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Bradford , Vermont
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October 7, 1981     Journal Opinion
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October 7, 1981
 

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October 7, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 Thoughts on the t-of-Doors by Gary W. Moore BOW SEASON OPENS SATURDAY Vermont archery season for deer opens this 'y good. The last allowed many deer to survive and this crop was excellent. The biologists in the Fish estimate the deer herd at about season is the envy of New England. Last were taken by archers. The season this year may also take an antlered deer during and if they receive a permit, an antlerless few hunters are able to take three a permit. BOARD MEETING WEDNESDAY meeting of the Vermont Fish and Game Board on Wednesday to consider a regulation that would fish only by means specifically allowed by is the means that the department wishes to long thought that it was illegal, but on an attorney from the Office of the Attorney that if the law made no mention of for taking fish, that fish that were not rmentioned could be taken by any method. Lake Champlain and most of the inland be destroyed by a method of fishing long LICENSE RESTRICTIONS small game license in Vermont has car- purchaser should be aware of. allows the hunting of woodcock, partridge, snowshoe hare, rabbitt and migratory No other game may be taken with the means no turkeys, bear, deer, coon, fox or any Commonly hunted in Vermont. Small game license is not valid during the season except to hunt waterfowl. This is an WILL BE OUT for antlerless permits must wait until after staff at Roxbury is now processing the applications and October 16 is the first day that ) applicants. for other than landowners and permanent must be filled out and returned for validation. rots and $15 for nonresidents. a permit by the end of the month can was not successful in the lottery. SNOWSHOE HARE TESTED hare from Orleans County were recently Tularemia is a bacterial disease )bits. seven snowshoes tested had the disease ac- They were from the area where a man had snowshoe earlier and then come down with report of the infection hit the papers I was calls from hunters wondering about the found in other game. recommends that even though the tests hunters should always avoid handling a ! at acts sick or doesn't run. If you want to he rubber gloves while dressing rabbits or bacteria so there is no need to fear has pledged $25,000 to Montana's Fish to further research the use and effect The grant is being made available so can assess the pesticide's impact e and the environment. are aware, endrin has been found in midwest and has threatened the ng seasons. Unlimited date Connecticut will N.H. Chapter of the fund- should be Calendar by the American Jnlimited "is spread nuch like Vent held last towards national rt which 1979 more important to realize," said Davis "is that this national fund-raising total must in- crease this year if the North American Waterfowl habitat race is to be won." Prizes to be given away the night of the dinner include a 16 foot canoe with roof rack and paddles, five guns, decoys, and many other interesting outdoor items. In addition, there will be an auction of several outstanding wildlife prints and the Ruger Red Labia 20 gauge shotgun. Tickets, which are $25.00 each (for men) md $15.00 each for ladies and include a one year membership and a subscription to the organization's magazine. Call Tom Davis at 603-542-2184 for tickets and further details. Valley Fair horse show Driving (Horse or Pony), a in Costume Class, Leadline, Pair be held Class, Equitation for all -q a Fall divisions and a Groom's Class for to round out the days event. the Class lists may be obtained Y Fair by writing or calling show manager, Alice Stockwell,  it 9:30 Bradford, 222-5789. Early entries are only $2.50 per class as and a trophy and six ribbons and will be presented in each I0 and class. The judge for the show trot and will be Gail Avent of Lebanon, N.H. "It is hoped that local horseman will support this fall 19 show so that we may make it an annual event," said a fair chain- spokesman. A food booth will end be on the grounds for the day. ;ions: -SILVER ANNIE-- Silver Annie, a nasty 1923 Buick, is shown giving owner Clifford French of Bradford a "Silver Annie" Sunday drive. My trip back to Bennington As I sat contented in the cousin, the 49 red Jeepster, p.m. garage I noticed a lot of ac- driven by Esther French and About 3:00p.m. I was driven tivity and I just knew that we Lillian Lamb as passenger. were about to take another Bringing up the rear was my trip. yellow cousin driven by My cousins, a new 1949 Red Mahlon Thurston with his wife Jeepster, along with her Junis by his side. sister, a yellow 1948 Jeepster We all stopped at Coffins were being prettied up. Texaco in Fairlee and had our On Sept. 17, I was checked tanks filled to the top. Then over with a little water being down the interstate at 40 to 45 added to my radiator. A little miles per hour. I was very oil squirted here and there, no proud, leading my young need to check my crankcase cousins down the road as I am always full of oil. I knowing not where--we were needed a little air in one front headed. tire and I seemed to realize we We left the interstate at the were going some distance. Rockingham exit and headed On Sept. 18 at 8:00 a.m., my for Chester, Vt. We were soon cousins were backed out of the joined by another yellow 1948 garage and wiped off with a Jeepster driven by Ernest soft cloth, but poor me, I was French of E. Corinth with his backed out and loaded up with wife Betty at his side. all the luggage and not a bit of We all stopped in Chester at dust wiped from my eager 11:00 a.m. for lunch (The body as we were being readied people that is). for the trip. I was chomping at We left at noon and headed the bit, anxious to get started, for Bromley Mtn. stopping on 9:00 a.m.: I was all smiles the top to have a few pictures as I led out the group, with taken. Cliff French at my steering Heading down the mountain wheel and Rowland Lamb as a 6 miles to Manchester, we passenger, then headed for Bennington, I was followed by my snooty arriving at the motel at 1:30 up to a filling station and filled up again. I averaged 14 miles to the gallon and the cousins got 22. Then back to the motel where I sat. I saw the eight people pile into two of my cousins and go away to some restaurant and fill their faces, arriving back at the motel about 8:50. Then the cousins had their side curtains put on, but only fin old canvas thrown over my driving compartment. As I sat there, dark and dreary, I realized I was looking at my former home about 200 feet away, where I sat from 1968 until 1976, when I was hauled out and dragged to Bradford where Cliff finished making me road worthy and happy to beback on the road. It rained Friday night and most of Saturday. No one came near me, but my cousins were out running around, the women out shopping and the men visiting others. Saturday night they went to the Steak House for dinner. Sunday morning, all were up early, going to the Friendly Ice Cream for breakfast. Back at the motel we were loaded up with luggage and then up to the airport to be joined with 300 old cars ranging in age from 1901 to 1950. We left Bennington around 2:00 p.m., arriving in Chester at 3:30 for lunch. We left at 4:00 p.m. arriving home at 6:00 p.m. tired but happy that I had been able to return to one of my former homes. Random Notes Our 40 to 45 mile per hour speed was very comfortable for all of us. But when we were pushed up to 60, it made my tired old parts groan a little bit. It made me feel good to be able to run away from my cousins on the steeper hills. And now as I sit in the garage, after 4400 miles in the last 3 years, I look forward to making the trip to Bethlehem, Penn., next June toa car show of 500 Buicks. This will be a National Buick Meet. Take me out to the 8" m DOODLE-BUG CHAMPS---The machine was "Plum Crazy". The owner-drivers were Craig Trischman, left, and Gregory Slack, both from South Corinth. The team took first place in the doodle-bug class. PULLING A LOAD--Four-wheel drive pick-up moves the bolt the required distance for a successful pull. " "-.,,,,.   ..... SQUARE DANCE Sr. IN BRADFORD Sr. BRADFORD--There will be a Club Level Square Dance held at the Oxbow High School Cafeteria on Oct. 10 starting at & 8:00 p.m. The caller will be A] age Monty. The dance is spon- sored by the Connecticut FLEA MARKET--This exhibit had an assortment of Valley Swingers. both new and used merchandise. Over the River (co.tinued from page 4) rail and the grain all came in by rail, at the nearby Conicut Station. The farm had 100 acres of meadow land, and most of the time 100 to 150 horses. They also had a piggery -- two or three hun- dred pigs in a building that seemed to Queenie like it was a half a mile long. They butchered the pigs there, using very modern methods, stringing them up on an overhead track, then packing them in ice in boxcars. They shipped two or three a week to Armour's in WoodsviUe. Neighboring farmer John Smith says he remembers the old piggery, which is gone now. He also says that the entertainer Arthur Godfrey's father used to come to Glendower to buy horses, and he is quite sure that Arthur himself used to come there to visit when he was a child. Ellis Hall of Pike says there used to be a creamery at Glendower. In 1922 the farm was bought by F. E. Gorham, who converted it to a dairy farm. John Smith remembers when the Gorhams had their auc- tion. They had planned on their son taking over the farm eventually, but he died sud- denly of pneumonia soon after he was married, and after that the parents lost all their in- centive for continuing with the farm. More recent owners in- clude Charles Kallberg, Peter Haubrich, and now Roger Scott. Other sources: Newbury deed records; History of Newbury, Frederic Wells; History of Newbury, 1977. New Post Office for W. Topsham W. TOPSHAM--The U. S. Postal Service has awarded a contract for the construction of a leased Post Office for W. Topsham, Vt. The contract was awarded to Ulric Tremblay of Washington, Vt., for a basic five year lease term at $5,100 per year. The agreement also calls for four five-year lease renewal options. The new Post Office will be located on Town Road 34 in W. Topsham. Estimated completion date of the project is February, 1982. WHAT'S A FAIR WITHOUT COTTON CANDY -:These youngsters will have sticky fingers when they finish eating their treat. ONLY ONE THIN DIME TO WIN--It may be a bit more expensive to play today but the thrill of winning is still there when you play the skill games at the side attractions. TASKER'S WELL We Need Your Business! # 603-942.8173 603-942-5581 NORTHWOOD N.H. -NOT EXACTLY BEAR RIDGE---This youngster enjoyed his auto ride at the fair. Ford John Deere Skidder Trador Trailer New England Equipmentc,.,. 802-29$-7553 14 P.O. Box 101S White River Jet. Vermont 05001 at HOULE AUTO SALES s.v. u,,. *62 Over 82 Prices 1981 detoun $10'| • Front Wheel Drive • Sunroof • Hatchback 4 Door • Economy + KING CAB DIESEL TRUCKS Ready To Roll 1981 Models, whilesupply lasts 5 Speed Transmission- Radial Tires s500 To$85 Off All Remeining Gasoline Engine Trucks In Stock • Two Wheel • Four Drive Wheel Drive HOULE AUTO SALES 479-0548 18 ! South.Main Street, Barre 5ales Open 8-8 Weekdays, 8-5 Saturday "We Are e Service Denier" • A Proven Energy Saver! BLE, SH 8UN WORK FOR YOU Make Your Own Storm Windows, Storm Doors, Porch Łnclosures/ SO EASY ANYONE CAN DO IT! ( CUT FLEX-O-GLASS TO SIZE " AND TACK OVER SCREENS OR WINDOW OPENINGSl ONLY COSTSSOLITTLE 63˘ ANYONE Run. ft. CAN AFFORD IT! " Wide Also 28", 4B" & M" Widths WARP BROS. ChiCago 80651 Pioneers in Plastlcs Since 1924 Take this ad to ! r Hardware, Lumber or Bid! fS YOUR GUARANTEE OAKSBROS. INC. BUILDING SUPPLIES & HARDWARE Bradford, Vt. Tel. 222-5280 Showroom Open Regular . Hours Plus Fri. 'til 9 p.m. MON.-FRI. 7:00 A.M. - 5:90 P.M. SATURDAY 8:00 A.M. - NOON October 7, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 Thoughts on the t-of-Doors by Gary W. Moore BOW SEASON OPENS SATURDAY Vermont archery season for deer opens this 'y good. The last allowed many deer to survive and this crop was excellent. The biologists in the Fish estimate the deer herd at about season is the envy of New England. Last were taken by archers. The season this year may also take an antlered deer during and if they receive a permit, an antlerless few hunters are able to take three a permit. BOARD MEETING WEDNESDAY meeting of the Vermont Fish and Game Board on Wednesday to consider a regulation that would fish only by means specifically allowed by is the means that the department wishes to long thought that it was illegal, but on an attorney from the Office of the Attorney that if the law made no mention of for taking fish, that fish that were not rmentioned could be taken by any method. Lake Champlain and most of the inland be destroyed by a method of fishing long LICENSE RESTRICTIONS small game license in Vermont has car- purchaser should be aware of. allows the hunting of woodcock, partridge, snowshoe hare, rabbitt and migratory No other game may be taken with the means no turkeys, bear, deer, coon, fox or any Commonly hunted in Vermont. Small game license is not valid during the season except to hunt waterfowl. This is an WILL BE OUT for antlerless permits must wait until after staff at Roxbury is now processing the applications and October 16 is the first day that ) applicants. for other than landowners and permanent must be filled out and returned for validation. rots and $15 for nonresidents. a permit by the end of the month can was not successful in the lottery. SNOWSHOE HARE TESTED hare from Orleans County were recently Tularemia is a bacterial disease )bits. seven snowshoes tested had the disease ac- They were from the area where a man had snowshoe earlier and then come down with report of the infection hit the papers I was calls from hunters wondering about the found in other game. recommends that even though the tests hunters should always avoid handling a ! at acts sick or doesn't run. If you want to he rubber gloves while dressing rabbits or bacteria so there is no need to fear has pledged $25,000 to Montana's Fish to further research the use and effect The grant is being made available so can assess the pesticide's impact e and the environment. are aware, endrin has been found in midwest and has threatened the ng seasons. Unlimited date Connecticut will N.H. Chapter of the fund- should be Calendar by the American Jnlimited "is spread nuch like Vent held last towards national rt which 1979 more important to realize," said Davis "is that this national fund-raising total must in- crease this year if the North American Waterfowl habitat race is to be won." Prizes to be given away the night of the dinner include a 16 foot canoe with roof rack and paddles, five guns, decoys, and many other interesting outdoor items. In addition, there will be an auction of several outstanding wildlife prints and the Ruger Red Labia 20 gauge shotgun. Tickets, which are $25.00 each (for men) md $15.00 each for ladies and include a one year membership and a subscription to the organization's magazine. Call Tom Davis at 603-542-2184 for tickets and further details. Valley Fair horse show Driving (Horse or Pony), a in Costume Class, Leadline, Pair be held Class, Equitation for all -q a Fall divisions and a Groom's Class for to round out the days event. the Class lists may be obtained Y Fair by writing or calling show manager, Alice Stockwell,  it 9:30 Bradford, 222-5789. Early entries are only $2.50 per class as and a trophy and six ribbons and will be presented in each I0 and class. The judge for the show trot and will be Gail Avent of Lebanon, N.H. "It is hoped that local horseman will support this fall 19 show so that we may make it an annual event," said a fair chain- spokesman. A food booth will end be on the grounds for the day. ;ions: -SILVER ANNIE-- Silver Annie, a nasty 1923 Buick, is shown giving owner Clifford French of Bradford a "Silver Annie" Sunday drive. My trip back to Bennington As I sat contented in the cousin, the 49 red Jeepster, p.m. garage I noticed a lot of ac- driven by Esther French and About 3:00p.m. I was driven tivity and I just knew that we Lillian Lamb as passenger. were about to take another Bringing up the rear was my trip. yellow cousin driven by My cousins, a new 1949 Red Mahlon Thurston with his wife Jeepster, along with her Junis by his side. sister, a yellow 1948 Jeepster We all stopped at Coffins were being prettied up. Texaco in Fairlee and had our On Sept. 17, I was checked tanks filled to the top. Then over with a little water being down the interstate at 40 to 45 added to my radiator. A little miles per hour. I was very oil squirted here and there, no proud, leading my young need to check my crankcase cousins down the road as I am always full of oil. I knowing not where--we were needed a little air in one front headed. tire and I seemed to realize we We left the interstate at the were going some distance. Rockingham exit and headed On Sept. 18 at 8:00 a.m., my for Chester, Vt. We were soon cousins were backed out of the joined by another yellow 1948 garage and wiped off with a Jeepster driven by Ernest soft cloth, but poor me, I was French of E. Corinth with his backed out and loaded up with wife Betty at his side. all the luggage and not a bit of We all stopped in Chester at dust wiped from my eager 11:00 a.m. for lunch (The body as we were being readied people that is). for the trip. I was chomping at We left at noon and headed the bit, anxious to get started, for Bromley Mtn. stopping on 9:00 a.m.: I was all smiles the top to have a few pictures as I led out the group, with taken. Cliff French at my steering Heading down the mountain wheel and Rowland Lamb as a 6 miles to Manchester, we passenger, then headed for Bennington, I was followed by my snooty arriving at the motel at 1:30 up to a filling station and filled up again. I averaged 14 miles to the gallon and the cousins got 22. Then back to the motel where I sat. I saw the eight people pile into two of my cousins and go away to some restaurant and fill their faces, arriving back at the motel about 8:50. Then the cousins had their side curtains put on, but only fin old canvas thrown over my driving compartment. As I sat there, dark and dreary, I realized I was looking at my former home about 200 feet away, where I sat from 1968 until 1976, when I was hauled out and dragged to Bradford where Cliff finished making me road worthy and happy to beback on the road. It rained Friday night and most of Saturday. No one came near me, but my cousins were out running around, the women out shopping and the men visiting others. Saturday night they went to the Steak House for dinner. Sunday morning, all were up early, going to the Friendly Ice Cream for breakfast. Back at the motel we were loaded up with luggage and then up to the airport to be joined with 300 old cars ranging in age from 1901 to 1950. We left Bennington around 2:00 p.m., arriving in Chester at 3:30 for lunch. We left at 4:00 p.m. arriving home at 6:00 p.m. tired but happy that I had been able to return to one of my former homes. Random Notes Our 40 to 45 mile per hour speed was very comfortable for all of us. But when we were pushed up to 60, it made my tired old parts groan a little bit. It made me feel good to be able to run away from my cousins on the steeper hills. And now as I sit in the garage, after 4400 miles in the last 3 years, I look forward to making the trip to Bethlehem, Penn., next June toa car show of 500 Buicks. This will be a National Buick Meet. Take me out to the 8" m DOODLE-BUG CHAMPS---The machine was "Plum Crazy". The owner-drivers were Craig Trischman, left, and Gregory Slack, both from South Corinth. The team took first place in the doodle-bug class. PULLING A LOAD--Four-wheel drive pick-up moves the bolt the required distance for a successful pull. " "-.,,,,.   ..... SQUARE DANCE Sr. IN BRADFORD Sr. BRADFORD--There will be a Club Level Square Dance held at the Oxbow High School Cafeteria on Oct. 10 starting at & 8:00 p.m. The caller will be A] age Monty. The dance is spon- sored by the Connecticut FLEA MARKET--This exhibit had an assortment of Valley Swingers. both new and used merchandise. Over the River (co.tinued from page 4) rail and the grain all came in by rail, at the nearby Conicut Station. The farm had 100 acres of meadow land, and most of the time 100 to 150 horses. They also had a piggery -- two or three hun- dred pigs in a building that seemed to Queenie like it was a half a mile long. They butchered the pigs there, using very modern methods, stringing them up on an overhead track, then packing them in ice in boxcars. They shipped two or three a week to Armour's in WoodsviUe. Neighboring farmer John Smith says he remembers the old piggery, which is gone now. He also says that the entertainer Arthur Godfrey's father used to come to Glendower to buy horses, and he is quite sure that Arthur himself used to come there to visit when he was a child. Ellis Hall of Pike says there used to be a creamery at Glendower. In 1922 the farm was bought by F. E. Gorham, who converted it to a dairy farm. John Smith remembers when the Gorhams had their auc- tion. They had planned on their son taking over the farm eventually, but he died sud- denly of pneumonia soon after he was married, and after that the parents lost all their in- centive for continuing with the farm. More recent owners in- clude Charles Kallberg, Peter Haubrich, and now Roger Scott. Other sources: Newbury deed records; History of Newbury, Frederic Wells; History of Newbury, 1977. New Post Office for W. Topsham W. TOPSHAM--The U. S. Postal Service has awarded a contract for the construction of a leased Post Office for W. Topsham, Vt. The contract was awarded to Ulric Tremblay of Washington, Vt., for a basic five year lease term at $5,100 per year. The agreement also calls for four five-year lease renewal options. The new Post Office will be located on Town Road 34 in W. Topsham. Estimated completion date of the project is February, 1982. WHAT'S A FAIR WITHOUT COTTON CANDY -:These youngsters will have sticky fingers when they finish eating their treat. ONLY ONE THIN DIME TO WIN--It may be a bit more expensive to play today but the thrill of winning is still there when you play the skill games at the side attractions. TASKER'S WELL We Need Your Business! # 603-942.8173 603-942-5581 NORTHWOOD N.H. -NOT EXACTLY BEAR RIDGE---This youngster enjoyed his auto ride at the fair. Ford John Deere Skidder Trador Trailer New England Equipmentc,.,. 802-29$-7553 14 P.O. Box 101S White River Jet. Vermont 05001 at HOULE AUTO SALES s.v. u,,. *62 Over 82 Prices 1981 detoun $10'| • Front Wheel Drive • Sunroof • Hatchback 4 Door • Economy + KING CAB DIESEL TRUCKS Ready To Roll 1981 Models, whilesupply lasts 5 Speed Transmission- Radial Tires s500 To$85 Off All Remeining Gasoline Engine Trucks In Stock • Two Wheel • Four Drive Wheel Drive HOULE AUTO SALES 479-0548 18 ! South.Main Street, Barre 5ales Open 8-8 Weekdays, 8-5 Saturday "We Are e Service Denier" • A Proven Energy Saver! BLE, SH 8UN WORK FOR YOU Make Your Own Storm Windows, Storm Doors, Porch Łnclosures/ SO EASY ANYONE CAN DO IT! ( CUT FLEX-O-GLASS TO SIZE " AND TACK OVER SCREENS OR WINDOW OPENINGSl ONLY COSTSSOLITTLE 63˘ ANYONE Run. ft. CAN AFFORD IT! " Wide Also 28", 4B" & M" Widths WARP BROS. ChiCago 80651 Pioneers in Plastlcs Since 1924 Take this ad to ! r Hardware, Lumber or Bid! fS YOUR GUARANTEE OAKSBROS. INC. BUILDING SUPPLIES & HARDWARE Bradford, Vt. Tel. 222-5280 Showroom Open Regular . Hours Plus Fri. 'til 9 p.m. MON.-FRI. 7:00 A.M. - 5:90 P.M. SATURDAY 8:00 A.M. - NOON