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Bradford , Vermont
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October 27, 1982     Journal Opinion
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October 27, 1982
 

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October 27, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 * Legislative candidates in Bradfor, l J III J ] " H Ip El MADELEINE KUNIN (continued frompage 1 Bradford, sees law en- ,[I and drug laws in the ports capital punishment in and cases where the victims more than a quarter-century e ect hi, ways. are me forcement and crime as major ffate. He favors a "reduction cases where are tortured." "'vmums needlessly He as a selectman i. his vyon's opponent Ken issues in the state. Vittum said i'n plea bargaining and the helpless, the elderly, the said he supports prayer in hometown, wouldalso'like to G free" t.  a Republican from he would work to ses stroner insanity defense," and sup- handicapped, and children, • overnor o mon POLITICAL ANNOUNOE/gENT YOU'RE THE EMPLOYER YOu DECIDE WHO IS BEST QUALIFIED TO SERVE AS VERMONT'S U.S. SENATOR? ROBERT T. STAFFORD Montclair, New Jersey, 1940 o  e"-ucation: ’,]l, beerfield Academy, Mass. t Amherst University, B.A. Born, Rutland, Vermont 1913 Haward University Law School, 1967 Fanployment: Clerical Assistant, Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, 1968 Legislative Assistant to Sen. Edward Kennedy, 1969-71 Worked on Sargent Shriver's campaign for vice-resident, 1972 nking and Insurance Commissioner, appointed 1973 by Gov. Thomas Secretary of State, elected 1976. 1978-1980. employed, 1981- Member: Massachusetts Bar Ass'n. Education: Rutland public schools Middlebury College, B.S. Boston University Law School, LL.B., 1938 Honorary Degrees, Boston University, Norwich University, Middlebury College, St. Michaels College, University of Vermont. Employment Rutland City Prosecutor, 1942 U.S. Navy, 1942-1947 (World War II) Rutland County States Attorney, 1947-1951 U.S. Navy, 1951-1953 (Korean Conflict) Vermont Deputy Attorney General, 1953 Vermont Attorney General, 1954-1956 Vermont Lieutenant Governor, 1956-1958 Governor of Vermont, 1958-1960 Elected to U.S. House of Representatives, 1960 Re-elected 1%2, 1964, 1966, 1968, and 1970. Served on: House Armed Services Committee Committee on Standards of Official Conduct Vice Chairman of House Republican Conference, 92nd Congress U.S. Senator, Appointed 1971, Elected 1972 Re-elected 1976 Serving on: Environment and Public Works CommitteemChairman Subcommittee on Transportation Labor and Human Resources Committee Subcommittee on Education, the Arts and Humanities, Chairman Subcommittee on Labor Subcommittee on Handicapped Veterans Affairs Committee Member: Rutland County and Vermont Bar Ass'ns. WHO CAN DO MORE FOR VERMONT? MAKE YOUR CHOICE. VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd Paid for by the Bob Stafford Volunteers, Jack Abell, Treasurer schools, and "more vigorous collection of (government) loans." Running for reelection to one of two Senate seats open in Caledonia County, Democrat Scudder Parker, of St. Johnsbury said, "The biggest issue facing state government is the very big question of how to cope with what is going on in Washington (the New Federalism push, huge cuts in federal programs to be replaced by block grants to the states)." Citing early damage to federal programs such" as entitlements for special education, Parker added, "Federalism in many ways is an abandonment of programs. We need to tCaVelope our own programs t will strengthen our communities." He also spoke on state government's role in stressing energy con- servation, and on "using both old and new plans" for boosting economic develop- ment. Also seeking a Caledonia County Senate seat is former t.. Johnsbury selectmen and t. Johnsbury Academy science teacher William Stowe, a Republican. Stowe said that, if elected, he would "run each decision through a series of sires, with the first I return to Montpelier as a Senator from Caledonia County. Said Morse, '.'I've never promised anybody how I'd vote on a particular issue, but I'll listen to my con- stituents to hear what they have to say." Write-in Senatorial can- didate Herb Gallagher takes a simple approach to his unique campaign. Asked what committees he would be in- terested in serving on if elected, Gallagher replied, "Well... I'd like to serve on a forestry committee because I have some forest on my land, 'and I'd like to serve on an elderly committee because I'm old." The fiftyish can- didate said he would like to see the state help the part-time farmer with crop marketing and incentives. Gallagher said he was particularly concerned with unused land in the state. Tom Ryan, former bank president and community leader from Rutland, is a Democrat running against Republican Peter Smith for Lt. Governor. Ryan has been touring the state recently stressing his goal of "strengthening the position of Lt. Governor in this state, using it as something other than just a figurehead title." Ryan told the Bradford group wold ask if the legislation is last week that the office could really needed, and with the "be used to coordinate and others I would ask if the strengthen the state's corn- problem could be better munity planning process. solved by private enterprise." Asked if there were limits He concentrated his address that could be placed on growth on stressing "reduction in in Vermont, Ryan said, "This government," and citing his is why the community plan- experience at the local ning process is so important. government level. In an area like Waitsfield Long-time Senator Gerald wherea ski areahas ballooned Morse, a Republican from causing many town residents Groton who began his to consider placing retric- legislative career in 1955 after (please turn to page 7 ) Electin a Justice of Peace Editor's note: The following article was written by the Democrat and Republican parties in Bradford. They both feel it is important the reader is aware of Various elected positions. BRADFORD-- Why do we elect Justices of Peace in Vermont -- to notorize documents and marry people? Hardly, a Justice of Peace can perform only some notorial acts and can marry people. But, ministers can marry people and there are many people who can notorize documents. The position of Justice of Peace is much more important. They ser.e on two important boards, the Board of Civil Authority and on the Board of Tax Abatement, where they perform vital and important government functions. The Board of Civil Authority is, among other functions, responsible for voter check lists, the conduct of elections, assisting citizens in their voting when necessary, and con- sidering tax appeals from the Board of Listers. In matters involving elections the Board of Civil Authority must include members of both major parties and when assisting a voter, a member of each party must be present. The same is true for the polling place and the counting of ballots. The Board of Tax Abatement considers the abating, that is the excusing, of taxes. For instance, the fire department buys a building for use as a fire house after the first day of the tax year, but a fire house is exempt from property tax. Since the property was in another persons name on the first day of the tax year the property cannot be exempted till the next year. The Board of Abatement can excuse the tax for the period the building was a fire house. There are many other circumstances where the reliving of taxes is proper and esireable. The above are only some of the important functions of the Justice of Peace in Vermont. (Justices of Peace no longer hold court) You as voters select Justices of Peace, and this is an important function that you have the responsibility to perform. What kind of a person makes a good Justice of Peace, one who is actively concerned in community affairs, who will take the responsibility serious and will and can participate fully. It is sometimes a difficult task spending much of the day at the polls and then coming back and counting ballots late into the evening, or to spend long hours looking over properties that are the subject of tax appeals. Its more a position of hard work than honor, although due respect must be given to those who care enough to par- ticipate fully in these duties. POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT Re=elect Congressman Judd Gregg U.S.Congress Selected as one of the outstanding First-term members of Congress Paid for OV Granite Staters to Re-elect Judd Gregg Robert Keller - Fiscal Agent THE KUNIN DIFFERENCE • Early proponent of the nuclear freeze. • Vocal opponent of the environrnencal policies of James Watt. • National leader for equal rights and representation for women. • Long time supporter of increased funding for higher education. • Advocate for public funding of day care. • Author of a Vermont energy plan that promotes conservation and renewables over nuclear power. A leader in touch with Vermont II I III I I I IIIIIII POLITICALANNOUNCEMENT INCLUDING " YOURS'A" DEDICATION & RESPONSIBILITY VOTE REPUBLICAN FOR . INTEGRITY . THRIFT . EFFICIENCY . COMPASSION . LEADERSHIP GERALD WILLIAM MORSE G. 8TOWE LET'S HAVE A REPUBLICAN TEAM ON NOVEMBER 2 Vote For Gerald Morse & William G. Stowe for the two Senate Seats Thls ad was paid for by the fiNmia Ceunt-y hpubllcan Comndttee POLITICALANNOUNCEMENT I I II When Congress gave huge new tax breaks to the oil companies and other special interests... Jim Jeffords stood alone and objected. Jim knows strengthening of the free enterprise system must be accomplished in a way that's fair to all Americans. So he's fought for benefits for those who have been temporarily displaced...and for opportunities for all Americans to be productive citizens. Jim doesn't always stand alone. This year, when he led the way in reforming the nation's job training programs, his reforms were hailed by both parties as among the finest achievements of the current Congress. In difficult times, we need leaden with courage, conviction, uxpmte al tiit... keep Jim leffords in Congress. Paid for by the Jeffords for Congrs Committee. I I II I J I POLITICAL ANNOUNCJEME_ NT • ....... ,.,,.,,,.,L:.. ' Whal Dick Snellin00 Promised ] GOVERNOR SNELLING DELIVERED! L Vermonlers are saviaQ more than ,0 IN ELECTRIC BATE COSTS AS SNELLING ENERGY PLAN IS IMPLEMED Paid for by Snelling ' Committee i II i I III I i i Ii, i _ I October 27, 1982-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 * Legislative candidates in Bradfor, l J III J ] " H Ip El MADELEINE KUNIN (continued frompage 1 Bradford, sees law en- ,[I and drug laws in the ports capital punishment in and cases where the victims more than a quarter-century e ect hi, ways. are me forcement and crime as major ffate. He favors a "reduction cases where are tortured." "'vmums needlessly He as a selectman i. his vyon's opponent Ken issues in the state. Vittum said i'n plea bargaining and the helpless, the elderly, the said he supports prayer in hometown, wouldalso'like to G free" t.  a Republican from he would work to ses stroner insanity defense," and sup- handicapped, and children, • overnor o mon POLITICAL ANNOUNOE/gENT YOU'RE THE EMPLOYER YOu DECIDE WHO IS BEST QUALIFIED TO SERVE AS VERMONT'S U.S. SENATOR? ROBERT T. STAFFORD Montclair, New Jersey, 1940 o  e"-ucation: ’,]l, beerfield Academy, Mass. t Amherst University, B.A. Born, Rutland, Vermont 1913 Haward University Law School, 1967 Fanployment: Clerical Assistant, Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, 1968 Legislative Assistant to Sen. Edward Kennedy, 1969-71 Worked on Sargent Shriver's campaign for vice-resident, 1972 nking and Insurance Commissioner, appointed 1973 by Gov. Thomas Secretary of State, elected 1976. 1978-1980. employed, 1981- Member: Massachusetts Bar Ass'n. Education: Rutland public schools Middlebury College, B.S. Boston University Law School, LL.B., 1938 Honorary Degrees, Boston University, Norwich University, Middlebury College, St. Michaels College, University of Vermont. Employment Rutland City Prosecutor, 1942 U.S. Navy, 1942-1947 (World War II) Rutland County States Attorney, 1947-1951 U.S. Navy, 1951-1953 (Korean Conflict) Vermont Deputy Attorney General, 1953 Vermont Attorney General, 1954-1956 Vermont Lieutenant Governor, 1956-1958 Governor of Vermont, 1958-1960 Elected to U.S. House of Representatives, 1960 Re-elected 1%2, 1964, 1966, 1968, and 1970. Served on: House Armed Services Committee Committee on Standards of Official Conduct Vice Chairman of House Republican Conference, 92nd Congress U.S. Senator, Appointed 1971, Elected 1972 Re-elected 1976 Serving on: Environment and Public Works CommitteemChairman Subcommittee on Transportation Labor and Human Resources Committee Subcommittee on Education, the Arts and Humanities, Chairman Subcommittee on Labor Subcommittee on Handicapped Veterans Affairs Committee Member: Rutland County and Vermont Bar Ass'ns. WHO CAN DO MORE FOR VERMONT? MAKE YOUR CHOICE. VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd Paid for by the Bob Stafford Volunteers, Jack Abell, Treasurer schools, and "more vigorous collection of (government) loans." Running for reelection to one of two Senate seats open in Caledonia County, Democrat Scudder Parker, of St. Johnsbury said, "The biggest issue facing state government is the very big question of how to cope with what is going on in Washington (the New Federalism push, huge cuts in federal programs to be replaced by block grants to the states)." Citing early damage to federal programs such" as entitlements for special education, Parker added, "Federalism in many ways is an abandonment of programs. We need to tCaVelope our own programs t will strengthen our communities." He also spoke on state government's role in stressing energy con- servation, and on "using both old and new plans" for boosting economic develop- ment. Also seeking a Caledonia County Senate seat is former t.. Johnsbury selectmen and t. Johnsbury Academy science teacher William Stowe, a Republican. Stowe said that, if elected, he would "run each decision through a series of sires, with the first I return to Montpelier as a Senator from Caledonia County. Said Morse, '.'I've never promised anybody how I'd vote on a particular issue, but I'll listen to my con- stituents to hear what they have to say." Write-in Senatorial can- didate Herb Gallagher takes a simple approach to his unique campaign. Asked what committees he would be in- terested in serving on if elected, Gallagher replied, "Well... I'd like to serve on a forestry committee because I have some forest on my land, 'and I'd like to serve on an elderly committee because I'm old." The fiftyish can- didate said he would like to see the state help the part-time farmer with crop marketing and incentives. Gallagher said he was particularly concerned with unused land in the state. Tom Ryan, former bank president and community leader from Rutland, is a Democrat running against Republican Peter Smith for Lt. Governor. Ryan has been touring the state recently stressing his goal of "strengthening the position of Lt. Governor in this state, using it as something other than just a figurehead title." Ryan told the Bradford group wold ask if the legislation is last week that the office could really needed, and with the "be used to coordinate and others I would ask if the strengthen the state's corn- problem could be better munity planning process. solved by private enterprise." Asked if there were limits He concentrated his address that could be placed on growth on stressing "reduction in in Vermont, Ryan said, "This government," and citing his is why the community plan- experience at the local ning process is so important. government level. In an area like Waitsfield Long-time Senator Gerald wherea ski areahas ballooned Morse, a Republican from causing many town residents Groton who began his to consider placing retric- legislative career in 1955 after (please turn to page 7 ) Electin a Justice of Peace Editor's note: The following article was written by the Democrat and Republican parties in Bradford. They both feel it is important the reader is aware of Various elected positions. BRADFORD-- Why do we elect Justices of Peace in Vermont -- to notorize documents and marry people? Hardly, a Justice of Peace can perform only some notorial acts and can marry people. But, ministers can marry people and there are many people who can notorize documents. The position of Justice of Peace is much more important. They ser.e on two important boards, the Board of Civil Authority and on the Board of Tax Abatement, where they perform vital and important government functions. The Board of Civil Authority is, among other functions, responsible for voter check lists, the conduct of elections, assisting citizens in their voting when necessary, and con- sidering tax appeals from the Board of Listers. In matters involving elections the Board of Civil Authority must include members of both major parties and when assisting a voter, a member of each party must be present. The same is true for the polling place and the counting of ballots. The Board of Tax Abatement considers the abating, that is the excusing, of taxes. For instance, the fire department buys a building for use as a fire house after the first day of the tax year, but a fire house is exempt from property tax. Since the property was in another persons name on the first day of the tax year the property cannot be exempted till the next year. The Board of Abatement can excuse the tax for the period the building was a fire house. There are many other circumstances where the reliving of taxes is proper and esireable. The above are only some of the important functions of the Justice of Peace in Vermont. (Justices of Peace no longer hold court) You as voters select Justices of Peace, and this is an important function that you have the responsibility to perform. What kind of a person makes a good Justice of Peace, one who is actively concerned in community affairs, who will take the responsibility serious and will and can participate fully. It is sometimes a difficult task spending much of the day at the polls and then coming back and counting ballots late into the evening, or to spend long hours looking over properties that are the subject of tax appeals. Its more a position of hard work than honor, although due respect must be given to those who care enough to par- ticipate fully in these duties. POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT Re=elect Congressman Judd Gregg U.S.Congress Selected as one of the outstanding First-term members of Congress Paid for OV Granite Staters to Re-elect Judd Gregg Robert Keller - Fiscal Agent THE KUNIN DIFFERENCE • Early proponent of the nuclear freeze. • Vocal opponent of the environrnencal policies of James Watt. • National leader for equal rights and representation for women. • Long time supporter of increased funding for higher education. • Advocate for public funding of day care. • Author of a Vermont energy plan that promotes conservation and renewables over nuclear power. A leader in touch with Vermont II I III I I I IIIIIII POLITICALANNOUNCEMENT INCLUDING " YOURS'A" DEDICATION & RESPONSIBILITY VOTE REPUBLICAN FOR . INTEGRITY . THRIFT . EFFICIENCY . COMPASSION . LEADERSHIP GERALD WILLIAM MORSE G. 8TOWE LET'S HAVE A REPUBLICAN TEAM ON NOVEMBER 2 Vote For Gerald Morse & William G. Stowe for the two Senate Seats Thls ad was paid for by the fiNmia Ceunt-y hpubllcan Comndttee POLITICALANNOUNCEMENT I I II When Congress gave huge new tax breaks to the oil companies and other special interests... Jim Jeffords stood alone and objected. Jim knows strengthening of the free enterprise system must be accomplished in a way that's fair to all Americans. So he's fought for benefits for those who have been temporarily displaced...and for opportunities for all Americans to be productive citizens. Jim doesn't always stand alone. This year, when he led the way in reforming the nation's job training programs, his reforms were hailed by both parties as among the finest achievements of the current Congress. In difficult times, we need leaden with courage, conviction, uxpmte al tiit... keep Jim leffords in Congress. Paid for by the Jeffords for Congrs Committee. I I II I J I POLITICAL ANNOUNCJEME_ NT • ....... ,.,,.,,,.,L:.. ' Whal Dick Snellin00 Promised ] GOVERNOR SNELLING DELIVERED! L Vermonlers are saviaQ more than ,0 IN ELECTRIC BATE COSTS AS SNELLING ENERGY PLAN IS IMPLEMED Paid for by Snelling ' Committee i II i I III I i i Ii, i _ I