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October 28, 1981     Journal Opinion
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October 28, 1981
 

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Page 4-The Journal Opinion-October 28, 1981 )RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. inc. Publisher of Journal Opinion Weekl/neWSlmlr ImMislmd hi Ihrferd, Vomlt. Sqdncrilm retqls - Vorment ud Now Ilempddre $9.00 r yw; $6.i1 fe ||1 sods; emt ef  - $|2.fl Ir Veer d $7.00 k |Ix nNtb|; Shier citizen $LN. hceld r.hm| INPsRge peid el |nldfeAo VomNt 05053. Pwblidmd by NertkNot Peb#skb| Comlmny, Inc., P.O. lien $71, |mdfonL Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford /  Woodsville K02-222-5281 " :  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper ii 1 Editorial - J Halloween caution The return to standard time in most states and Halloween trick-or- treaters are an added hazard for motorists in October. Standard time began Sunday, Oct. 25 and for many drivers the trip home from visits or work will he after dark with reduced visibility. The "fall back" from daylight to standard time should serve as a reminder to motorists that extra caution behind the wheel is the best way to compemate for darkness replacing daylight in peak evening commuting hours. Since Halloween falls on a Saturday this year, parents should encourage their younger children to do their trick-or-treating during the daylight hours to avoid the hazards of traffic in darkness. Parents can help guarantee the safety of their children while trick-or- treating by  with them, If this isn't po tapm can be, placed on costumes and trick-or-treat bags, and youngsters should be allowed to go out only in groups. Motorists should drive extra slowly through residential neighborhoods and honk their horns to caution youngsters. We offer these Halloween safety tips: -- Make sure costumes are not loose-fitting garments that could cause the child to trip. -- Use make-up instead of masks which obstruct the child's vision. -- Make sure all costumes are made of non-flammable material. -- Keep lighted jack-o'lanterns or candles away from children or flammable materials, -- Plan Halloween parties at home or at a neighborhood facility whenever possible. -- Inspect all treats before allowing children to eat them. I Letters to the Editor_00 What to do w/th/efto00rs? To the Editor : and picking up the food, now de--t/on People these days are so the school just throws the food greedy in our towns today. We out. To the Editor: used to have a pail in our lunch In my opinion I feel that The recent ad for the use of room at school for leftover when grownups say kids these the Low Mansion as a food. The food was for a days are immature, the "Haunted House" for parson's pigs. This person, grownups should look at Halloween really shocked me. more than likely, could feed themselves and their actions It seems the house has reached the ultimate almost all his pigs. which are sometimes worse degradation. That a After more people found out than kids. about the food, they all wanted Jeff Stewart designated historic building in it. But instead of taking turns Groton, Vt. the National Register reached its recent destruction through Good/dea the neglect of proper security. is sad enough, but to add to it To the Editor : and can't leave until school is this proposed use is almost I am a student from Blue over, but they do bring your more than I can bear. Mountain Union High School lunch to you, and your class Like a gracious old queen in WellsRiver, Vermont. work. this big old house with the In our school we don't get I think this is a pretty good stately pillars seemed to suspended by being kicked out idea. distinguish the village. Many of school for a day. Instead, ff Cindy Welch a visitor approaching from the you get suspended you have to S. Ryegate south inquired about it, go in a room for a day and stay curious about its history, and impressed to learn along with In.school suspension other facets that John Phillip SOusa visited the home. To the Editor : students act better. I know I am not alone in I am a student at Blue The student can work on expressing the feeling that the Mountain Union School in whatever work they want to in, whole venture is in poor taste. Wells River, Vermont. This this room, as long as it's I do hope no one gets hurt and year there is a new system of schoolwork. I think it gives the no pumpkim with candles tip suspension. It is called in- student more time to think of over! school suspension, what they have done so they Dorothy Cole I think the system is very won't do it again. It makes it Bradford effective. Students who are easier for the student and the suspended are put into this teacher. room for a day. As a result of Karen Fifleld this new system, the halls Greton have become quieter and the Overeaters anonymous Its time to get away from the concerns of the future (see last few columns) and look at what's going on in the valley right now. A while back we noted the "passing" of the New England River Basins Commission as part of the cutbacks of the Administration. Along with it the Citizens Advisory Group was set adrift and also slated for oblivion. A little history here might shed some light on why this could be a con- siderable loss for the valley. When NERBC was created in 1968 it became apparent that there had to he some direct connection with people at the grassroots level ff any real effect was to be seen. In addition, the Connecticut River Basin, as the largest in New England, had its own Project office and staff set up in Hanover. In short order two support groups outside the government structure came into being. These were CAG, a citizens ad- visory group made up of "plain ole citizens" appointed by the , several states and SAG, a science advisory group, you guessed it, made up of science and engineering types selected in much the same way. CAG took care of political, social and economic points of view while SAG represented technical and environmental concerns. Naturally there was an overlapping of interests and the whole thing got to be awkward to manage, so that a few years back the two groups were merged into a single Connecticut Advisory Group. It represents a long history of dealing with basic problems, involves itself with every conceivable point of view and it comprises an awesome bank of talent and expertise. The river's problems go on. A change in administration does nothing to alter that situation. To lose such a working party as CAG is obviously unfortunate -- if indeed it is to be lost. Into the breach has stepped the Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission, an organization already mentioned ih these pages. Under-funded and understaffed, it now is the only agency left officially charged with overseeing the effective management of the river's water resources. It needs all the free help it can get and of course that is the business of CAG. At the monent talks are being held to see if these two groups can work out a practical relationship. In the process each is getting a new look at its limitations and respon- sibilities. It will be interesting to watch and perhaps the outcome will play a big role in the valley's future. We'll keep yon informed. Our ...... ' ..... when they " ' then the less than a River In ' , barn, freestall barn parlor in barn in 68, sot , room for an bWy R:: RT ?.'MmIc H EONnF E?yEWR ! sons, head, with. WMRA to raise operating .funds WENTWORTH-WARREN-- age five. The WIC Program opened at Food supplements (milk, Mount Moosilauke Health eggs, fruit juice, cheese, Center on Wednesday Oct. 14 cereals, legumes, and infant with 55 people from various formula) are prescribed on towns present. The Health the basis of need for each Committee has worked for individual and WIC food over a year to achieve having vouchers are redeemable at a WIC site here. It is ad- participating stores. ministered by the lbanon In order to be eligible for Health Council and the Bureau services one must meet an of Maternal and Child Health, income guideline and he which administers the determined by the staff nutritenist to be nutritionally at risk affeed of sup- Center on Route 25 on Wed- plemental foods. Each person nesdays from 10:00 til 2:00 must also be receiving regular p.m. The next clinic will be on-going health care either Wednesday Nov. 11. through the Health Center or WIC offers nutrition by their own private counciling, dietary physician. assessment and the For more information, or to prescription of special sup  make an appointment, please plementary foods to eligible call the Health Center at 603- pregnant and postpartum 764-5525, or the Lebanon office women and to children up to at 603-44{]-1260. AS(: counW committee nominations WOODSVILLE--Chairman of County Committeemen are the Grafton County responsible for local ad- Agricultural Stabilization and ministration of farm Conservation Committee, programs. To be eligible, a Bernard W. Tullar, urges person must reside in the farmers to take an active part county, and be actively far- in the upcoming committee ming. If you know of a elections, qualified person for this "Now is your chance to have position, get two other people a say in who will direct ASCS besides yourself to sign a programs in the county", Mr. petition and enter his or her Tullar said. "As in the past", name not later than Nov. 2. he added, "nominations will "You will be performing a first be made by petition." If service for your agricultural three or more petitions for community", Mr. Tullar eligible candidates are concluded. received, no more nominations will be made. If less thhn three petitions are INTERESTING FACT forthcoming, the county On New Year's Day, 1907, committee will add names to Theodore Roosevelt shook make up a slate of three hands with8,513people. candidates, Letters and petition forms have been mailed to all known NOTES & COMMENTS eligible voters in the county, The bad luck that you according to Mr. Tullar. grumble about is probably the Additional petition forms are direct result of your own available at the county office, activity. @ Arts prognun alive and well EDITOR'S NOTE: Thisletter, Program is alive and well! work directly with besides being sent to the Four years ago this program professional artists for Journal Opinion, was also sent was founded when interested several sessions. Barbara home to parents of children in schools began sharing various Duncan and Janet Warner- Arts Programs. Today, Ashley have worked with through volunteer interest, all stiJdents in movement and eight schools in the Orange dance as part of a physical East Supervisory Union education program. Stephen participate in thisprogram. Stearms, a mime, worked in Your students have been some schools in helping shape To the Editor: ff off many for the first time in the Orange Last Spring, a chapter of tbeirlives. District. East School If you know of someone who is obviously suffering from To the Editor : The ,Orange East Arts being overweight or has an eating problem, we hope you will share this information bohydrates, which is "cun- about our OA Bradford ning, baffling and powerful." Chalter with the person. We For such a person, dieting is know from the AA Big Book no longer a matter of will that this proven program of power. Such a person as recovery is not "for everyone ourselves has become in a meetings). But most of all, we could eat secretly, or who hope yon will share this in- schools has been the Artist in have looked forward t0 eating formation with your readers. Resident Program. Through akme or who otherwise have Thank you very much. the co-sponsorship of the developed a relationship with Bradford Overeaters Vermont Council on the Arts, food, oftentimes car- Anonymous students have been able to Overeaters Anonymous began meeting in the Bradford area at the Orange County Mental Health Center. We have recently moved to another OCMH building, the old Ag building behind the Bradford Academy (now the Life Skills .Center by day) where we continue to meet every Tbursdaynightfrom$-gp.m. who needs it, but for the sense "addicted" to fond, and Overeaters Anonymous is a person who wants it." It is our needs help. OA offers that help self-help support group and belief, though, that there are without fees or dues. fellowship for compulsive many people like ourselves Newcomers are always overeaters or those suffering who would want this program welcome. from other eating disorders, but don't know it exists. There We invite you, as well, to ...... We have no dues or fees. We are many people like our- visit one of our meetings so - utilize the 12 Steps and 12 selves who have tried you can find out first-hand Traditions of AA, except  diets and failed, or bow OA works. (As we said, where the alcoholic is have lost weight only to regain we are very similar to AA powerless over alcohol, we are it, or have hidden food so they p,verless over food. In our Bradford group alone, we have those who have ex- perienced 5,10, 30, and over 50 pound weight losses and kept exposed to theatre, dance, and communication theatre skills. music. Some of the programs This year the Orange East have been performances by Arts Program will feature Peter Driscoll, Stephen three main programs: A Stearns, Janet Warner- Concert by the International Ashley, mimes; The Vermont Singing Group, "Up With Jazz Ensemble; plays by the People" -- Nov. II in the Parish Players and the Green 'schools, Nov. 12 for the public Mountain Guild; folk music by at Oxbow High School; Henry Margaret MacArthur; Old Chapin willdo a music-theatre New England dancing by residency in all schools either Applejack; dance by the this fall or next spring; and Whirligig Dance Group; and Barbara Duncanwill do a an Introduction to Opera by dance residency. the Young Audiences of Any parent, or friend of the Massachusetts, Inc. Arts are welcome to attend Another program in the Art Programs providing you call the principal of the school directly involved and make arrangements. Also, any one who would he interested in fund raising activities to The Tullars A .farming .family Charles and Alice Tullar when Fran and Wayne spotted ting) and to use their own had a farm in Corinth, then about 1929 they moved to West Fairlee to a back, sidehill farm which was so rough and rocky that it took three weeks to plow an acre and a quarter. Besides having 20 cows, Charles raised oxen to train and sell, also shod oxen and horses. He made the shoes himself, also ox-yokes. His son George still has his old ox sling and dump cart. Charles trained his oxen so well that they were handy on either side, and would march around side-by-side without even having a yoke on. Charles was also a great hunter, always ready to take his dogs and his sons and head off on a coon hunt -- and they rarely came back empty- handed. His sons Bernard and George have their own farms now. Berway Farm Bernard Tullar started on a farm similar to his father's, in Lyme, then in 1958 he bought and moved to his present farm on the River Road in Lyme. Through the years be has developed a farm of 175 acres, plus 180 acres which he rents, and grows all his own corn and hay. To the original old cowbarn and sheepbarn, Bernard added a milking parlor, freestail barn, heifer barn, shop, and machinery sheds. Most of his farm buildings went up in smoke on July 4, 1977, probably from sparks from the hay elevator. He and his wife Fran and son Wayne were all coming in from the hayfield, and Bernard was just putting away the tractor, the fire. They called the fire department and rushed to get the cattle and equipment out as fast as they could. Friends and neighbors pitched in, and through their efforts and these of the firefighters, more than 100 cows were saved, as well as some of the milking equipment and part of one of the cowbarns. Several of the firemen were sent to the hospital by fumes, perhaps from burning fertilizer. After the fire, the milking cows were trucked three miles up the road to Bernard's brother George's farm until new quarters could be built for them. Cleanup and recon- struction began immediately, and in January they were able to bring the cows back home. Fran Tullar, a school teacher, had always taken an active part in the farm, both in fieldwork and farm management, and had spent many hours mowing hay, raking and baling. Before the fire she had already retired from teaching to devote more time to farm bookkeeping, etc. After the fire she worked closely with Bernard and Wayne in making plans for reconstruction. Wayne has worked all his life on the farm. He graduated from the two-year Dairy Science course at the University of New Hampshire and has worked into a part- nership with his father on the farm -- now named Berway Farm, using both their names. Wayne and his Inother both took a computer course to keep them abreast of developments'in ELFAC (Electronic Farm Accoun- Project Crash activities MONTPELIER--There have Tickets Issued-- 576; Uniform been 179 DWI arrests by Project CRASH in 1981 as compared to 98 for the com- parable number of weeks in 1980. This represents an in- crease of 82.6 percent in 1981 DWI arrests by Project CRASH when compared to 1980. Factors which contributed to this increase were Legislation which became effective July 1, 1981 per- mitting officers to be equipped with roadside testors (Alco- Sensor) and the instituting of roadblocks in place of roving CRASH patrols, according to state officials. Since the in- treduction of roadside testors and roadblock procedures on July 1st, ere have been 118 DWI arrests by CRASH weekend personnel, or, 66 percent of all 1981 CRASH DWI arrests have occurred since this date. Project CRASH weekend enforcement is financed with federal funds received from the Governor's Highway Safety Program. The following are Project CRASH's activities for the 28 weekends of 1981. Number of Officers Worked and Agency State Police Officers -- 157, or 38.8 percent; Municipal Police Officers -- 163, or 40.2 percent; Sheriff Officers-- 85, or 21.0 percent. The total for officers working was, 405. Total Contacts hy CRASH Teams Defective Equipment Traffic Tickets Issued -- 547; Other Motor Vehicle Citations Issued -- 63; DWl Arrests -- 179; Warnings Issued -- 119. "  TOlT'sts ......... Complimentary Tests -- 865; Implied Consent -- 172; Implied Consent -- Refused -- 12. Fines Collected for the year totaled $17,445.00. owe8 Vermonters BURLINGTON--The Internal Revenue Service owes forty- seven Vermonters a total of $11,686 and will gladly send it out -- if only they can find the taxpayers! The smallest refund due is $3.80, while the largest is $1,438. Delegianis said taxpayers need not consult or engage the services of a "locating" or "searching" service to obtain information about their checks. They can simply contact the Burlington IRS Taxpayer Assistance office at 1-800-642-3110 (toll-free). In addition to the forty-seven individuals, the listing also contains 12 businesses. Those entitled to refunds in this area are: Keith Barbour, of Thetford; John Butler, of Vershire; and Emile Hebert, of St. Johnsbury. My opinion To the Editor: Gods of grief and gods of Glory have been around for a long time. In ancient Greece and Rome there was a god for everything, and seem to be little better today. The God of the IRA can see no good in San Paisley, the English and very little in themselves. The God of Ayatolah Khomeni can not tolerate anyone that disagrees with the Ayatolah. The God of fundamentalist Moslems disagree with anyone who wants peace. The Gods of Israel and the Palistinians disagree with everyone. I believe my GOd stands on higher ground. He believes that women should have equal rights, that a woman doing the same work as a man, and probably doing it better, should be paid more than two- thirds the amount the man is. He believes in woman's provide these programs is asked to let your local school principal know. Anne Taylor Orange East Arts Program Committee choice on abortion; that there is no one else on earth in as good a position to know whether that child can be raised with love and un- derstanding. She knows herself better than the president, the pope and Jerry Farwell. With 25 percent of the earth's people forever hungry and 10 percen[ starving, she is unsure if she can raise him without abuse, hunger and the humiliation of unemployment and poverty. My God is watching from a higher circle. Right now He is watching an 11 year old girl in Michigan. A victim of abuse and pregnant, her parents separated, she is a ward of the state or the court. Her father wants her to have an abortion; her mother says no, the judge says no. She is in dispair. My God doesn't like this torture, but He is helpless to change it. He wrings His hands and cries a lot. After all, God wasn't married to Mary. Without this grief, there would be no glory; without this love, there would be no story to tell our children at Christmas time. Donald Darling Bradford, Vt. computers for bookkeeping and for planning their breeding program. The farm now has facilities for 144 milking cows, including a double-six herringbone milking parlor. Their setup is not only work- saving, but energy-saving, as they have a thermal-store hot water system which uses the beat of the milk to heat their water. Another modern development is August seeding of cornfields to a cover crop of rye, by airplane. In 1979, Berway Farm was named Grafton County Conservation Farm of the Year, in recognition of their comeback after the fire, as well as other features of their farm management. Tullando Farms After George Tullar left the home farm, he worked for a few years at Dartmouth Dairy while he looked around for a good farm to buy. In 1956 he and his wife Barbara were able to by their present main farm in Orford, to which they have since added all or part of ten other farms. They were fortunate to be able to buy also working Since corporated, gradually ownership buying poration. Tullando successful in quality breeding their bull Sky High. He l by Select proving by the Putnam and Hugh also by his of EX-91. George first calves Tullando permint. Another which the measuring the year, for with better nutrients. be able to much before. Along also kitchen was built in considerable since then. by MARY HANSON and The 1981 Magazine Drive The Horse, was very successful, as we Jim Kinder,] exceeded our goal by ap- Felicis proximately $300. Our total sale was $2,865.62. Receipts by classes were as The follows: Fabrizio Freshmen -- $492.18 Smas Sophomores-- $1218.47 state. Juniors-- $398.18 he eligible Seniors -- $756.76 Top salesmen for the drive were Maria Pike -- $469.09 Jody Thayer-- $161.43 Sandy Willey  $1AO formance Drew Tobiasen -- $99.76 eligible Charles Heath-- $98.72 competition. Elizabeth Peters -- $86.68 Special David Patten--S85.85 in order Sheri Ball -- $85.28 Dairy Allen Towne -- $84.87 Hudson, Cheryl Cardin-- $73.77 McKean We wish to thank these pulled people and all the other victory, students who helped to put us Hi over the top. Many prizes have already team been distributed and the KansasCity s remainder have been ordered Some and will be given out as soon Awards as they arrive. Fabrizio The profit made for the Cate student activities' fund was about $1000. It will be used to There buy cheerleading sweaters, trash cans and covers for the the other new literary magazine, petiters Doing Well contests The a-la-carte program is report. doing very well. Each day more and more people buy lunch from this program. The Team program now sells a large to l variety of foods such as next sandwiches, potato chips, record yogurt, cheeseburgers, win both chocolate and plain milk, ring Oct. 27 dings, ice cream, and other travel to foods. Different foods will be added as time goes on. Mrs. 29, the Lloyd, who is in charge of this phase of the lunch program at Crusaders WHS, reports that she is very in pleased with the success of spot. this venture. Report Cards due Marks will close Friday, High Oct. 30th. Report cards will be issued on Wednesday, Nov. on 4th, 1981. taineers On Tuesday, Oct. 27, PSAT face the exams will be given to juniors, second Halloween Dance first time On Friday, Oct. 30, the easily on Seniors will be sponsoring a the score' Halloween Dance at the community building. The no dance starts at 8:00 p.m. and kicked ends at 11:00 p.m. Admission is $2.00 with a mask; $2.50 without a mask. This dance is open only to WHS students and fire the their guests, they Honor Society after. The National Honor Society is once again selling as they stationary. All the members fensive have packets and will be coming around. Several This members of the Senior Honor many Society have definitely decided to take part in an Their exchange with another Honor that Society from Eagle Grove High School in Iowa. The students are anxiously tl awaiting the trip. It is now subject to School Board ap- proval FFA News On Saturday, Oct. 17 the The Woodsville FFA competed in for the lnterscholastics at Durham, N.H. At the com- 3-1 petition Woodsville won several awards. Page 4-The Journal Opinion-October 28, 1981 )RTHEAST PUBLISHING COMPANY. inc. Publisher of Journal Opinion Weekl/neWSlmlr ImMislmd hi Ihrferd, Vomlt. Sqdncrilm retqls - Vorment ud Now Ilempddre $9.00 r yw; $6.i1 fe ||1 sods; emt ef  - $|2.fl Ir Veer d $7.00 k |Ix nNtb|; Shier citizen $LN. hceld r.hm| INPsRge peid el |nldfeAo VomNt 05053. Pwblidmd by NertkNot Peb#skb| Comlmny, Inc., P.O. lien $71, |mdfonL Robert F. Huminski President & Publisher Bradford /  Woodsville K02-222-5281 " :  .  603-747-2016 An Independent Newspaper ii 1 Editorial - J Halloween caution The return to standard time in most states and Halloween trick-or- treaters are an added hazard for motorists in October. Standard time began Sunday, Oct. 25 and for many drivers the trip home from visits or work will he after dark with reduced visibility. The "fall back" from daylight to standard time should serve as a reminder to motorists that extra caution behind the wheel is the best way to compemate for darkness replacing daylight in peak evening commuting hours. Since Halloween falls on a Saturday this year, parents should encourage their younger children to do their trick-or-treating during the daylight hours to avoid the hazards of traffic in darkness. Parents can help guarantee the safety of their children while trick-or- treating by  with them, If this isn't po tapm can be, placed on costumes and trick-or-treat bags, and youngsters should be allowed to go out only in groups. Motorists should drive extra slowly through residential neighborhoods and honk their horns to caution youngsters. We offer these Halloween safety tips: -- Make sure costumes are not loose-fitting garments that could cause the child to trip. -- Use make-up instead of masks which obstruct the child's vision. -- Make sure all costumes are made of non-flammable material. -- Keep lighted jack-o'lanterns or candles away from children or flammable materials, -- Plan Halloween parties at home or at a neighborhood facility whenever possible. -- Inspect all treats before allowing children to eat them. I Letters to the Editor_00 What to do w/th/efto00rs? To the Editor : and picking up the food, now de--t/on People these days are so the school just throws the food greedy in our towns today. We out. To the Editor: used to have a pail in our lunch In my opinion I feel that The recent ad for the use of room at school for leftover when grownups say kids these the Low Mansion as a food. The food was for a days are immature, the "Haunted House" for parson's pigs. This person, grownups should look at Halloween really shocked me. more than likely, could feed themselves and their actions It seems the house has reached the ultimate almost all his pigs. which are sometimes worse degradation. That a After more people found out than kids. about the food, they all wanted Jeff Stewart designated historic building in it. But instead of taking turns Groton, Vt. the National Register reached its recent destruction through Good/dea the neglect of proper security. is sad enough, but to add to it To the Editor : and can't leave until school is this proposed use is almost I am a student from Blue over, but they do bring your more than I can bear. Mountain Union High School lunch to you, and your class Like a gracious old queen in WellsRiver, Vermont. work. this big old house with the In our school we don't get I think this is a pretty good stately pillars seemed to suspended by being kicked out idea. distinguish the village. Many of school for a day. Instead, ff Cindy Welch a visitor approaching from the you get suspended you have to S. Ryegate south inquired about it, go in a room for a day and stay curious about its history, and impressed to learn along with In.school suspension other facets that John Phillip SOusa visited the home. To the Editor : students act better. I know I am not alone in I am a student at Blue The student can work on expressing the feeling that the Mountain Union School in whatever work they want to in, whole venture is in poor taste. Wells River, Vermont. This this room, as long as it's I do hope no one gets hurt and year there is a new system of schoolwork. I think it gives the no pumpkim with candles tip suspension. It is called in- student more time to think of over! school suspension, what they have done so they Dorothy Cole I think the system is very won't do it again. It makes it Bradford effective. Students who are easier for the student and the suspended are put into this teacher. room for a day. As a result of Karen Fifleld this new system, the halls Greton have become quieter and the Overeaters anonymous Its time to get away from the concerns of the future (see last few columns) and look at what's going on in the valley right now. A while back we noted the "passing" of the New England River Basins Commission as part of the cutbacks of the Administration. Along with it the Citizens Advisory Group was set adrift and also slated for oblivion. A little history here might shed some light on why this could be a con- siderable loss for the valley. When NERBC was created in 1968 it became apparent that there had to he some direct connection with people at the grassroots level ff any real effect was to be seen. In addition, the Connecticut River Basin, as the largest in New England, had its own Project office and staff set up in Hanover. In short order two support groups outside the government structure came into being. These were CAG, a citizens ad- visory group made up of "plain ole citizens" appointed by the , several states and SAG, a science advisory group, you guessed it, made up of science and engineering types selected in much the same way. CAG took care of political, social and economic points of view while SAG represented technical and environmental concerns. Naturally there was an overlapping of interests and the whole thing got to be awkward to manage, so that a few years back the two groups were merged into a single Connecticut Advisory Group. It represents a long history of dealing with basic problems, involves itself with every conceivable point of view and it comprises an awesome bank of talent and expertise. The river's problems go on. A change in administration does nothing to alter that situation. To lose such a working party as CAG is obviously unfortunate -- if indeed it is to be lost. Into the breach has stepped the Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission, an organization already mentioned ih these pages. Under-funded and understaffed, it now is the only agency left officially charged with overseeing the effective management of the river's water resources. It needs all the free help it can get and of course that is the business of CAG. At the monent talks are being held to see if these two groups can work out a practical relationship. In the process each is getting a new look at its limitations and respon- sibilities. It will be interesting to watch and perhaps the outcome will play a big role in the valley's future. We'll keep yon informed. Our ...... ' ..... when they " ' then the less than a River In ' , barn, freestall barn parlor in barn in 68, sot , room for an bWy R:: RT ?.'MmIc H EONnF E?yEWR ! sons, head, with. WMRA to raise operating .funds WENTWORTH-WARREN-- age five. The WIC Program opened at Food supplements (milk, Mount Moosilauke Health eggs, fruit juice, cheese, Center on Wednesday Oct. 14 cereals, legumes, and infant with 55 people from various formula) are prescribed on towns present. The Health the basis of need for each Committee has worked for individual and WIC food over a year to achieve having vouchers are redeemable at a WIC site here. It is ad- participating stores. ministered by the lbanon In order to be eligible for Health Council and the Bureau services one must meet an of Maternal and Child Health, income guideline and he which administers the determined by the staff nutritenist to be nutritionally at risk affeed of sup- Center on Route 25 on Wed- plemental foods. Each person nesdays from 10:00 til 2:00 must also be receiving regular p.m. The next clinic will be on-going health care either Wednesday Nov. 11. through the Health Center or WIC offers nutrition by their own private counciling, dietary physician. assessment and the For more information, or to prescription of special sup  make an appointment, please plementary foods to eligible call the Health Center at 603- pregnant and postpartum 764-5525, or the Lebanon office women and to children up to at 603-44{]-1260. AS(: counW committee nominations WOODSVILLE--Chairman of County Committeemen are the Grafton County responsible for local ad- Agricultural Stabilization and ministration of farm Conservation Committee, programs. To be eligible, a Bernard W. Tullar, urges person must reside in the farmers to take an active part county, and be actively far- in the upcoming committee ming. If you know of a elections, qualified person for this "Now is your chance to have position, get two other people a say in who will direct ASCS besides yourself to sign a programs in the county", Mr. petition and enter his or her Tullar said. "As in the past", name not later than Nov. 2. he added, "nominations will "You will be performing a first be made by petition." If service for your agricultural three or more petitions for community", Mr. Tullar eligible candidates are concluded. received, no more nominations will be made. If less thhn three petitions are INTERESTING FACT forthcoming, the county On New Year's Day, 1907, committee will add names to Theodore Roosevelt shook make up a slate of three hands with8,513people. candidates, Letters and petition forms have been mailed to all known NOTES & COMMENTS eligible voters in the county, The bad luck that you according to Mr. Tullar. grumble about is probably the Additional petition forms are direct result of your own available at the county office, activity. @ Arts prognun alive and well EDITOR'S NOTE: Thisletter, Program is alive and well! work directly with besides being sent to the Four years ago this program professional artists for Journal Opinion, was also sent was founded when interested several sessions. Barbara home to parents of children in schools began sharing various Duncan and Janet Warner- Arts Programs. Today, Ashley have worked with through volunteer interest, all stiJdents in movement and eight schools in the Orange dance as part of a physical East Supervisory Union education program. Stephen participate in thisprogram. Stearms, a mime, worked in Your students have been some schools in helping shape To the Editor: ff off many for the first time in the Orange Last Spring, a chapter of tbeirlives. District. East School If you know of someone who is obviously suffering from To the Editor : The ,Orange East Arts being overweight or has an eating problem, we hope you will share this information bohydrates, which is "cun- about our OA Bradford ning, baffling and powerful." Chalter with the person. We For such a person, dieting is know from the AA Big Book no longer a matter of will that this proven program of power. Such a person as recovery is not "for everyone ourselves has become in a meetings). But most of all, we could eat secretly, or who hope yon will share this in- schools has been the Artist in have looked forward t0 eating formation with your readers. Resident Program. Through akme or who otherwise have Thank you very much. the co-sponsorship of the developed a relationship with Bradford Overeaters Vermont Council on the Arts, food, oftentimes car- Anonymous students have been able to Overeaters Anonymous began meeting in the Bradford area at the Orange County Mental Health Center. We have recently moved to another OCMH building, the old Ag building behind the Bradford Academy (now the Life Skills .Center by day) where we continue to meet every Tbursdaynightfrom$-gp.m. who needs it, but for the sense "addicted" to fond, and Overeaters Anonymous is a person who wants it." It is our needs help. OA offers that help self-help support group and belief, though, that there are without fees or dues. fellowship for compulsive many people like ourselves Newcomers are always overeaters or those suffering who would want this program welcome. from other eating disorders, but don't know it exists. There We invite you, as well, to ...... We have no dues or fees. We are many people like our- visit one of our meetings so - utilize the 12 Steps and 12 selves who have tried you can find out first-hand Traditions of AA, except  diets and failed, or bow OA works. (As we said, where the alcoholic is have lost weight only to regain we are very similar to AA powerless over alcohol, we are it, or have hidden food so they p,verless over food. In our Bradford group alone, we have those who have ex- perienced 5,10, 30, and over 50 pound weight losses and kept exposed to theatre, dance, and communication theatre skills. music. Some of the programs This year the Orange East have been performances by Arts Program will feature Peter Driscoll, Stephen three main programs: A Stearns, Janet Warner- Concert by the International Ashley, mimes; The Vermont Singing Group, "Up With Jazz Ensemble; plays by the People" -- Nov. II in the Parish Players and the Green 'schools, Nov. 12 for the public Mountain Guild; folk music by at Oxbow High School; Henry Margaret MacArthur; Old Chapin willdo a music-theatre New England dancing by residency in all schools either Applejack; dance by the this fall or next spring; and Whirligig Dance Group; and Barbara Duncanwill do a an Introduction to Opera by dance residency. the Young Audiences of Any parent, or friend of the Massachusetts, Inc. Arts are welcome to attend Another program in the Art Programs providing you call the principal of the school directly involved and make arrangements. Also, any one who would he interested in fund raising activities to The Tullars A .farming .family Charles and Alice Tullar when Fran and Wayne spotted ting) and to use their own had a farm in Corinth, then about 1929 they moved to West Fairlee to a back, sidehill farm which was so rough and rocky that it took three weeks to plow an acre and a quarter. Besides having 20 cows, Charles raised oxen to train and sell, also shod oxen and horses. He made the shoes himself, also ox-yokes. His son George still has his old ox sling and dump cart. Charles trained his oxen so well that they were handy on either side, and would march around side-by-side without even having a yoke on. Charles was also a great hunter, always ready to take his dogs and his sons and head off on a coon hunt -- and they rarely came back empty- handed. His sons Bernard and George have their own farms now. Berway Farm Bernard Tullar started on a farm similar to his father's, in Lyme, then in 1958 he bought and moved to his present farm on the River Road in Lyme. Through the years be has developed a farm of 175 acres, plus 180 acres which he rents, and grows all his own corn and hay. To the original old cowbarn and sheepbarn, Bernard added a milking parlor, freestail barn, heifer barn, shop, and machinery sheds. Most of his farm buildings went up in smoke on July 4, 1977, probably from sparks from the hay elevator. He and his wife Fran and son Wayne were all coming in from the hayfield, and Bernard was just putting away the tractor, the fire. They called the fire department and rushed to get the cattle and equipment out as fast as they could. Friends and neighbors pitched in, and through their efforts and these of the firefighters, more than 100 cows were saved, as well as some of the milking equipment and part of one of the cowbarns. Several of the firemen were sent to the hospital by fumes, perhaps from burning fertilizer. After the fire, the milking cows were trucked three miles up the road to Bernard's brother George's farm until new quarters could be built for them. Cleanup and recon- struction began immediately, and in January they were able to bring the cows back home. Fran Tullar, a school teacher, had always taken an active part in the farm, both in fieldwork and farm management, and had spent many hours mowing hay, raking and baling. Before the fire she had already retired from teaching to devote more time to farm bookkeeping, etc. After the fire she worked closely with Bernard and Wayne in making plans for reconstruction. Wayne has worked all his life on the farm. He graduated from the two-year Dairy Science course at the University of New Hampshire and has worked into a part- nership with his father on the farm -- now named Berway Farm, using both their names. Wayne and his Inother both took a computer course to keep them abreast of developments'in ELFAC (Electronic Farm Accoun- Project Crash activities MONTPELIER--There have Tickets Issued-- 576; Uniform been 179 DWI arrests by Project CRASH in 1981 as compared to 98 for the com- parable number of weeks in 1980. This represents an in- crease of 82.6 percent in 1981 DWI arrests by Project CRASH when compared to 1980. Factors which contributed to this increase were Legislation which became effective July 1, 1981 per- mitting officers to be equipped with roadside testors (Alco- Sensor) and the instituting of roadblocks in place of roving CRASH patrols, according to state officials. Since the in- treduction of roadside testors and roadblock procedures on July 1st, ere have been 118 DWI arrests by CRASH weekend personnel, or, 66 percent of all 1981 CRASH DWI arrests have occurred since this date. Project CRASH weekend enforcement is financed with federal funds received from the Governor's Highway Safety Program. The following are Project CRASH's activities for the 28 weekends of 1981. Number of Officers Worked and Agency State Police Officers -- 157, or 38.8 percent; Municipal Police Officers -- 163, or 40.2 percent; Sheriff Officers-- 85, or 21.0 percent. The total for officers working was, 405. Total Contacts hy CRASH Teams Defective Equipment Traffic Tickets Issued -- 547; Other Motor Vehicle Citations Issued -- 63; DWl Arrests -- 179; Warnings Issued -- 119. "  TOlT'sts ......... Complimentary Tests -- 865; Implied Consent -- 172; Implied Consent -- Refused -- 12. Fines Collected for the year totaled $17,445.00. owe8 Vermonters BURLINGTON--The Internal Revenue Service owes forty- seven Vermonters a total of $11,686 and will gladly send it out -- if only they can find the taxpayers! The smallest refund due is $3.80, while the largest is $1,438. Delegianis said taxpayers need not consult or engage the services of a "locating" or "searching" service to obtain information about their checks. They can simply contact the Burlington IRS Taxpayer Assistance office at 1-800-642-3110 (toll-free). In addition to the forty-seven individuals, the listing also contains 12 businesses. Those entitled to refunds in this area are: Keith Barbour, of Thetford; John Butler, of Vershire; and Emile Hebert, of St. Johnsbury. My opinion To the Editor: Gods of grief and gods of Glory have been around for a long time. In ancient Greece and Rome there was a god for everything, and seem to be little better today. The God of the IRA can see no good in San Paisley, the English and very little in themselves. The God of Ayatolah Khomeni can not tolerate anyone that disagrees with the Ayatolah. The God of fundamentalist Moslems disagree with anyone who wants peace. The Gods of Israel and the Palistinians disagree with everyone. I believe my GOd stands on higher ground. He believes that women should have equal rights, that a woman doing the same work as a man, and probably doing it better, should be paid more than two- thirds the amount the man is. He believes in woman's provide these programs is asked to let your local school principal know. Anne Taylor Orange East Arts Program Committee choice on abortion; that there is no one else on earth in as good a position to know whether that child can be raised with love and un- derstanding. She knows herself better than the president, the pope and Jerry Farwell. With 25 percent of the earth's people forever hungry and 10 percen[ starving, she is unsure if she can raise him without abuse, hunger and the humiliation of unemployment and poverty. My God is watching from a higher circle. Right now He is watching an 11 year old girl in Michigan. A victim of abuse and pregnant, her parents separated, she is a ward of the state or the court. Her father wants her to have an abortion; her mother says no, the judge says no. She is in dispair. My God doesn't like this torture, but He is helpless to change it. He wrings His hands and cries a lot. After all, God wasn't married to Mary. Without this grief, there would be no glory; without this love, there would be no story to tell our children at Christmas time. Donald Darling Bradford, Vt. computers for bookkeeping and for planning their breeding program. The farm now has facilities for 144 milking cows, including a double-six herringbone milking parlor. Their setup is not only work- saving, but energy-saving, as they have a thermal-store hot water system which uses the beat of the milk to heat their water. Another modern development is August seeding of cornfields to a cover crop of rye, by airplane. In 1979, Berway Farm was named Grafton County Conservation Farm of the Year, in recognition of their comeback after the fire, as well as other features of their farm management. Tullando Farms After George Tullar left the home farm, he worked for a few years at Dartmouth Dairy while he looked around for a good farm to buy. In 1956 he and his wife Barbara were able to by their present main farm in Orford, to which they have since added all or part of ten other farms. They were fortunate to be able to buy also working Since corporated, gradually ownership buying poration. Tullando successful in quality breeding their bull Sky High. He l by Select proving by the Putnam and Hugh also by his of EX-91. George first calves Tullando permint. Another which the measuring the year, for with better nutrients. be able to much before. Along also kitchen was built in considerable since then. by MARY HANSON and The 1981 Magazine Drive The Horse, was very successful, as we Jim Kinder,] exceeded our goal by ap- Felicis proximately $300. Our total sale was $2,865.62. Receipts by classes were as The follows: Fabrizio Freshmen -- $492.18 Smas Sophomores-- $1218.47 state. Juniors-- $398.18 he eligible Seniors -- $756.76 Top salesmen for the drive were Maria Pike -- $469.09 Jody Thayer-- $161.43 Sandy Willey  $1AO formance Drew Tobiasen -- $99.76 eligible Charles Heath-- $98.72 competition. Elizabeth Peters -- $86.68 Special David Patten--S85.85 in order Sheri Ball -- $85.28 Dairy Allen Towne -- $84.87 Hudson, Cheryl Cardin-- $73.77 McKean We wish to thank these pulled people and all the other victory, students who helped to put us Hi over the top. Many prizes have already team been distributed and the KansasCity s remainder have been ordered Some and will be given out as soon Awards as they arrive. Fabrizio The profit made for the Cate student activities' fund was about $1000. It will be used to There buy cheerleading sweaters, trash cans and covers for the the other new literary magazine, petiters Doing Well contests The a-la-carte program is report. doing very well. Each day more and more people buy lunch from this program. The Team program now sells a large to l variety of foods such as next sandwiches, potato chips, record yogurt, cheeseburgers, win both chocolate and plain milk, ring Oct. 27 dings, ice cream, and other travel to foods. Different foods will be added as time goes on. Mrs. 29, the Lloyd, who is in charge of this phase of the lunch program at Crusaders WHS, reports that she is very in pleased with the success of spot. this venture. Report Cards due Marks will close Friday, High Oct. 30th. Report cards will be issued on Wednesday, Nov. on 4th, 1981. taineers On Tuesday, Oct. 27, PSAT face the exams will be given to juniors, second Halloween Dance first time On Friday, Oct. 30, the easily on Seniors will be sponsoring a the score' Halloween Dance at the community building. The no dance starts at 8:00 p.m. and kicked ends at 11:00 p.m. Admission is $2.00 with a mask; $2.50 without a mask. This dance is open only to WHS students and fire the their guests, they Honor Society after. The National Honor Society is once again selling as they stationary. All the members fensive have packets and will be coming around. Several This members of the Senior Honor many Society have definitely decided to take part in an Their exchange with another Honor that Society from Eagle Grove High School in Iowa. The students are anxiously tl awaiting the trip. It is now subject to School Board ap- proval FFA News On Saturday, Oct. 17 the The Woodsville FFA competed in for the lnterscholastics at Durham, N.H. At the com- 3-1 petition Woodsville won several awards.