct. 13 Itate, ate until it became water supply, the beneficial hard put to round out one's diet. CORINTH: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. a beautiful green chrysalis, use of many Federal We will eventually have to face up to the possibility of GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Wait--Something is hap- programs still in existence, or finding fewer and fewer sources for that 85 percent. WOODSVILLE: Precinct Commissioners parting! any of a multitude of water California estimates that within 20 years it .will cease to THETFORD: School Board, 7:30 p.m. It is changing to what is related interests. The citizens export foodstuffs--dwindling irrigation supplies plus Wednesday, Oct. 14 the most beautiful thing in must demand and then must growing population will make that state an importer rather ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. the world, support, than exporter. The same is true of the rest of the southwest. LYME: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. It's a Monarch Butterfly. Fourth and final: In a day The corn and wheat belts, faced with soaring petroleum- It will fly to a tree and there it and age where criticisms based fertilizer costs and dwindling water reserves will be HAVERHILL: School Board, 7:30 p.m. will stay for a day or two. abound, I am proud to an- sending less and less grain into domestic markets. Florida Then it's off to Mexico and nounce that the staff of will follow California for the same reasons. It will become then she will lay an egg and NERBC with termination irresponsible to mouth the familiar cliches "we'll just have to the beauty of the Monarch will notices in hand geared up for a find other sources". Unfortunately, we will be competing hatch and happen again, six month marathon to with the rest of the world where conditions are in many ways ,, worse than our own. To suggest that we juSthave balmy more for what we want may be fatuous in the extreme. Which leads us hack to our own area and its potential. Not too long ago -- a century or less -- this area was the bread- basket for much of the metropolitan east. Wheat, rye, oats, BUILD A poultry, mutton, beef, truck crops, name it, it was grown ROOT CELLAR here in reasonable quantities. It was not easy. The farmer made up in skill and hard work what the soil and climate FOR WINTER IVoodsville Elementary School withheld. Soils were thin, growing seasons short, the weather FOOD STORAGE For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: fickle. But the farmer planted and cultivated and harvested Wednesday-- Corn Chowder, sandwich, saltines, fruit because there were markets and with what he had, he sup- cocktail, milk. plied them. Root cellars were once commonly used to Thursday-- Hot Dog in Bun, wax beans, applesauce, milk. Then what happened to change this around? The westward through the winter, and they work just as Friday-- Bologna Sandwich, carrots & celery sticks, movement happened, the barge canals happened, the days. So if your basement is too dry pineapple, milk. railroads happened. The 40 foot deep soils of the middle west root vegetables in, just cobble together Monday-- Ravioli, bread-butter, corn, peach cobbler, and the rich fiat prairie lands could deliver a ton of grain or a simple structures.., and keep your milk. side of beef to the Boston or New York markets at a fraction fresh well into the cold months. Tuesday--Filled Rolls, green beans, jello w-fruit, milk. of what thp.j, cost to produce locally. You can build a crude barrel root cellar Little by little as eastern markets looked to western sup- wooden container at a 45 angle, two-thirds Morrill Elementary School pliers, the variety disappeared from eastern agriculture and into the ground ... letting its bottom concentration was on those things that could compete -- large rocks or bricks {for drainage) Cover For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: dairy products, orchard fruits, and that unique product of the with six inches of dirt, six inches of" straW, Wednesday-- Baked Beans, cole slaw, brown bread-butter, north, maple syrup, which, though it could not compete with two inches of soft. Carefully pack boiled egg, jello, milk, southern sugar, nevertheless found and held a sentimental, tables in straw--layer after layer--in the Thursday-- Pigs - n - Blanket, corn, pears, milk. gourmet market. The marginal farms returned to second cover the top of the full container with Friday-- Spanish Rice, tossed salad, bread-butter, ap- growth, the high pastures, often too remote or difficult to foot of straw or leaves, and (3} a plesauce, milk. harvest, were let go and the bottoms and fiats put to an in- a large rock. (If you can't obtain a wooden a hardware store or a Monday-- Farmer Jones Special, string  beans, apples, tensified program of corn and other forage crops. Even then drainage tile fitted with milk. it was cheaper to bring grain in from the west than to grow it well.) Tuesday-- Pizza, whole corn, banana, milk. here -- so perhaps our treasured dairy products are not all Folks who find that a barrel root that home-grown, fanc Haverhill Academy Junior High Somehow we must get a lot of this turned around. We must age box. Use one-inch hardwood lumber ( For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: get that 85 percent figure reduced. And we must not kid ruin many vegetables) and make Wednesdny Ravioli, cole slaw, hot rolls-butter, cheese ourselves. We will never be entirely self-sufficient. Our by three feet wide, by three feet deep. tastes have become too sophisticated to accept the rather You can divide this container into chunk, vanilla pudding-top, milk. basic fare, we might produce on our thin soils with our short manta if you want (one of our readers, Thursday-- Sausage Links, green beans, mashed potato, seasons and generally harsh winters. Few of us would settle er, partitioned hers into three 20-inch apple sauce, milk. for beans, bacon and corn bread for much of the winter, before building a that extends J Friday-- Tuna Noodle Casserole, stewed tomatoes, Variety has become commonplace. Fewer still would accept past the edge of the box peaches, milk. the austerity that was commonplace a century ago, and I give your cold-numbed fingers something  Monday--Pizza, tossodsalad, pineapple-pears, milk. would hasten to suggest, that in spite of what has to be a ' when you lift the lid later in thewinter. Tuesday-- Peanut Butter Sandwich, corn chowder, worsening food situation, it should not be necessary ever to Once the box and the top are built, you saltines, cheese chunk, jello-fr, cocktail, milk. do so. dig your pit. This excavation should be WomLwille High School There are signs that we are beginning to think seriously feet deep and--of course--large For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: about the problem. Farm land is being seen, at long last, as a wooden bin. Sink the box in the hole, Wednesday-- Chicken Pie, peas, biscuits, gingerbread- resource to be cherished and preserved. New Hampshire has around the container's sides with loose topping, milk. a law on the books, originally funded for some $3 million and heap more earth up around the box's edges. Be sure to slope this soil so Thursday-- NO LUNCH with an increase in the real estate tax to maintain funding, off the mound and away from the wood. Friday-- Macaroni & Cheese, stewed tomatoes, hot rolls- The purpose: to buy development rights on selected farm You can fall the box to within about siz butter, apples, Hermit bar, milk. sites. In Vermont, Governor Shelling has just named a task top with vegetables--using cabbages Monday-- Peanut Butter Sandwich, tomato soup, force to develop a policy and strategy to achieve the same root crops--and then spread a dry crackers, cheese chunk, fruit cocktail, milk. ends; to keep and maintain farm lands within the each pile of garden goodies. Tuesday-- American Chop Slay, green beans, hot rolls- agricultural community, mini-root cellar should be with butter, peaches, vanilla pudding, milk. The Agricultural agencies of beth states are involved in a leaves, which cooperative effort to assess the potential in the Connecticut After you've filled your cellar, put ALL MENUS SUBJECT TO CHANGE Valley for the development of a broad range of appropriate cover it with about four inches of leaveS, crops. They started in the Keene-Brattleboro area lastyear with a sheet of old roofing tin or some Fall Folia00e Report and areworkingnorth. The University of Vermont and the and a couple of bricks ( University of New Hampshire are working together in a joint study looking at the feasibility of a market center to serve as Fo, FREE additional information on root cellars or MONTPELIER--With the foliage season well under way, a direct link between farmer and consumer in the tri-town .. With LESS!, care of this paper. Ask for brilliant autumn colors can now be viewed in all portions of area. Geeff Dates, one of the alternate writers of this column, Cellar That Ain't!". tha state, will head up that study. NORTHERN VERMONT--Full color reported in eastern There is then an acute awareness of the developing sections with mid-stage coloration in the Champlain Islands problems. Part of the-picture is the fact that we are not yet in and in the Champlain Valley near Grand Isle Alburg, that much trouble. Food prices are higher than we'd like but BABY GIRL Swanton, and St. Albans. Suggested routes for viewing in- not insupportable--they are in some ways lower than they ARRIVES ELY--Mr. dude 2, tS, 104, and Interstate 91. were a halt century ago ( a dozen eggs costs less today in THETFORD CTR.-- Mr. and CENTRAL VERMONT-- Full color foliage at all hourly labor than it did in 1931). Supply is more than Mrs. Michael Raymond are are the elevations in the Woodstock, Rutland, and Middlebury adequate -- we eat as well as ever. If there is a problem, it is the parents of a new babygirl, girl, regions. Color very good in the Chelsea, Peacham, and admittedly years away, and we are optimistic enough to Erin Near, born on Sept. 26 at Sept. Waitsfield areas as well. Suggested routes for viewing are foresee solutions in the "magic" of new technology, whether Mary Hitchcock Hospital. 103, 4, 30, and 100. it be in agriculture, marketing, distribution or synthesis -- 1 SOUTHERN VERMONT-- Good viewing most "science will find a new way". Perhaps, but such miracles everywhere, particularly at higher elevations where peak are highly speculative and often prove utterly romantic. conditions are reported. Lower elevations in Bennington area Breakthroughs usually prove less spectacular than originally NEW SON ARRIVES report 60 percent coloration with 50-70 percent in Brattloboro thought and some just don't deliver the promise. The "green E. CORINTH--Mr. and Mrs. area. Best routes for viewing include 30, 121, 9, 11, 100, and I- revolution" of a few years back is now rarely mentioned and Robert Danforth of E. Corinth, ORFOR0 91. other marvels have lead up blind alleys, are the parents of a new son, Tomas Foliage reports are available 24* hours a day from the In the next and last installment we'll take a look at some Luke Huyler James, born on Vermont Travel Division's Foliage Reporting Service at 802- possibilities that may or may not have promise, but they do Sept. 20 at the Alice Peck Day Jess 828-3239. sound intriguing. Memorial Hospital. at Mary Page 4-The Journal Opinion-October 7, 1981 NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. Inc. Publisher of Journal M Opinion WooklT NeWtp, lpor Imblblmd hi qH'd, Vernont. $qpbaaPipltu nnal Vornog0t grad New Nompokko $9.00 pot yeer; $6.00 for six nodo; HI ef ste - $11.N per yeer mid $7.00 fw Ill mNtkl; hnior t|Hi discNnt $Le0. fmcead Im0 lwete lNd4 at lnulfedo YeuaNt 0$035. Puldhked bT Nmtkm*! Pildlsklq Cemlmmy, llc., P.O. |is $7e, lmaHenl. Robert F. Humlnski President & Publisher Bradford /  ; Woodsville 802-222-5281  .  603-747-2016 %, p, An Independent Newspaper I Editorial Hats off The Lyme selectmen, at their Sept. 23 meeting, announced an anonymous $1000 donation towards emergency firewood for town residents. The anonymous donor should be congratulated for providing a public service which is seen rarely in this day and age. The 1980's have been said to he an age of budget cutting, of "tightening our belts," and of financial con- servation on the part of our federal and state governments. Unfor- tunately, many of the elderly, the handicapped, and those unable to fend for themselves when the fiscal rug is pulled out from under our social programs, will be loft behind. It is this principle of neighbor- helping.neighbor that built our communities in the Upper Valley during the late 1700's and which followed throughout the 19th century. It is that same principle and spirit that can be seen in the Lyme firewood fund donation. The eight cords of wood that were provided in Lyme by the donation, in theory, are to he eventually replaced by those who must use the fuel in a time of financial crisis. The donation may be heating the homes of Lyme residents in need, for many years to come. Similar firewood funds would be an asset to any community in our area and could even be provided by local government if properly budgeted for. Perhaps the most important thing accomplished by the donation is the example set that someone still cares. Two old.time stock .farms Houghton's Pavilion Stock end to the room, airiness, and hundred years earlier. Farm conveniences of the barn for Sources: Julia Fifield, The showplace of the area a hundred years ago was the Pavilion Stock Farm, south of Orford village. It was built in 1878 and later nicknamed "Houghton's Folly." An article in the Man- chester Mirror and Farmer around that time tells us: "S. S. Houghton, a merchant of Boston (the Pavilion Store, 55 Tremont St.) is its owner; and, having a love for fine stock, he finds his recreation when away from business, in looking after the interests of this mammoth establishment. It is probably the most complete and extensive stock barn in the United States... The structure was com- menced in April, 1877, and was completed the following winter, at a cost of about $40,000 . . . The size is 240 by 200 feet (L-shaped, about 60 feet deep), and it has four floors, the upper apartment being a story and a half in height . . . (Over the main entrance) goes up a tower 150 feet high, in which is a large clock that strikes the hours, with a face on each of the four sides, and a bell weighing 1,268 pounds... As the article tells us, this enormous building housed quite a variety of animals and equipment: "The basement is now occupied by farm carriages and tools, calves, colts, swine, hens, roots, and ice-cellar... Connected with the pens are spacious yards where the stock can have access to the sun and room for exercise...The first story greets you with a magnificent reception room 21 by 36, with side rooms for ladies and gentlemen fitted up in style and with every modern convenience. You then step from this room into the carriage-room . . . through which carriages can drive in through one door and out at another. : . it can easily ac- commodate 200 horses with roomy apartments, and an eighth of them with sump- tuous box stalls. There is no stock, carriages, Pay, grain, help, and visitors... Ithas the capacity of 18 good-sized barns... It took one million feet of lumber to build it. There is not a post in sight in the first or second story. The support is wholly of iron trusses..." The specialty of Pavilion Stock Farm was the breeding and training of horses for harness racing. Mr. Houghton could enjoy this sport on his own racetrack, bordered with cedar trees, which can still be seen from the highway. The pride of the establishment was the stallion George Wilkes, Jr. Adjacent to the barn was the country home of the Houghtons, a portion of the house formerly occupied by the Story and Riley families, which the Houghtons drastically renovated and enlarged, Evidently Mrs. Houghton did not mind having horses as close neighbors, but her sensibilities were offended by the pungent aroma of cows -- so, soon after the huge barn was built, Mr. Houghton had to buy land in the Quintown section of Orford, out beyond Orfordville, and build a separate barn there for his cattle. An innovation in this region was his construction and use of a horizontal bin for ensilage storage -- a forerunner of trench silos. Eventually Mr. Houghton sold the farm to Joseph Saiadino. Sone years later, the enormous clock tower collapsed under the stress of its own weight. The building itself stood until destroyed by fire at 2 a.m. on July 26, 1930. The Saladinos built a new barn, also remodeled the former servants' quarters for their own residence. Today the place is owned partly by George Tullar and partly by Mrs. Clifford Fifield, She and her husband, who called the place "ields' Folly", populated the farm with sheep -- reminiscent of the flock of 116 sheep raised there by Alexander Riley a Alice Hodgson, Nellie Saladino, and the papers of Rosalind Ordway. Glendower Stock Farm There has always been a farm near the Vermont end of the Bedell Bridge. During the years of first settlement it was first farmed by Col. Remembrance Chamberlain (nephew of Richard Chum- berlin, the ferryman). Remembrance's wife was Elizabeth Elliott, widow of Haynes Johnson. When Haynes died in 1775, leaving her with three small children, it was at the beginning of the Revolution, and she was so afraid of the Indians and Tories that she returned to her hometown of Chester, N. H. until she came back to Newbury to marry Mr. Chamberlain. She came on a horse through the wilderness, her three small children riding with her, fording streams and sometimes compelled to lodge in the woods. Mr. Chamberlain farmed and kept tavern at his house near the bridge, his son Moody and grandson Ezra continuing the business until Ezra sold the farm. Eventually, in 1899, the Chamberlain farm and others nearby were combined as the Glendower Stock Farm, owned by a corporation of New York businessmen for the raising of hackney horses. Leon "Queenie" LaFrance, who lived at the Bedell Bridge toll house, when a child used to do chores at the Glendower Stock Farm for 25 cents a week. He said the farm was owned by a New York millionaire and he raised hackney horses, Morgans, which were shipped all over the world. Many of them went to Germany. Queenie described them as "those fancy-btePlzing horses they used with the carriages that had the driver on top." The horses were shipld out by (please turn to page 5) 1 Letters to the Editor Screaming P.agle patch of the CALEn - ' J 101st Airborne Division in t An open leer to the ci,e achieve the maximum World War II, who are not Wednesday,Oct. 7 possible from the many aware that we continue to be WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens Luncheon of New England/New York programs in progress and at active as an association. That Christ vestry, serving at noon. For reservations, . . the same time provide for the means they are unaware of Thursday, Oct. 8 To theEditor: written? It iswrittentorelate carryover to the states of our annual reunions, revisits BRADFORD: Champlain Valley Work NERBC's missions prior toits to training areas and hat- Program Open House, from 1:00 to4:00p.m, at My name is unimportant, an experience, to voice some extinction on l October. To the tlefields and our annual East Senior Center. my title is unimportant, and pride, and to challenge some very end these people memorial ceremony at our Friday, Oct. 9 the organization which I people, monument at Arlington BRADFORD: Senior Citizens Luncheon at represent is about to become I have been involved the last maintained their motivation. defunct, several months as the acting Many individuals outside National Cemetery. Can you Vocational Center, serving at 11:45 a.m. For Why then,, is this letter administrator of the New NERBC have commented help us locate old buddies cai1222-4782. England River Basins upon their professionalism living in your readership Saturday, Oct. I0 and purpose right to the wire. area? HANOVER: Exercise Lecture Series in Commission, affectionately When such devotion to duty is Would you therefore, please Auditorium at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock The Monarch known as NERBC, pronounced with a slash a fact it reaffirms one's faith include the following letter in starting at 8:00a.m. Includes medical clinic. in America and you realize your letter box? BRADFORD: Club Ivel Square Dance at the( Butte rf/y between B and C. This is a that nothing terminates, it The 101st Airborne Division School Cafeteria starting at 8:00 p.m. To the Editor: " rather complex Federal-State merely moves on to a different Association is looking for Connecticut Valley Swingers, Mrs. Wilson's third grade organization which has been means to the same end. former members who proudly S. STRAFFORD: Lords Acre Harvest Supper class from Bradford deeply involved in water And so does the challenge, wore the Screaming Eagle beginning at 5:00 p.m. at the Barret Hall. The ! Elementary School did some resource problems in New Governors, legislatures, and patch in World War II and in start at 7:00 p.m. Dinner: $4.50, Adults; $2.50, writing and wondered if you England-New York for the citizens; it is your turn. Vietnam. We have much news Sunday, Oct. II would print these in your past 14 years. As with many CDR. StephenL. Richmond to pass on of onr activities and FAIRLEE: Chicken Barbecue and Bake newspaper, others, this organization did Alternate Chairman of preparations for the 1982 station to benefit the Federated Church, startingi not compete in the Federal reunion in Chicago. We may Monday, Oct. 12 OUR MONARCH Budget and therefore is tar- have news about each corn- E. CORINTH: Cribbage Club at the Blake Under a leaf minated as of 1 October 1981. Riding on his leaf The termination is not ]01St Airborne pany or battery too. We urge basementstartingat7:00p.m. former troopers to join us Tuesday, Oct. 13 Munching the milk weed important, what is important on its way to growing big are four things : D/v/s/on reun/on while there is still time. FAIRLEE: Community Circlewillmeet Contact : George E. homeof Mrs. Irene Gulley. Next he "popped" his skin First: The New England To the editor : Koskimaki, 13914 Edmore BRADFORD : Meetin.g for the Valley and made a beautiful green Governors have by resolution Our numbers are dwindling Drive, Detroit, MI. 48205. at 8:00 p.m. downstairs at the Bradford nest created the New England-New fast and yet there are coun- Thank you for your efforts in FAIRLEE: Historical Society Lecture, at Resting and changing York Water Council which will tless numbers of ex- our behalf. Fairlee Town Hall. Speaker: J. Kevin ( r Happy Butterfly! take up where NERBC left off. paratroopers and glidermen George E. Kos!dmaki of the Wilbur Collection at the UVM Library. Second: The governors who proudly wore the Membership&Publicity Wednesday, Oct. 14 MY MONSTER through their representatives WELLS RIVER: Senior Citizens Luncheon by Theresa King to this new Council and in Christ vestry, serving at noon. For reservations' My monster is funny. My response to the needs of their monter is blue, red, purple citizens have the opportunity, and green" I lve mY monster" and the chanenge' t develp Our  mEETI A good color the leg is purple, an effective Council which is the bodY is blue" It is funny but responsive t the real needs f River itisgood, the state, the area, and the region. A no nonsense Council ' 1 n 1 BUTTERFLIES that produces results. by Blllle JoTrojanowski Third: The citizens of New LXr""Sec ''Wenesday'IF'R "e en;)0;'m Oct7 Butterflies are really, England-New York have the really nice and beautiful, opportunity to annunciate ' NEWBURY: Village Trustees, 7:30 p.m. Our butterfly hatched and their needs, be it ground water A few scenarios continued w FAIRLEE: School Board, 7:30 p.m. flew away. aquifers, hydropower and the Thursday, Oct. 8 They fly really high into competing uses of their byROBERTA. MICHENFELDER CORINTH:SchoolBoard,7:30p.m. the sky. streams, disposal of dredge In setting the stage for these "few scenarios" we've been VERSHIRE: School Board, 7:30 p.m. Sometimes butterflies are big spoils that will be safe and looking at the growing problems of water management in Friday, Oct. 9 or small, allow continued use of our those areas that provide the country with a large part of its WOODSVILLE: Haverhill District Court, 2:00: harbors, acid rain, safe off- food supply. Though we tend to think of Vermont and New Monday, Oct. 12 MONARCH BUTTERFLY shore development, enhan- Hampshire as agricultural states, each imports some 85 FAIRLEE: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. by Suzanne Tomlinson cement of their coastal zones, percent of its food stocks. The remaining 15 percent covers a WOODSVILLE: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. It happened--an egg the loss of top soil, the effects rather narrow range of nutrition. After going through dairy N. HAVERHILL: Grafton County hatched intoa worm. of mineral mining on our products, apples, bramble fruits and maple syrup, one is Tuesday, Oct. 13 Itate, ate until it became water supply, the beneficial hard put to round out one's diet. CORINTH: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. a beautiful green chrysalis, use of many Federal We will eventually have to face up to the possibility of GROTON: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. Wait--Something is hap- programs still in existence, or finding fewer and fewer sources for that 85 percent. WOODSVILLE: Precinct Commissioners parting! any of a multitude of water California estimates that within 20 years it .will cease to THETFORD: School Board, 7:30 p.m. It is changing to what is related interests. The citizens export foodstuffs--dwindling irrigation supplies plus Wednesday, Oct. 14 the most beautiful thing in must demand and then must growing population will make that state an importer rather ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. the world, support, than exporter. The same is true of the rest of the southwest. LYME: Selectmen, 7:00 p.m. It's a Monarch Butterfly. Fourth and final: In a day The corn and wheat belts, faced with soaring petroleum- It will fly to a tree and there it and age where criticisms based fertilizer costs and dwindling water reserves will be HAVERHILL: School Board, 7:30 p.m. will stay for a day or two. abound, I am proud to an- sending less and less grain into domestic markets. Florida Then it's off to Mexico and nounce that the staff of will follow California for the same reasons. It will become then she will lay an egg and NERBC with termination irresponsible to mouth the familiar cliches "we'll just have to the beauty of the Monarch will notices in hand geared up for a find other sources". Unfortunately, we will be competing hatch and happen again, six month marathon to with the rest of the world where conditions are in many ways ,, worse than our own. To suggest that we juSthave balmy more for what we want may be fatuous in the extreme. Which leads us hack to our own area and its potential. Not too long ago -- a century or less -- this area was the bread- basket for much of the metropolitan east. Wheat, rye, oats, BUILD A poultry, mutton, beef, truck crops, name it, it was grown ROOT CELLAR here in reasonable quantities. It was not easy. The farmer made up in skill and hard work what the soil and climate FOR WINTER IVoodsville Elementary School withheld. Soils were thin, growing seasons short, the weather FOOD STORAGE For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: fickle. But the farmer planted and cultivated and harvested Wednesday-- Corn Chowder, sandwich, saltines, fruit because there were markets and with what he had, he sup- cocktail, milk. plied them. Root cellars were once commonly used to Thursday-- Hot Dog in Bun, wax beans, applesauce, milk. Then what happened to change this around? The westward through the winter, and they work just as Friday-- Bologna Sandwich, carrots & celery sticks, movement happened, the barge canals happened, the days. So if your basement is too dry pineapple, milk. railroads happened. The 40 foot deep soils of the middle west root vegetables in, just cobble together Monday-- Ravioli, bread-butter, corn, peach cobbler, and the rich fiat prairie lands could deliver a ton of grain or a simple structures.., and keep your milk. side of beef to the Boston or New York markets at a fraction fresh well into the cold months. Tuesday--Filled Rolls, green beans, jello w-fruit, milk. of what thp.j, cost to produce locally. You can build a crude barrel root cellar Little by little as eastern markets looked to western sup- wooden container at a 45 angle, two-thirds Morrill Elementary School pliers, the variety disappeared from eastern agriculture and into the ground ... letting its bottom concentration was on those things that could compete -- large rocks or bricks {for drainage) Cover For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: dairy products, orchard fruits, and that unique product of the with six inches of dirt, six inches of" straW, Wednesday-- Baked Beans, cole slaw, brown bread-butter, north, maple syrup, which, though it could not compete with two inches of soft. Carefully pack boiled egg, jello, milk, southern sugar, nevertheless found and held a sentimental, tables in straw--layer after layer--in the Thursday-- Pigs - n - Blanket, corn, pears, milk. gourmet market. The marginal farms returned to second cover the top of the full container with Friday-- Spanish Rice, tossed salad, bread-butter, ap- growth, the high pastures, often too remote or difficult to foot of straw or leaves, and (3} a plesauce, milk. harvest, were let go and the bottoms and fiats put to an in- a large rock. (If you can't obtain a wooden a hardware store or a Monday-- Farmer Jones Special, string  beans, apples, tensified program of corn and other forage crops. Even then drainage tile fitted with milk. it was cheaper to bring grain in from the west than to grow it well.) Tuesday-- Pizza, whole corn, banana, milk. here -- so perhaps our treasured dairy products are not all Folks who find that a barrel root that home-grown, fanc Haverhill Academy Junior High Somehow we must get a lot of this turned around. We must age box. Use one-inch hardwood lumber ( For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: get that 85 percent figure reduced. And we must not kid ruin many vegetables) and make Wednesdny Ravioli, cole slaw, hot rolls-butter, cheese ourselves. We will never be entirely self-sufficient. Our by three feet wide, by three feet deep. tastes have become too sophisticated to accept the rather You can divide this container into chunk, vanilla pudding-top, milk. basic fare, we might produce on our thin soils with our short manta if you want (one of our readers, Thursday-- Sausage Links, green beans, mashed potato, seasons and generally harsh winters. Few of us would settle er, partitioned hers into three 20-inch apple sauce, milk. for beans, bacon and corn bread for much of the winter, before building a that extends J Friday-- Tuna Noodle Casserole, stewed tomatoes, Variety has become commonplace. Fewer still would accept past the edge of the box peaches, milk. the austerity that was commonplace a century ago, and I give your cold-numbed fingers something  Monday--Pizza, tossodsalad, pineapple-pears, milk. would hasten to suggest, that in spite of what has to be a ' when you lift the lid later in thewinter. Tuesday-- Peanut Butter Sandwich, corn chowder, worsening food situation, it should not be necessary ever to Once the box and the top are built, you saltines, cheese chunk, jello-fr, cocktail, milk. do so. dig your pit. This excavation should be WomLwille High School There are signs that we are beginning to think seriously feet deep and--of course--large For the week of Oct. 7 to 13: about the problem. Farm land is being seen, at long last, as a wooden bin. Sink the box in the hole, Wednesday-- Chicken Pie, peas, biscuits, gingerbread- resource to be cherished and preserved. New Hampshire has around the container's sides with loose topping, milk. a law on the books, originally funded for some $3 million and heap more earth up around the box's edges. Be sure to slope this soil so Thursday-- NO LUNCH with an increase in the real estate tax to maintain funding, off the mound and away from the wood. Friday-- Macaroni & Cheese, stewed tomatoes, hot rolls- The purpose: to buy development rights on selected farm You can fall the box to within about siz butter, apples, Hermit bar, milk. sites. In Vermont, Governor Shelling has just named a task top with vegetables--using cabbages Monday-- Peanut Butter Sandwich, tomato soup, force to develop a policy and strategy to achieve the same root crops--and then spread a dry crackers, cheese chunk, fruit cocktail, milk. ends; to keep and maintain farm lands within the each pile of garden goodies. Tuesday-- American Chop Slay, green beans, hot rolls- agricultural community, mini-root cellar should be with butter, peaches, vanilla pudding, milk. The Agricultural agencies of beth states are involved in a leaves, which cooperative effort to assess the potential in the Connecticut After you've filled your cellar, put ALL MENUS SUBJECT TO CHANGE Valley for the development of a broad range of appropriate cover it with about four inches of leaveS, crops. They started in the Keene-Brattleboro area lastyear with a sheet of old roofing tin or some Fall Folia00e Report and areworkingnorth. The University of Vermont and the and a couple of bricks ( University of New Hampshire are working together in a joint study looking at the feasibility of a market center to serve as Fo, FREE additional information on root cellars or MONTPELIER--With the foliage season well under way, a direct link between farmer and consumer in the tri-town .. With LESS!, care of this paper. Ask for brilliant autumn colors can now be viewed in all portions of area. Geeff Dates, one of the alternate writers of this column, Cellar That Ain't!". tha state, will head up that study. NORTHERN VERMONT--Full color reported in eastern There is then an acute awareness of the developing sections with mid-stage coloration in the Champlain Islands problems. Part of the-picture is the fact that we are not yet in and in the Champlain Valley near Grand Isle Alburg, that much trouble. Food prices are higher than we'd like but BABY GIRL Swanton, and St. Albans. Suggested routes for viewing in- not insupportable--they are in some ways lower than they ARRIVES ELY--Mr. dude 2, tS, 104, and Interstate 91. were a halt century ago ( a dozen eggs costs less today in THETFORD CTR.-- Mr. and CENTRAL VERMONT-- Full color foliage at all hourly labor than it did in 1931). Supply is more than Mrs. Michael Raymond are are the elevations in the Woodstock, Rutland, and Middlebury adequate -- we eat as well as ever. If there is a problem, it is the parents of a new babygirl, girl, regions. Color very good in the Chelsea, Peacham, and admittedly years away, and we are optimistic enough to Erin Near, born on Sept. 26 at Sept. Waitsfield areas as well. Suggested routes for viewing are foresee solutions in the "magic" of new technology, whether Mary Hitchcock Hospital. 103, 4, 30, and 100. it be in agriculture, marketing, distribution or synthesis -- 1 SOUTHERN VERMONT-- Good viewing most "science will find a new way". Perhaps, but such miracles everywhere, particularly at higher elevations where peak are highly speculative and often prove utterly romantic. conditions are reported. Lower elevations in Bennington area Breakthroughs usually prove less spectacular than originally NEW SON ARRIVES report 60 percent coloration with 50-70 percent in Brattloboro thought and some just don't deliver the promise. The "green E. CORINTH--Mr. and Mrs. area. Best routes for viewing include 30, 121, 9, 11, 100, and I- revolution" of a few years back is now rarely mentioned and Robert Danforth of E. Corinth, ORFOR0 91. other marvels have lead up blind alleys, are the parents of a new son, Tomas Foliage reports are available 24* hours a day from the In the next and last installment we'll take a look at some Luke Huyler James, born on Vermont Travel Division's Foliage Reporting Service at 802- possibilities that may or may not have promise, but they do Sept. 20 at the Alice Peck Day Jess 828-3239. sound intriguing. Memorial Hospital. at Mary