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November 9, 1994
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Library News . " , Area Library News ney Memorial Library Orfo-- Soci Ub'rary hi Iiag Librarian Patricia Ottina has invited Newbury Elementa- from Ms. Musty's kindergarten classes, Mr. Mint's. grade one/ ausman's grade one to during class visit Children's Book Michael will read for students from Ms. Hays' and Ruth Ken- on Nov. 17 as part of the celebration. 00EL ORFORD--The Orford Friends of the Libraries will present a program by expeditionist and photographer Mike Brochu Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Orford Social Library, his third appearance in Orford. The seminar will include Kenya's Moist-Mare National Park. the Serengctti Plain. and the Ngoran-Gora Crater in Zanzibar. A previous lecturer on ice climbing and the Gashabram II Expedition to Nepal, he will be sharing his dual projector slide show, set to music. Admission is free, and refreshments will be served. Bradford Public Library BRADFORD--The Bradford Public Library is once again having the "Teddy Bear Holidays" open house at the library Dec. 3 from 1 - 5 p.m. Hundreds of ted- dy bears will be on display, These bears have been getting ready for weeks, so please take the time to create a holiday memory with your family. On Nov. 21, there will be a lecture given by Barbara McManamy, N.P. The subject will be "The Menopause and Beyond," a program to separate myth from realty. This will be at 7 p.m. at the library. Monroe nixes liquor and sweeps by Marcia Tomlinson MONROE--For the fourth straight general election, Monroe voters re- fused to lift the ban on sales of beer, wine and sweepstakes tickets within the town. All four "liquor ques- tions'" were defeated "at least two to one" according to the Town Clerk Nov. 8. The liquor sale questions were turned down by nearly identical percentages in 1988, 1990 and 1992. This overwhelming defeat marks the fourth attempt at the petitioned question. The sale of sweepstakes tickets, defeated this time 215-128, has sleadily lost support over the years. In 1988 the question lost by just eight votes. In 1990 it lost by a little more, and in 1992 it lost by 55 votes. This lime it lost by 87 votes. Wlae00 -e Can 1 (00dt Tlae Best U,' ;ecl Ca:t.s in tlae er 0P : Best Selection The Best Savings Miller Auto has Our volume used car the best used car bus]ness allows us to pass lection in the region, huge savings on to you. The Best Service We have been selling used cars with i ate grity since 190 Come see fi ,r yourself why people keep coming back. R AUTO COMPANY 28 Gates Street River Junction, VT 05001 402 . 295 . 8500 I I CIIEIPfTRUCKS * PONTIAC CADILLAC MILLER NISSAN, dEEP-EAGLE 80 Main Street West Lebanon, NH 03784 603 298 8737 I IIIII I I II II * ISUZU GEO * NISSAN JEEP EAGLE MILLER MAZDA & DODGE OF LEBANON Route 120 Lebanon, NH 03766 603 448 6363 I I I I I I I MAZDA DODGE * DODGE TRUCKS * HEflTZ November 9, 1994  JOURNAL OPINION  Page 5 Off-year voter turnout fair by Marcia Tomlinson UPPER VALLEY--Although not as impressive as for the 1992 general election which included the presi- dential race, this year's voter turn- out in the Upper Valley was more than 50 percent on average. Factors cited by town clerks included warm temperatures and fair weather, as well as tight Congressional races. The highest local turnout was in Thetford, 73.0%, a town that was highlighted by a school bond vote and a tough Vermont House contest between two town residents. Brad- ford registered the lowest percen- tage, 46.3%, barely coming in below Haverhill's 46.4%. The following are the voter turn- out percentages for the towns in our readershi.p area, with their I992 per- centages m brackets. OIQ New Hampshire: Bath, 52.5 (N/A); Haverhill, 46.4 (82.6); Lyme, 59.9 (84A): Monroe 66.4 (88.0); Orford, 472 (80.5); and Piermont, 53.6 (77.1). The area average turnout was 54.3 (82.5). o4, e Vermont: Barnet, 65.5 (86.7); Brad- ford, 46.3 (65.7); Corinth, 46.9 (74.0): Fairlee, 66.9 (84.7); New- bury, 63.0 (81.7): Ryegale, 55.0 (69.6); Thetford, 73.0 (80.4); Vet- shire, 60.7 (, 5); Topsham, 52.5 (76.6); and West Fairlee, 59.5 (71.7). The area average turnout was 58.9 (77.3). In Vermont, absentee ballots were no more plentiful than usual in half the towns, but were heavier than usual in Barnet, Corinth, Fairlee, Ryegate, Vershire and West Fairlee. RONDO MEETING PIKE--Rondo will meet Nov. 9 at 6:30 p.m. for a Guest Night Dinner at the Towne House Inn, Pike. Featured will be a barber shop quartet from the North Country Chordsmen. RUTH DWYER Lingelbach defeated by Marcia Tomlinsoa THETFORD--Five-term Vermont House incumbent Doris Lingelbach (D) was upset Nov. 8 by Ruth Dwyer (R), 1,003-815. Although Dwyer was victorious in all three towns of Orange-4 (Thetford, Fair- lee, and West Fairlee), the upset was most telling in West Fairlee and Fairlee, where she tipped Lingel- bach almost two to one. Dwyer, who said, "If we had more farmers in the legislature, the ses- sion might adjourn on time," is co- owner with her husband of the Thetford Veterinary Clinic and ig a horse trainer and riding instructor. In addition to farming, Dwyer has been active in educational is- sues, having served on the Thetford School Board, Thefford Academy Board of Trustees, and the Vermont School Board Association. The breakdown of voting for Dyer to Lingelbach was Thetlbrd 613-595, Fairlee 246-148, and West Fairlee 144-72. Waits River educational planning process continues TOPSHAM--The Waits River Educe- padng, please call Anne Rosten at tional Planning Group has an- 439-5279, Leinie Brownell at 439-6313 nounced that its organizational phase or Sooz Murphy at 439-6127, is nearly completed and work is about to begin on a community-wide effort to re-examine the educational choices anti pdorlties in the towns of Topsham and Ctrinth, Seven working committees have been formed and are charged with the job of fact-finding, with the ultimate NEW EBA 2002 SEWING I goal of making planning recommen- dations to the school board in such MACHINE ,' areas as academic achievement, disci- ISALE! '200' OFFi * pline nd budging. In addition, the groups will be looking at administra- tive structure and will be attempting to i oltod stitch survey the community to ascertain sdleon. what kind of goals people have for the educational system, "New Swiss design. Thirty-two members of the commu- * ::'Convenintaecssories and nity have already signed up to partici- acessory tray.:' Dendable na performance. project.pate in theand fact-findingcommittee membersPhase of arethe  ses nii t0":sheer: fabric,): hopeful that a broad spectrum ofciti- " 25 year manufacturer! lited zens will become involved in what warranty. :: i.::: f i seems to be shaping up as an ongoing MANY 0111[R MAi! :::: citizens advisory council to the school board. "The active participation of EI AND EUIAPBESIEg(IN: some Waits River Valley School HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION teachers has been a welcome anti en- AND PRICES! couraging development," said a re- lease from the group. "A spirit of unity SeW Eas' With has pervaded recent talks between the 00lna= citizens and the school board, leading to a decision to have board members participate in the fact-finding process. Hopes are high that a coalition ofciti- LOCAl. IIRROCI'IOll *  zeus. teachers and board members will work effectively to set goals and implement solutions." The committee is currently in the process of deciding whether to apply for a state grant that is available to en- Colonial Plaza courage community participation in W. Lebanon, N.H. educational planning, (603) 298-5288 Focus groups will be meeting in the near future to discuss specifics in each "Manufacturcr' uggcstcd retail price $499. area. Any residents of either town who Available only at participating EIna dealers, would like to join in are welcomed to 1994 Elan do so, If you are interested in partici- A4[I)ITATI0N, ItB.LIN, 411ACLB Discussion period, reading pertod, practice. $50 for 10 weeks Starting Monday, November 21 from 7:00-8:30 p.m 802-439-5895 TIME Is Growing Close! There Is Nothing Like A Homemade Christmas Unique Holiday Fabrics at affordable prices Patterns and Guides For Holiday Gifts 45 Depot St., Lyndonviile 802.626-9367 Open'Tuesday to Saturday 9:30 to5 - Frkfa 9 ta 8 t Closed Mondays Library News . " , Area Library News ney Memorial Library Orfo-- Soci Ub'rary hi Iiag Librarian Patricia Ottina has invited Newbury Elementa- from Ms. Musty's kindergarten classes, Mr. Mint's. grade one/ ausman's grade one to during class visit Children's Book Michael will read for students from Ms. Hays' and Ruth Ken- on Nov. 17 as part of the celebration. 00EL ORFORD--The Orford Friends of the Libraries will present a program by expeditionist and photographer Mike Brochu Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Orford Social Library, his third appearance in Orford. The seminar will include Kenya's Moist-Mare National Park. the Serengctti Plain. and the Ngoran-Gora Crater in Zanzibar. A previous lecturer on ice climbing and the Gashabram II Expedition to Nepal, he will be sharing his dual projector slide show, set to music. Admission is free, and refreshments will be served. Bradford Public Library BRADFORD--The Bradford Public Library is once again having the "Teddy Bear Holidays" open house at the library Dec. 3 from 1 - 5 p.m. Hundreds of ted- dy bears will be on display, These bears have been getting ready for weeks, so please take the time to create a holiday memory with your family. On Nov. 21, there will be a lecture given by Barbara McManamy, N.P. The subject will be "The Menopause and Beyond," a program to separate myth from realty. This will be at 7 p.m. at the library. Monroe nixes liquor and sweeps by Marcia Tomlinson MONROE--For the fourth straight general election, Monroe voters re- fused to lift the ban on sales of beer, wine and sweepstakes tickets within the town. All four "liquor ques- tions'" were defeated "at least two to one" according to the Town Clerk Nov. 8. The liquor sale questions were turned down by nearly identical percentages in 1988, 1990 and 1992. This overwhelming defeat marks the fourth attempt at the petitioned question. The sale of sweepstakes tickets, defeated this time 215-128, has sleadily lost support over the years. In 1988 the question lost by just eight votes. In 1990 it lost by a little more, and in 1992 it lost by 55 votes. This lime it lost by 87 votes. Wlae00 -e Can 1 (00dt Tlae Best U,' ;ecl Ca:t.s in tlae er 0P : Best Selection The Best Savings Miller Auto has Our volume used car the best used car bus]ness allows us to pass lection in the region, huge savings on to you. The Best Service We have been selling used cars with i ate grity since 190 Come see fi ,r yourself why people keep coming back. R AUTO COMPANY 28 Gates Street River Junction, VT 05001 402 . 295 . 8500 I I CIIEIPfTRUCKS * PONTIAC CADILLAC MILLER NISSAN, dEEP-EAGLE 80 Main Street West Lebanon, NH 03784 603 298 8737 I IIIII I I II II * ISUZU GEO * NISSAN JEEP EAGLE MILLER MAZDA & DODGE OF LEBANON Route 120 Lebanon, NH 03766 603 448 6363 I I I I I I I MAZDA DODGE * DODGE TRUCKS * HEflTZ November 9, 1994  JOURNAL OPINION  Page 5 Off-year voter turnout fair by Marcia Tomlinson UPPER VALLEY--Although not as impressive as for the 1992 general election which included the presi- dential race, this year's voter turn- out in the Upper Valley was more than 50 percent on average. Factors cited by town clerks included warm temperatures and fair weather, as well as tight Congressional races. The highest local turnout was in Thetford, 73.0%, a town that was highlighted by a school bond vote and a tough Vermont House contest between two town residents. Brad- ford registered the lowest percen- tage, 46.3%, barely coming in below Haverhill's 46.4%. The following are the voter turn- out percentages for the towns in our readershi.p area, with their I992 per- centages m brackets. OIQ New Hampshire: Bath, 52.5 (N/A); Haverhill, 46.4 (82.6); Lyme, 59.9 (84A): Monroe 66.4 (88.0); Orford, 472 (80.5); and Piermont, 53.6 (77.1). The area average turnout was 54.3 (82.5). o4, e Vermont: Barnet, 65.5 (86.7); Brad- ford, 46.3 (65.7); Corinth, 46.9 (74.0): Fairlee, 66.9 (84.7); New- bury, 63.0 (81.7): Ryegale, 55.0 (69.6); Thetford, 73.0 (80.4); Vet- shire, 60.7 (, 5); Topsham, 52.5 (76.6); and West Fairlee, 59.5 (71.7). The area average turnout was 58.9 (77.3). In Vermont, absentee ballots were no more plentiful than usual in half the towns, but were heavier than usual in Barnet, Corinth, Fairlee, Ryegate, Vershire and West Fairlee. RONDO MEETING PIKE--Rondo will meet Nov. 9 at 6:30 p.m. for a Guest Night Dinner at the Towne House Inn, Pike. Featured will be a barber shop quartet from the North Country Chordsmen. RUTH DWYER Lingelbach defeated by Marcia Tomlinsoa THETFORD--Five-term Vermont House incumbent Doris Lingelbach (D) was upset Nov. 8 by Ruth Dwyer (R), 1,003-815. Although Dwyer was victorious in all three towns of Orange-4 (Thetford, Fair- lee, and West Fairlee), the upset was most telling in West Fairlee and Fairlee, where she tipped Lingel- bach almost two to one. Dwyer, who said, "If we had more farmers in the legislature, the ses- sion might adjourn on time," is co- owner with her husband of the Thetford Veterinary Clinic and ig a horse trainer and riding instructor. In addition to farming, Dwyer has been active in educational is- sues, having served on the Thetford School Board, Thefford Academy Board of Trustees, and the Vermont School Board Association. The breakdown of voting for Dyer to Lingelbach was Thetlbrd 613-595, Fairlee 246-148, and West Fairlee 144-72. Waits River educational planning process continues TOPSHAM--The Waits River Educe- padng, please call Anne Rosten at tional Planning Group has an- 439-5279, Leinie Brownell at 439-6313 nounced that its organizational phase or Sooz Murphy at 439-6127, is nearly completed and work is about to begin on a community-wide effort to re-examine the educational choices anti pdorlties in the towns of Topsham and Ctrinth, Seven working committees have been formed and are charged with the job of fact-finding, with the ultimate NEW EBA 2002 SEWING I goal of making planning recommen- dations to the school board in such MACHINE ,' areas as academic achievement, disci- ISALE! '200' OFFi * pline nd budging. In addition, the groups will be looking at administra- tive structure and will be attempting to i oltod stitch survey the community to ascertain sdleon. what kind of goals people have for the educational system, "New Swiss design. Thirty-two members of the commu- * ::'Convenintaecssories and nity have already signed up to partici- acessory tray.:' Dendable na performance. project.pate in theand fact-findingcommittee membersPhase of arethe  ses nii t0":sheer: fabric,): hopeful that a broad spectrum ofciti- " 25 year manufacturer! lited zens will become involved in what warranty. :: i.::: f i seems to be shaping up as an ongoing MANY 0111[R MAi! :::: citizens advisory council to the school board. "The active participation of EI AND EUIAPBESIEg(IN: some Waits River Valley School HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION teachers has been a welcome anti en- AND PRICES! couraging development," said a re- lease from the group. "A spirit of unity SeW Eas' With has pervaded recent talks between the 00lna= citizens and the school board, leading to a decision to have board members participate in the fact-finding process. Hopes are high that a coalition ofciti- LOCAl. IIRROCI'IOll *  zeus. teachers and board members will work effectively to set goals and implement solutions." The committee is currently in the process of deciding whether to apply for a state grant that is available to en- Colonial Plaza courage community participation in W. Lebanon, N.H. educational planning, (603) 298-5288 Focus groups will be meeting in the near future to discuss specifics in each "Manufacturcr' uggcstcd retail price $499. area. Any residents of either town who Available only at participating EIna dealers, would like to join in are welcomed to 1994 Elan do so, If you are interested in partici- A4[I)ITATI0N, ItB.LIN, 411ACLB Discussion period, reading pertod, practice. $50 for 10 weeks Starting Monday, November 21 from 7:00-8:30 p.m 802-439-5895 TIME Is Growing Close! There Is Nothing Like A Homemade Christmas Unique Holiday Fabrics at affordable prices Patterns and Guides For Holiday Gifts 45 Depot St., Lyndonviile 802.626-9367 Open'Tuesday to Saturday 9:30 to5 - Frkfa 9 ta 8 t