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October 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
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October 27, 1982
 

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'age 4-The Journal Opinion-October 27, 1982 --" K" II III I I ill iiiiii i i i i NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly newspeper Peblishod in IJredferd, Vormenl, Sebscriptlou re t.eo - Vermont end New Hempshtre. $9.00 per year; $6.00 flr six melHhs; out of state $12.00 per your end $7.00 for six montks; Senior citilen discees! $2.00. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford 802-222-5281 v ;  Woodsville % f 603-747"2016 An Independent Newspaper I Letters to the Editor I urges voters to be informed To the Editor: The League of Women Voters of New Hampshire has made a study of the state's tax structure and reached a i consensus. We find that one of the most pressing problems facing our state is the need to modernize our 4x structure. This will keep us competitive with other states and meet citizens' needs in education, grown, the state's revenues have not kept pace with in: flation, federal funds which have shored up many state activities are being cut drastically, state debt has increased, the state's bend rating has been lowered, and a fiscal plight of our state so that they might make the best possible choice of candidates among those running for all state offices. For it will be the responsibility of the persons we elect to work for the solution of our state's fiscal crisis is being problems and to meet the acknowledged at all levels of needs of our people. government. Susan Oechsle As we approach the League of /,, BY ICTHARINE BLAISDELL John O00o0a employment, and quality of November 2 election, the Women Voters Clockmaker and silver00 f) League urges all voters to Finaneing Government li ur state's needs have inform themselves about the Chairman Concord, N.H. In 1902, Alfred Blaisdell of resounded with the sounds of revolving F'wemen thank everyone To the Editor: The Department very much sure shows what can be done. -- The Fireman's Roas Beef needs an addition built to Again thanks to all. supper held at Union 36 bchool house their fire truck, etc. Remember, we need you, so was well attended -- a sell out Firemen wish to thank each we can help those in need. of tickets, and everyone who helped in The WestTopsham The proceeds go to the West any way at the supper and Tri-Village Topsham Tri-Village Fire before. Fire Department -- Department. Working together as a team To the Editor: Department for 25 years, to the public. _ , ..j Due to redistricting, our Bill also knows much'about Bill spent many extra hours politics-as he'has been at the Academy, not only Selectma ;for 9 years in the helping students but fellow town of St. Jobnsbury. He associates. Best of luck to also has served on the State him. I hope some of this in- Water Quality Management formation o Bill Stowe will Board. help you to vot your choice on Now that you know some of Election Day. his experienced background, Douglas R. Merrill was a dedicated teacher for 30 you can imagine how Bradford, Vt. years and head of the Science dedicated he is to his job and state senate candidates are both from out of our local area. Just to ill| in a little gap of information. I would like to tell you a bit alott one of the candidates--Bill Stowe. I worked with Bill at St. Johnsbury Academy where he Guided tours to Whreshold Institute' To the Editor : in the general direction to sponsoring of a few guided Taking pen in hand, I wish, where the action takes place, walking tours thru the area -- but to date, after looking at miles and miles of nothing, we still have not found the "Headquarters" from which eminate the profound ob- servations, decisions etc. I suggest that the Institute take under consideration the or is itall a big hoax! ? Anyway, thanks, and others join me in looking forward to a few light-hearted minutes every week. Name withheld by request East Corinth in print, to compliment the "Board Members" of-the "Threshold Institute" for keeping us well informed about the goings-on in their neck of the woods. Their lively accounts have prompted several excursions It's your duty to vote A voice for Guest vironment has deteriorated legislate action taken by the and continues to do so. The itizens of-Vermont to enact precipation of industrial s6mf of the best and toughest pollution from the midwest is envii'onmental laws in the killing the fish in our lakes and cbfintry. streams and the trees on our Vermonters need someone mountains. Vermont en- vironmentalists are well aware of this. Yet their con- cerned Warvngs that Senbbr Stafford is not the seasoned environmentalist he makes himself out to be are being countered by professional lobbyists from Washington. They are stumping for Staf- ford in a desperate attempt to Washington, be wary of candidates who have campaigned on single issues, especially against their op- ponents on showboat issues like the constitutional amendment to balance the budget. Send to Washington fiscally responsible people who have relied on stressing their achievements during their campaign, not simply on their opponent's political weaknesses. In statewide and county races, we will need educated and knowledgeable men and women capable of picking up the respon- sibility for sustaining vital services that will be shifted from the federal to the state and possibly, in some cases, even to the local level. In the Sept. 14 primary elections, only about 25 percent of the eligible To the Editor: U.S. Senator Robert Staf- ford has used his chair- manship of the Senate Committee on the Environ- ment and Public Works about keep alive the "appearances" and now it's up to the rest of of environmental concern, the states to follow'. As Ver- These outsiders' idea of mont's next U.S. Senator, Jim concern is simply political .Guest will lead the way. rhetoric compared to the Fred Wilber Marshfleld, Vermont voters in the Uiper Valley and our region turned out at the polls to cast as effectively" as the State of votes Honullv a substantially Vermont has been at fighting their, , ,, v0H,,a:.,  ::  drunkenness and driving zrn ou a[ me ports nex[ ioay. liquor. As we pointed out in an FYF: For Senator Stafford may Your Information piece earlier this support sound environmental year, low voter turnouts often in- legislation, but he has voted crease the danger that the outcome of the contest could be determined less by popular sentiment and more by who shows up to vote. Again, a vote at the polls does not take into account the views of those who choose to stay home. in Washington who will aggressively act to insure that the environment we are working hard to .protect will not be* threatened ' and, Lerlps, destrol by the shortsighteiness of a budget cut here and a dollar saved &ere. Vermont has taken the lead in environmental .legislation (conti with the Reagan Administration for those budget cuts which are making effective enforcement Of such legislation impossible. During the years of Senator Stafford's experienced tenure m Washington, the en- The Nov. 2 elections are just a little less than one week away, but this is our last chance to urge voters in Vermont and New Hampshire to exercise their duty to vote as citizens of their respective states. We are not going to tell you who to vote for. But we will suggest some important factors to bear in mind when you head toward the polls. In this off-year election, use your vote not to affirm your support or protest the policies of the present administration in Washington. Use your vote to elect government of. ficials knowledgeable and responsible enough to detect and remedy the problems associated with new federal policies and fiscally adept enough to adjust to new policies that may work. Elect officials who will stay in- dependent from special interest groups and Political Action Com- mittees on matters relating to energy and the politicians hard for "reducing the role of government" without being very specific on what programs might be reduced, In New Hampshire in particular, voters should think hard before voting for candidates who have campaigned only on what they would not do if elected, when their opponents might be more safely predictable. In races for Senate and C0ngresonal representatives to Brooklyn, N. Y., wrote his recollections of his grand- father, John Osgood of Haverhill: "I recollect my dear Grandfather as a smallish, clean-shaven man, rather inclined to stoop, and bald from age. Because of a stiff joint in one leg he always walked with a cane. "Grandfather's business, which he learned at Salem, Mass., was that of a clock maker and silversmith, which of course included the repairing of watches and jewelry, and many other small jobs requiring neatness and skill at which a modern jeweller would turn up his nose, ,. "His shop (on the west side of Route 10, across from the north end of the North Common) was a little one story building still standing (in 1902). There was a door between two windows in the front. This door was divided in the middle so that the upper part could be opened in- dependently of the lower part to give air in the warm weather, and I remember Grandfather leaning with his elbows on the top of the lower part and chatting with visitors or passers by. At the right hand window Grandfather had his watchmaker's bench and tools; between it and the door was a show case. On the other side of the shop he had a lathe and a bench, with dies and tools for making silver spoons, of which he produced a great many. "The back room extended the full width of the shop and according to my recollection contained nothing save a brick forge or furnace -- I think it had a bellows -- and probably requisites for casting, as would be necessary for spoons, knee and shoe buckles, and the brass work of his clocks. "! cannot help thinking that Grandfather loved his business and worked at it with something of the ardor of the Middle Ages workmen, and that at times the little shop industry. Be that as it may he was quite successful in business... "I have heard Grand- mother mention the names of several apprentices or work- men who worked for Gran- dfather, and it seems to me that at times he must have had more than one. For quite a number of years, perhaps 10, before his death Grandfather abandoned the more active part of his business, such as clock making, and contented himself with the less active parts of the trade, repairing watches and jewelry and selling the same and spec- tacles. "Much of his trade was in the form of barter, for in one of his old account hooks many of the bills are squared with wheat, corn, oats, or even salt pork! "It has always been a source of much regret to me that quite a lot of lead patterns for knee and shoe buckles which were left in an old box in the woodshed were in- continently melted up by a boy who did chores for Grand- mother, to cast little hatchets for me, the mould for which he carved in a block of wood. All be wanted was lead -- I verily believe he would have melted the bullets of our Revolutionary Forefathers to have got lead. "It was much the same about other personal property. Neither of my parents enough appreciating 'strong mechanical bent' to think it of any consequence to preserve implements and tools which would have been of much interest to me. So shortly after Grandfather's death in 1840, all tools and personal property were sold at auction and disappeared forever. "There was a turning lathe which my indulgent Grandfather used to allow me to make spin, and a machine, of which I have a vague recollection, composed of a heavy block of wood, with iron feet, and a circle of iron on top, also some gear wheels driven with a crank, and fast, wi siderable rattling! pleasing to my Later I have must have been the tleman's gear he cut the teeth on wheels. Years tried to hunt up the but although I letters, never could trace of it. "In the attic of mother's house to play by rainy days, there waS some 18 inches had various bits works, old springs accumulate in chmaker's shop. could I go through might be able to those old fusees before chain was (Note: a fusee was a the spring unwound to of the spring.) At there were box, and my taste research helped me: the gear could he from the fusee and was a neat little click and spring inside. "As intimated, father was very little grandson, but 7 years old at the death, so no recollections and fragmentary. often doin to amuse me. One brought in a little a section of goose as were universall writing at that time. loaded by pellet with each slice of raw potato. was then used to at the big end little the air before it, out the forward .quite a loud delightful to me, cannot remember anY good advice, I shall forget the popgun." Sources: manuscript owned by Page of Haverhill. Watch out for spooks! Spooky ghouls, goblins and creatures of all kinds will be out in force this Saturday night, Oct. 30 celebrating one of our oldest holidays, Halloween. While it is a time of fun for trick-or-treaters, it is also a very dangerous time. Local police will be out in force not so much to squelch vandalism and chase window soapers, but mainly to keep an eye on traffic and insure that drivers operate their vehicles in a safe manner and keep in mind that streets will be crowded with youngsters making their rounds. Parents can consider additional safety factors which assist local authorities in making Halloween 1982 an accident free event. Think about this. Dress the kids in white so they will be easier for drivers to'see. Of ff they must wear a black costume, adorn it with reflectorized tape. Always have a parent or older person accompany all groups and keep the groups in small, easily managed numbers. If you follow these reminders, you will be assisting area youngsters in having a fun night. EXECUTIVE COUNCILOR Raymond S. Burton. (R-N Jt.) i i The political reafi6es The Executive Council accepted the Annual Reports of the following Agencies in New Hampshire State Government: New Hampshire Insurance Department, New Hampshire Air Resources Com- mission, Dept. of Public Works and High. ways, and the Department of State. Anyone desiring copies please call or write me. The CounCil approved the nomination of Ruth Wellington of Pike and Cathy McDowell of Randolph to the State Commission on the Stattm of Women. I am personally very pleased to see these two citizens from our Council District serving in New Hampshire State Government in a volunteer capacity. They are doing an outstanding job for us here in the North Country. I'm doing my best for Paul Doharty, currently the Director of Parks. Ronald Poltak of Manchester has been nominated to eplace Mr: Doherty. Frankly, my only role may be to tam a yes vote to effect some sort of consultant role for Mr. Doherty to retain his many years of experience in state government with projects having to do with Mt. Washington and Franconia Notch. The polRical reality is that when an individual takes an unclassified position that goes through Governor and Council, that individual must realize that it is a political risk and could well loose their job as they got it -- by politics! It is sad, but true. Paul Doherty has contributed many years to our state and northern areas through his classified position within the Fish and Game Dept., but when he took the Director of Parks job he became an un- classified employee -- thus subject to the political realities of life. I will try to do my best under the circumstances. In this state we can be very thankful for the Council, otherwise Paul Doherty would have been out a long time ago. The Governor and Council unanimously voted for a resolution in support of the 9 percent raise for State employees and urged the General 'Court to fund it as soon as possible. The next Governor and Council meeting is scheduled for Nov. 5, 1982. I would be pleased to see any people from our district in attendance. Bradford Academy hosts 170 graduates by EVERDENE A. HOOD 1907, Helen Worthen Brandon- Heaven a place. Just to be the last class to graduate 50th anniversary of their mittee. Tbe annual Bradford 1911, Harold Haskins - 1911, there and to look on His face, under Mr. Haskins. She read marriage. Joseph Carter, Dean Osgood was i Academy Alumni Banquet Earl Sweet - 1924, Leonard Wile through the ages be glory the article from Journal 1928, was hospitalized a month of the program. He and ReuniOn was held at Griggs - 1930, Beatrice for me. Oplnion as her tribute, with an abdominal problem. Class of 1932 do the Oxbow High School in May Jenki Wilson - 1933, Wesley Friends will be there ! have The earliest class to respond Dean Osgond, 1953, presented the Jack" and with Russell Kincaid presiding. President Kincaid welcomed the 172 present. The Late Charles Haskins, 1909, said grace and a delicious turkey dinner was served. It was prepared by the Ladies of the Congregational and Methodist Churches. Meryl Morrill did the floral arrangements. The 50 year class was recognized. Kenneth Wheatley introduced his class members. Out of 23 living members eight were present. Fifteen out of 25 attended a luncheon at Lake Morey Inn earlier in the day. Those present were: Marion Cole Maxhouse, Doris Goodwin Murphy, Louise Hutchinson, Dorothy Jeweil Cook, Evelyn Judd Metcalf, Jennie Tburston Corliss, Kenneth Wheatley, Mabel Zwicker Humphrey.. Meda Stanley Kinghorn introduced the seven mem- bers present of the 60-year class. They were: Alton Currier, Nellie Garfield Tucker, Floyd Marshall, Floyd Merrill, Henrietta Murphy Drew, Meda Stanley Kinghorn, Constance Weaver Daniels. Martina Day Stever spoke for the Scholarship Fund Committee. Last year was the first fund drive in 10 years and we received over $800. This year we continued and 49 donors contributed $635. This fund helps graduating Seniors of children of Bradford Academy Alumni. Two students were belped last year and $1,000 is now available, The.Class of 1932 donated $110, to the scholarsbip fund. Charles Haskins paid tribute to alumni members deceased since last year's When by the gift of His in- banquet: Laurence Worthley - finite grace, I am accorded In Carter - 1935, John Mann 1935, Ralph Newton - 1936, Ruby Ames Dill - 1938, Wendell Tillotson 1943, Cornelius Wright - 1948, Helen Edmonds Piper - 1949, Alice Kinghorn Haviland - 1955, Philip Whitcomb- 1963. For 40 years Charles Haskins has paid tribute to deceased Bradford Academy Alumni. For 10 years previous to that he served as Treasurer of the Bradford Academy Alumni Association. Mr. Haskins spoke of the 1942 t'eunion. It was at the Congregational vestry -- a packed room -- a hot, humid evening. Mr. Haskins remembered three things concerning this evening: His brother, Earl, was the President of the 25 year class. World War II was being fought and things were not going good. Two alumni members were fighting against Rommel in North Africa -- Ezra Eastman and Ernest Harmon. Ernest Harmon served in World War I and World War II The program 40 years ago lasted longer than the programs today. Someone brought my brother a noteand he announced, "I am sorry to end sucb a pleasant evening in this manner but the note I just received informs me that Principal John Huden's wife and son have been killed in a thunderstorm." Mr. Haskins closed his tribute by reading verses from a Methodist hymn When all my troubles and trials are o'er, and I am safe on that beautiful shore, Just to be near the dear Lord I adore, Will through the ages be glory for me. - loved long ago, Joy like a river around me will flow; Yet just a smile from my Saviour 1 know, Will through the ages be glory for me. Laura Dickey, 1927, spoke a few words in memory of Harold Haskins. Her class was to the Roll Call was 1909, being the report of the Nominating represented by Charles Committee: President -- Haskins. Hope Rogers Janice Poilender Larabee, Kjeilerup. 1916 has had a third 1958; Vice President -- book published, Bert Holland, William Hodge, 1959. 1925, and Mary Hunter Russell Kincaid, 1957, will Holland, 1929, were replace Leland Blodgett, 1954, congratulated because the on the Nominating Corn- Haverhill police report recent WOODSVILLE-- Reports from the office of Police Chief Stephen Savage for the period Oct. 15 to Oct. 22 are as follow: Sergeant John McDonald arrested James Fairbanks, 17, of Benton, N.H., for an alleged false reporting of an accident and conduct after an accident on Oct. 15, said police. On Oct. 16 Kelley Lennon of North Haverhill reported the theft of a class ring, a sterling silver ring and a small amount of cash from the Community Building in Woodsville. The items have not yet been recovered, and police have no suspects. Also on Oct. 16, Albert M. Dumais, 24, of Groton, Vt., was arrested for allegedly failing to pay a fine. The fine was issued for failure to operate a motor vehicle with a valid license, operating a motor vehicle without headlights and criminal trespass, said police. On Oct. 17 police arrested two people on three charges. Dawn Marie Smith, of Woodsville, and Robert C. Hanaford, of Ryegate, Vt. beth 25, were arrested for allegedly possessing marijuana with the intent to sell, possessing LSD with the intent to distribute and manufacturing a controlled drug, marijuana. Bail was set at $.5000 each and a probable cause hearing is scheduled for Nov. 19, said police. On Oct. 17, Officer Bernard Marvin investigated a motor vehicle accident at Patten's Gas Co. in North Haverhill. Kenneth Davis of N. Haverhill was operating a'vehicle which struck signs belonging to the gas company. No charges were made. HAVERHILL DISTRICt COURT WOODSVILLE-- Decisions of the court 6n Oct. 18 by Judge Krl T. Brnckner were as follows: David Asselin, 22, of Warren, N.H., was found guilty of conduct after an accident -- leaving the scene. He was conditionally discharged upon payment of restitution to the state and other parties damaged. Thomas Reed, 21, of Con- cord, N.H., was turned over to New Hampshire Superior Court. Probable cause was found on charges against him for allegedly falsifying physical evidence and escape from custody. special recogniti evening closed in manner -- with the the Bradford led by Dean Osgood. On Oct. 18, Albert M. Forest Street in Dumais, 24, of Groton, Vt., Oct. 20. John J. was arrested for unauthorized Woodsville, was use of a motor vehicle. He following too closely allegedly took a dump truck vehicle struck one from the B&M Railroad on Pamela Hitchcock Sept. 27 and discarded it in River, said Groton. On Oct. 21, James Morrill of N. issued a citation Haverhill reported his office J. Peddell of Pike, bu.rg!arized and $2,000 in cash operating missing on Oct. 20. Police valid license. have no suspects at.this time. earlier charged with Officer Terry Alexander driving after investigated an adckJent at the revocation; this intersection of RoUte 10 and null processed. mEETInG Wednesday, Oct. 27 HAVERHILL: School Board, 7:30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Court, 2:00 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00p.m. FAIRLEE: selectmen, 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 2 ELECTfON DAY: polls open for general election Wednesday, Nov. 3 WELLS RIVER: BMU School Board, 7:30 p.m. WARREN: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmenl 8: 00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30p.m. 'age 4-The Journal Opinion-October 27, 1982 --" K" II III I I ill iiiiii i i i i NORTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY, inc. Publisher of Journal I1 Opinion Weekly newspeper Peblishod in IJredferd, Vormenl, Sebscriptlou re t.eo - Vermont end New Hempshtre. $9.00 per year; $6.00 flr six melHhs; out of state $12.00 per your end $7.00 for six montks; Senior citilen discees! $2.00. Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford 802-222-5281 v ;  Woodsville % f 603-747"2016 An Independent Newspaper I Letters to the Editor I urges voters to be informed To the Editor: The League of Women Voters of New Hampshire has made a study of the state's tax structure and reached a i consensus. We find that one of the most pressing problems facing our state is the need to modernize our 4x structure. This will keep us competitive with other states and meet citizens' needs in education, grown, the state's revenues have not kept pace with in: flation, federal funds which have shored up many state activities are being cut drastically, state debt has increased, the state's bend rating has been lowered, and a fiscal plight of our state so that they might make the best possible choice of candidates among those running for all state offices. For it will be the responsibility of the persons we elect to work for the solution of our state's fiscal crisis is being problems and to meet the acknowledged at all levels of needs of our people. government. Susan Oechsle As we approach the League of /,, BY ICTHARINE BLAISDELL John O00o0a employment, and quality of November 2 election, the Women Voters Clockmaker and silver00 f) League urges all voters to Finaneing Government li ur state's needs have inform themselves about the Chairman Concord, N.H. In 1902, Alfred Blaisdell of resounded with the sounds of revolving F'wemen thank everyone To the Editor: The Department very much sure shows what can be done. -- The Fireman's Roas Beef needs an addition built to Again thanks to all. supper held at Union 36 bchool house their fire truck, etc. Remember, we need you, so was well attended -- a sell out Firemen wish to thank each we can help those in need. of tickets, and everyone who helped in The WestTopsham The proceeds go to the West any way at the supper and Tri-Village Topsham Tri-Village Fire before. Fire Department -- Department. Working together as a team To the Editor: Department for 25 years, to the public. _ , ..j Due to redistricting, our Bill also knows much'about Bill spent many extra hours politics-as he'has been at the Academy, not only Selectma ;for 9 years in the helping students but fellow town of St. Jobnsbury. He associates. Best of luck to also has served on the State him. I hope some of this in- Water Quality Management formation o Bill Stowe will Board. help you to vot your choice on Now that you know some of Election Day. his experienced background, Douglas R. Merrill was a dedicated teacher for 30 you can imagine how Bradford, Vt. years and head of the Science dedicated he is to his job and state senate candidates are both from out of our local area. Just to ill| in a little gap of information. I would like to tell you a bit alott one of the candidates--Bill Stowe. I worked with Bill at St. Johnsbury Academy where he Guided tours to Whreshold Institute' To the Editor : in the general direction to sponsoring of a few guided Taking pen in hand, I wish, where the action takes place, walking tours thru the area -- but to date, after looking at miles and miles of nothing, we still have not found the "Headquarters" from which eminate the profound ob- servations, decisions etc. I suggest that the Institute take under consideration the or is itall a big hoax! ? Anyway, thanks, and others join me in looking forward to a few light-hearted minutes every week. Name withheld by request East Corinth in print, to compliment the "Board Members" of-the "Threshold Institute" for keeping us well informed about the goings-on in their neck of the woods. Their lively accounts have prompted several excursions It's your duty to vote A voice for Guest vironment has deteriorated legislate action taken by the and continues to do so. The itizens of-Vermont to enact precipation of industrial s6mf of the best and toughest pollution from the midwest is envii'onmental laws in the killing the fish in our lakes and cbfintry. streams and the trees on our Vermonters need someone mountains. Vermont en- vironmentalists are well aware of this. Yet their con- cerned Warvngs that Senbbr Stafford is not the seasoned environmentalist he makes himself out to be are being countered by professional lobbyists from Washington. They are stumping for Staf- ford in a desperate attempt to Washington, be wary of candidates who have campaigned on single issues, especially against their op- ponents on showboat issues like the constitutional amendment to balance the budget. Send to Washington fiscally responsible people who have relied on stressing their achievements during their campaign, not simply on their opponent's political weaknesses. In statewide and county races, we will need educated and knowledgeable men and women capable of picking up the respon- sibility for sustaining vital services that will be shifted from the federal to the state and possibly, in some cases, even to the local level. In the Sept. 14 primary elections, only about 25 percent of the eligible To the Editor: U.S. Senator Robert Staf- ford has used his chair- manship of the Senate Committee on the Environ- ment and Public Works about keep alive the "appearances" and now it's up to the rest of of environmental concern, the states to follow'. As Ver- These outsiders' idea of mont's next U.S. Senator, Jim concern is simply political .Guest will lead the way. rhetoric compared to the Fred Wilber Marshfleld, Vermont voters in the Uiper Valley and our region turned out at the polls to cast as effectively" as the State of votes Honullv a substantially Vermont has been at fighting their, , ,, v0H,,a:.,  ::  drunkenness and driving zrn ou a[ me ports nex[ ioay. liquor. As we pointed out in an FYF: For Senator Stafford may Your Information piece earlier this support sound environmental year, low voter turnouts often in- legislation, but he has voted crease the danger that the outcome of the contest could be determined less by popular sentiment and more by who shows up to vote. Again, a vote at the polls does not take into account the views of those who choose to stay home. in Washington who will aggressively act to insure that the environment we are working hard to .protect will not be* threatened ' and, Lerlps, destrol by the shortsighteiness of a budget cut here and a dollar saved &ere. Vermont has taken the lead in environmental .legislation (conti with the Reagan Administration for those budget cuts which are making effective enforcement Of such legislation impossible. During the years of Senator Stafford's experienced tenure m Washington, the en- The Nov. 2 elections are just a little less than one week away, but this is our last chance to urge voters in Vermont and New Hampshire to exercise their duty to vote as citizens of their respective states. We are not going to tell you who to vote for. But we will suggest some important factors to bear in mind when you head toward the polls. In this off-year election, use your vote not to affirm your support or protest the policies of the present administration in Washington. Use your vote to elect government of. ficials knowledgeable and responsible enough to detect and remedy the problems associated with new federal policies and fiscally adept enough to adjust to new policies that may work. Elect officials who will stay in- dependent from special interest groups and Political Action Com- mittees on matters relating to energy and the politicians hard for "reducing the role of government" without being very specific on what programs might be reduced, In New Hampshire in particular, voters should think hard before voting for candidates who have campaigned only on what they would not do if elected, when their opponents might be more safely predictable. In races for Senate and C0ngresonal representatives to Brooklyn, N. Y., wrote his recollections of his grand- father, John Osgood of Haverhill: "I recollect my dear Grandfather as a smallish, clean-shaven man, rather inclined to stoop, and bald from age. Because of a stiff joint in one leg he always walked with a cane. "Grandfather's business, which he learned at Salem, Mass., was that of a clock maker and silversmith, which of course included the repairing of watches and jewelry, and many other small jobs requiring neatness and skill at which a modern jeweller would turn up his nose, ,. "His shop (on the west side of Route 10, across from the north end of the North Common) was a little one story building still standing (in 1902). There was a door between two windows in the front. This door was divided in the middle so that the upper part could be opened in- dependently of the lower part to give air in the warm weather, and I remember Grandfather leaning with his elbows on the top of the lower part and chatting with visitors or passers by. At the right hand window Grandfather had his watchmaker's bench and tools; between it and the door was a show case. On the other side of the shop he had a lathe and a bench, with dies and tools for making silver spoons, of which he produced a great many. "The back room extended the full width of the shop and according to my recollection contained nothing save a brick forge or furnace -- I think it had a bellows -- and probably requisites for casting, as would be necessary for spoons, knee and shoe buckles, and the brass work of his clocks. "! cannot help thinking that Grandfather loved his business and worked at it with something of the ardor of the Middle Ages workmen, and that at times the little shop industry. Be that as it may he was quite successful in business... "I have heard Grand- mother mention the names of several apprentices or work- men who worked for Gran- dfather, and it seems to me that at times he must have had more than one. For quite a number of years, perhaps 10, before his death Grandfather abandoned the more active part of his business, such as clock making, and contented himself with the less active parts of the trade, repairing watches and jewelry and selling the same and spec- tacles. "Much of his trade was in the form of barter, for in one of his old account hooks many of the bills are squared with wheat, corn, oats, or even salt pork! "It has always been a source of much regret to me that quite a lot of lead patterns for knee and shoe buckles which were left in an old box in the woodshed were in- continently melted up by a boy who did chores for Grand- mother, to cast little hatchets for me, the mould for which he carved in a block of wood. All be wanted was lead -- I verily believe he would have melted the bullets of our Revolutionary Forefathers to have got lead. "It was much the same about other personal property. Neither of my parents enough appreciating 'strong mechanical bent' to think it of any consequence to preserve implements and tools which would have been of much interest to me. So shortly after Grandfather's death in 1840, all tools and personal property were sold at auction and disappeared forever. "There was a turning lathe which my indulgent Grandfather used to allow me to make spin, and a machine, of which I have a vague recollection, composed of a heavy block of wood, with iron feet, and a circle of iron on top, also some gear wheels driven with a crank, and fast, wi siderable rattling! pleasing to my Later I have must have been the tleman's gear he cut the teeth on wheels. Years tried to hunt up the but although I letters, never could trace of it. "In the attic of mother's house to play by rainy days, there waS some 18 inches had various bits works, old springs accumulate in chmaker's shop. could I go through might be able to those old fusees before chain was (Note: a fusee was a the spring unwound to of the spring.) At there were box, and my taste research helped me: the gear could he from the fusee and was a neat little click and spring inside. "As intimated, father was very little grandson, but 7 years old at the death, so no recollections and fragmentary. often doin to amuse me. One brought in a little a section of goose as were universall writing at that time. loaded by pellet with each slice of raw potato. was then used to at the big end little the air before it, out the forward .quite a loud delightful to me, cannot remember anY good advice, I shall forget the popgun." Sources: manuscript owned by Page of Haverhill. Watch out for spooks! Spooky ghouls, goblins and creatures of all kinds will be out in force this Saturday night, Oct. 30 celebrating one of our oldest holidays, Halloween. While it is a time of fun for trick-or-treaters, it is also a very dangerous time. Local police will be out in force not so much to squelch vandalism and chase window soapers, but mainly to keep an eye on traffic and insure that drivers operate their vehicles in a safe manner and keep in mind that streets will be crowded with youngsters making their rounds. Parents can consider additional safety factors which assist local authorities in making Halloween 1982 an accident free event. Think about this. Dress the kids in white so they will be easier for drivers to'see. Of ff they must wear a black costume, adorn it with reflectorized tape. Always have a parent or older person accompany all groups and keep the groups in small, easily managed numbers. If you follow these reminders, you will be assisting area youngsters in having a fun night. EXECUTIVE COUNCILOR Raymond S. Burton. (R-N Jt.) i i The political reafi6es The Executive Council accepted the Annual Reports of the following Agencies in New Hampshire State Government: New Hampshire Insurance Department, New Hampshire Air Resources Com- mission, Dept. of Public Works and High. ways, and the Department of State. Anyone desiring copies please call or write me. The CounCil approved the nomination of Ruth Wellington of Pike and Cathy McDowell of Randolph to the State Commission on the Stattm of Women. I am personally very pleased to see these two citizens from our Council District serving in New Hampshire State Government in a volunteer capacity. They are doing an outstanding job for us here in the North Country. I'm doing my best for Paul Doharty, currently the Director of Parks. Ronald Poltak of Manchester has been nominated to eplace Mr: Doherty. Frankly, my only role may be to tam a yes vote to effect some sort of consultant role for Mr. Doherty to retain his many years of experience in state government with projects having to do with Mt. Washington and Franconia Notch. The polRical reality is that when an individual takes an unclassified position that goes through Governor and Council, that individual must realize that it is a political risk and could well loose their job as they got it -- by politics! It is sad, but true. Paul Doherty has contributed many years to our state and northern areas through his classified position within the Fish and Game Dept., but when he took the Director of Parks job he became an un- classified employee -- thus subject to the political realities of life. I will try to do my best under the circumstances. In this state we can be very thankful for the Council, otherwise Paul Doherty would have been out a long time ago. The Governor and Council unanimously voted for a resolution in support of the 9 percent raise for State employees and urged the General 'Court to fund it as soon as possible. The next Governor and Council meeting is scheduled for Nov. 5, 1982. I would be pleased to see any people from our district in attendance. Bradford Academy hosts 170 graduates by EVERDENE A. HOOD 1907, Helen Worthen Brandon- Heaven a place. Just to be the last class to graduate 50th anniversary of their mittee. Tbe annual Bradford 1911, Harold Haskins - 1911, there and to look on His face, under Mr. Haskins. She read marriage. Joseph Carter, Dean Osgood was i Academy Alumni Banquet Earl Sweet - 1924, Leonard Wile through the ages be glory the article from Journal 1928, was hospitalized a month of the program. He and ReuniOn was held at Griggs - 1930, Beatrice for me. Oplnion as her tribute, with an abdominal problem. Class of 1932 do the Oxbow High School in May Jenki Wilson - 1933, Wesley Friends will be there ! have The earliest class to respond Dean Osgond, 1953, presented the Jack" and with Russell Kincaid presiding. President Kincaid welcomed the 172 present. The Late Charles Haskins, 1909, said grace and a delicious turkey dinner was served. It was prepared by the Ladies of the Congregational and Methodist Churches. Meryl Morrill did the floral arrangements. The 50 year class was recognized. Kenneth Wheatley introduced his class members. Out of 23 living members eight were present. Fifteen out of 25 attended a luncheon at Lake Morey Inn earlier in the day. Those present were: Marion Cole Maxhouse, Doris Goodwin Murphy, Louise Hutchinson, Dorothy Jeweil Cook, Evelyn Judd Metcalf, Jennie Tburston Corliss, Kenneth Wheatley, Mabel Zwicker Humphrey.. Meda Stanley Kinghorn introduced the seven mem- bers present of the 60-year class. They were: Alton Currier, Nellie Garfield Tucker, Floyd Marshall, Floyd Merrill, Henrietta Murphy Drew, Meda Stanley Kinghorn, Constance Weaver Daniels. Martina Day Stever spoke for the Scholarship Fund Committee. Last year was the first fund drive in 10 years and we received over $800. This year we continued and 49 donors contributed $635. This fund helps graduating Seniors of children of Bradford Academy Alumni. Two students were belped last year and $1,000 is now available, The.Class of 1932 donated $110, to the scholarsbip fund. Charles Haskins paid tribute to alumni members deceased since last year's When by the gift of His in- banquet: Laurence Worthley - finite grace, I am accorded In Carter - 1935, John Mann 1935, Ralph Newton - 1936, Ruby Ames Dill - 1938, Wendell Tillotson 1943, Cornelius Wright - 1948, Helen Edmonds Piper - 1949, Alice Kinghorn Haviland - 1955, Philip Whitcomb- 1963. For 40 years Charles Haskins has paid tribute to deceased Bradford Academy Alumni. For 10 years previous to that he served as Treasurer of the Bradford Academy Alumni Association. Mr. Haskins spoke of the 1942 t'eunion. It was at the Congregational vestry -- a packed room -- a hot, humid evening. Mr. Haskins remembered three things concerning this evening: His brother, Earl, was the President of the 25 year class. World War II was being fought and things were not going good. Two alumni members were fighting against Rommel in North Africa -- Ezra Eastman and Ernest Harmon. Ernest Harmon served in World War I and World War II The program 40 years ago lasted longer than the programs today. Someone brought my brother a noteand he announced, "I am sorry to end sucb a pleasant evening in this manner but the note I just received informs me that Principal John Huden's wife and son have been killed in a thunderstorm." Mr. Haskins closed his tribute by reading verses from a Methodist hymn When all my troubles and trials are o'er, and I am safe on that beautiful shore, Just to be near the dear Lord I adore, Will through the ages be glory for me. - loved long ago, Joy like a river around me will flow; Yet just a smile from my Saviour 1 know, Will through the ages be glory for me. Laura Dickey, 1927, spoke a few words in memory of Harold Haskins. Her class was to the Roll Call was 1909, being the report of the Nominating represented by Charles Committee: President -- Haskins. Hope Rogers Janice Poilender Larabee, Kjeilerup. 1916 has had a third 1958; Vice President -- book published, Bert Holland, William Hodge, 1959. 1925, and Mary Hunter Russell Kincaid, 1957, will Holland, 1929, were replace Leland Blodgett, 1954, congratulated because the on the Nominating Corn- Haverhill police report recent WOODSVILLE-- Reports from the office of Police Chief Stephen Savage for the period Oct. 15 to Oct. 22 are as follow: Sergeant John McDonald arrested James Fairbanks, 17, of Benton, N.H., for an alleged false reporting of an accident and conduct after an accident on Oct. 15, said police. On Oct. 16 Kelley Lennon of North Haverhill reported the theft of a class ring, a sterling silver ring and a small amount of cash from the Community Building in Woodsville. The items have not yet been recovered, and police have no suspects. Also on Oct. 16, Albert M. Dumais, 24, of Groton, Vt., was arrested for allegedly failing to pay a fine. The fine was issued for failure to operate a motor vehicle with a valid license, operating a motor vehicle without headlights and criminal trespass, said police. On Oct. 17 police arrested two people on three charges. Dawn Marie Smith, of Woodsville, and Robert C. Hanaford, of Ryegate, Vt. beth 25, were arrested for allegedly possessing marijuana with the intent to sell, possessing LSD with the intent to distribute and manufacturing a controlled drug, marijuana. Bail was set at $.5000 each and a probable cause hearing is scheduled for Nov. 19, said police. On Oct. 17, Officer Bernard Marvin investigated a motor vehicle accident at Patten's Gas Co. in North Haverhill. Kenneth Davis of N. Haverhill was operating a'vehicle which struck signs belonging to the gas company. No charges were made. HAVERHILL DISTRICt COURT WOODSVILLE-- Decisions of the court 6n Oct. 18 by Judge Krl T. Brnckner were as follows: David Asselin, 22, of Warren, N.H., was found guilty of conduct after an accident -- leaving the scene. He was conditionally discharged upon payment of restitution to the state and other parties damaged. Thomas Reed, 21, of Con- cord, N.H., was turned over to New Hampshire Superior Court. Probable cause was found on charges against him for allegedly falsifying physical evidence and escape from custody. special recogniti evening closed in manner -- with the the Bradford led by Dean Osgood. On Oct. 18, Albert M. Forest Street in Dumais, 24, of Groton, Vt., Oct. 20. John J. was arrested for unauthorized Woodsville, was use of a motor vehicle. He following too closely allegedly took a dump truck vehicle struck one from the B&M Railroad on Pamela Hitchcock Sept. 27 and discarded it in River, said Groton. On Oct. 21, James Morrill of N. issued a citation Haverhill reported his office J. Peddell of Pike, bu.rg!arized and $2,000 in cash operating missing on Oct. 20. Police valid license. have no suspects at.this time. earlier charged with Officer Terry Alexander driving after investigated an adckJent at the revocation; this intersection of RoUte 10 and null processed. mEETInG Wednesday, Oct. 27 HAVERHILL: School Board, 7:30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmen, 8:00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Court, 2:00 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1 WOODSVILLE: Haverhill Selectmen, 7:00p.m. FAIRLEE: selectmen, 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 2 ELECTfON DAY: polls open for general election Wednesday, Nov. 3 WELLS RIVER: BMU School Board, 7:30 p.m. WARREN: Selectmen, 7: 30 p.m. ORFORD: Selectmenl 8: 00 p.m. LYME: Selectmen, 7:30p.m.