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October 28, 1981     Journal Opinion
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by Ulla Forsell (Sweden). Checkerboard Teapot," by (United States). A new role .for glass takes shape by DAVIDM. MAXFIELD look like that, be used like Smithsonian News that. ' " Service From at least 1500 B.C., the After 35 centuries of time of the oldest known utilitarian use, glass now is existing vessels, which were appearing in a new role and a made in Egypt, glass has been universe of new shapes, the substance for making Contemporary artists are useful objects, whether working the ancient material mundane or highly or- into nonfunctional, namental--jugs, bowls and imaginative sculp- vases, beads and trinkets, for tare--intriguing forms that example. Later came window can be satirical, funky, panes, optical devices, lights, shocking, amusing, awesome, electronic components and, brash or sometimes just most recently, laser fibers. playful. But only in the last 20 years If the objects are at all or so has glass caught theeye decorative in the traditional of American artists as an ideal gift shop sease--or possibly even practical--those features are largely secondary to the craftsman's principal in- tention to experiment with the artistic and physical properties of glass. Produced in small studio furnaces now available to independent sulptors, the new glass is making a major impression internationally: on other artists, gallery owners, museums, the glass industry and a new breed of collectors. "People have a concept of what glass is," Michael Monroe, curator at the Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., says, "but when they see what is now being created, they react, 'I didn't realize it could material for personal ex- presson, a substance that can be shaped for purely aesthetic purposes. Innovative glass- melting techniques, happily developed in the early 1960s, made this possible. And so did a new wave of teaching in museums and at colleges as well as changing American cultural attitudes about art after the 1950s. The new world of abstract, sculptural shapes created by glass artists is not a result of mass production. Each object is unique, thus accounting for prices running into the hun- dreds or even thousands of dollars. Unlike a factory operation where design and fabrication are kept separate, the studio artists mold or blow and then shape the glass from collectors, Monroe says. their own designs, sometimes "Many want to be connected with the aid of an associate or to the artists, to follow their two. work; they just don't want to This is appealing to today's buy an anonymous object." The look of the new creations often can be con- jured up by their names: "Wooly Eggs"-- delicate, clear oval shapes containing spun glass threads; "Small Black Unidentified Animal Plate"--black amber glass with, well, an unidentified animal outlined in white; "Sparkling Star"--greenish cut and cemented plate glass, radiating from a central eore along six planes, and "Space. Spiral II"--tinted glass, laminated and cut, sweeping upward in a 270-degree arc. "Glass is being conceived and appreciated in ways radically different from anything ever done before in its 3,500-year history," ac- cording to Thomas S. Buechner, president and director of The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, N.Y. "Also evident," he continues, "is the fact that while craft and art are blooming, the glass industry is sitting relatively still. This may be because changes elsewhere are so novel and so evident that they overshadow the steady, more subtle im- provements being made through design departments.. Whether the studio glass is clear or opaque, sandblasted or shattered, geometric or freeform, bright and shiny or process, however, becomes dull--in fact, whether it is more complex by adding considered fine art or craf- cobalt, iron or other metallic t--little concerns such oxides to the basic recipe to curators as Monroe and the obtain color characteristics. artists themselves. "What an To Patti and other artists, object is made of or how it is the beauty of the material is created shouldn't determine that it is "expressionistic," whether it is art," Monroe says. "What is important are the ideas behind the piece you're looking at. Does the object make a statement that transcends its technical merits?" Pioneer glass artist and teacher Marvin Lipofsky, a that it can be twisted and controlled unlike any other substance. But "it's kind of a wrestling match with glass," Patti says. "It's a battle to make the glass speak my language and not let the glass dictate to me." Although glass had been Californian, agrees. "My molded and formed around a biggest problem is tha[there's core as early as 2000 B.C., the no personality in (many of major breakthrough in the) works today. It's all giassmaking came in the Near technique. A statement is East about the beginning of lacking in a lot of them." the Christian era. This was the Actually, the glass-making discovery of glass-blowing, an process and techniques have important technique used been pretty well mastered by the studio artists in recent years, a long journey from the early 1960s when "there was practically no information available," as one of today's leading craftsmen, Thomas Patti of Massachusetts, recalls. A versatile, flexible, taffy- like material in its molten state, glass is made by melting sand with the proper amounts of soda and lime to a 1500-degree Fahrenheit glowing mass. This simple today by both industry and the studio artist. The discovery permitted the production of glass objects in quantities and types previously unknown. A second advance of comparable importance oc- curred early in the 19th century with the introduction of glass-pressing and bottle- making developed at the outset of the  Industrial Revolution. But ironically these changes made glass so widely available that it began ( please turn to page 3A I in the I buy myself a "So that's you get CIRCULATING IN: NEW HAMPSHIRE -- Lyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Londoff, Benton. Lvrnon, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . VERMONT - Thetford,, East Thefford, Thetford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Foirlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topshom, West Topshom, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegote Corner, Eost Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peacham, Bornet, West Bornet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 9,200 'tz .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont October 28, 1981 down, but ark has been consists of look like house. Since are rather preliminary order How used? Full Divided as for utility How about a gym, a wine for storage There are necessary the work s to water- Hydraulic to plug cemen- a batter-like COver walls. wail and IC:n special handle it of water- If water problem, sure the from the tround the with a 'proofing water the ENERGY I Ill I I Economics efficiency and basic applications by BILLCHRISTIANSEN look at the economics of heat electric resistance heating. Energy Outreach pumps and basic applications. The heat pump, in general, Advisor Because of the high ef- offers an average 20 percent ]   Last week I tried to outline ficiency of heat pumps they,savings over conventional what a heat pump is and how it usually produce a savings cooling systems and central works. This week I'd like to over oil, natural gas or electric resistance heating. As with any system, this assumes ' proper installation and adequate insulation in the lx2 or Ix3 furring strips for wall paneling can be attached to masonry walls in various ways. A popular system uses anchor nails which stick with a special adhesive. Furring is hammered over the nail and the nail is clinched. Another way is attaching the furring directly to the masonry with case hardened nails. Rigid insulation can be applied with mastic directly to the walls -- a good "extra." Cover furring with vapor barrier before applying paneling. If you don't like the idea of walking on concrete you can create a wood floor by using one of the systems shown in (please turn to page 3A) Special anchor nails (or bolts) are available for attachment of furring strips directly to concrete or concrete block walls,  ** * t 0 is spread on  BA[tcrT WALL I poured oncm or concrete 2 conoete footing 3 concrete sb Soor 4 sal (treated) 6 heed kmt 7 s tote plate 9 "-... ,-'oucei  attach to Ix3 f'umng grips htch are nailed at right angles to joists. O center spacing ( strips depends on the se o# the t. / 8{J$IA'IDED C:lJl The new iltr is e khvork or wood or me ll th I'ng on  'om jot. The  Komecd ile. Slight twistin9 nail, @ r A WOODSTOVE j/iFfl XOUCAS00UILD FOR $35I \\;\;- q "Forgot about messing around with old 55-gallon drums. What you want to build your homemade stove out of is a discarded electric water heater tank." That's what Iowa native Robert Smyers told us when we were looking for a homebuilt woodstove design that would improve on the usual 55-gallon drum heaters that most people put together. Our search for an alternative was sparked by the fact that barrels don't usually produce very efficient or attractive stoves.., and are increas- ingly difficult to find. Smyers gave us at least four good reasons why water heater tanks were better for the purpose. For one thing, the walls of such containers are at least three times as thick as are those of 55-gallon barrels ... which means that a water heater drum will make a much tougher--and longer-lasting--stove. Furthermore, when you build a firebox from a junked water heater tank, it's relatively easy to make the stove as airtight and efficient as any $500 woodburner on the market. Besides that, if you follow Robert's plan, your heater will be easy to load, it will have excellent fire and tem- perature control, and it'll look classy enough to put on display right in the living room. And finally, you can build a water heater stove for even less than most folks now spend putting together a 55.gallon-barrel woodburner. As a matter of fact, Rob- ert built our test model for less than $35, and it took him and his brother Emerson only six hours to make it. It really isn't difficult to find discarded .water heater tanks, either. Most of the landfills scattered around the country, in fact, are filled with such containers. Any trashed electric {forget the gas units for this proj- ectl water heater of 30- to 50-gallon capacity will con- vert nicely into a stove. Frankly, we don't have room here to give you com- plete instructions for constructing our you-can-make.it woodstove. But anyone with a cutting torch and weld- er should find the job pretty easy. And if you don't own or operate such equipment, scout around until you find a competent welding shop that'll convert your tank at a reasonable price. The free reprint mentioned at the end of this article will give you detailed informa. tion on adding the legs, the loading hopper box with hinged lid, the exhaust stack, and the draft control. As an inexpensive, attractive homebuilt heater, it's your best bet. For FREE additional information on building MOM's wooOburning stove or on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS  magazine, send your name and addrees to Doing MORE,.. with LESS!, care of this paper. Ask for Reprint No, 606: "How We Heat A House With A Single Woodstove". i i 1 i iiiii  - house to ensure minimal operating costs. In determining whether a heat pump represents an economical alternative to another type of heating and cooling system for your home, a number of factors should be assessed. First, heat pumps are most economical when used year-round for both winter heating and summer cooling. If a heat pump is used for heating only, the system will lie unused for part of the year. If it is only used for cooling, it will not offer energy or dollar savings over con- ventional air conditioners. A second factor to consider is the climate. The efficiency of a heat pump varies significantly with the outdoor temperature. While a heat pump may be twice as ef- ficient as a conventional heating system at 50 degrees F, it may be only slightly more efficient at 35 degrees. As the temperature drops below 35 degrees, the heat pump must be supplemented by another heating system, such as electric resistance heating. In some cases, a hybrid system is used with gas or oil burning incorporated into the heat pump. At this time, in areas ( ph, ase turn to page 8A ) FIREWOOD & TREE SERVICE Mixed llardwmd $70. cord. Cut. spilt, delivered. Bob Ilolly : call 222-4.di6 before 8:(HP a.m., after 5 :IX; Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 by BILL CHRISTIANSEN Energy Outreach Advisor Hot water heating systems are a little harder to figure out than warm air. In all cases there is a boiler with a series of pipes to carry the hot water out and return the same water to the boiler. In some older systems this is done by gravity but in most newer systems, there is one or more circulator pumps to do the job. The circulator pumps are usually located on the return side of the loop. Headng system maintenance Hot water system harder to f't00ure PAR T 1I be done with several different materials on the market. The cheapest is ,." X 3" fiberglass pipe insulation, available in most hardware stores. The next step would be to check the radiator units in the house. If fin4ube, baseboard units are found these should be inspected with a flashlight. If they are dirty and full of dust, a vacuum cleaner can be used to clean them. Sometimes a long brush is useful. On all radiators, free standing or baseboard, air must be able to circulate around the unit. The first thing to cheek in a There should be at least two hot water system is the boiler inches of free space below the area. Look for leaks or wet unit and an opening at the top places around the boiler, pipes, circulators and fittings. If leaks are found, they should be repaired and this will probably require a plumber. If there is a circulator motor on the system, it should be oiled, with a few drops of general purpose oil. Next, check the pipes that carry the hot water from the .boiler to the various radiators. so cool air at floor level can move into the unit, become heated and move into the room. Boxes, carpets, draperies and furniture are the things that usually in, terfere with the air movement. Clean, unob- structed radiator units are most efficient. With the boiler hot and the system in operation, the Again, look for leaks or wet heating of each radiator unit places around the fittings. In should be checked. On each most cases, the supply pipes radiator unit there should be should be insulated. This can (please turn to page 8A) HAPPY BIRTHDAY MRMlUl JARRELL A FRIEND APPLES & CIDER / INDIAN CORN MILl, APPLE STAND Route 10 llaverhilI, N.il. Near bridge to Newbury ) J Open l)aily: II AM-6PM-- Sun.: 12-6PM 603-787.6445 I Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion. , is only $10.00 RENT SINGLE HOME 4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths. I Block from stores, etc, in June, owner will credit Rent toward Pur- chase. 9 )) For details call 80,-222-4486 i by Ulla Forsell (Sweden). Checkerboard Teapot," by (United States). A new role .for glass takes shape by DAVIDM. MAXFIELD look like that, be used like Smithsonian News that. ' " Service From at least 1500 B.C., the After 35 centuries of time of the oldest known utilitarian use, glass now is existing vessels, which were appearing in a new role and a made in Egypt, glass has been universe of new shapes, the substance for making Contemporary artists are useful objects, whether working the ancient material mundane or highly or- into nonfunctional, namental--jugs, bowls and imaginative sculp- vases, beads and trinkets, for tare--intriguing forms that example. Later came window can be satirical, funky, panes, optical devices, lights, shocking, amusing, awesome, electronic components and, brash or sometimes just most recently, laser fibers. playful. But only in the last 20 years If the objects are at all or so has glass caught theeye decorative in the traditional of American artists as an ideal gift shop sease--or possibly even practical--those features are largely secondary to the craftsman's principal in- tention to experiment with the artistic and physical properties of glass. Produced in small studio furnaces now available to independent sulptors, the new glass is making a major impression internationally: on other artists, gallery owners, museums, the glass industry and a new breed of collectors. "People have a concept of what glass is," Michael Monroe, curator at the Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., says, "but when they see what is now being created, they react, 'I didn't realize it could material for personal ex- presson, a substance that can be shaped for purely aesthetic purposes. Innovative glass- melting techniques, happily developed in the early 1960s, made this possible. And so did a new wave of teaching in museums and at colleges as well as changing American cultural attitudes about art after the 1950s. The new world of abstract, sculptural shapes created by glass artists is not a result of mass production. Each object is unique, thus accounting for prices running into the hun- dreds or even thousands of dollars. Unlike a factory operation where design and fabrication are kept separate, the studio artists mold or blow and then shape the glass from collectors, Monroe says. their own designs, sometimes "Many want to be connected with the aid of an associate or to the artists, to follow their two. work; they just don't want to This is appealing to today's buy an anonymous object." The look of the new creations often can be con- jured up by their names: "Wooly Eggs"-- delicate, clear oval shapes containing spun glass threads; "Small Black Unidentified Animal Plate"--black amber glass with, well, an unidentified animal outlined in white; "Sparkling Star"--greenish cut and cemented plate glass, radiating from a central eore along six planes, and "Space. Spiral II"--tinted glass, laminated and cut, sweeping upward in a 270-degree arc. "Glass is being conceived and appreciated in ways radically different from anything ever done before in its 3,500-year history," ac- cording to Thomas S. Buechner, president and director of The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, N.Y. "Also evident," he continues, "is the fact that while craft and art are blooming, the glass industry is sitting relatively still. This may be because changes elsewhere are so novel and so evident that they overshadow the steady, more subtle im- provements being made through design departments.. Whether the studio glass is clear or opaque, sandblasted or shattered, geometric or freeform, bright and shiny or process, however, becomes dull--in fact, whether it is more complex by adding considered fine art or craf- cobalt, iron or other metallic t--little concerns such oxides to the basic recipe to curators as Monroe and the obtain color characteristics. artists themselves. "What an To Patti and other artists, object is made of or how it is the beauty of the material is created shouldn't determine that it is "expressionistic," whether it is art," Monroe says. "What is important are the ideas behind the piece you're looking at. Does the object make a statement that transcends its technical merits?" Pioneer glass artist and teacher Marvin Lipofsky, a that it can be twisted and controlled unlike any other substance. But "it's kind of a wrestling match with glass," Patti says. "It's a battle to make the glass speak my language and not let the glass dictate to me." Although glass had been Californian, agrees. "My molded and formed around a biggest problem is tha[there's core as early as 2000 B.C., the no personality in (many of major breakthrough in the) works today. It's all giassmaking came in the Near technique. A statement is East about the beginning of lacking in a lot of them." the Christian era. This was the Actually, the glass-making discovery of glass-blowing, an process and techniques have important technique used been pretty well mastered by the studio artists in recent years, a long journey from the early 1960s when "there was practically no information available," as one of today's leading craftsmen, Thomas Patti of Massachusetts, recalls. A versatile, flexible, taffy- like material in its molten state, glass is made by melting sand with the proper amounts of soda and lime to a 1500-degree Fahrenheit glowing mass. This simple today by both industry and the studio artist. The discovery permitted the production of glass objects in quantities and types previously unknown. A second advance of comparable importance oc- curred early in the 19th century with the introduction of glass-pressing and bottle- making developed at the outset of the  Industrial Revolution. But ironically these changes made glass so widely available that it began ( please turn to page 3A I in the I buy myself a "So that's you get CIRCULATING IN: NEW HAMPSHIRE -- Lyme, Lyme Center, Orford, Orfordville, Piermont, Haverhill, Haverhill Center, Haverhill Comer, North Haverhill, East Haverhill, Pike, Woodsville, Bath, Monroe, Lisbon, Londoff, Benton. Lvrnon, Warren, Glencliff, Wentworth . . . VERMONT - Thetford,, East Thefford, Thetford Hill, Thetford Center, North Thetford, Post Mills, Fairlee, West Foirlee, Bradford, Bradford Village, Corinth, East Corinth, Topshom, West Topshom, Newbury Village, South Newbury, West Newbury, Wells River, Groton, Ryegote Corner, Eost Ryegate, South Ryegate, Peacham, Bornet, West Bornet. THIS WEEK'S PRESS RUN 9,200 'tz .Serving Over 48 Communities in Northern New Hampshire and Vermont October 28, 1981 down, but ark has been consists of look like house. Since are rather preliminary order How used? Full Divided as for utility How about a gym, a wine for storage There are necessary the work s to water- Hydraulic to plug cemen- a batter-like COver walls. wail and IC:n special handle it of water- If water problem, sure the from the tround the with a 'proofing water the ENERGY I Ill I I Economics efficiency and basic applications by BILLCHRISTIANSEN look at the economics of heat electric resistance heating. Energy Outreach pumps and basic applications. The heat pump, in general, Advisor Because of the high ef- offers an average 20 percent ]   Last week I tried to outline ficiency of heat pumps they,savings over conventional what a heat pump is and how it usually produce a savings cooling systems and central works. This week I'd like to over oil, natural gas or electric resistance heating. As with any system, this assumes ' proper installation and adequate insulation in the lx2 or Ix3 furring strips for wall paneling can be attached to masonry walls in various ways. A popular system uses anchor nails which stick with a special adhesive. Furring is hammered over the nail and the nail is clinched. Another way is attaching the furring directly to the masonry with case hardened nails. Rigid insulation can be applied with mastic directly to the walls -- a good "extra." Cover furring with vapor barrier before applying paneling. If you don't like the idea of walking on concrete you can create a wood floor by using one of the systems shown in (please turn to page 3A) Special anchor nails (or bolts) are available for attachment of furring strips directly to concrete or concrete block walls,  ** * t 0 is spread on  BA[tcrT WALL I poured oncm or concrete 2 conoete footing 3 concrete sb Soor 4 sal (treated) 6 heed kmt 7 s tote plate 9 "-... ,-'oucei  attach to Ix3 f'umng grips htch are nailed at right angles to joists. O center spacing ( strips depends on the se o# the t. / 8{J$IA'IDED C:lJl The new iltr is e khvork or wood or me ll th I'ng on  'om jot. The  Komecd ile. Slight twistin9 nail, @ r A WOODSTOVE j/iFfl XOUCAS00UILD FOR $35I \\;\;- q "Forgot about messing around with old 55-gallon drums. What you want to build your homemade stove out of is a discarded electric water heater tank." That's what Iowa native Robert Smyers told us when we were looking for a homebuilt woodstove design that would improve on the usual 55-gallon drum heaters that most people put together. Our search for an alternative was sparked by the fact that barrels don't usually produce very efficient or attractive stoves.., and are increas- ingly difficult to find. Smyers gave us at least four good reasons why water heater tanks were better for the purpose. For one thing, the walls of such containers are at least three times as thick as are those of 55-gallon barrels ... which means that a water heater drum will make a much tougher--and longer-lasting--stove. Furthermore, when you build a firebox from a junked water heater tank, it's relatively easy to make the stove as airtight and efficient as any $500 woodburner on the market. Besides that, if you follow Robert's plan, your heater will be easy to load, it will have excellent fire and tem- perature control, and it'll look classy enough to put on display right in the living room. And finally, you can build a water heater stove for even less than most folks now spend putting together a 55.gallon-barrel woodburner. As a matter of fact, Rob- ert built our test model for less than $35, and it took him and his brother Emerson only six hours to make it. It really isn't difficult to find discarded .water heater tanks, either. Most of the landfills scattered around the country, in fact, are filled with such containers. Any trashed electric {forget the gas units for this proj- ectl water heater of 30- to 50-gallon capacity will con- vert nicely into a stove. Frankly, we don't have room here to give you com- plete instructions for constructing our you-can-make.it woodstove. But anyone with a cutting torch and weld- er should find the job pretty easy. And if you don't own or operate such equipment, scout around until you find a competent welding shop that'll convert your tank at a reasonable price. The free reprint mentioned at the end of this article will give you detailed informa. tion on adding the legs, the loading hopper box with hinged lid, the exhaust stack, and the draft control. As an inexpensive, attractive homebuilt heater, it's your best bet. For FREE additional information on building MOM's wooOburning stove or on THE MOTHER EARTH NEWS  magazine, send your name and addrees to Doing MORE,.. with LESS!, care of this paper. Ask for Reprint No, 606: "How We Heat A House With A Single Woodstove". i i 1 i iiiii  - house to ensure minimal operating costs. In determining whether a heat pump represents an economical alternative to another type of heating and cooling system for your home, a number of factors should be assessed. First, heat pumps are most economical when used year-round for both winter heating and summer cooling. If a heat pump is used for heating only, the system will lie unused for part of the year. If it is only used for cooling, it will not offer energy or dollar savings over con- ventional air conditioners. A second factor to consider is the climate. The efficiency of a heat pump varies significantly with the outdoor temperature. While a heat pump may be twice as ef- ficient as a conventional heating system at 50 degrees F, it may be only slightly more efficient at 35 degrees. As the temperature drops below 35 degrees, the heat pump must be supplemented by another heating system, such as electric resistance heating. In some cases, a hybrid system is used with gas or oil burning incorporated into the heat pump. At this time, in areas ( ph, ase turn to page 8A ) FIREWOOD & TREE SERVICE Mixed llardwmd $70. cord. Cut. spilt, delivered. Bob Ilolly : call 222-4.di6 before 8:(HP a.m., after 5 :IX; Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion is only $5.00 by BILL CHRISTIANSEN Energy Outreach Advisor Hot water heating systems are a little harder to figure out than warm air. In all cases there is a boiler with a series of pipes to carry the hot water out and return the same water to the boiler. In some older systems this is done by gravity but in most newer systems, there is one or more circulator pumps to do the job. The circulator pumps are usually located on the return side of the loop. Headng system maintenance Hot water system harder to f't00ure PAR T 1I be done with several different materials on the market. The cheapest is ,." X 3" fiberglass pipe insulation, available in most hardware stores. The next step would be to check the radiator units in the house. If fin4ube, baseboard units are found these should be inspected with a flashlight. If they are dirty and full of dust, a vacuum cleaner can be used to clean them. Sometimes a long brush is useful. On all radiators, free standing or baseboard, air must be able to circulate around the unit. The first thing to cheek in a There should be at least two hot water system is the boiler inches of free space below the area. Look for leaks or wet unit and an opening at the top places around the boiler, pipes, circulators and fittings. If leaks are found, they should be repaired and this will probably require a plumber. If there is a circulator motor on the system, it should be oiled, with a few drops of general purpose oil. Next, check the pipes that carry the hot water from the .boiler to the various radiators. so cool air at floor level can move into the unit, become heated and move into the room. Boxes, carpets, draperies and furniture are the things that usually in, terfere with the air movement. Clean, unob- structed radiator units are most efficient. With the boiler hot and the system in operation, the Again, look for leaks or wet heating of each radiator unit places around the fittings. In should be checked. On each most cases, the supply pipes radiator unit there should be should be insulated. This can (please turn to page 8A) HAPPY BIRTHDAY MRMlUl JARRELL A FRIEND APPLES & CIDER / INDIAN CORN MILl, APPLE STAND Route 10 llaverhilI, N.il. Near bridge to Newbury ) J Open l)aily: II AM-6PM-- Sun.: 12-6PM 603-787.6445 I Your ad, this size, on page 1 of the Second Opinion. , is only $10.00 RENT SINGLE HOME 4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths. I Block from stores, etc, in June, owner will credit Rent toward Pur- chase. 9 )) For details call 80,-222-4486 i