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October 28, 1981     Journal Opinion
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October 28, 1981
 

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October 28, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 Lung:. Association urges VFW head to make Racquet ball news Thoughts on the cauuon on Halloween New Hampshire visit Morris cancels Smith, 3-0 ut-of-Doors Halloween brings ghosts, children are old enough to Plans have recently been Fellwoek joined PostNo. 1114 by Gary W. Moore move the Vermont Fish and Game Board killed the special nine day December it had earlier passed unanimously. The that move came swiftly and are certain to e board members received three memos consider an extension of the 1981 turkey memos were from Commissioner Wildlife Biologist Ben Day. The main Jeff Wallin, the biologist in charge of the that the turkey was over populated in the the condition was attributable to mild winters. He went on to give data  views citing the turkeys he tracks by radio, from the spring. a short term solution of a nine day December. He stated that such added days r not be needed next year. 12, the board heard Wallin George Duke of West Dummerston to have a December season as the depar- Shirley Holmes of Canaan seconded Wote was unanimous. no discussion in the time between the the meeting last Wednesday. Most of us season would be held as planned. The only was the final vote needed after the proposal and the necessary time had passed to as the topic came up for final action. I season be approved and the second was of Swanton, Jim Walker of Stowe and New Haven spoke in opposition. A major to be the added pressure on the landowners. Several calls from farmers who did not want that would put hunters on their land. Roger Whitcomb, who was listed as the the advertisements, said that he had not all. came, the result left many bewildered in- Duke and I were the only two to vote Season. Was learned  that the vote could prove to be that the department acting on the OK of. mailed out 13,000 turkey permits December season. the part of Day will be hard to correct. of the week that to notify each permit mail, as would be necessary, could cost the final approval by the board was he to save the department money by the earlier mailing not received it as of this writing, I un- has sent the members of explaining the situation and asking if they on what has become a problem that after I have seen the letter a chance to see what time and the Act will allow. As I was in the vote was taken I can not ask for recon- Would have to come from one of the four who SAME AS LAST YEAR to biologist Charles Willey propose that be the same as the season this year. the board gave initial approval to January 2 through March 7 in the January 2 through February 14 in the boundaries are to be the same as in the wardens report stable or increased state. He stated that there is some the season in October when most trap- r said that he is not now in favor as beaver and the otter harvests is most game managers Willey is very regards the maintaining of stable priority. NO ACTION TAKEN ON MOST OF AGENDA to several people ask for a variety of to get more input from were present to ask for a longer season r their hounds more. They seemed to running their dogs earlier than is said that they had to stop the fox hunting season closed the . Chief Warden Whitcomb pointed their dogs until March 15. When asked they would know, Whitcomb told them Trappers Association read a list of he represents wants changed. A big board discussed a possible recom- that would prevent convicted license. of Save 'N Acre Club met with what he hopes to do to keep land YOUR PERMIT BACK antlerless permit back after signing it This is for all permits even the holders. goblins and, sometimes, real danger. The New Hampshire Lung Association warns about .one danger for children -- the sk of choking on holiday treats scb as candy corn, hard candy, and peanuts. At Halloween, children go door-to-door "begging". Parents should insist youngsters bring the goodies home for inspection. For the youngest-- two, three or even four years old -- some of the candy can be divided or mashed before eating. The chewing and swallowing muscles of young children may not be suf- ficiently developed to cope with certain treats. Choking can result. Halloween goodies also may "go down the wrong way," and lodge in the lung instead of the stomach. This is called aspiration. A "foreign object" of any kind in the lung can cause lifelong problems. small, hard bits of food. Parents should always be on guard against "small objects" getting into their mouths. Choking, blocked air passages, even aspiration into the lung can result. Moreover, such items as eyes and buttons that might come loose from dolls, or wheels from toy cars. Set a good example. Don't put anything but food into your own mouth. Keep the coffee table clear of small objects within a little one's reach. Ask your lung association for the leaflet: "Keep Your Child From Choking." For more information on this subject, contact the New Hampshire Lung Association at P.O. Box 1014, 456 Beech St., Manchester, NH 03105 or call (603) 669-2411. chew and swallow correctly announced by the VFW in Evansville. This post has N. HAVERHILb--In a Men's before trusting them with Department of New Hamp- since becomethelargestVFW Intermediate Round Robin shire for the upcoming visit by post in the country. Besides National VFW Commander- serving two terms as post in-Chief, Arthur Fellwock of commander, Fellwock also Evansville, Ind. While touring has the distinction of being the the state with State Com- youngest VFW' state com- mander John Smart, Nashua, mander in the history of the Fellwock will visit 27 of the department of Illinois. A state's 60 posts, graduate of the University of Fellwock was elected to the Evansville he is vice president position of National Senior of sales for Universal Corp., Vice Commander-in-Chief at which installs production the 81st National Convention controls in large companies. in Chicago, Ill. in August of On Tuesday evening, Nov. 3, (1). 1980. Two months later upon commander-in-chief FeUwock Men's Intermediate the untimely death of then and National President League commander-in-chief, T.C. Marion Watson, Louisville, Ned McLure (2) over Steve Selman, Fellweck became Ky., will be honored at a Blood (1) ; Scott McAllister (3) commander-in-chief for the joint reception at the Franklin over Bruce Murray (0); unexpired term. He was VFW post. Mrs. Watson will Marvin Harrison (2) over elected to serve a full one year be in the state at the same David Bettoney (I); Lance term this August at the time visiting various national convention in auxiliaries. Philadelphia, Pa. Fellwock will be visiting After serving in the U.S. VFW posts in Littleton and N. Navy in World War lI Haverhill on Monday, Nov. 2. At times, surgery for removal . . . is required. This, according to Orthopedic-pediatrlc clinic will be held the New Hampshire Lung Association. The best warning is: Be sure NEW SON ARRIVES WELLS RIVER--Mr. and Mrs. Terry Williams of Wells River are the parents of a new baby boy, weighing eight pounds and two ounces, horn on Oct. 9 at Cottage Hospital in Woodsville. INTERESTING FACT "A pig between two sheets" is lunch-counter talk for a ham sandwich. LITTLETON-- The North Country Home Health Agency, in cooperation with the Bureau for Handicapped Children, Department of Public Health, is sponsoring an Orthopedic and Pediatric Evaluation Clinic at the Littleton Hospital on Friday, Nov. 6. This clinic is a diagnostic and evaluation clinic for children 18 years and under who have a suspected crip- pling handicap. Among the categories included are: congenital deformities, or- thopedic problems (curvature of the spine, toeing in or out, etc.), birth injuries, crippling Collier re-elected_ chairman of OESC BRADFORD--The Orange Heidenreich and Mrs. Blan- East Senior Center's annual meeting was held at the Wells River United Church of Christ. A delicious meal prepared by cook, Paul Hinman, assisted by Esther Hinman and site manager Susan Goodwin was served by volunteers before the meeting. Charles Collier, chairman of the Advisory Board of Orange East Senior Center welcomed all. Minutes of the last annual meeting were read by Secretary, George Durgin. Mrs. Winifred Blanchard read the treasurer's report and Don Rugg gave a detailed budget report for the coming year. William Lightfoot presented the report of the nominating committee. The following officers were elected: chairman, Charles Collier; vice-chairman, Rev. John Knight; secretary, George E. Durgin; treasurer, Don Rugg and associate treasurer, Mrs. Edith Emerson. A vote of thanks was given to retiring officers, William chard who will continue as members of the Board. The Director's report was given by Vivan Nemhauser. Progress was noted in m of meals, transportation and the new Senior Home Companion program. Kay Hemmings of W. Newbury was the first Senior Home Companion and Ruth McCarty of Fairlee has just been added as the second. They will visit seniors in the six towns (Bradford, Newbury, Fairlee, West Fairies, Corinth and Top- sham) served by Orange East Senior Center. Flu shots will be given at the Center by Community Health Services at the regular Town .Nurse Clinic on Wednesday, Oct. 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00. A charge of $2.50 will have to be made for the cost of the vaccine this year. Orange East Senior Center is looking forward to another year of service to the com- munity and thanks the towns for their support. Name chosen at hospice meeting BRADFORD--A meeting for the general public was held by the Bradford unit of Hospice on Tues., Oct. 20 at the Senior Citizen's Center in Bradford. Vadia Boudreau acted as chairman and announced that the executive committee had chosen a name, "Hospice of the Bradford Area." There will be another executive committee meeting on Nov. 5 to draw up by-laws. At present two families are being helped by volunteers. There will be another training session for volunteers in March. The present training session will have its sixth meeting on Nov. 28 at the Center. The topic will be "Spiritual Needs" with the Rev. Robert Robb of Piermont as speaker. Lucia Button who is co- chairman of the Bradford Hospice, spoke of the need for funds to provide postage fees, the expense for speakers, and expenses for library and educational supplies, and films. She said she hoped that the local churches and civic organizations would respond to this appeal. Checks may be sent to her or Eleanor Don- nellymade out to Bradford Hospice. The next general meeting will be on Tues., Nov. 17 at 7:30 at the Senior Citizen's Center in Bradford. toll call discount offered in Bradford beyond a customer's local service area, all within Vermont and none exceeding a 24-mile radius from the customer's exchange. -- An entry fee per ex- change selected ranging from 85-cents to $1.80 applies in addition to regular monthly local service charges. -- The discount applies to all customer-dialed calls except those between 9 a.m. and noon on weekdays. op- percent discount on calls to to area manager Anthony maximum of 10 exchanges that certain exchanges chosen Munn. within a24-mileradius. Munn said the service is in the "Selective Calling Service" designed to provide an will be introduced on a alternative to standard toll New progressive basis by the service "by allowing "called year's end to all Vermont customers a reduction in toll exchanges served by New charges to frequently called England Telephone according exchanges which they can a 50 select based on their own calling needs." d'kflll Provisions of the service meets include: school grade classes and will take -- A 50 percent discount on Oct. effect Oct. 26. Sehmidtwi be directly dialed calls to a working on motor skills and ahouse games with the younger children at the elementary school. held the Oct. - l i i CEUTER DATSUN, IRe. st AImn00 r00mr, vt oBn Jt their INTERESTING FACT [, ex- Northern Alaska's great Part- Brooks Range, called the gates of the arctic, is the in- largest remaining expanse of to untouched terrain in the first United States. conditions due to infection, Robert Arbuckle or Dr. H. trauma, disturbance of Taylor Caswell, orthopedic growth, hearing defect, or surgeons. A child referred for severe malocclusion, a pediatric evaluation will be Any child suspected of examined by Dr. Cynthia having a handicap of this kind Steinem, pediatrician. is accepted into the program, After the children are seen with no charge to the family at the clinic, follow-up is done for the first visit. If more by the area Home Health office visits are required, Agency. Visiting nurses payment may or may not be continue instructions from the provided by this program doctors and assist parents in depending on information continuing any program given by the family at the heeded for the child. The child initial visit, is seen regularly at clinic, if Referrals to the program needed, to follow progress and may be made by the family growth. itself, or through a local Appointments will be taken physician or visiting nurse, by the North Country Home Referrals are madedirectly to Health Agency for the next the North Country Home clinic to be held Nov. 6, 1981. If Health Agency who will then you have a child you would set up an examination date. - like seen, please call the North Children seen for orthopedic Country Home Health Agency problems are examined by Dr. at 444-5317. A Woman's Point of View Life on the by FRAN HYDE "Expect the Unexpected". That was the theme of the 1981 National Farm Credit Directors Conference which Arthur and I recently attended in Houston, Tex. And what a good theme ! For us it went into action when we arrived at the airport in Lebanon and found the 2 o'clock flight to Boston had been changed to 2:30 on the first of October and so we would miss our scheduled connection and had to wait $hours to leave for Texas, with arrival time 3 a.m. ! - After a short night we were off and going with the rest of the conferees and guests on Monday morning. The theme was still at work; in the opening session the multi-media presentation on Texas didn't work. First the slides didn't show; then they showed and the music made no sound; then the slides showed, but in the wrong order .... and so a break was called and while the audience enjoyed coffee or cold drinks and Texas fruit in the hallway, the technicians made the necessary corrections and when we returned to the meeting room we were treated to an overall look at Texas agriculture. The directors who had planned and were executing the conference seemed to take comfort in the theme, and when changes were made we'd all say to each other, "Expect the Unexpected!" This covered the cancellation of a trip to NASA headquarters, the non-arrival of a luncheon speaker who thought he was scheduled for the next day, an- nouncements that didn't reach the entire group, and the arrival of bellboys for luggage at 6 a.m. when conferees had been told the time would be 7 o'clock ! Among the trips planned for wives was one to Cutter Bill's Western Store. Here, one could find anything they might need in the line of Western clothing. R was fun to look through, but we made few purchases. One price tag sticks in my memory; $800 for a woman's suede jacket with feather trimmed yoke ! Tuesday afternoon, I passed up a shopping tour, choosing instead a trip on the Motpr Vessel Sam Houston which gave us a look at ships and installations along the shipping channel. The channel was lined with ships, mostly of foreign nations, and some of the cargoes from close by would he grains, chemicals, steel, papers, rubber and petroleum products. That evening the men took the beat trip with the San Jacinto Inn as their destination. The women were taken to the Inn by bus, and there all enjoyed the biggest seafood dinner I've ever had; all one wanted of shrimp, oysters on the half-shell, carbs, fried fish or chicken and french fried potato. A 570 foot tall monument near the Inn honors those Texans who defeated General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna on April 21, 1836, when the Texas Army led by Sam Houston caught the Mexican Army during an afternoon siesta. On the way back to the hotel a number of the busses stopped for a look at "Gillie's", a large and well-known Country and Western music spot, and watched riders try to keep their seat on the mechanical bulls. With the average age of Houston residents at 28, it was easy to see how such a place could be popular. During the agricultural tour which always follows the conference we visited a cattle finishing lot where 15,000 beef animals were being readied for market; we were flown to Lubbock where we saw cotton fields, cotton gins and elevators, and visited a plant owned by cooperatives whbre we watched the entire process of turning cotton into denim material for making Levi Straus's famous jeans. That evening we were part of several hundred people who at- tended a dinner which was a tribu to farmer cooperation in West Texas spensorea oy me r'mins Cotton Cooperative Association of the American Cotton Growers. A call home on Thursday morning revealed that the corn was not ready for picking and so we prepared to continue on to San Antonio and then take a three-day trip into Mexico! Next week's column will tell about the rest of the trip, so continue to "Expect the Unexpected"! A&W ARTESIAN WELL CO. ince 1930 m,, hl.m, u. ].aos.00ln r.ree CALL Mrs. Walter Shaw m2-741623S2 ,,llll I I I III III followed by Bonnie Prouty and Guarantee "Savings (!). The Sandy Morris with Diane 111 Club took (2) points from Match Steve Blood was the Burgess. Lavoies Sales & Service; The winner with Gary Scruton Wallyball News Racquet Shack (3) points over second, Peter Durgin, third. Action started Wednesday the O.S.A.; and Dud's Arco (3) Ray Chapin and Mike Hudson night with Russ's Hideaway points over the Ryegate tied for fourth, and Norman taking (2) points to Brad's Corners. Farr was fifth. Men's Advanced League Lyme plans larger vault Steve Savage (3) over Joe Moore (0); Rich Saffo, Jr. (2) over Steve Walker (1); Scott LYME]yme selectmen are municipal offices that will be Davis (3) over Barry Field discussing plans for a larger in the ground floor of the vault for town records to be addition will be available for Mills (3) over Norman Farr (0); Fred White (3) over Francis Stoddard (0); Mike Hudson (3) over John Dwyer (0); John Dwyer (3) over Gerry Lyons (0). Men's Novice installed in the new town of- inspection next week. The flees to be located in the plans will be located at the recently approved, but long selectmen's office; notices awaited, Lyme town library will be posted for the locations addition, of the plans when the office is The selectmen say the vault closed. will be used to house all town G r o u n d b r e a k i n g records and documents and ceremonies for the new Lyme could be doubled in size by library addition took place on incorporating an area that Wednesday, Sept. 30. was to be set aside for use as Construction of the addition storage space. The existing is expected to begin later this vault in the Lyme town offices month and will take about 26 is a size of five and one- weeks, according to Eleanor League " quarter by six and one-half Crary, library trustee Charlie Meyers (2) over feet. The planned larger vault chairman. Tim Whalen (1) and Dick will occupy a space of nine by Town officials were hoping Rothenberg (3) over George ninefeet, to start building over two Cobb (0). Lyme resident Dorothy months ago, but were delayed Ladies' Advanced- Sears has offered to pay up to after the Governor's Com- Intermediate League $2000 of the cost of expanding mission for the Handicapped Shirley Morris (3) over tbevault, rejected ph;nned access Susanne Smith (0); Sarah Davis (2) over Mary Ford (1); Shirley Morris (3) over Penny Scruton (0); Steffie Saffo (3) over Bonnie Prouty (O); Mary Ford (2) over Diana Walker (1). On Friday night the Ladies' Round Robin ended in a tie between Marry Ford and Susanne Smith. Penny Scruton, Pat Wolfe and Doris Savage were next in a tie, The fiord man completes Naw recruit tndning THETFORD CTR.--Navy Seaman Recruit Ricky A. Bailey, son of Warren A. and Florence .M. Bailey of Thet- ford Center has completed recruit training at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, /) Ill. (/ During the eight-week d training cycle, trainees t studied general military subjects designed to prepare them for further academic and on-the-job training in one of the Navy's 85 basic oc- cupational fields. Included in their studies were seamanship, close order drill, Naval history and first aid. Personnel who complete , thus course of instruction are eligible for three hours of -, college credit in Physical Education and Hygiene. A 1981 graduate of Thetford Academy, he joined the Navy in July 1981. The selectmen say the cost routes to the town offices. of expanding the vault should State officials finally ap- cost in the neighborhood of proved revised access routes $750 to $1005. , Monday, Sept. 29. Floor plans for the . Students sp//t wood (continued from page 3) Hanover and Lyme, and, according to Ted Unities of the Listen staff, last winter through various programs an estimated 100 cords of wood were provided for up to 50 families, which, without that help, might have been without heat. That total included about 25 cords of wood distributed on an emergency basis to families that had run out of fuel entirely and were con- fronted with potentially health-threatening crises -- without literally immediate delivery of wood supplies. "And this winter, with the reduction in federal funds available for community fuel assistance programs, the need for emergency wood supplies will undoubtedly be greater," said Mr. Unkles, a 1980 graduate of Dartmouth who began working at Listen as a Vista Volunteer. THE CHOICE OF CHAMPIONS Some men have a style all their own. Perhaps that's why they choose Izod I. Lacoste . It's s co\\;mblnatlon of quality, style and faultless design. Like this classlc Orlon llcryllc pullover sweater wlth dbbed V-neck, waletband and cuffs. In color8 to coordinate wlth Lacoste shifts, slacks and other sportswear. Izod Lacoste... obviously for w innem.S,M,L,XL, W.00. Cardlgan Ir.oo. II I III St. 3ohnsbury,f. * Woodsville, N.H. Get itoutofyour D[I You know in your heart it is the only system for you, and it's available now at: CHIPS MICROcENTER SOL TH STREET H NC)VER, NH 03755 Phone: 603-643-5413 --Personal Computing is a very satisfying and rewarding hobby. --Business computing can save your office time and frustration. Chll can lupply your Apple Computer need today. oornput00r "zed Dealer October 28, 1981-The Journal Opinion-Page 5 Lung:. Association urges VFW head to make Racquet ball news Thoughts on the cauuon on Halloween New Hampshire visit Morris cancels Smith, 3-0 ut-of-Doors Halloween brings ghosts, children are old enough to Plans have recently been Fellwoek joined PostNo. 1114 by Gary W. Moore move the Vermont Fish and Game Board killed the special nine day December it had earlier passed unanimously. The that move came swiftly and are certain to e board members received three memos consider an extension of the 1981 turkey memos were from Commissioner Wildlife Biologist Ben Day. The main Jeff Wallin, the biologist in charge of the that the turkey was over populated in the the condition was attributable to mild winters. He went on to give data  views citing the turkeys he tracks by radio, from the spring. a short term solution of a nine day December. He stated that such added days r not be needed next year. 12, the board heard Wallin George Duke of West Dummerston to have a December season as the depar- Shirley Holmes of Canaan seconded Wote was unanimous. no discussion in the time between the the meeting last Wednesday. Most of us season would be held as planned. The only was the final vote needed after the proposal and the necessary time had passed to as the topic came up for final action. I season be approved and the second was of Swanton, Jim Walker of Stowe and New Haven spoke in opposition. A major to be the added pressure on the landowners. Several calls from farmers who did not want that would put hunters on their land. Roger Whitcomb, who was listed as the the advertisements, said that he had not all. came, the result left many bewildered in- Duke and I were the only two to vote Season. Was learned  that the vote could prove to be that the department acting on the OK of. mailed out 13,000 turkey permits December season. the part of Day will be hard to correct. of the week that to notify each permit mail, as would be necessary, could cost the final approval by the board was he to save the department money by the earlier mailing not received it as of this writing, I un- has sent the members of explaining the situation and asking if they on what has become a problem that after I have seen the letter a chance to see what time and the Act will allow. As I was in the vote was taken I can not ask for recon- Would have to come from one of the four who SAME AS LAST YEAR to biologist Charles Willey propose that be the same as the season this year. the board gave initial approval to January 2 through March 7 in the January 2 through February 14 in the boundaries are to be the same as in the wardens report stable or increased state. He stated that there is some the season in October when most trap- r said that he is not now in favor as beaver and the otter harvests is most game managers Willey is very regards the maintaining of stable priority. NO ACTION TAKEN ON MOST OF AGENDA to several people ask for a variety of to get more input from were present to ask for a longer season r their hounds more. They seemed to running their dogs earlier than is said that they had to stop the fox hunting season closed the . Chief Warden Whitcomb pointed their dogs until March 15. When asked they would know, Whitcomb told them Trappers Association read a list of he represents wants changed. A big board discussed a possible recom- that would prevent convicted license. of Save 'N Acre Club met with what he hopes to do to keep land YOUR PERMIT BACK antlerless permit back after signing it This is for all permits even the holders. goblins and, sometimes, real danger. The New Hampshire Lung Association warns about .one danger for children -- the sk of choking on holiday treats scb as candy corn, hard candy, and peanuts. At Halloween, children go door-to-door "begging". Parents should insist youngsters bring the goodies home for inspection. For the youngest-- two, three or even four years old -- some of the candy can be divided or mashed before eating. The chewing and swallowing muscles of young children may not be suf- ficiently developed to cope with certain treats. Choking can result. Halloween goodies also may "go down the wrong way," and lodge in the lung instead of the stomach. This is called aspiration. A "foreign object" of any kind in the lung can cause lifelong problems. small, hard bits of food. Parents should always be on guard against "small objects" getting into their mouths. Choking, blocked air passages, even aspiration into the lung can result. Moreover, such items as eyes and buttons that might come loose from dolls, or wheels from toy cars. Set a good example. Don't put anything but food into your own mouth. Keep the coffee table clear of small objects within a little one's reach. Ask your lung association for the leaflet: "Keep Your Child From Choking." For more information on this subject, contact the New Hampshire Lung Association at P.O. Box 1014, 456 Beech St., Manchester, NH 03105 or call (603) 669-2411. chew and swallow correctly announced by the VFW in Evansville. This post has N. HAVERHILb--In a Men's before trusting them with Department of New Hamp- since becomethelargestVFW Intermediate Round Robin shire for the upcoming visit by post in the country. Besides National VFW Commander- serving two terms as post in-Chief, Arthur Fellwock of commander, Fellwock also Evansville, Ind. While touring has the distinction of being the the state with State Com- youngest VFW' state com- mander John Smart, Nashua, mander in the history of the Fellwock will visit 27 of the department of Illinois. A state's 60 posts, graduate of the University of Fellwock was elected to the Evansville he is vice president position of National Senior of sales for Universal Corp., Vice Commander-in-Chief at which installs production the 81st National Convention controls in large companies. in Chicago, Ill. in August of On Tuesday evening, Nov. 3, (1). 1980. Two months later upon commander-in-chief FeUwock Men's Intermediate the untimely death of then and National President League commander-in-chief, T.C. Marion Watson, Louisville, Ned McLure (2) over Steve Selman, Fellweck became Ky., will be honored at a Blood (1) ; Scott McAllister (3) commander-in-chief for the joint reception at the Franklin over Bruce Murray (0); unexpired term. He was VFW post. Mrs. Watson will Marvin Harrison (2) over elected to serve a full one year be in the state at the same David Bettoney (I); Lance term this August at the time visiting various national convention in auxiliaries. Philadelphia, Pa. Fellwock will be visiting After serving in the U.S. VFW posts in Littleton and N. Navy in World War lI Haverhill on Monday, Nov. 2. At times, surgery for removal . . . is required. This, according to Orthopedic-pediatrlc clinic will be held the New Hampshire Lung Association. The best warning is: Be sure NEW SON ARRIVES WELLS RIVER--Mr. and Mrs. Terry Williams of Wells River are the parents of a new baby boy, weighing eight pounds and two ounces, horn on Oct. 9 at Cottage Hospital in Woodsville. INTERESTING FACT "A pig between two sheets" is lunch-counter talk for a ham sandwich. LITTLETON-- The North Country Home Health Agency, in cooperation with the Bureau for Handicapped Children, Department of Public Health, is sponsoring an Orthopedic and Pediatric Evaluation Clinic at the Littleton Hospital on Friday, Nov. 6. This clinic is a diagnostic and evaluation clinic for children 18 years and under who have a suspected crip- pling handicap. Among the categories included are: congenital deformities, or- thopedic problems (curvature of the spine, toeing in or out, etc.), birth injuries, crippling Collier re-elected_ chairman of OESC BRADFORD--The Orange Heidenreich and Mrs. Blan- East Senior Center's annual meeting was held at the Wells River United Church of Christ. A delicious meal prepared by cook, Paul Hinman, assisted by Esther Hinman and site manager Susan Goodwin was served by volunteers before the meeting. Charles Collier, chairman of the Advisory Board of Orange East Senior Center welcomed all. Minutes of the last annual meeting were read by Secretary, George Durgin. Mrs. Winifred Blanchard read the treasurer's report and Don Rugg gave a detailed budget report for the coming year. William Lightfoot presented the report of the nominating committee. The following officers were elected: chairman, Charles Collier; vice-chairman, Rev. John Knight; secretary, George E. Durgin; treasurer, Don Rugg and associate treasurer, Mrs. Edith Emerson. A vote of thanks was given to retiring officers, William chard who will continue as members of the Board. The Director's report was given by Vivan Nemhauser. Progress was noted in m of meals, transportation and the new Senior Home Companion program. Kay Hemmings of W. Newbury was the first Senior Home Companion and Ruth McCarty of Fairlee has just been added as the second. They will visit seniors in the six towns (Bradford, Newbury, Fairlee, West Fairies, Corinth and Top- sham) served by Orange East Senior Center. Flu shots will be given at the Center by Community Health Services at the regular Town .Nurse Clinic on Wednesday, Oct. 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00. A charge of $2.50 will have to be made for the cost of the vaccine this year. Orange East Senior Center is looking forward to another year of service to the com- munity and thanks the towns for their support. Name chosen at hospice meeting BRADFORD--A meeting for the general public was held by the Bradford unit of Hospice on Tues., Oct. 20 at the Senior Citizen's Center in Bradford. Vadia Boudreau acted as chairman and announced that the executive committee had chosen a name, "Hospice of the Bradford Area." There will be another executive committee meeting on Nov. 5 to draw up by-laws. At present two families are being helped by volunteers. There will be another training session for volunteers in March. The present training session will have its sixth meeting on Nov. 28 at the Center. The topic will be "Spiritual Needs" with the Rev. Robert Robb of Piermont as speaker. Lucia Button who is co- chairman of the Bradford Hospice, spoke of the need for funds to provide postage fees, the expense for speakers, and expenses for library and educational supplies, and films. She said she hoped that the local churches and civic organizations would respond to this appeal. Checks may be sent to her or Eleanor Don- nellymade out to Bradford Hospice. The next general meeting will be on Tues., Nov. 17 at 7:30 at the Senior Citizen's Center in Bradford. toll call discount offered in Bradford beyond a customer's local service area, all within Vermont and none exceeding a 24-mile radius from the customer's exchange. -- An entry fee per ex- change selected ranging from 85-cents to $1.80 applies in addition to regular monthly local service charges. -- The discount applies to all customer-dialed calls except those between 9 a.m. and noon on weekdays. op- percent discount on calls to to area manager Anthony maximum of 10 exchanges that certain exchanges chosen Munn. within a24-mileradius. Munn said the service is in the "Selective Calling Service" designed to provide an will be introduced on a alternative to standard toll New progressive basis by the service "by allowing "called year's end to all Vermont customers a reduction in toll exchanges served by New charges to frequently called England Telephone according exchanges which they can a 50 select based on their own calling needs." d'kflll Provisions of the service meets include: school grade classes and will take -- A 50 percent discount on Oct. effect Oct. 26. Sehmidtwi be directly dialed calls to a working on motor skills and ahouse games with the younger children at the elementary school. held the Oct. - l i i CEUTER DATSUN, IRe. st AImn00 r00mr, vt oBn Jt their INTERESTING FACT [, ex- Northern Alaska's great Part- Brooks Range, called the gates of the arctic, is the in- largest remaining expanse of to untouched terrain in the first United States. conditions due to infection, Robert Arbuckle or Dr. H. trauma, disturbance of Taylor Caswell, orthopedic growth, hearing defect, or surgeons. A child referred for severe malocclusion, a pediatric evaluation will be Any child suspected of examined by Dr. Cynthia having a handicap of this kind Steinem, pediatrician. is accepted into the program, After the children are seen with no charge to the family at the clinic, follow-up is done for the first visit. If more by the area Home Health office visits are required, Agency. Visiting nurses payment may or may not be continue instructions from the provided by this program doctors and assist parents in depending on information continuing any program given by the family at the heeded for the child. The child initial visit, is seen regularly at clinic, if Referrals to the program needed, to follow progress and may be made by the family growth. itself, or through a local Appointments will be taken physician or visiting nurse, by the North Country Home Referrals are madedirectly to Health Agency for the next the North Country Home clinic to be held Nov. 6, 1981. If Health Agency who will then you have a child you would set up an examination date. - like seen, please call the North Children seen for orthopedic Country Home Health Agency problems are examined by Dr. at 444-5317. A Woman's Point of View Life on the by FRAN HYDE "Expect the Unexpected". That was the theme of the 1981 National Farm Credit Directors Conference which Arthur and I recently attended in Houston, Tex. And what a good theme ! For us it went into action when we arrived at the airport in Lebanon and found the 2 o'clock flight to Boston had been changed to 2:30 on the first of October and so we would miss our scheduled connection and had to wait $hours to leave for Texas, with arrival time 3 a.m. ! - After a short night we were off and going with the rest of the conferees and guests on Monday morning. The theme was still at work; in the opening session the multi-media presentation on Texas didn't work. First the slides didn't show; then they showed and the music made no sound; then the slides showed, but in the wrong order .... and so a break was called and while the audience enjoyed coffee or cold drinks and Texas fruit in the hallway, the technicians made the necessary corrections and when we returned to the meeting room we were treated to an overall look at Texas agriculture. The directors who had planned and were executing the conference seemed to take comfort in the theme, and when changes were made we'd all say to each other, "Expect the Unexpected!" This covered the cancellation of a trip to NASA headquarters, the non-arrival of a luncheon speaker who thought he was scheduled for the next day, an- nouncements that didn't reach the entire group, and the arrival of bellboys for luggage at 6 a.m. when conferees had been told the time would be 7 o'clock ! Among the trips planned for wives was one to Cutter Bill's Western Store. Here, one could find anything they might need in the line of Western clothing. R was fun to look through, but we made few purchases. One price tag sticks in my memory; $800 for a woman's suede jacket with feather trimmed yoke ! Tuesday afternoon, I passed up a shopping tour, choosing instead a trip on the Motpr Vessel Sam Houston which gave us a look at ships and installations along the shipping channel. The channel was lined with ships, mostly of foreign nations, and some of the cargoes from close by would he grains, chemicals, steel, papers, rubber and petroleum products. That evening the men took the beat trip with the San Jacinto Inn as their destination. The women were taken to the Inn by bus, and there all enjoyed the biggest seafood dinner I've ever had; all one wanted of shrimp, oysters on the half-shell, carbs, fried fish or chicken and french fried potato. A 570 foot tall monument near the Inn honors those Texans who defeated General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna on April 21, 1836, when the Texas Army led by Sam Houston caught the Mexican Army during an afternoon siesta. On the way back to the hotel a number of the busses stopped for a look at "Gillie's", a large and well-known Country and Western music spot, and watched riders try to keep their seat on the mechanical bulls. With the average age of Houston residents at 28, it was easy to see how such a place could be popular. During the agricultural tour which always follows the conference we visited a cattle finishing lot where 15,000 beef animals were being readied for market; we were flown to Lubbock where we saw cotton fields, cotton gins and elevators, and visited a plant owned by cooperatives whbre we watched the entire process of turning cotton into denim material for making Levi Straus's famous jeans. That evening we were part of several hundred people who at- tended a dinner which was a tribu to farmer cooperation in West Texas spensorea oy me r'mins Cotton Cooperative Association of the American Cotton Growers. A call home on Thursday morning revealed that the corn was not ready for picking and so we prepared to continue on to San Antonio and then take a three-day trip into Mexico! Next week's column will tell about the rest of the trip, so continue to "Expect the Unexpected"! A&W ARTESIAN WELL CO. ince 1930 m,, hl.m, u. ].aos.00ln r.ree CALL Mrs. Walter Shaw m2-741623S2 ,,llll I I I III III followed by Bonnie Prouty and Guarantee "Savings (!). The Sandy Morris with Diane 111 Club took (2) points from Match Steve Blood was the Burgess. Lavoies Sales & Service; The winner with Gary Scruton Wallyball News Racquet Shack (3) points over second, Peter Durgin, third. Action started Wednesday the O.S.A.; and Dud's Arco (3) Ray Chapin and Mike Hudson night with Russ's Hideaway points over the Ryegate tied for fourth, and Norman taking (2) points to Brad's Corners. Farr was fifth. Men's Advanced League Lyme plans larger vault Steve Savage (3) over Joe Moore (0); Rich Saffo, Jr. (2) over Steve Walker (1); Scott LYME]yme selectmen are municipal offices that will be Davis (3) over Barry Field discussing plans for a larger in the ground floor of the vault for town records to be addition will be available for Mills (3) over Norman Farr (0); Fred White (3) over Francis Stoddard (0); Mike Hudson (3) over John Dwyer (0); John Dwyer (3) over Gerry Lyons (0). Men's Novice installed in the new town of- inspection next week. The flees to be located in the plans will be located at the recently approved, but long selectmen's office; notices awaited, Lyme town library will be posted for the locations addition, of the plans when the office is The selectmen say the vault closed. will be used to house all town G r o u n d b r e a k i n g records and documents and ceremonies for the new Lyme could be doubled in size by library addition took place on incorporating an area that Wednesday, Sept. 30. was to be set aside for use as Construction of the addition storage space. The existing is expected to begin later this vault in the Lyme town offices month and will take about 26 is a size of five and one- weeks, according to Eleanor League " quarter by six and one-half Crary, library trustee Charlie Meyers (2) over feet. The planned larger vault chairman. Tim Whalen (1) and Dick will occupy a space of nine by Town officials were hoping Rothenberg (3) over George ninefeet, to start building over two Cobb (0). Lyme resident Dorothy months ago, but were delayed Ladies' Advanced- Sears has offered to pay up to after the Governor's Com- Intermediate League $2000 of the cost of expanding mission for the Handicapped Shirley Morris (3) over tbevault, rejected ph;nned access Susanne Smith (0); Sarah Davis (2) over Mary Ford (1); Shirley Morris (3) over Penny Scruton (0); Steffie Saffo (3) over Bonnie Prouty (O); Mary Ford (2) over Diana Walker (1). On Friday night the Ladies' Round Robin ended in a tie between Marry Ford and Susanne Smith. Penny Scruton, Pat Wolfe and Doris Savage were next in a tie, The fiord man completes Naw recruit tndning THETFORD CTR.--Navy Seaman Recruit Ricky A. Bailey, son of Warren A. and Florence .M. Bailey of Thet- ford Center has completed recruit training at the Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, /) Ill. (/ During the eight-week d training cycle, trainees t studied general military subjects designed to prepare them for further academic and on-the-job training in one of the Navy's 85 basic oc- cupational fields. Included in their studies were seamanship, close order drill, Naval history and first aid. Personnel who complete , thus course of instruction are eligible for three hours of -, college credit in Physical Education and Hygiene. A 1981 graduate of Thetford Academy, he joined the Navy in July 1981. The selectmen say the cost routes to the town offices. of expanding the vault should State officials finally ap- cost in the neighborhood of proved revised access routes $750 to $1005. , Monday, Sept. 29. Floor plans for the . Students sp//t wood (continued from page 3) Hanover and Lyme, and, according to Ted Unities of the Listen staff, last winter through various programs an estimated 100 cords of wood were provided for up to 50 families, which, without that help, might have been without heat. That total included about 25 cords of wood distributed on an emergency basis to families that had run out of fuel entirely and were con- fronted with potentially health-threatening crises -- without literally immediate delivery of wood supplies. "And this winter, with the reduction in federal funds available for community fuel assistance programs, the need for emergency wood supplies will undoubtedly be greater," said Mr. Unkles, a 1980 graduate of Dartmouth who began working at Listen as a Vista Volunteer. THE CHOICE OF CHAMPIONS Some men have a style all their own. Perhaps that's why they choose Izod I. Lacoste . It's s co\\;mblnatlon of quality, style and faultless design. 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